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1.
BMJ Open ; 12(8): e060961, 2022 Aug 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35940830

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: To describe the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on outpatient appointments for children and young people. SETTING: All National Health Service (public) hospitals in England. PARTICIPANTS: All people in England aged <25 years. OUTCOME MEASURES: Outpatient department attendance numbers, rates and modes (face to face vs telephone) by age group, sex and socioeconomic deprivation. RESULTS: Compared with the average for January 2017 to December 2019, there was a 3.8 million appointment shortfall (23.5%) for the under-25 population in England between March 2020 and February 2021, despite a total rise in phone appointments of 2.6 million during that time. This was true for each age group, sex and deprivation fifth, but there were smaller decreases in face to face and total appointments for babies under 1 year. For all ages combined, around one in six first and one in four follow-up appointments were by phone in the most recent period. The proportion of appointments attended was high, at over 95% for telephone and over 90% for face-to-face appointments for all ages. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 led to a dramatic fall in total outpatient appointments and a large rise in the proportion of those appointments conducted by telephone. The impact that this has had on patient outcomes is still unknown. The differential impact of COVID-19 on outpatient activity in different sociodemographic groups may also inform design of paediatric outpatient services in the post-COVID period.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescente , Citas y Horarios , COVID-19/epidemiología , Niño , Inglaterra/epidemiología , Humanos , Pacientes Ambulatorios , Pandemias , Medicina Estatal
2.
PLoS One ; 17(8): e0268506, 2022.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35913944

RESUMEN

Point of care testing (POCT) is an analytical test performed by a healthcare professional outside of a conventional laboratory. The global POCT market was valued at US$ 23.16 billion in 2016 and is forecasted to grow to US$ 36.96 billion in 2021. This upward trend for POCT has increased workload for pathology departments who manage POCT. This research aims to characterize and analyse the teaching and training of POCT at United Kingdom (UK) universities on Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS) accredited biomedical science degrees, and at UK hospital laboratories. A freedom of information (FOI) request was sent in 2018 to all 52 UK universities with an accredited IBMS Biomedical science degree to request information on teaching of POCT, with a 100% response rate. Further FOI requests were sent to all National Health Service (NHS) hospital pathology departments in the UK, regarding POCT training provided to trainee Biomedical scientists, with a 97% response rate. Twelve of the degrees contained no POCT teaching, with a further 9 having no specific POCT teaching. Sixty-six laboratories confirmed that there was no POCT training. The university teaching hours varied between 0 and 35 hours. The median time spent teaching POCT at university was 2 hours. The laboratory teaching hours varied between 0 and 450 hours The median time spent teaching POCT in hospital laboratories was 3 hours. A content analysis of the learning outcomes provided by 29 universities showed that only 61% (84/137) were measurable and 26% (36/137) of the learning outcomes used action verbs that have previously been listed to be avoided in learning outcome writing. Only 9% (13/137) of outcomes specifically described POCT, with 8 of these being measurable. The findings demonstrate that although this is a commonly required skill for biomedical scientists, there is a clear lack of POCT teaching and training in the UK. To meet the new Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA) guidelines, but most importantly to ensure the workforce is fit for the needs of the current healthcare system, the quality and quantity of POCT teaching and training needs to improve.


Asunto(s)
Laboratorios de Hospital , Humanos , Pruebas en el Punto de Atención , Medicina Estatal , Estudiantes , Reino Unido , Universidades
3.
BMJ Open ; 12(8): e059564, 2022 Aug 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35922111

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To investigate which organisational characteristics of primary care dental practices influence the implementation of evidence-based guidance. DESIGN: A multimethod study set within primary care dentistry in Scotland comprising: (1) Semistructured interviews with dental teams to inform development of a self-report questionnaire exploring the translation of guidance in primary care dentistry and (2) A questionnaire-based survey and case studies exploring which organisational characteristics influence knowledge translation. RESULTS: Interview data identified three themes: leadership, communication and context. Survey data revealed compliance with recommendations from three topics of dental guidance to be variable, with only 41% (emergency dental care), 19% (oral health assessment and review) and 4% (drug prescribing) of respondents reporting full compliance. Analysis revealed no significant relationship between practice characteristics and compliance with emergency dental care or drug prescribing recommendations. Positive associations were observed between compliance with oral health assessment and review recommendations and having a practice manager, as well as with the type of treatment offered, with fully private practices more likely, and fully National Health Service practices less likely to comply, when compared with those offering a mixture of treatment. Synthesis of the data identified leadership and context as key drivers of guidance uptake. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence-based dental recommendations are not routinely translated into practice, with variable leadership and differing practice contexts being central to poor uptake. Guidelines should aim to tailor recommendations and implementation strategies to reflect the complexities and varying contexts that exist in primary care dentistry, thus facilitating the implementation of evidence-based guidance.


Asunto(s)
Salud Bucal , Medicina Estatal , Odontología , Odontólogos , Humanos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
4.
BMJ Open ; 12(8): e061834, 2022 08 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35914912

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: To investigate factors that promote and prevent the use of compression therapy in people with venous leg ulcers. DESIGN: Qualitative interview study with nurses using the Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF). SETTING: Three National Health Service Trusts in England. PARTICIPANTS: Purposive sample of 15 nurses delivering wound care. RESULTS: Nurses described factors which made provision of compression therapy challenging. Organisational barriers (TDF domains environmental context and resources/knowledge, skills/behavioural regulation) included heavy/increasing caseloads; lack of knowledge/skills and the provision of training; and prescribing issues (variations in bandaging systems/whether nurses could prescribe). Absence of specialist leg ulcer services to refer patients into was perceived as a barrier to providing optimal care by some community-based nurses. Compression use was perceived to be facilitated by clinics for timely initial assessment; continuity of staff and good liaison between vascular/leg ulcer clinics and community teams; clear local policies and care pathways; and opportunities for training such as 'shadowing' in vascular/leg ulcer clinics. Patient engagement barriers (TDF domains goals/beliefs about consequences) focused on getting patients 'on board' with compression, and supporting them in using it. Clear explanations were seen as key in promoting compression use. CONCLUSIONS: Rising workload pressures present significant challenges to enhancing leg ulcer services. There may be opportunities to develop facilitated approaches to enable community nursing teams to make changes to practice, enhancing quality of patient care. The majority of venous leg ulcers could be managed in the community without referral to specialist community services if issues relating to workloads/skills/training are addressed. Barriers to promoting compression use could also be targeted, for example, through the development of clear patient information leaflets. While the patient engagement barriers may be easier/quicker to address than organisational barriers, unless organisational barriers are addressed it seems unlikely that all people who would benefit from compression therapy will receive it.


Asunto(s)
Úlcera de la Pierna , Úlcera Varicosa , Inglaterra , Humanos , Úlcera de la Pierna/terapia , Investigación Cualitativa , Medicina Estatal , Úlcera Varicosa/terapia
5.
Curr Opin Ophthalmol ; 33(5): 399-406, 2022 Sep 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35916569

RESUMEN

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: In this review, we consider the challenges of creating a trusted resource for real-world data in ophthalmology, based on our experience of establishing INSIGHT, the UK's Health Data Research Hub for Eye Health and Oculomics. RECENT FINDINGS: The INSIGHT Health Data Research Hub maximizes the benefits and impact of historical, patient-level UK National Health Service (NHS) electronic health record data, including images, through making it research-ready including curation and anonymisation. It is built around a shared 'north star' of enabling research for patient benefit. INSIGHT has worked to establish patient and public trust in the concept and delivery of INSIGHT, with efficient and robust governance processes that support safe and secure access to data for researchers. By linking to systemic data, there is an opportunity for discovery of novel ophthalmic biomarkers of systemic diseases ('oculomics'). Datasets that provide a representation of the whole population are an important tool to address the increasingly recognized threat of health data poverty. SUMMARY: Enabling efficient, safe access to routinely collected clinical data is a substantial undertaking, especially when this includes imaging modalities, but provides an exceptional resource for research. Research and innovation built on inclusive real-world data is an important tool in ensuring that discoveries and technologies of the future may not only favour selected groups, but also work for all patients.


Asunto(s)
Medicina Estatal , Confianza , Registros Electrónicos de Salud , Humanos , Reino Unido
6.
J Health Organ Manag ; ahead-of-print(ahead-of-print)2022 Aug 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35918282

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: Missed appointments within the National Health Service (NHS) are a drain on resources, associated with not only considerable time and cost implications, but also sub-optimal health outcomes. This literature review aims to explore non-attendance within the NHS in relation to causes, impacts and possible mitigation of negative effects of missed appointments. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: MEDLINE, CINAHL Plus and PubMed were searched with a date range of 2016-2021. Databases were searched for peer-reviewed articles published in English addressing non-attendance of adults within the NHS. Studies were excluded if they were theoretical papers, dissertations or research concerning patients aged under 18. A total of 21 articles met the inclusion criteria and were selected for analysis. FINDINGS: The results indicate a significant association of non-attendance and poor health outcomes. Patients from a lower socioeconomic status, adults aged over 85 and those with multiple co-morbidities are more likely to miss appointments. The most commonly reported patient-centred reasons for failing to attend were forgetfulness, transportation difficulties, and family commitments. Practice-specific reasons were cited as inefficiencies of the appointment booking system, failure of traditional reminders and inconvenient timings. Interventions included text reminder services, the inclusion of costs within reminders and enhanced patient involvement with the booking process. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: Non-attendance is complex, and to secure maximum attendance, targeted interventions are required by healthcare facilities to ensure patient needs are met. The adaption of scheduling systems and healthcare services can assist in reducing DNA rates.


Asunto(s)
Sistemas Recordatorios , Medicina Estatal , Adulto , Citas y Horarios , Instituciones de Salud , Humanos , Cooperación del Paciente , Participación del Paciente
7.
BMJ ; 378: o1934, 2022 08 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35918068
12.
Trials ; 23(1): 628, 2022 Aug 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35922823

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI) experience urine leakage with physical activity. Currently, the interventional treatments for SUI are surgical, or endoscopic bulking injection(s). However, these procedures are not always successful, and symptoms can persist or come back after treatment, categorised as recurrent SUI. There are longstanding symptoms and distress associated with a failed primary treatment, and currently, there is no consensus on how best to treat women with recurrent, or persistent, SUI. METHODS: A two-arm trial, set in at least 20 National Health Service (NHS) urology and urogynaecology referral units in the UK, randomising 250 adult women with recurrent or persistent SUI 1:1 to receive either an endoscopic intervention (endoscopic bulking injections) or a standard NHS surgical intervention, currently colposuspension, autologous fascial sling or artificial urinary sphincter. The aim of the trial is to determine whether surgical treatment is superior to endoscopic bulking injections in terms of symptom severity at 1 year after randomisation. This primary outcome will be measured using the patient-reported International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire - Urinary Incontinence - Short Form (ICIQ-UI-SF). Secondary outcomes include assessment of longer-term clinical impact, improvement of symptoms, safety, operative assessments, sexual function, cost-effectiveness and an evaluation of patients' and clinicians' views and experiences of the interventions. DISCUSSION: There is a lack of high-quality, randomised, scientific evidence for which treatment is best for women presenting with recurrent SUI. The PURSUIT study will benefit healthcare professionals and patients and provide robust evidence to guide further treatment and improve symptoms and quality of life for women with this condition. TRIAL REGISTRATION: International Standard Randomised Controlled Trials Number (ISRCTN) registry ISRCTN12201059. Registered on 09 January 2020.


Asunto(s)
Incontinencia Urinaria de Esfuerzo , Incontinencia Urinaria , Esfínter Urinario Artificial , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Calidad de Vida , Medicina Estatal , Resultado del Tratamiento , Incontinencia Urinaria/diagnóstico , Incontinencia Urinaria/cirugía , Incontinencia Urinaria de Esfuerzo/diagnóstico , Incontinencia Urinaria de Esfuerzo/cirugía
15.
Lancet ; 400(10350): 422, 2022 08 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35933999
16.
BMJ Open ; 12(8): e059115, 2022 Aug 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35926994

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: When novel devices are used 'in human' for the first time, their optimal use is uncertain because clinicians only have experience from preclinical studies. This study aimed to investigate factors that might optimise use of the Odon Device for assisted vaginal birth. DESIGN: We undertook qualitative case studies within the ASSIST Study, a feasibility study of the Odon Device. Each 'case' was defined as one use of the device and included at least one of the following: observation of the attempted assisted birth, and an interview with the obstetrician, midwife or woman. Data collection and thematic analysis ran iteratively and in parallel. SETTING: Tertiary referral National Health Service maternity unit in the Southwest of England. PARTICIPANTS: Women requiring a clinically indicated assisted vaginal birth. INTERVENTION: The Odon Device, an innovative device for assisted vaginal birth. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Determining the optimal device technique, device design and defining clinical parameters for use. RESULTS: Thirty-nine cases involving an attempted Odon-assisted birth were included in this study, of which 19 resulted in a successful birth with the device. Factors that improved use included optimisation of device technique, device design and clinical parameters for use. Technique adaptations included: applying the device during, rather than between, contractions; having a flexible approach to the application angle; and deflating the air cuff sooner than originally proposed. Three design modifications were proposed involving the deflation button and sleeve. Although use of the device was found to be appropriate in all fetal positions, it was considered contraindicated when the fetal station was at the ischial spines. CONCLUSIONS: Case study methodology facilitated the acquisition of rapid insights into device function in clinical practice, providing key insights regarding use, design and key clinical parameters for success. This methodology should be considered whenever innovative devices are introduced into clinical practice. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ISRCTN10203171.


Asunto(s)
Extracción Obstétrica , Partería , Estudios de Factibilidad , Femenino , Humanos , Parto , Embarazo , Medicina Estatal
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