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1.
Span J Psychol ; 27: e17, 2024 Jul 18.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-39023175

RESUMEN

Informal caregivers, who provide unpaid care work to individuals with disabilities, are devalued despite their important contributions to society. Identifying the factors contributing to their devaluation is crucial for recognizing and valuing their work. In two experimental studies, we examined (a) whether informal caregivers are dehumanized; (b) the moderating impact of belief in a just world (BJW) on this process; and (c) the predictive impact of BJW and the dehumanization of informal caregivers on the perception of informal caregivers' suffering. In Study 1 (N = 180), a 2 (informal caregiver vs. non-caregiver) X 2 (female vs. male) between-participants design was used; in Study 2 (N = 205), there were two experimental conditions: female informal caregiver vs. male informal caregiver. Participants were randomly assigned to one description of a target and were asked to complete measures assessing the dehumanization of the target (Studies 1 and 2), the perception of the suffering of the target (Study 2), and a measure of BJW referring to themselves (Study 2). Results showed the expected dehumanization effect, such that participants attributed fewer uniquely human emotions to informal caregivers compared to non-caregivers, regardless of their gender (Studies 1 and 2). However, this effect was observed only among participants with higher BJW (Study 2). Furthermore, BJW and the dehumanization of informal caregivers predicted the minimization of the perception of informal caregivers' suffering (Study 2). These results establish a theoretical relationship between these research areas and offer insights for practical implications and future research.


Asunto(s)
Cuidadores , Deshumanización , Humanos , Femenino , Masculino , Cuidadores/psicología , Adulto , Persona de Mediana Edad , Justicia Social , Estrés Psicológico/psicología , Anciano , Percepción Social , Adulto Joven
4.
PLoS One ; 19(7): e0306786, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38985705

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Many areas of healthcare are impacted by a paucity of research that is translatable to clinical practice. Research utilising real-world data, such as routinely collected patient data, may be one option to efficiently create evidence to inform practice and service delivery. Such studies are also valuable for exploring (in)equity of services and outcomes, and benefit from using non-selected samples representing the diversity of the populations served in the 'real world'. This scoping review aims to identify and map the published research which utilises routinely collected clinical healthcare data. A secondary aim is to explore the extent to which this literature supports the pursuit of social justice in health, including health inequities and intersectional approaches. METHOD: This review utilises Arksey and O'Malley's methodological framework for scoping reviews and draws on the recommended enhancements of this framework to promote a team-based and mixed methods approach. This includes searching electronic databases and screening papers based on a pre-specified inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data relevant to the research aims will be extracted from included papers, including the clinical/professional area of the topic, the source of data that was used, and whether it addresses elements of social justice. All screening and reviewing will be collaborative and iterative, drawing on strengths of the research team and responsive changes to challenges will be made. Quantitative data will be analysed descriptively, and conceptual content analysis will be utilised to understand qualitative data. These will be collectively synthesised in alignment to the research aims. CONCLUSION: Our findings will highlight the extent to which such research is being conducted and published, including gaps and make recommendations for future endeavours for real-world data studies. The findings from this scoping review will be relevant for practitioners and researchers, as well as health service managers, commissioners, and research funders.


Asunto(s)
Atención a la Salud , Equidad en Salud , Justicia Social , Humanos , Proyectos de Investigación , Literatura de Revisión como Asunto
5.
J Law Med Ethics ; 52(S1): 66-69, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38995246

RESUMEN

In recent years, the Minnesota Attorney General's Office and the Minnesota Department of Health have cultivated a productive partnership to strengthen the state's multidisciplinary response to overlapping health equity and social justice issues. This article describes shared efforts in three areas: post-conviction justice, drug overdose, and human trafficking/exploitation.


Asunto(s)
Sobredosis de Droga , Minnesota , Humanos , Sobredosis de Droga/prevención & control , Gobierno Estatal , Abogados , Justicia Social , Equidad en Salud
6.
J Law Med Ethics ; 52(S1): 13-16, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38995256

RESUMEN

The new federal Pregnant Workers Fairness Act advances important protections for pregnant workers, but leaves behind agricultural workers, who are overrepresented in hazardous occupational environments. This article highlights the connection between workplace pregnancy discrimination and health inequities. It concludes with a discussion of immigrant-led advocacy efforts to eliminate health inequities and advance health justice.


Asunto(s)
Agricultores , Humanos , Femenino , Embarazo , Estados Unidos , Agricultores/legislación & jurisprudencia , Justicia Social/legislación & jurisprudencia , Lugar de Trabajo/legislación & jurisprudencia , Mujeres Embarazadas
7.
Fam Syst Health ; 42(2): 292-297, 2024 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38990673

RESUMEN

The authors want to invite the integrated care community to reflect with us on an evolutionary shift in how we approach matters of justice and equity: from a diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) framework to a perspective that centers the relational concepts of belonging, dignity, and justice (BDJ) for a more just world (Davis, 2021). Our desire to reflect, question, and pivot is inspired by the Ecocycle Planning Model-which I (Deepu George) used to critically frame the Collaborative Family Healthcare Association's (CFHA) history in Part I of the article (George, 2023a) and creatively anticipate our future in Part II (George & Khatri, 2024). In this article, the authors want to focus on the nodes of maturity and creative destruction, as well as the idea of the rigidity trap-to examine our collective energies around the idea of DEI. With CFHA's 30th anniversary upon us, we pause and reflect on not only the benefits of DEI efforts heretofore, but also the pitfalls, to avoid the rigidity trap, which is likely to occur when we embrace tenets of an idea that may no longer serve the values we once aspired to or fail to evolve in favor of the familiar. Considering critiques of the limitations of DEI work in practice and literature, the authors believe a BDJ approach will better inform our growth moving forward. Therefore, the authors want to reflect, honor, and build upon the impact and gains from DEI and adapt them to better serve the needs of all-especially the historically marginalized and underrepresented voices. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2024 APA, all rights reserved).


Asunto(s)
Diversidad Cultural , Justicia Social , Humanos , Respeto , Inclusión Social , Personeidad , Equidad en Salud/tendencias , Equidad en Salud/normas
8.
Sci Rep ; 14(1): 15905, 2024 Jul 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38987608

RESUMEN

Governance quality refers to how well the processes and institutions of public governance function and is widely recognized as having an important influence on human well-being. We developed and tested a theoretical model that elucidates the relationship between governance quality and the subjective well-being of residents in China by revealing the serial mediation effects of perceived social fairness and trust in government. Using data from the nationally representative Chinese Social Survey conducted in 2021 (n = 5019), we performed structural equation modeling to empirically examine our hypotheses. The results indicated that governance quality exerted a significant positive fully indirect impact on subjective well-being through perceived social fairness, trust in government, and their serial mediation effects. This study contributes to the literature by providing valuable insights into the determinants of subjective well-being and highlighting the serial mediating roles of perceived social fairness and trust in government in the relationship between governance quality and subjective well-being. The findings also provide practical insights for policymakers, as they indicate that promoting perceived social fairness and fostering trust in government are essential to translate governance quality into subjective well-being.


Asunto(s)
Gobierno , Confianza , Humanos , China , Femenino , Masculino , Adulto , Persona de Mediana Edad , Justicia Social , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Adulto Joven
10.
Ann Glob Health ; 90(1): 41, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-39005643

RESUMEN

A healthy ocean is essential for human health, and yet the links between the ocean and human health are often overlooked. By providing new medicines, technologies, energy, foods, recreation, and inspiration, the ocean has the potential to enhance human health and wellbeing. However, climate change, pollution, biodiversity loss, and inequity threaten both ocean and human health. Sustainable realisation of the ocean's health benefits will require overcoming these challenges through equitable partnerships, enforcement of laws and treaties, robust monitoring, and use of metrics that assess both the ocean's natural capital and human wellbeing. Achieving this will require an explicit focus on human rights, equity, sustainability, and social justice. In addition to highlighting the potential unique role of the healthcare sector, we offer science-based recommendations to protect both ocean health and human health, and we highlight the unique potential of the healthcare sector tolead this effort.


Asunto(s)
Cambio Climático , Océanos y Mares , Humanos , Biodiversidad , Conservación de los Recursos Naturales , Sector de Atención de Salud , Derechos Humanos , Justicia Social , Desarrollo Sostenible
11.
Indian J Public Health ; 68(2): 324-325, 2024 Apr 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38953828

RESUMEN

The WHO's World Health Day 2024 slogan, "My health, my right," has been unpacked through the lens of an evolving social epidemiological understanding. The operative part of the theme merely reiterates international positions that have been established for a long and is unable to adequately incorporate advances in the understanding of the central role that structural determinants play in the production of ill-health. Given the urgency of addressing Sustainable Development Goal and Universal Health Coverage goals, the reduction of health inequities through the promotion of social justice is as much a governance imperative as moral.


Asunto(s)
Justicia Social , Humanos , Salud Global , Determinantes Sociales de la Salud , Derecho a la Salud , Organización Mundial de la Salud , Inequidades en Salud , Desarrollo Sostenible , Cobertura Universal del Seguro de Salud
12.
J Couns Psychol ; 71(4): 267, 2024 Jul.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38949779

RESUMEN

Reports an error in "Defining racial allies: A qualitative investigation of White allyship from the perspective of people of color" by Cassandra L. Hinger, Cirleen DeBlaere, Rebecca Gwira, Michelle Aiello, Arash Punjwani, Laura Cobourne, Ngoc Tran, Madison Lord, Jordan Mike and Carlton Green (Journal of Counseling Psychology, 2023[Nov], Vol 70[6], 631-644). An additional citation was added for the structure of the definition of White allies in the second paragraph of the introduction. The online version of this article has been corrected. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2024-23216-002.) While interdisciplinary scholars and activists urge White allies to engage in racial justice work led by the voices of Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC), to date, most research on racial allyship has centered exclusively on the perspective of White allies themselves. Thus, the purpose of this study was to create a framework of racial allyship from the perspective of BIPOC. Utilizing constructivist grounded theory (Charmaz, 2014), focus groups were conducted to understand how BIPOC describe the knowledge, skills, and actions of White allies. Participants across eight focus groups described allyship as an ongoing interpersonal process that included a lifelong commitment to (a) building trust, (b) engaging in antiracist action, (c) critical awareness, (d) sociopolitical knowledge, (e) accountability, and (f) communicating and disseminating information. The findings of this study point to several avenues through which White counseling psychologists can incorporate racial allyship in their research, training, clinical, and advocacy work that align with our field's emphasis on social justice, multiculturalism, and prevention. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2024 APA, all rights reserved).


Asunto(s)
Investigación Cualitativa , Humanos , Femenino , Adulto , Masculino , Racismo/psicología , Población Blanca/psicología , Justicia Social , Persona de Mediana Edad
13.
AMA J Ethics ; 26(7): E572-579, 2024 Jul 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38958426

RESUMEN

Structural determinants of health frameworks must express antiracism to be effective, but racial and ethnic inequities are widely documented, even in harm reduction programs that focus on person-centered interventions. Harm reduction strategies should express social justice and health equity, resist stigma and discrimination, and mitigate marginalization experiences among people who use drugs (PWUD). To do so, government and organizational policies that promote harm reduction must acknowledge historical and ongoing patterns of racializing drug use. This article gives examples of such racialization and offers recommendations about how harm reduction programming can most easily and effectively motivate equitable, antiracist care for PWUD.


Asunto(s)
Reducción del Daño , Equidad en Salud , Justicia Social , Humanos , Reducción del Daño/ética , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias/prevención & control , Racismo/prevención & control , Estigma Social , Consumidores de Drogas , Determinantes Sociales de la Salud/ética
14.
Torture ; 34(1): 83-88, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38975917

RESUMEN

The collective action of MOCAO, Movimiento en resistencia contra las agresiones oculares del ESMAD (Escuadrón Móvil An-tidisturbios) is a social strateg y to demand access to justice and the fulfilment of guarantees of reparation and non-repetition in Colombia. A brief account of significant events in our trajecto-ry as a social movement is presented, together with our letter of petitions to the national government as victims and survivors of ocular aggressions in the framework of police violence. Al-though ESMAD today has been reformed under the name of the Unit for Dialogue and Maintenance of Order (UNDMO), we consider that there have not yet been structural changes to ensure that its function is related to protecting the constitution-al right to social protest.


Asunto(s)
Agresión , Justicia Social , Humanos , Colombia , Agresión/psicología , Libertad , Policia , Violencia/psicología , Tortura
15.
BMJ Open ; 14(7): e080915, 2024 Jul 17.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-39019634

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: A grassroots environmental-justice organisation in Kansas City has been examining the disproportionate exposure to air pollution experienced by residents living fenceline to the largest classification railyard in the USA. Prior analyses showed limited increased risk for asthma exacerbation for patients with asthma living closer to toxic release inventory (TRI) facilities and railyards. In this study, we assessed geographical asthma and environmental disparities, to further explore community-level disparities. DESIGN: This is a cross-sectional study of population-level asthma rates, which included rates for all asthma encounters and acute asthma encounters (urgent care, emergency department, inpatient admission). Distances from census-tract centroids to nearest TRI facilities, railyards and highways were calculated. The association between asthma rates and distances was examined using Kendall's τ correlation and multivariable Poisson regression models. SETTING: We used electronic medical record data from the regional paediatric hospital, census and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) air monitoring data. PARTICIPANTS: Patients with 2+ asthma encounters during the EPA study timeframe were identified. RESULTS: Residential distance from railyards exhibited a significant negative correlation with overall (-0.36 (CI -0.41 to -0.32)) and acute (-0.27 (CI -0.32 to -0.22)) asthma rates. Asthma rates were elevated among tracts north of the closest railyard (incident rate ratio: 1.38; CI 1.35 to 1.41) when compared with southern directionality. An increased distance from the nearest railyard of 3 km was associated with a decrease in overall asthma rates of 26%. CONCLUSION: Significant negative associations between proximity to all pollution source types and asthma rates were observed. This community-level research has served as a tool for community engagement and will be used to support proposed local policy. Environmental justice work addresses local concerns involving small, limited datasets, if the data exist at all. The academic epidemiological platform may reconsider acceptable approaches to small population research in order to better serve communities with the most need.


Asunto(s)
Contaminación del Aire , Asma , Exposición a Riesgos Ambientales , Humanos , Asma/epidemiología , Estudios Transversales , Niño , Masculino , Kansas/epidemiología , Exposición a Riesgos Ambientales/efectos adversos , Femenino , Contaminación del Aire/efectos adversos , Contaminación del Aire/análisis , Preescolar , Adolescente , Contaminantes Atmosféricos/análisis , Contaminantes Atmosféricos/efectos adversos , Justicia Social
16.
Int J Equity Health ; 23(1): 123, 2024 Jun 14.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38877451

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Although it is widely acknowledged that access to civil justice (ATJ) is a key social determinant of health (SDOH), the existing literature lacks empirical evidence supporting ATJ as a SDOH for specific dimensions of health. METHODS: A legal epidemiological, cross-sectional, postal survey was conducted on n = 908 randomly sampled participants in Hong Kong in March 2023. Data collected were perceptions of the civil justice system, health, and sociodemographics. Perceived ATJ was assessed using a modified version of the Inaccessibility of Justice scale (IOJ) and Perceived Inequality of Justice scale (PIJ), i.e. the "modified IOJ-PIJ", consisting of 12 of the original 13 items from both scales divided into two subdomains: "procedural fairness", and "outcome neutrality". For health data, quality of life was assessed using the Hong Kong version of the Abbreviated World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire (WHOQOL-BREF(HK)), psychological distress (including symptoms of anxiety and depression) was assessed using the four-Item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-4), and having comorbidities was assessed using Sangha's Self-Administered Comorbidity Questionnaire (SCQ). Structural equation modelling (SEM) was used to investigate the relationships between perceived ATJ and the measured health outcomes. RESULTS: SEM demonstrated that both subdomains for ATJ had significantly negative associations (B < 0; p < 0.05) with all quality-of-life subdomains, except for between outcome neutrality with social relationships; both subdomains for ATJ had significantly positive association (B > 0; p < 0.05) with both anxiety and depression; and, after adjusting for age, only "procedural fairness" had significantly positive association (B > 0; p < 0.05) with having comorbidities. CONCLUSION: This study provided empirical evidence that ATJ is a SDOH for specific dimensions of health. The results of this study encourage laws, policies, and initiatives aimed at improving ATJ, as well as collaborative efforts from the legal and health sectors through health-justice partnerships, and from the broader community, to safeguard and promote public health by strengthening ATJ.


Asunto(s)
Determinantes Sociales de la Salud , Justicia Social , Humanos , Estudios Transversales , Masculino , Femenino , Hong Kong/epidemiología , Persona de Mediana Edad , Adulto , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Calidad de Vida/psicología , Anciano , Adulto Joven , Depresión/epidemiología , Depresión/psicología
17.
Health Aff (Millwood) ; 43(6): 798-804, 2024 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38830166

RESUMEN

Public health frameworks have grappled with the inequitable distribution of power as a driver of the social conditions that determine health. However, these frameworks have not adequately considered building community power as a strategy to shift the distribution of power. Community power-building organizations build and organize a base of affected people to take collective action to transform their material conditions, using advocacy and other tactics. We conducted qualitative interviews with representatives of twenty-two national nongovernmental public health organizations (public health NGOs) and thirteen community power-building organizations to explore the nature and potential of partnerships between public health and community power-building organizations. Our findings suggest ways to close advocacy gaps within the public health ecosystem and ways in which public health can strategically leverage its power, resources, and expertise to support social justice campaigns and movements.


Asunto(s)
Salud Pública , Humanos , Defensa del Consumidor , Justicia Social , Organizaciones , Investigación Cualitativa , Entrevistas como Asunto
18.
Perspect Med Educ ; 13(1): 349-356, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38912167

RESUMEN

Problem & Background: Medical education has acknowledged the impact of structural societal factors on health, prompting the need for curricula seeking to eliminate health inequities upstream while simultaneously caring for downstream effects of existing inequities. The Keck School of Medicine of USC (KSOM) implemented one such comprehensive curriculum, Health Justice and Systems of Care (HJSC), integrating health systems science, structural competency, and service-learning in a required course spanning the pre-clerkship and clerkship phases with an optional post clerkship elective. Approach: The HJSC course addresses topics including racism in medicine, health inequities, and health systems science. Using transformative learning theory, it fosters critical consciousness and structural competency. Assessments include case analyses, reflections, team-based learning sessions, and group projects related to social justice in healthcare. The program aims to instill cultural humility and practical application, fostering a holistic approach to medical education that implores physicians to become advocates for health justice. Outcomes of the Innovation: Feedback from students indicated generally positive perceptions of the curriculum. Students provided overall positive comments about discussions with guest speakers. However, students expressed a desire for more concrete examples of how health inequities can be remedied. Some found small-group activities less engaging. Other challenges included providing students of different readiness levels with tailored experiences and seamlessly integrating HJSC content within basic and clinical sciences courses. Critical Reflection: Next steps include continuing to integrate content into the science curriculum and clerkships, improving opportunities for meaningful student interactions, and enhancing faculty development to address health justice concerns in clinical settings.


Asunto(s)
Curriculum , Justicia Social , Humanos , Curriculum/tendencias , Curriculum/normas , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Atención a la Salud , Prácticas Clínicas/métodos
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