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1.
Health Psychol ; 38(12): 1107-1115, 2019 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31512923

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: Exercise video games (EVGs) may offer an attractive, sustainable alternative or supplement to traditional modes of exercise. Understanding the psychosocial factors that influence the appeal of EVGs is important for improving the efficacy of video games as a method of promoting the uptake and long-term maintenance of physical activity. METHODS: This study examined changes in psychosocial constructs from self-determination theory and self-efficacy theory as mediators of intervention efficacy among 189 healthy, sedentary adults randomized to 12-week programs of either EVGs or standard exercise (e.g., treadmill walking, stationary cycling) followed by 6 months of follow-up. The EVG group engaged in significantly more weekly minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) at the end of treatment compared with the standard exercise group. Univariate and multivariate mediational models were used to examine theoretically derived psychosocial constructs as potential mediators of differential intervention effects. RESULTS: Univariate mediational models suggest a significant indirect effect of treatment on MVPA outcomes through enjoyment, self-efficacy, stress management, depressive symptoms, and positive engagement (p < .05). Multiple mediational analyses confirm all the univariate results (p < .05), with the exception of enjoyment. CONCLUSIONS: Differences in the efficacy of EVG versus standard exercise interventions were mediated by several psychosocial constructs, suggesting that qualities specific to game play may enhance adherence to physical activity both in and outside of the laboratory environment. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).


Asunto(s)
Ejercicio Físico/psicología , Juegos de Video/normas , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad
2.
Games Health J ; 8(4): 237-249, 2019 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31386586

RESUMEN

Introduction: Millions of people suffer from obstructive respiratory conditions globally. Including videogames in rehabilitation programs can be an interesting alternative to traditional programs or a complementary activity. Objective: To explore the use of videogames in the treatment of patients with obstructive respiratory diseases. Methods: A systematic literature search was performed to identify randomized clinical trials evaluating the effects of videogames on health outcomes in patients with respiratory obstructive diseases. The following databases were searched: PubMed, Web of Science, ScienceDirect, and Scopus. The methodological quality of the studies included was assessed with the Downs and Black quality assessment method. Results: Nine articles were included, of which three used videogames as physical training methods and managed to improve exercise capacity, strength, quality of life, and symptoms. The remaining six articles used videogames to educate patients about the disease and showed slight improvements in knowledge of the disease and use of medication. Conclusion: The results of this review show that videogames are a very useful complementary therapy. They can contribute to enhance rehabilitation programs, as they improve exercise capacity, muscle strength, quality of life, severity, control, and knowledge of the disease. Videogames should be supervised by a professional so that programs can be tailored to patients, proposing different activities in the game and controlling the correct performance, and generating an increase in adherence to treatment. Registry: prospective register of systematic reviews (PROSPERO) CRD42018094094.


Asunto(s)
Enfermedad Pulmonar Obstructiva Crónica/orina , Juegos de Video/psicología , Juegos de Video/normas , Terapia por Ejercicio/métodos , Terapia por Ejercicio/normas , Humanos , Enfermedad Pulmonar Obstructiva Crónica/psicología
4.
Games Health J ; 8(4): 257-264, 2019 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30964335

RESUMEN

Background: Previous research indicates games for health have substantial promise in promoting change in children's diet and physical activity (PA) behavior for obesity and diabetes prevention, but the research has generally not been rigorous. The study reported here was an efficacy trial of two role-playing videogames played in sequence, "Escape from Diab" (hereinafter called Diab) and "Nanoswarm: Invasion from Inner Space" (hereinafter called Nano), on diabetes and obesity risk factors: fasting insulin and body mass index (BMI), and risk-related behaviors: diet, PA, and sedentary behavior (SB). Design: A two-group (treatment vs. wait list control) randomized clinical trial was used with baseline, immediate postintervention (∼3 months postbaseline), and 2 months postassessments. Intervention: Diab and Nano were desktop or laptop role-playing videogames with nine sessions (each episode/session lasting ∼60 minutes). Two storylines attempted to immerse players and used ethnically diverse characters to model desired behaviors. Tailored goal setting, problem solving, and motivational statements were used. Methods: A sample of 200 overweight or obese children (ages 10-12 years from 85th to 99th BMI percentile [%ile]) was recruited, primarily using a volunteer list. Fasting insulin was the primary dependent variable. BMI, fruit, vegetable and sweetened beverage intakes, PA, and SBs were secondary outcomes. Generalized linear mixed models were used to test for the treatment effects. Results: No significant differences were detected in any of the tested outcome variables. Conclusions: The lack of differences may indicate that games cannot change dietary behaviors and thereby not change-related clinical outcomes. Alternatively, there seem to have been changes in (1) the types of videogames children expect and like to play since a pilot study was conducted, (2) productization challenges, and/or (3) problems in staff management of the trial. All may have contributed to the lack of effect.


Asunto(s)
Promoción de la Salud/normas , Insulina/análisis , Sobrepeso/metabolismo , Obesidad Pediátrica/metabolismo , Juegos de Video/normas , Índice de Masa Corporal , Niño , Ayuno/sangre , Ayuno/metabolismo , Femenino , Promoción de la Salud/métodos , Promoción de la Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Insulina/sangre , Masculino , Sobrepeso/sangre , Obesidad Pediátrica/sangre , Proyectos Piloto , Investigación Cualitativa , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Juegos de Video/psicología , Juegos de Video/estadística & datos numéricos
5.
J Med Internet Res ; 21(3): e12994, 2019 03 28.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30920375

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: There is a worldwide shortage of health workers, and this issue requires innovative education solutions. Serious gaming and gamification education have the potential to provide a quality, cost-effective, novel approach that is flexible, portable, and enjoyable and allow interaction with tutors and peers. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the effectiveness of serious gaming/gamification for health professions education compared with traditional learning, other types of digital education, or other serious gaming/gamification interventions in terms of patient outcomes, knowledge, skills, professional attitudes, and satisfaction (primary outcomes) as well as economic outcomes of education and adverse events (secondary outcomes). METHODS: A comprehensive search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Knowledge, Educational Resources Information Centre, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PsycINFO, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature was conducted from 1990 to August 2017. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and cluster RCTs were eligible for inclusion. Two reviewers independently searched, screened, and assessed the study quality and extracted data. A meta-analysis was not deemed appropriate due to the heterogeneity of populations, interventions, comparisons, and outcomes. Therefore, a narrative synthesis is presented. RESULTS: A total of 27 RCTs and 3 cluster RCTs with 3634 participants were included. Two studies evaluated gamification interventions, and the remaining evaluated serious gaming interventions. One study reported a small statistically significant difference between serious gaming and digital education of primary care physicians in the time to control blood pressure in a subgroup of their patients already taking antihypertensive medications. There was evidence of a moderate-to-large magnitude of effect from five studies evaluating individually delivered interventions for objectively measured knowledge compared with traditional learning. There was also evidence of a small-to-large magnitude of effect from 10 studies for improved skills compared with traditional learning. Two and four studies suggested equivalence between interventions and controls for knowledge and skills, respectively. Evidence suggested that serious gaming was at least as effective as other digital education modalities for these outcomes. There was insufficient evidence to conclude whether one type of serious gaming/gamification intervention is more effective than any other. There was limited evidence for the effects of serious gaming/gamification on professional attitudes. Serious gaming/gamification may improve satisfaction, but the evidence was limited. Evidence was of low or very low quality for all outcomes. Quality of evidence was downgraded due to the imprecision, inconsistency, and limitations of the study. CONCLUSIONS: Serious gaming/gamification appears to be at least as effective as controls, and in many studies, more effective for improving knowledge, skills, and satisfaction. However, the available evidence is mostly of low quality and calls for further rigorous, theory-driven research.


Asunto(s)
Empleos en Salud/educación , Juegos de Video/normas , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Investigación Cualitativa
6.
Games Health J ; 8(4): 250-256, 2019 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30730230

RESUMEN

Objective: We aimed to confirm whether the practice of exergames produces an effect on children's mood states during school physical education (PE) classes. Materials and Methods: The children were allocated to experimental group (EG) and control group (CG). The EG performed exergames during PE classes, and the CG attended regular school PE classes. The Brunel Mood Scale, which evaluates six mood dimensions (tension, mental confusion, anger, vigor, depression, and fatigue), was used to assess the children's moods before (pre) and immediately after the third lesson (acute effect). Results: The practice of exergames during PE classes produced an acute effect on children's moods. The results indicated that playing exergames helped to increase vigor (P < 0.01; effect size [ES]: 0.50; confidence interval [CI]: 0.16-0.84) and fatigue (P < 0.01; ES: 0.50; CI: 0.16-0.84). Conclusion: Three exergame sessions produced an acute effect and improved children's moods during school PE classes. More research is needed to evaluate the long-term effect of exergames on children and adolescents.


Asunto(s)
Afecto , Terapia por Ejercicio/normas , Juegos de Video/normas , Análisis de Varianza , Índice de Masa Corporal , Niño , Terapia por Ejercicio/métodos , Terapia por Ejercicio/estadística & datos numéricos , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Educación y Entrenamiento Físico/métodos , Educación y Entrenamiento Físico/normas , Educación y Entrenamiento Físico/estadística & datos numéricos , Psicometría/instrumentación , Psicometría/métodos , Estadísticas no Paramétricas , Juegos de Video/psicología , Juegos de Video/estadística & datos numéricos
7.
Games Health J ; 8(3): 220-226, 2019 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30418041

RESUMEN

Objective: Exergames are popular technology applications that encourage individuals to engage in exercise and create positive moods for players. However, little is known as to whether playing exergames makes players perceive to be more energetic and relaxed and whether enthusiasm about doing exercise moderates such perceptions. To answer these questions, we use the Flow Theory and the Self-Determination Theory to develop the hypotheses. Methods: We conducted a randomized controlled trial, which randomly assigned 337 participants to an intervention group and a control group. We asked the participants in the intervention group to play exergames for 2 weeks. We measured enthusiasm about doing exercise by asking the participants to evaluate themselves as having enthusiasm on doing exercise or not. We measured participants' perceptions of happiness, perceived energy (the perception of sufficient physical and mental resources), and relaxation before and after the 2-week exergame playing, generating scores to represent their changes. Results: We found that playing exergames induces positive changes in happiness, perceived energy, and relaxation. Such changes were significant for participants who are enthusiastic about doing exercise, but not for those who are unenthusiastic about doing exercise. Conclusion: This study was the first using the Flow Theory and the Self-Determination Theory to examine the impact of playing exergames on players' perceptions and to identify the moderator role of enthusiasm about doing exercise. These positive impacts of exergames can be used in rehabilitation settings in encouraging positive attitudes and behaviors toward exercise.


Asunto(s)
Ejercicio Físico/psicología , Participación del Paciente/psicología , Percepción , Juegos de Video/psicología , Adulto , Análisis de Varianza , Femenino , Felicidad , Humanos , Masculino , Participación del Paciente/métodos , Psicometría/instrumentación , Psicometría/métodos , Taiwán , Juegos de Video/normas
8.
Games Health J ; 8(3): 227-235, 2019 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30339063

RESUMEN

Objective: The purpose of the study was to determine perception of videogames and the use Pokémon Go in Costa Rica. Materials and Methods: A national representative sample (n = 1059) of adults aged 18 years and older was chosen to complete a face-to-face survey on videogame perceptions and the use of Pokémon Go. Statistical analyses included 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) around the estimate, multiple regression, cluster, and factor analysis. Results: The 85.2% of the population (n = 866) were familiar with videogames, especially those in the 18- to 29-year age group (96.3%) and college education (94.8%). Perceptions about videogames were negative (Addictive = 89.6%, Violence = 75.5%, Bad for health = 51.3%) and positive (Stimulate mental abilities = 59.6%, Relaxing = 55.2%, Improve family communication = 49.4%); and 28.4% perceived that people without responsibilities played videogames. Perceptions were different by age group and educational level. Age and gender were significant predictors of attitudes toward videogame playing. Pokémon Go was played by 3.9% of those respondents who knew or had heard about videogames, who reported spending 6.7 h/week (95% CI = 3.9-9.5) playing the game, walking 24.7 km (95% CI = 12.5-36.9), and covering 70.4 km (95% CI = 45.3-95.5) by other transportation means. Conclusions: Positive and negative perceptions toward videogames mediated by age and education level were found in a Costa Rican sample. Age and gender predicted attitudes toward videogame playing. A small number of participants played Pokémon Go, which might suggest that this videogame was not engaging in this population.


Asunto(s)
Ejercicio Físico/psicología , Percepción , Juegos de Video/normas , Adolescente , Adulto , Costa Rica , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Aplicaciones Móviles/normas , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Juegos de Video/psicología
9.
J Autism Dev Disord ; 49(3): 978-995, 2019 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30377883

RESUMEN

Recent years have seen an emergence of social emotional computer games for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). These games are heterogeneous in design with few underpinned by theoretically informed approaches to computer-based interventions. Guided by the serious game framework outlined by Whyte et al. (Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders 45(12):1-12, 2014), this study aimed to identify the key motivating and learning features for serious games targeting emotion recognition skills from the perspectives of 11 youth with ASD and 11 experienced professionals. Results demonstrated that youth emphasised the motivating aspects of game design, while the professionals stressed embedding elements facilitating the generalisation of acquired skills. Both complementary and differing views provide suggestions for the application of serious game principles in a potential serious game.


Asunto(s)
Trastorno del Espectro Autista/psicología , Trastorno del Espectro Autista/terapia , Personal de Salud/psicología , Personal de Salud/normas , Juegos de Video/psicología , Juegos de Video/normas , Adolescente , Adulto , Emociones/fisiología , Femenino , Grupos Focales , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Juegos de Video/tendencias , Adulto Joven
10.
Integr Comp Biol ; 58(6): 1255-1268, 2018 12 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30272130

RESUMEN

Whether diagrammatic or deeply detailed, most anatomical illustration adheres to established archetypes-identical views of similar dissections, exhibiting neither variability nor originality. These conventional views are replicated from one generation of anatomy textbooks, atlases, and now digital sources, with little modification or reference to original dissection. In this paper, I argue that more effective communication in the field of anatomy requires rethinking conventional anatomical images and avoiding over-reliance on anatomic terminology. The ubiquity and emphasis on the image in the emerging digital learning ecosystem challenges science educators to revisit their use of the conventional visuals. The tools of narrative creating engaging science communication can also be used in constructing better images. After brief review of the role of anatomical jargon and its discontents, I present several examples of "readable" images. These examples have been refined in the course of communicating detailed anatomy and movement for two decades to medical and other health professions students, as well as to character designers, modelers, riggers, and animators in the animation and gaming industries. That "reading an image" promotes understanding without jargon is both anecdotally self-evident and yet scientifically largely untested. Rather than subsisting on images of convenience, the intersection of narrative tools and anatomical imagery provides the opportunity to structure images with intentionality and ultimately evaluate their impact. Such key images and their stories will ultimately require testing to validate the extensive anecdotal evidence that visual stories promote learning.


Asunto(s)
Anatomía Artística/educación , Comunicación , Empleos en Salud/educación , Ilustración Médica , Ciencia en las Artes , Ciencia/educación , Juegos de Video/normas , Humanos , Estudiantes
11.
Games Health J ; 7(5): 335-340, 2018 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29989430

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of an exergaming program on physical activity, motor competence, and enjoyment in preschool children. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A sample of 65 preschool children was recruited from an urban preschool located in the Western United States. Children were randomly assigned to either an exergaming (n = 36) or a free-play group (n = 29). The intervention was 30 min/day, 5 days/week for 12 weeks for both groups, and all outcome variables were measured once during the final week of the intervention. The exergaming program included three active videogames: GoNoodles, Adventure to Fitness, and Cosmic Kids Yoga. Children in the free-play group were offered a variety of sport activities. School-day step counts were recorded using pedometers, motor competence was assessed by the Test for Gross Motor Development-Edition 3 (TGMD-3), and enjoyment was accessed using one subscale of the Intrinsic Motivational Inventory. A 2 × 2 multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) test was employed to examine the differences between sexes and groups on the outcome variables. RESULTS: The omnibus MANOVA yielded a statistically significant multivariate group main effect (F = 3.71, P = 0.016). Follow-up tests revealed statistically significant differences between groups on average school step counts (mean difference = 785 steps, P = 0.003, d = 0.68) and total TGMD-3 scores (mean difference = 8.7, P = 0.019, d = 0.51), with the exergaming group displaying higher mean scores compared with the free-play group. CONCLUSION: Young children who were randomly assigned to the exergaming group demonstrated higher school-day step counts and higher motor competence levels compared with the free-play group. These results support the use of this modality in childcare settings.


Asunto(s)
Ejercicio Físico/psicología , Ludoterapia/normas , Juegos de Video/normas , Índice de Masa Corporal , Preescolar , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Motivación , Distribución Normal , Ludoterapia/métodos , Desempeño Psicomotor/fisiología , Juegos de Video/psicología
12.
Eur J Public Health ; 28(4): 647-651, 2018 08 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29672683

RESUMEN

Background: Since 2001, a recommendation of no more than 2 h per day of screen time for children 2 years of age or older was adopted in many countries. However, this recommendation was rarely examined empirically. The goal of the present study was to question this recommendation in today's connected world. Methods: We used data from the ado@internet.ch survey (spring 2012), a representative sample of 8th graders in the Canton of Vaud, Switzerland (n = 2942, 50.6% female). Internet use, health outcomes, substance use, well-being and socio-demographic characteristics were considered. Bi-variate statistical analyses were performed. Results: All outcomes were significantly associated with the time spent on internet, more time being associated with a higher prevalence of adverse consequences. Youth spending on average one more hour on Internet per day than the reference category (1.5-2.5 h) did not differ in terms of adverse health outcomes. Differences began to appear on sleeping problems, tobacco use, alcohol misuse, cannabis use and sport inactivity with youth spending between 3.5 h and 4.5 h per day on internet. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the absence of justification for setting a limit to only 2 h of screen time per day. Significant effects on health seem to appear only beyond 4 h per day and there may be benefits for those who spend less than an hour and a half on internet.


Asunto(s)
Conducta del Adolescente/psicología , Conducta Adictiva/epidemiología , Guías como Asunto , Internet/normas , Juegos de Video/normas , Adolescente , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Prevalencia , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Suiza/epidemiología , Factores de Tiempo
13.
Games Health J ; 7(2): 107-115, 2018 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29608336

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) practicing a task in a virtual environment could improve performance given a similar task in a real environment, as well as distinguishing whether there is transference between performing the practice in virtual environment and then a real environment and vice versa. METHODS: Twenty-two people with DMD were evaluated and divided into two groups. The goal was to reach out and touch a red cube. Group A began with the real task and had to touch a real object, and Group B began with the virtual task and had to reach a virtual object using the Kinect system. RESULTS: ANOVA showed that all participants decreased the movement time from the first (M = 973 ms) to the last block of acquisition (M = 783 ms) in both virtual and real tasks and motor learning could be inferred by the short-term retention and transfer task (with increasing distance of the target). However, the evaluation of task performance demonstrated that the virtual task provided an inferior performance when compared to the real task in all phases of the study, and there was no effect for sequence. CONCLUSIONS: Both virtual and real tasks promoted improvement of performance in the acquisition phase, short-term retention, and transfer. However, there was no transference of learning between environments. In conclusion, it is recommended that the use of virtual environments for individuals with DMD needs to be considered carefully.


Asunto(s)
Destreza Motora/fisiología , Distrofia Muscular de Duchenne/terapia , Juegos de Video/normas , Adolescente , Análisis de Varianza , Brasil , Niño , Estudios Cruzados , Humanos , Masculino , Distrofia Muscular de Duchenne/psicología , Análisis y Desempeño de Tareas , Interfaz Usuario-Computador , Juegos de Video/tendencias , Realidad Virtual , Adulto Joven
14.
Int J Law Psychiatry ; 57: 77-84, 2018.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29548507

RESUMEN

For decades politicians, parent groups, researchers, media outlets, professionals in various fields, and laymen have debated the effects playing violent video games have on children and adolescents. In academia, there also exists a divide as to whether violent video games cause children and adolescents to be aggressive, violent, and even engage in criminal behavior. Given inconsistencies in the data, it may be important to understand the ways and the reasons why professional organizations take a stance on the violent video game effects debate which may reflect greater expressed certitude than data can support. This piece focuses on the American Psychological Association's internal communications leading to the creation of their 2005 Resolution on Violence in Video Games and Interactive Media. These communications reveal that in this case, the APA attempted to "sell" itself as a solution to the perceived violent video game problem. The actions leading to the 2005 resolution are then compared to the actions of the APA's 2013-2015 Task Force on Violent Media. The implications and problems associated with the APA's actions regarding violent video games are addressed and discussed below.


Asunto(s)
Conducta del Adolescente/psicología , Conducta Infantil/psicología , Juegos de Video/efectos adversos , Juegos de Video/normas , Violencia/psicología , Adolescente , Agresión/psicología , Niño , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Percepción Social , Sociedades Médicas/normas
15.
Games Health J ; 7(2): 136-142, 2018 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29393679

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To encourage high school students to meet physical activity goals using a newly developed game, and to document the feasibility, benefits, and challenges of using an electronic gaming application to promote physical activity in high school students. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Working with youth and game designers an electronic game, Camp Conquer, was developed to motivate high school students to meet physical activity goals. One-hundred-five high school students were recruited to participate in a 12-week pilot test of the game and randomly assigned to a Game Condition or Control Condition. Students in both conditions received a FitBit to track their activity, and participants in the Game Condition received access to Camp Conquer. Number of steps and active minutes each day were tracked for all participants. FitBit use, game logins, and qualitative feedback from researchers, school personnel, and participants were used to determine intervention engagement. RESULTS: The majority of study participants did not consistently wear their FitBit or engage with the gaming intervention. Numerous design challenges and barriers to successful implementation such as the randomized design, absence of a true school-based champion, ease of use, and game glitches were identified. CONCLUSION: Developing games is an exciting technique for motivating the completion of a variety of health behaviors. Although the present intervention was not successful in increasing physical activity in high school students, important lessons were learned regarding how to best structure a gaming intervention for the high school population.


Asunto(s)
Ejercicio Físico/psicología , Estudiantes/psicología , Telemedicina/instrumentación , Juegos de Video/psicología , Adolescente , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Motivación , Proyectos Piloto , Instituciones Académicas/organización & administración , Telemedicina/métodos , Telemedicina/normas , Juegos de Video/normas
16.
Games Health J ; 7(2): 127-135, 2018 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29394102

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of the Virtual Sprouts intervention, an interactive multiplatform mobile gardening game, on dietary intake and psychosocial determinants of dietary behavior in minority youth. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this quasi-experimental pilot intervention, 180 third-, fourth-, and fifth-grade students in Los Angeles Unified School District participated in a 3-week program that included three Virtual Sprouts gaming sessions, three in-school lessons, and three in-home activities, using a nutrition- and gardening-focused curriculum. Pre- and postintervention questionnaires were used to assess psychosocial determinants of dietary behavior, including knowledge about and self-efficacy to eat fruits and vegetables (FV). Data were collected on FV, whole grains, fiber, total sugar, added sugar, and energy from sugary beverages through the Block Kids Food Screener ("last week" version) for Ages 2-17. Repeated measures analysis of covariance models was used for continuous outcomes, controlling for age, sex, ethnicity, school, and free school lunch. RESULTS: After the intervention, the intervention group (n = 116) compared with the control group (n = 64) had a significantly improved self-efficacy to eat FV score (+1.6% vs. -10.3%, P = 0.01), and an improved self-efficacy to cook FV score (+2.9% vs. -5.0%, P = 0.05). There were no significant differences in dietary intake or self-efficacy to garden scores between intervention and control groups. CONCLUSION: The results from this 3-week pilot study suggest that an interactive mobile game with a nutrition- and gardening-focused curriculum can improve psychosocial determinants of dietary behavior in minority youth.


Asunto(s)
Jardinería/métodos , Aplicaciones Móviles/normas , Autoeficacia , Estudiantes/psicología , Juegos de Video/psicología , Niño , Culinaria/métodos , Femenino , Frutas , Promoción de la Salud/métodos , Humanos , Los Angeles , Masculino , Grupos Minoritarios/psicología , Instituciones Académicas/organización & administración , Interfaz Usuario-Computador , Verduras , Juegos de Video/normas , Realidad Virtual
17.
Games Health J ; 7(1): 1-8, 2018 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29394109

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Exergaming is potentially useful to promote physical activity in children; however, long-term effectiveness is unclear. MobileKids Monster Manor (MKMM) is a mobile exergame developed with the help of young advisors. The game wirelessly transmits physical activity data from an accelerometer to a mobile device. Players' steps are redeemed for in-game rewards, for example, new characters. OBJECTIVE: First, to evaluate whether increased physical activity previously observed in a 1-week intervention is sustained over a 2-week intervention and 1-week follow-up, and second, to compare impact in schools within different socioeconomic environments. METHODS: Thirty-seven elementary school students participated in a 4-week randomized controlled study (1-week baseline; 2-week intervention [with only the Game group receiving MKMM]; and 1-week follow-up). All participants wore a Tractivity® accelerometer throughout. Linear mixed models were applied to assess sustainability; a second 42-children-based dataset and age-/sex-adjusted linear regression models were used to compare effect across socioeconomic environments. RESULTS: In the first week of intervention, the Game group compared to the Control group showed a greater increase in physical activity (of 1,758 steps/day [95% confidence interval, CI = 133-3,385] and 31 active minutes/day [95% CI = 4-59]), relative to baseline (13,986 steps/day; 231 active minutes/day). However, this was not sustained in the second intervention week or follow-up. The school within a lower socioeconomic status environment showed lower baseline activity and the 1-week intervention resulted in a greater increase relative to baseline (3,633 steps/day more [95% CI = 1,281-5,985]). CONCLUSION: MKMM could be a useful short-term physical activity promotion tool; however, effectiveness may decrease as novelty diminishes.


Asunto(s)
Ejercicio Físico , Juegos de Video/normas , Acelerometría/métodos , Colombia Británica , Niño , Femenino , Promoción de la Salud/métodos , Humanos , Masculino , Instituciones Académicas/organización & administración , Instituciones Académicas/tendencias , Estudiantes/estadística & datos numéricos
18.
Games Health J ; 7(2): 143-150, 2018 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29406774

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: Exergames played with a photorealistic avatar may enhance motivation to play, in addition to frequency, duration, and intensity of game-play. This article reports the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of an exergame played with a photorealistic avatar on physical activity (PA) intensity in a laboratory-based study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Teens (12-14 years old) were recruited from a large, metropolitan area of the southwestern United States. Parents provided written informed consent. Teens completed online data collection, played an exergame with a photorealistic avatar in an observed laboratory setting, and then participated in postassessment data collection that included online questionnaires and a telephone interview. RESULTS: The program was feasible: 42 out of 48 teens recruited (87.5%) completed all data collection activities; game enjoyment was 21.9 ± 8.4 out of possible score of 32; immersion, 49.7 ± 15.6 out of a possible score of 88; avatar identification, 43.9 ± 16.5 out of a possible score of 68; and program satisfaction, 15.6 ± 3.6 out of possible score of 20. Objectively assessed PA indicated that 15.88 minutes of the laboratory-based gameplay session (74.9% of total time) was in vigorous PA; small effect sizes were observed in autonomy (ES = 0.45; P = 0.01) and competence (ES = 0.36; P = 0.03). Little change was observed in relatedness (ES = 0.04; P = 0.82) Qualitative data confirmed participants enjoyed playing the game with a photorealistic avatar and provided suggestions to enhance the gameplay experience. CONCLUSION: Playing an exergame with a photorealistic avatar holds promise as a method for increasing PA among youth. Additional research is needed to further explore its effects on gameplay frequency, intensity, and duration in nonlaboratory setting.


Asunto(s)
Ejercicio Físico/psicología , Fotograbar/normas , Juegos de Video/psicología , Adolescente , Niño , Estudios de Factibilidad , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Fotograbar/métodos , Investigación Cualitativa , Texas , Juegos de Video/normas
19.
Games Health J ; 7(1): 37-42, 2018 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29265884

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: Finding suitable and engaging ways for older people living in long-term care (LTC) to engage in physical activity, to maintain function is challenging. There is a need to explore the use of exergames for LTC residents who have mobility and cognitive impairments. We investigated the effect of a group-based Xbox Kinect (Microsoft Corp., Redmond, WA) exergame program on mobility in LTC residents with and without cognitive impairment. METHODS: Facilities were randomly assigned to the intervention (four facilities, n = 29, aged 84.7 ± 7.4 years) or control group (five facilities, n = 36, aged 85.8 ± 7.2 years). The intervention group played Xbox Kinect exergames twice weekly for 8 weeks. The control group continued usual activities. The primary outcome measure was mobility, assessed pre- and postintervention using the de Morton Mobility Index (DEMMI). RESULTS: DEMMI scores improved in residents who played exergames, although this did not reach significance (P = 0.06). There was no interaction between cognition scores and DEMMI scores (P = 0.86). Participants attended an average of 55% of scheduled exergames sessions. CONCLUSION: The trend toward improvement in mobility, as well as attendance rates indicate that the Xbox Kinect exergames were engaging for a proportion of residents. On this basis, further exergames development for LTC residents warrants attention.


Asunto(s)
Terapia por Ejercicio/métodos , Juegos de Video/normas , Accidentes por Caídas/prevención & control , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Análisis por Conglomerados , Cognición , Prueba de Esfuerzo/métodos , Terapia por Ejercicio/psicología , Femenino , Humanos , Cuidados a Largo Plazo/métodos , Masculino , Estadísticas no Paramétricas , Juegos de Video/tendencias
20.
Games Health J ; 7(1): 75-82, 2018 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29227162

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Hand strength weakness affects the performance of most activities of daily living. This study aims to design, develop, and test an electromyography (EMG) biofeedback training system based on serious games to promote motivation and synchronization and proper work intensity in grip exercises for improving hand strength. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An EMG surface sensor, soft balls with different stiffness and three exergames, conforms the system to drive videogame clues in response to EMG-inferred grip strength, while overseeing motivation. An experiment was designed to study the effect of performing handgrip (HG) exercises with the proposed system versus traditional exercises. Participants, organized into two groups, followed a training program for each hand. One group followed a HG exergame training (ET) with the dominant hand and traditional HG training with the nondominant hand and inverse sequence by the second group. Initial and final grip forces were measured using a digital dynamometer. Questionnaires evaluated motivation and user experience, and exercise performance was evaluated in terms of work and rest time percentage and maximal voluntary contraction percentage over contraction periods. Data were analyzed for statistically significant differences and increase of means. RESULTS: Participants showed significantly better exercise performance and higher grip forces, with sustained intrinsic motivation and user experience, with the ET. CONCLUSION: Improvement in force level arises evidently from the synchronized work-rest time pattern and appropriated intensity of the muscle activity. This leads to support that EMG biofeedback exergames improve motor neurons firing and resting.


Asunto(s)
Biorretroalimentación Psicológica/métodos , Electromiografía/métodos , Fuerza de la Mano , Motivación , Juegos de Video/normas , Adulto , Anciano , Terapia por Ejercicio/métodos , Terapia por Ejercicio/normas , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Juegos de Video/tendencias
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