Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 525
Filtrar
2.
Ann Surg ; 273(4): e125-e126, 2021 04 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33351468

RESUMEN

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has highlighted existing systemic inequities that adversely affect a variety of communities in the United States. These inequities have a direct and adverse impact on the healthcare of our patient population. While civic engagement has not been cultivated in surgical and anesthesia training, we maintain that it is inherent to the core role of the role of a physician. This is supported by moral imperative, professional responsibility, and a legal obligation. We propose that such civic engagement and social justice activism is a neglected, but necessary aspect of physician training. We propose the implementation of a civic advocacy education agenda across department, community and national platforms. Surgical and anesthesiology residency training needs to evolve to the meet these increasing demands.


Asunto(s)
Anestesiología/educación , Educación de Postgrado en Medicina/métodos , Disparidades en el Estado de Salud , Disparidades en Atención de Salud , Rol del Médico , Justicia Social/educación , Especialidades Quirúrgicas/educación , Anestesiología/ética , Educación de Postgrado en Medicina/ética , Política de Salud , Disparidades en Atención de Salud/ética , Humanos , Defensa del Paciente/educación , Defensa del Paciente/ética , Justicia Social/ética , Especialidades Quirúrgicas/ética , Estados Unidos
6.
Ann Glob Health ; 86(1): 114, 2020 09 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32944511

RESUMEN

Solidarity in the general sense means unity or agreement of feeling or action, especially among individuals with a common interest; or mutual support within a group. There are different ways of standing in solidarity in different kinds of literatures. One of the most important ways is to advocate. Advocacy is a win-win strategy and a process of supporting and enabling people to express their views and concerns. In the end, I think sharing different types of solidarity can be one of the drivers that stimulate the solidarity itself, and I call on everyone to contribute to this sharing. I hope that this solidarity, which began in the world with the beginning of COVID-19, will not end with its end and will last forever because our world needs coexistence. This may be the only gift to the world from COVID-19.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus , Salud Global , Cooperación Internacional , Pandemias , Neumonía Viral , Justicia Social , Betacoronavirus , Conducta Cooperativa , Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Infecciones por Coronavirus/prevención & control , Salud Global/ética , Salud Global/tendencias , Humanos , Pandemias/ética , Pandemias/prevención & control , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Neumonía Viral/prevención & control , Justicia Social/ética , Justicia Social/tendencias , Responsabilidad Social
9.
OMICS ; 24(9): 515-517, 2020 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32603205

RESUMEN

After the initial emergency responses deployed to control the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in the first half of 2020, we should now start thinking about long-term strategies and concepts for pandemic and disaster governance such as resilience. In this context, COVID-19 health care and education are especially important because they are essential public goods that determine what kind of a society we live in, during the pandemic and afterward. So for, the focus has been a tactical efficiency perspective that prioritized instrumental, logistical, or pragmatic aspects in planetary health and university education, with much less attention paid to social justice, history of inequity, and power asymmetries that affect the pandemic impacts in society. For a resilient COVID-19 response, we need to address not only medical, technical, and logistical challenges, but also the social disparities that are inherited from the prepandemic world that are negatively affecting the current pandemic outcomes.


Asunto(s)
Betacoronavirus/patogenicidad , Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Pandemias , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Salud Pública/ética , Justicia Social/ética , Acceso a la Información/ética , Investigación Biomédica/ética , Infecciones por Coronavirus/diagnóstico , Infecciones por Coronavirus/patología , Disparidades en Atención de Salud/ética , Humanos , Cooperación Internacional , Neumonía Viral/diagnóstico , Neumonía Viral/patología , Salud Pública/educación , Salud Pública/métodos
11.
Hastings Cent Rep ; 50(3): 28-32, 2020 May.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32596899

RESUMEN

In this essay, we suggest practical ways to shift the framing of crisis standards of care toward disability justice. We elaborate on the vision statement provided in the 2010 Institute of Medicine (National Academy of Medicine) "Summary of Guidance for Establishing Crisis Standards of Care for Use in Disaster Situations," which emphasizes fairness; equitable processes; community and provider engagement, education, and communication; and the rule of law. We argue that interpreting these elements through disability justice entails a commitment to both distributive and recognitive justice. The disability rights movement's demand "Nothing about us, without us" requires substantive inclusion of disabled people in decision-making related to their interests, including in crisis planning before, during, and after a pandemic like Covid-19.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Personas con Discapacidad , Equidad en Salud/ética , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Justicia Social/ética , Nivel de Atención/ética , Betacoronavirus , Comunicación , Equidad en Salud/legislación & jurisprudencia , Humanos , Pandemias , Justicia Social/legislación & jurisprudencia , Nivel de Atención/legislación & jurisprudencia
12.
Hastings Cent Rep ; 50(3): 54-56, 2020 May.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32596911

RESUMEN

The Covid-19 pandemic has concentrated bioethics attention on the "lifeboat ethics" of rationing and fair allocation of scarce medical resources, such as testing, intensive care unit beds, and ventilators. This focus drives ethics resources away from persistent and systemic problems-in particular, the structural injustices that give rise to health disparities affecting disadvantaged communities of color. Bioethics, long allied with academic medicine and highly attentive to individual decision-making, has largely neglected its responsibility to address these difficult "upstream" issues. It is time to broaden our teaching, research, and practice to match the breadth of the field in order to help address these significant societal inequities and unmet health needs.


Asunto(s)
Bioética/tendencias , Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Betacoronavirus , Grupos de Población Continentales , Asignación de Recursos para la Atención de Salud/ética , Disparidades en el Estado de Salud , Humanos , Pandemias , Justicia Social/ética , Factores Socioeconómicos
13.
Rev. salud pública ; 22(3): e184536, May-June 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | LILACS | ID: biblio-1115880

RESUMEN

ABSTRACT This article attempts to reflect on the importance of thinking in general about illness and about cancer, from an ethical perspective. This approach reveals the central role of personal dignity and the moral relevance that supports the reasons for respecting people. The ethical values that sustain the practice of medicine must aim at uplifting this dignity and seeking situations of justice, since living in a community expresses intersubjectivity that cannot be truncated by illnesses like cancer. Therefore, situations involving poverty cannot justify the lack of health care, and if such lacks occur, they run counter to ethical awareness in the deepest sense and destroy intersubjectivity. As a result, cancer is suffered as a vital experience, in a framework of lives that are lived and are not simply objects of study; those stricken with cancer are individuals who are denied the human right to health, and undergo the elimination of their dignity, the cancelation of justice, and a death sentence. Society is part of these actions and at the same time, suffers from the disappearance of hope. In this sense, the process of informed consent is used as a tool that encourages dialog and understanding between doctors and patients during proper treatment, on a shared path.(AU)


RESUMEN El artículo pretende hacer una reflexión sobre la importancia de pensar, en general, la enfermedad y, en particular, el cáncer, desde una perspectiva ética. Este acercamiento permite vislumbrar el papel central que tiene la dignidad de las personas y la relevancia moral que apuntalan las razones por las cuales ellas han de ser respetadas. Los valores éticos que sustentan la práctica médica han de apelar a enaltecer dicha dignidad y buscar situaciones de justicia, dado que vivir en comunidad da cuenta de una intersubjetividad que no puede ser truncada por enfermedades como el cáncer. Esto evidencia que las situaciones de pobreza no pueden justificar la carencia de cuidados de salud y que, cuando esto sucede, se contraviene, desde lo más hondo, una conciencia de carácter ético y se rompe la intersubjetividad. El cáncer se sufre en tanto experiencia vital, en un marco de vidas vividas y no simplemente de objetos de estudio; los enfermos son personas a quienes se les niega el derecho humano de la salud, se les borra su dignidad, se cancela la justicia y se les condena a la muerte. La sociedad es parte de estas acciones y a la vez sufre la cancelación de esperanzas. En este sentido, se retoma el proceso del consentimiento informado (CI) como una herramienta que permite el diálogo y la comprensión entre médicos y pacientes en la atención digna, en un camino compartido.(AU)


Asunto(s)
Justicia Social/ética , Personeidad , Consentimiento Informado/ética , Neoplasias/psicología , Relaciones Médico-Paciente/ética , Pobreza
15.
Bioethics ; 34(6): 620-632, 2020 07.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32433782

RESUMEN

There are no egalitarians in a pandemic. The scale of the challenge for health systems and public policy means that there is an ineluctable need to prioritize the needs of the many. It is impossible to treat all citizens equally, and a failure to carefully consider the consequences of actions could lead to massive preventable loss of life. In a pandemic there is a strong ethical need to consider how to do most good overall. Utilitarianism is an influential moral theory that states that the right action is the action that is expected to produce the greatest good. It offers clear operationalizable principles. In this paper we provide a summary of how utilitarianism could inform two challenging questions that have been important in the early phase of the pandemic: (a) Triage: which patients should receive access to a ventilator if there is overwhelming demand outstripping supply? (b) Lockdown: how should countries decide when to implement stringent social restrictions, balancing preventing deaths from COVID-19 with causing deaths and reductions in well-being from other causes? Our aim is not to argue that utilitarianism is the only relevant ethical theory, or in favour of a purely utilitarian approach. However, clearly considering which options will do the most good overall will help societies identify and consider the necessary cost of other values. Societies may choose either to embrace or not to embrace the utilitarian course, but with a clear understanding of the values involved and the price they are willing to pay.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Teoría Ética , Pandemias/ética , Derechos del Paciente/ética , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Servicios Médicos de Urgencia/ética , Humanos , Justicia Social/ética
16.
Nurs Ethics ; 27(4): 1056-1065, 2020 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32223503

RESUMEN

The life perspectives of persons with disabilities have been neglected in many countries and particularly in lower- and middle-income countries that have fewer resources to adequately address the societal needs of these persons. Bioethics purports normative standards for the way in which we treat with others, and the virtue of care should be at the heart of everyday life. Human rights are norms that aspire to protect all persons everywhere. Within this milieu, persons with disabilities who make up a significant portion of all societies worldwide meet many social barriers that inhibit their quality of life and leave them greatly disadvantaged in comparison to able-bodied persons. This article focuses on the notion of quality of life, the presumed perspectives of biomedicine and bioethics on disability, the neglect of the lived experience of persons with disabilities, and the discrimination underlying the struggle for equal rights and opportunities for persons with disability. It argues for equal access to social and beneficial medical interventions for persons with disabilities; that persons with disabilities should be seen as different but equal; that their contributions to societal deliberations would enhance the richness of thought, views, narratives and perspectives; and that society should stop using the term disability and use instead the less value-laden term anomaly. Finally, it recommends educational campaigns to change negative attitudes towards persons with predicaments or anomalies, the respecting of human diversity, collaboration between upper-income and lower- and middle-income countries to develop strategies that seek to change negative attitudes towards persons with anomalies, and the inclusion worldwide of all these matters as a part of a bioethics agenda that advocates for respecting the human rights of persons with anomalies.


Asunto(s)
Personas con Discapacidad/psicología , Derechos Humanos/ética , Calidad de Vida , Derecho a la Salud/ética , Discriminación Social , Justicia Social/ética , Bioética , Países Desarrollados , Países en Desarrollo , Derechos Humanos/legislación & jurisprudencia , Humanos , Internacionalidad
17.
Indian J Med Ethics ; 4 (NS)(4): 318-325, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31791930

RESUMEN

Forum for Medical Ethics Society (FMES), Mumbai; St. John's National Academy of Health Sciences (SJNAHS), Bengaluru; Society for Community Health Awareness Research and Action (SOCHARA,) Bengaluru and SAMA Resource Group for Women and Health, New Delhi co-hosted the joint 14th World Congress of Bioethics (WCB) and the 7th National Bioethics Conference (NBC) in Bengaluru. The theme of the Congress was, "Health for all in an unequal world: Obligations of Global Bioethics". The conference was held at an opportune time when we also commemorate 70 years of the Declaration of Human Rights of 1948 and 40 years of the Alma Ata Declaration of 1978. Both declarations affirmed Health as a fundamental Human Right. We have discussed earlier the significance of the congress theme in the year 2018.


Asunto(s)
Bioética , Guías como Asunto , Equidad en Salud/ética , Equidad en Salud/normas , Justicia Social/ética , Justicia Social/normas , Congresos como Asunto , Humanos
18.
J Bioeth Inq ; 16(4): 571-586, 2019 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31863256

RESUMEN

Social justice has been identified as a foundational moral commitment for global health research ethics. Yet what a commitment to social justice means for community engagement in such research has not been critically examined. This paper draws on the rich social justice literature from political philosophy to explore the normative question: What should the ethical goals of community engagement be if it is to help connect global health research to social justice? Five ethical goals for community engagement are proposed that promote well-being, agency, and self-development, particularly for those considered disadvantaged and marginalized. The paper also considers how key terms used in the proposed goals should be defined using existing theories of health and social justice. This analysis is done to give global health researchers and their partners a better idea of what the ethical goals mean. Patterns of convergence amongst different theories are identified that support relying on particular definitions of key terms.


Asunto(s)
Investigación Biomédica/ética , Participación de la Comunidad/métodos , Salud Global , Justicia Social/ética , Estado de Salud , Humanos , Cooperación Internacional , Objetivos Organizacionales , Filosofía Médica , Política
19.
Psychotherapy (Chic) ; 56(4): 491-502, 2019 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31815508

RESUMEN

Much has been written in recent years regarding the integration of social justice values with psychology and psychotherapy; however, the discourse surrounding social justice perspectives related to conducting psychotherapy research is scant. Psychotherapy researchers are beholden to various professional ethical standards, laws, and policies; however, adhering to these rules and guidelines may make research ethical, but not necessarily socially or politically just. In this article, the authors build on previous work from community, feminist, positive, and multicultural psychology perspectives as well as their own experiences as psychotherapy researchers, to propose a framework for approaching psychotherapy research from an ethical and socially just position. Examples from the authors' experiences conducting psychotherapy research with incarcerated individuals, community- and school-based research with youth, and research with sexual/gender minorities are provided to illustrate theoretical principles and provide practical recommendations. Barriers to implementing such a framework to psychotherapy research, as well as strategies to manage these challenges are also discussed. In addition, the authors propose a model that can be used to develop and evaluate the social justice process and content dimensions of a research study. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).


Asunto(s)
Trastornos Mentales/terapia , Psicoterapia/ética , Psicoterapia/métodos , Proyectos de Investigación , Justicia Social/ética , Humanos
20.
Monash Bioeth Rev ; 37(3-4): 94-110, 2019 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31760625

RESUMEN

Here, a moral case is presented as to why sign languages such as Auslan should be made compulsory in general school curricula. Firstly, there are significant benefits that accrue to individuals from learning sign language. Secondly, sign language education is a matter of justice; the normalisation of sign language education and use would particularly benefit marginalised groups, such as those living with a communication disability. Finally, the integration of sign languages into the curricula would enable the flourishing of Deaf culture and go some way to resolving the tensions that have arisen from the promotion of oralist education facilitated by technologies such as cochlear implants. There are important reasons to further pursue policy proposals regarding the prioritisation of sign language in school curricula.


Asunto(s)
Comunicación , Curriculum , Personas con Deficiencia Auditiva , Instituciones Académicas/ética , Lengua de Signos , Justicia Social/ética , Humanos , Formulación de Políticas
SELECCIÓN DE REFERENCIAS
DETALLE DE LA BÚSQUEDA
...