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5.
Br J Nurs ; 29(5): S4, 2020 Mar 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32167822
8.
Br J Nurs ; 29(4): 257, 2020 Feb 27.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32105529

RESUMEN

Sam Foster, Chief Nurse, Oxford University Hospitals, considers how the complaints from patients and staff have changed over the years and how a decision-making tool has helped her consider the issues.


Asunto(s)
Personal de Enfermería en Hospital/psicología , Satisfacción del Paciente , Medicina Estatal/organización & administración , Técnicas de Apoyo para la Decisión , Inglaterra , Hospitales Universitarios , Humanos , Cultura Organizacional
10.
Br J Nurs ; 29(4): 187, 2020 Feb 27.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32105539
11.
Br J Nurs ; 29(3): 174-175, 2020 Feb 13.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32053432

RESUMEN

John Tingle, Lecturer in Law, Birmingham Law School, University of Birmingham, discusses a Healthwatch report showing that improvements need to take place in the way the NHS reports on patient complaints.


Asunto(s)
Satisfacción del Paciente , Medicina Estatal/organización & administración , Humanos , Cultura Organizacional , Seguridad del Paciente , Calidad de la Atención de Salud , Medicina Estatal/normas , Reino Unido
12.
Br J Nurs ; 29(3): 181, 2020 Feb 13.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32053445

RESUMEN

Sam Foster, Chief Nurse, Oxford University Hospitals, considers the Government's promise of funding for continuing professional development, and calls for transparecy and further guidance.


Asunto(s)
Educación Continua en Enfermería/economía , Financiación Gubernamental , Personal de Enfermería/educación , Desarrollo de Personal/economía , Inglaterra , Humanos , Personal de Enfermería/psicología , Personal de Enfermería/provisión & distribución , Medicina Estatal/organización & administración
15.
Br J Anaesth ; 124(3): 243-250, 2020 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31902590

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Preoperative anaemia affects one third of patients undergoing cardiac surgery and is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. Although it is recommended that perioperative teams should identify and treat patients with preoperative anaemia before surgery, introducing new treatment protocols can be challenging in surgical pathways. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of introducing a preoperative intravenous iron service as a national initiative in cardiac surgery. METHODS: We performed a multicentre, stepped, observational study using the UK Association of Cardiothoracic Anaesthesia and Critical Care Research Network. The primary feasibility outcome was the ability to set up an anaemia and intravenous iron clinic at each site. The primary efficacy outcome was change in haemoglobin (Hb) concentration between intervention and operation. Secondary outcomes included blood transfusion and hospital stay. Patients with anaemia were compared with non-anaemic patients and with those who received intravenous iron as part of their routine treatment protocol. RESULTS: Seven out of 11 NHS hospitals successfully set up iron clinics over 2 yr, and 228 patients were recruited into this study. Patients with anaemia who received intravenous iron were at higher surgical risk, were more likely to have a known previous history of iron deficiency or anaemia, had a higher rate of chronic kidney disease, and were slightly more anaemic than the non-treated group. Intravenous iron was administered a median (inter-quartile range, IQR [range]) of 33 (15-53 [4-303]) days before surgery. Preoperative intravenous iron increased [Hb] from baseline to pre-surgery; mean (95% confidence interval) change was +8.4 (5.0-11.8) g L-1 (P<0.001). Overall, anaemic compared with non-anaemic patients were more likely to be transfused (49% [59/136] vs 27% (22/92), P=0.001) and stayed longer in hospital (median days [IQR], 9 [7-15] vs 8 [6-11]; P=0.014). The number of days alive and at home was lower in the anaemic group (median days [IQR], 20 [14-22] vs 21 [17-23]; P=0.033). CONCLUSION: The development of an intravenous iron pathway is feasible but appears limited to selected high-risk cardiac patients in routine NHS practise. Although intravenous iron increased [Hb], there is a need for an appropriately powered clinical trial to assess the clinical effect of intravenous iron on patient-centred outcomes.


Asunto(s)
Anemia Ferropénica/tratamiento farmacológico , Procedimientos Quirúrgicos Cardíacos , Hierro/administración & dosificación , Cuidados Preoperatorios/métodos , Administración Intravenosa , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Anemia Ferropénica/sangre , Anemia Ferropénica/complicaciones , Transfusión Sanguínea/estadística & datos numéricos , Vías Clínicas/organización & administración , Estudios de Factibilidad , Femenino , Hemoglobinas/metabolismo , Humanos , Hierro/uso terapéutico , Tiempo de Internación/estadística & datos numéricos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Proyectos Piloto , Complicaciones Posoperatorias/prevención & control , Estudios Prospectivos , Medicina Estatal/organización & administración
18.
Br J Nurs ; 29(2): 122-123, 2020 Jan 23.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31972113

RESUMEN

John Tingle, Lecturer in Law, Birmingham Law School, University of Birmingham, looks back at some patient safety policy publications and crises in 2019 and asks whether the NHS will be any safer in 2020 and whether any lessons have been learnt.


Asunto(s)
Seguridad del Paciente , Medicina Estatal/organización & administración , Humanos , Reino Unido
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