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1.
Ann Lab Med ; 42(2): 258-267, 2022 Mar 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34635617

RESUMEN

Background: With increasing number of migrants in Korea, there is an increasing need for blood products with rare blood antigens. Accordingly, the role of blood donors among migrants has been acknowledged. We investigated migrants' experiences and perceptions of blood donation along with their sociodemographic status and identified the effects on self-reported blood donation status. Methods: A cross-sectional survey using a self-developed, structured questionnaire was conducted on 479 migrants. The questionnaire included items about experiences, knowledge, and perceptions on blood donation and sociodemographic factors of respondents. Results: Most migrants in this study were from Southeast Asia (54.7%) or China (39.9%). Among them, 28.6% (N=137) had donated blood previously, and 2.7% (N=13) had previously donated blood in Korea. All previous blood donors were volunteers, and the two major deterrents of blood donation for non-donors were the fear of pain and lack of knowledge about blood donation. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, the country of birth (odds ratio [OR]=2.65, P<0.001 [China]; OR=4.85, P=0.001 [countries other than China and Southeast Asian countries]) and employment status (OR=2.80, P=0.034) were independently associated with blood donation. Conclusions: This is the first Korean study to analyze migrants' experiences and perceptions of blood donation in relation to their sociodemographic status. Our findings can help establish blood donation policies for migrants, devise campaigns to enhance blood donation awareness, and ultimately create a pool of rare blood resources in a multicultural society.


Asunto(s)
Donantes de Sangre , Migrantes , Estudios Transversales , Humanos , Percepción , República de Corea
2.
BMJ Glob Health ; 6(9)2021 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34593512

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: In 2019, there are more than 290 million people who have ever migrated from rural to urban areas in China. These rural-to-urban internal migrants account for more than one-fifth of China's population and is the largest internal migrant group globally. We present the first systematic review that examines whether internal migrants are more likely to exhibit non-communicable diseases (NCDs) risk factors and have worse NCD management outcomes than non-migrant counterparts in China. METHODS: A systematic review was conducted via medical, public health, and economic databases including Scopus, MEDLINE, JSTOR, WHO Library Database and World Bank e-Library from 2000 to 2020. Study quality was assessed using the National Institute of Health Quality Assessment tool. We conducted a narrative review and synthesised differences for all studies included, stratified by different types of outcomes. We also conducted random-effects meta-analysis where we had a minimum of two studies with 95% CIs reported. The study protocol has been registered with PROSPERO: CRD42019139407. RESULTS: For most NCD risk factors and care cascade management, comparisons between internal migrants and other populations were either statistically insignificant or inconclusive. While most studies found migrants have a higher prevalence of tobacco use than urban residents, these differences were not statistically significant in the meta-analysis. Although three out four studies suggested that migrants may have worse access to NCD treatment and both studies suggested migrants have lower blood pressure control rates than non-migrants, these findings were not statistically significant. CONCLUSION: Findings from this systematic review demonstrate that there is currently insufficient evidence on migrant and non-migrant differences in NCD risk factors and management in China. Further research is expected to investigate access to healthcare among internal and its effect on both their NCD outcomes and long-term healthcare costs in China.


Asunto(s)
Enfermedades no Transmisibles , Migrantes , China/epidemiología , Humanos , Enfermedades no Transmisibles/epidemiología , Enfermedades no Transmisibles/terapia , Factores de Riesgo , Población Rural
3.
Br J Nurs ; 30(18): S30-S38, 2021 Oct 14.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34645335

RESUMEN

Enhancing and enriching the health and wellbeing of migrant individuals with intellectual disability is essential in our diverse society. The needs of this population can be substantial, but unfortunately migrant individuals with intellectual disability face many challenges, from accessing health services, cultural complexities, financial difficulties, and language barriers, to lack of knowledge on the availability of particular services. Although a common condition, urinary incontinence remains a taboo subject and many individuals do not seek intervention even though it impacts on all aspects of their life. The migrant individual who has an intellectual disability may be unable to understand information that is provided, unable to gain knowledge, access educational material to promote continence and manage incontinence. This article considers what is known on the subject of urinary incontinence for an individual with intellectual disability from the migrant community in Ireland.


Asunto(s)
Discapacidad Intelectual , Migrantes , Incontinencia Urinaria , Humanos , Discapacidad Intelectual/epidemiología , Irlanda
4.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 21(1): 1053, 2021 Oct 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34610829

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Many internal migrants during the urbanization process in China are Migrant Parents, the aging group who move to urban areas to support their family involuntarily. They are more vulnerable economically and physically than the younger migrants. However, the fragmentation of rural and urban health insurance schemes divided by "hukou" household registration system limit migrant's access to healthcare services in their resident location. Some counties have started to consolidate the Urban Resident Basic Medical Insurance (URBMI) and the New Rural Cooperative Medical Scheme (NRCMS) as one Integrated Medical Insurance Schemes (IMIS) from 2008. The consolidation aimed to reduce the disparity between different schemes and increase the health care utilization of migrants. RESULTS: Using the inpatient sample of migrant parents from China Migrants Dynamic Survey in 2015, we used Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) for regression models. We found that the migrant parents covered by the IMIS are more likely to choose inpatient services and seek medical treatment in the migrant destination. We further subdivide Non-IMISs into NCMSs and URBMIs in the regression to alleviate the doubt about endogenous. The results revealed that the migrant parents in IMIS use more local medical services than both of them in URBMI and NCMS. CONCLUSIONS: The potential mechanisms of our results could be that IMIS alleviates the difficulty of seeking medical care in migrant destinations by improving the convenience of medical expense reimbursement and enhancing health insurance benefits.


Asunto(s)
Migrantes , China , Humanos , Seguro de Salud , Padres , Aceptación de la Atención de Salud
5.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 1668, 2021 09 14.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34521360

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The actual human cost of the pandemic cannot be viewed through the COVID-19 mortality rates alone, especially when the pandemic is widening the existing health disparities among different subpopulations within the same society. In Kuwait, migrant workers were already disproportionately impacted by COVID-19 and its unintended consequences. The totality of that effect on mortality is yet to be fully understood. OBJECTIVE: To estimate excess deaths in the pandemic year of 2020 among the Kuwaiti and non-Kuwaiti migrant populations. METHODS: We analyzed publicly available retrospective data in Kuwait on total annual mortality historically (from 2005 to 2019) and in 2020. We fitted a quasi-poisson generalized linear model adjusted for yearly trend and nationality to estimate the expected deaths in 2020 in the absence of the pandemic. We calculated excess deaths as the difference between observed and expected mortality for the year of the pandemic in both Kuwaitis and non-Kuwaitis. RESULTS: In the absence of the pandemic, we expected the total mortality in Kuwait to be 6629 (95% CI: 6472 to 6789) deaths. However, the observed total mortality in 2020 was 9975 deaths; about 3346 (3186 to 3503) more deaths above the expected historical trend. Deaths among migrant workers would have been approximately 71.9% (67.8 to 76.0) lower in the absence of the pandemic. On the other hand, deaths among Kuwaitis would have been 32.4% (29.3 to 35.6) lower if the country had not been hit by the pandemic. CONCLUSION: The burden of mortality brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic is substantially higher than what the official tally might suggest. Systematically disadvantaged migrant workers shouldered a larger burden of deaths in the pandemic year. Public health interventions must consider structural and societal determinants that give rise to the health disparities seen among migrant workers.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Migrantes , Humanos , Kuwait/epidemiología , Pandemias , Estudios Retrospectivos , SARS-CoV-2
6.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 1606, 2021 08 31.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34465333

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Migrants face structural, socio-political barriers in their resettlement processes that negatively affect their health. Migration also adversely impacts resources such as social capital and health literacy that are of importance for health and integration into society. Hence, there is a need for health promotion in the early post-migration phase. In Sweden, newly settled refugee migrants who have received a residence permit are offered an Introduction programme including a civic orientation course. The program is intended to facilitate access to the labour market and promote integration. The aim of the study was to explore participants' perceptions and experiences of a civic orientation course with added health communication. METHODS: We performed six focus group discussions: two in Arabic, two in Farsi and two in Somali. The discussions were facilitated by native speaking moderators. Participants were 32 men and women recruited from civic orientation classes in the county of Stockholm. We used an interview guide with semi-structured questions. The data were analysed using a method for content analysis for focus group discussions. RESULTS: Three main categories were identified: (1) 'The course gives valuable information but needs adjustments', which includes that the civic and health orientation is needed earlier, during the asylum phase, and that planning and course content need adjustments. (2) 'The health communication inspired participants to focus on their health', which includes that the health communication was useful and inspired uptake of healthier habits. (3) 'Participation in the course promoted independence and self-confidence', which includes that the course gave insights into society and values in Sweden, and promoted independence and new social contacts. CONCLUSION: This study adds knowledge about the users' perspectives on the potential of civic orientation to promote the health and integration of newly settled migrants, describing ways in which civic orientation with added health communication promoted health and empowerment. However, the content and delivery of the course need adjustment to better fit the migrants' life situations and varying pre-existing knowledge.


Asunto(s)
Refugiados , Migrantes , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Percepción , Investigación Cualitativa , Suecia
7.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 1618, 2021 09 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34482819

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: In national public health surveys including those assessing sexual and reproductive health, migrants generally tend to be underrepresented due to cultural, linguistic, structural and legal barriers, minimising the possibility to measure sexual rights' fulfilment in this group. This study aims to describe to what extent sexual rights of young migrants in Sweden are being fulfilled. METHODS: A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data from 1773 young (16-29 years) migrants by post, online, and at language schools and other venues. Sexual rights were operationalised and categorised into five domains adapted from the Guttmacher-Lancet Commission's definition. These domains included the right to: 1) access sexual and reproductive healthcare, 2) access information and education about sexuality and sexual and reproductive health and rights, 3) have bodily integrity, 4) make free informed decisions about sexuality and sexual relations and 5) have a satisfying and safe sexual life. Descriptive analysis was used to assess the extent of fulfilment for each right. RESULTS: There were wide variations in the fulfilment of sexual rights between subgroups and among the five domains. Most respondents rated their sexual health as good/fair, however, 6.3% rated their sexual health as bad/very bad. While most of those who visited related services were satisfied, 17.4% of respondents refrained from visiting the services despite their needs. Around four in ten respondents did not know where to get information about sexuality and sexual health. One-fourth of respondents reported sexual violence. Another 12.7% were limited by family members or fellow countrymen regarding with whom they can have an intimate relationship. Most respondents were satisfied with their sexual life, except for 11.9%. Men, non-binary respondents, lesbians, gays, bisexuals, asexuals, those who were awaiting a decision regarding residence permit and those born in South Asia reported poor sexual health to a greater extent and fulfilment of their sexual rights to a lesser extent than other groups. CONCLUSIONS: Timely and culturally adapted information about sexual rights, gender equalities, laws and available services in Sweden should be provided in appropriate languages and formats in order to raise awareness about sexual rights and improve access to available services. Tailored attention should be paid to specific vulnerable subgroups.


Asunto(s)
Salud Sexual , Migrantes , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Accesibilidad a los Servicios de Salud , Humanos , Masculino , Salud Reproductiva , Suecia
8.
Artículo en Chino | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34488265

RESUMEN

Objective: To analyze the application of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Screening Questionnaire and pulmonary function test in dust-exposed migrant workers. Methods: In May 2019, 149 cases of dust exposed migrant workers were selected as the research subjects through the free clinic in the countryside. COPD Screening Questionnaire and lung function test were carried out to analyze the high-risk groups and the influencing factors of positive pulmonary function test results. Results: Among 149 cases of dust-exposed migrant workers, 107 (71.8%) were positive for questionnaire screening, 73 (49.0%) were positive for pulmonary function test, 75 (50.3%) were diagnosed with coal worker's pneumoconiosis, and 101 (67.8%) were diagnosed with lung function injury. The positive rate of pulmonary function of migrant workers with positive questionnaire screening results was significantly higher than that of those with negative results (P<0.05) . The results of multivariate analysis showed that compared with non-pneumoconiosis, the risk of positive pulmonary function test results was higher in dust-exposed migrant workers with stage Ⅲ pneumoconiosis (OR=16.462, 95%CI: 3.390-79.946; P<0.01) . Compared with non-smoking, the risks of positive pulmonary function test results of dust-exposed migrant workers with smoking index of 11-20 package years and >20 package years were higher (OR=19.814, 95%CI: 3.854-101.883; OR=9.733, 95%CI: 2.310-41.008; P<0.01) . Conclusion: The risk of COPD in dust-exposed migrant workers is high, so we should strengthen the early examination of the high pneumoconiosis stage and smoking population. The screening questionnaire can better screen out the high-risk groups of COPD, and it can be used as a basic screening tool.


Asunto(s)
Minas de Carbón , Exposición Profesional , Neumoconiosis , Enfermedad Pulmonar Obstructiva Crónica , Migrantes , Polvo , Humanos , Neumoconiosis/diagnóstico , Neumoconiosis/epidemiología , Enfermedad Pulmonar Obstructiva Crónica/diagnóstico , Enfermedad Pulmonar Obstructiva Crónica/epidemiología , Pruebas de Función Respiratoria , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
10.
BMC Cancer ; 21(1): 1018, 2021 Sep 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34511112

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: An effective cross-cultural doctor-patient communication is vital for health literacy and patient compliance. Building a good relationship with medical staff is also relevant for the treatment decision-making process for cancer patients. Studies about the role of a specific migrant background regarding patient preferences and expectations are lacking. We therefore conducted a multicentre prospective survey to explore the needs and preferences of patients with a migrant background (PMB) suffering from gynecological malignancies and breast cancer to evaluate the quality of doctor-patient communication and cancer management compared to non-migrants (NM). METHODS: This multicentre survey recruited patients with primary or recurrence of breast, ovarian, peritoneal, or fallopian tube cancer. The patients either filled out a paper form, participated via an online survey, or were interviewed by trained staff. A 58-item questionnaire was primarily developed in German and then translated into three different languages to reach non-German-speaking patients. RESULTS: A total of 606 patients were included in the study: 54.1% (328) were interviewed directly, 9.1% (55) participated via an online survey, and 36.8% (223) used the paper print version. More than one quarter, 27.4% (166) of the participants, had a migrant background. The majority of migrants and NM were highly satisfied with the communication with their doctors. First-generation migrants (FGM) and patients with breast cancer were less often informed about participation in clinical trials (p < 0.05) and 24.5% of them suggested the help of an interpreter to improve the medical consultation. Second and third-generation migrants (SGM and TGM) experienced more fatigue and nausea than expected. CONCLUSIONS: Our results allow the hypothesis that training medical staff in intercultural competence and using disease-related patient information in different languages can improve best supportive care management and quality of life in cancer patients with migrant status.


Asunto(s)
Neoplasias de la Mama/etnología , Neoplasias de los Genitales Femeninos/etnología , Motivación , Evaluación de Necesidades , Prioridad del Paciente/etnología , Relaciones Médico-Paciente , Migrantes , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Neoplasias de la Mama/psicología , Comunicación , Asistencia Sanitaria Culturalmente Competente/etnología , Femenino , Neoplasias de los Genitales Femeninos/psicología , Alemania , Alfabetización en Salud , Humanos , Persona de Mediana Edad , Recurrencia Local de Neoplasia/etnología , Cooperación del Paciente , Prioridad del Paciente/estadística & datos numéricos , Satisfacción del Paciente/etnología , Satisfacción del Paciente/estadística & datos numéricos , Estudios Prospectivos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Migrantes/estadística & datos numéricos , Traducciones , Adulto Joven
11.
J Fam Psychol ; 35(6): 822-832, 2021 Sep.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34472931

RESUMEN

This 1-year longitudinal study examined the relations between maternal encouragement of sociability and social, school, and psychological adjustment in nonmigrant (n = 355, Mage = 9.90 years) and migrant children (n = 248, Mage = 9.95 years) in urban China. Data were obtained from multiple sources, including mothers' reports, peer nominations, teacher ratings, and child self-reports. The results showed that maternal encouragement of sociability negatively contributed to later loneliness in nonmigrant children, but not in migrant children. Moreover, among nonmigrant children, maternal encouragement of sociability was negatively associated with later behavioral problems for those who had higher initial behavioral problems, and positively associated with later perceived self-worth for those with higher initial self-worth. Among migrant children, the maternal encouragement of sociability was positively associated with later peer victimization and learning problems for those who had higher initial problems. The results indicate that maternal encouragement of sociability may function differently in the nonmigrant and migrant family contexts in China. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Asunto(s)
Migrantes , Niño , China , Humanos , Estudios Longitudinales , Instituciones Académicas , Ajuste Social
12.
Washington, D.C.; OPS; 2021-09-24. (OPS/ONUSIDA/CDE/COVID-19/21-0013).
en Español | PAHO-IRIS | ID: phr-54912

RESUMEN

El flujo de personas refugiadas y migrantes desde la República Bolivariana de Venezuela constituye el mayor movimiento de personas de la historia de América Latina y la segunda más numerosa a nivel mundial. Hasta el 2020, más de 5 millones de personas habían abandonado el país en busca de mejores condiciones de vida y de acceso a servicios básicos, entre ellos, la atención de salud. Esta publicación ha sido elaborada por ONUSIDA y la OPS en el marco del proceso de coordinación regional, técnica y financiera para el apoyo a personas refugiadas y migrantes de la República Bolivariana de Venezuela. Presenta orientaciones prácticas para incrementar la cobertura de salud a las personas refugiadas y migrantes del país, considerando el actual contexto de la COVID-19. Se estructura en cinco líneas de acción estratégicas dirigidas a ampliar las políticas de prevención, atención y tratamiento del VIH. Esta propuesta se dirige a los responsables de la formulación de políticas de los ministerios de salud de la Región y a funcionarios de los sistemas de salud, así como a otras instituciones que aborden cuestiones relacionadas con las poblaciones refugiadas y migrantes a nivel regional, nacional y subnacional, en especial a las que desarrollan actividades en las zonas fronterizas y en las comunidades de destino. Las recomendaciones se han adaptado al contexto de la pandemia de COVID-19, que ha sumado nuevos desafíos a las respuestas en salud, y en especial al VIH/sida en la Región de las Américas.


Asunto(s)
Refugiados , Migrantes , VIH , COVID-19 , Venezuela
13.
Washington, D.C.; PAHO; 2021-09-24. (PAHO/UNAIDS/CDE/COVID-19/21-0013).
en Inglés | PAHO-IRIS | ID: phr-54911

RESUMEN

The flow of refugees and migrants from the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela is the largest movement of people in the history of Latin America and the second largest in the world. By 2020, more than 5 million people had left the country in search of better living conditions and access to basic services, including health care. This publication was prepared by PAHO and UNAIDS as part of the regional process of coordinating technical and financial support for refugees and migrants in the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela. It presents practical guidelines for expanding health care coverage for Venezuelan refugees and migrants, taking into consideration the current context of COVID-19. It is structured along five strategic lines of action aimed at expanding HIV prevention, care, and treatment policies. This proposal is aimed at policymakers in the Region’s ministries of health, health system officials, and other institutions that deal with issues related to refugee and migrant populations at regional, national, and subnational levels, especially those active in border areas and destination communities. The recommendations have been adapted to the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, which has created new challenges in relation to health responses, especially the response to HIV/AIDS in the Region of the Americas.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , VIH , Refugiados , Migrantes , Emigración e Inmigración , Venezuela
14.
Infect Dis Poverty ; 10(1): 117, 2021 Sep 15.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34526137

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Chagas disease is a parasitic disease endemic to Latin America, but it has become a disease of global concern due to migration flows. Asymptomatic carriers may host the parasite for years, without knowing they are infected. The aim of this study is to assess prevalence of Chagas disease and evaluate the participants' level of knowledge between Latin American migrants attending a community-based screening campaign. METHODS: Three community-based campaigns were performed in Alicante (Spain) in 2016, 2017 and 2018, including educational chats and blood tests for Trypanosoma cruzi serology. Participants completed a questionnaire assessing knowledge about the mechanisms of transmission, disease presentation, diagnosis, and treatment. People seropositive for T. cruzi underwent diagnostic confirmation by two different tests. Results were analyzed by multivariable logistic regression and expressed as adjusted odds ratios (aORs), adjusting for age, sex, and time in Spain. RESULTS: A total of 596 participants were included in the study; 17% were aged under 18 years. Prevalence in adults was 11% [54/496; 95% confidence interval (CI): 8.3-14.5%] versus 0% among children. All but one case were in Bolivians. Diagnosis was independently associated with having been born in Bolivia (aOR: 102, 95% CI: 13-781) and a primary school-level education (aOR: 2.40, 95% CI: 1.14-5.06). Of 54 people diagnosed with Chagas disease (most of whom were asymptomatic), 42 (77.7%) returned to the clinic at least once, and 24 (44.4%) received treatment. Multivariable analysis showed that coming from Argentina (aOR: 13, 95% CI: 1.61-1188) or Bolivia (aOR: 1.90, 95% CI: 1.19-3.39) and having received information about Chagas disease in Spain (aOR: 4.63, 95% CI: 2.54-8.97) were associated with a good level of knowledge on the disease. Having primary level studies (aOR: 0.59, 95% CI: 0.34-0.98) and coming from Ecuador (aOR: 4.63, 95% CI: 2.52-847) were independently associated with a lower level of knowledge. CONCLUSIONS: Community-based interventions are a good strategy for diagnosing neglected diseases such as Chagas disease in non-endemic countries and for identifying and treating infected, asymptomatic individuals.


Asunto(s)
Enfermedad de Chagas/diagnóstico , Migrantes/estadística & datos numéricos , Trypanosoma cruzi/aislamiento & purificación , Adulto , Enfermedad de Chagas/epidemiología , Servicios de Salud Comunitaria , Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad , Estudios Transversales , Diagnóstico Precoz , Humanos , América Latina/etnología , Tamizaje Masivo , Persona de Mediana Edad , Enfermedades Desatendidas/epidemiología , Prevalencia , España/epidemiología
16.
BMC Womens Health ; 21(1): 344, 2021 09 28.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34583678

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Utilization of basic public health services (BPHS) allows for disease prevention and management and is an essential component for protecting health. Disparities in utilization exist between rural-to-urban migrants and their local counterparts in China. This study sought to determine the frequency of BPHS utilization and whether social support, discrimination, and sociodemographic features were risk factors for low BPHS utilization by Chinese female migrants. METHODS: Data were derived from a survey of female rural-to-urban migrants at nine work sites in Changsha, China. The association between social support, discrimination, sociodemographic factors and BPHS utilization was obtained using Chi-square and logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Between December 2017 and April 2018, 307 female participants completed the survey. A total of 24.7% reported having had health education, 26.1% had breast and cervical cancer screening, 27.2% had established a health care record, and 40.9% had received basic contraceptive services. Two factors were associated with the reduced likelihood of BPHS utilization: Length of migration and health record establishment (OR = 0.53; 95% CI = 0.31, 0.92) and years of education and basic contraceptive service use (OR = 0.36; 95% CI = 0.20, 0.67). The remaining six factors were associated with an increased likelihood of BPHS utilization: Living circumstances and health record establishment (OR = 2.11; 95% CI = 1.17, 3.80), health education (OR = 2.71; 95% CI = 1.51, 4.87) and cancer screening (OR = 2.38; 95% CI = 1.30, 4.36). Utilization of social support was associated with health record establishment (OR = 1.24; 95% CI = 1.06, 1.44), basic contraceptive service use (OR = 1.21; 95% CI = 1.04, 1.42) and cancer screening (OR = 1.29; 95% CI = 1.10, 1.51). Objective social support was associated with health education utilization (OR = 1.15; 95% CI = 1.04, 1.26), while subjective social support was associated with basic contraceptive service use (OR = 1.11; 95% CI = 1.05, 1.18) and cancer screening (OR = 1.10; 95% CI = 1.02, 1.17). Family location was associated with basic contraceptive service use (OR = 1.96; 95% CI = 1.12, 3.44) and migration time in Changsha was associated with basic contraceptive service use (OR = 2.24; 95% CI = 1.18, 4.27). CONCLUSIONS: Overall, there was low utilization rate for four BPHS by Chinese female migrants, and social support appears to be an important factor in this setting. Government, community, and workplace education efforts for enhancing BPHS utilization among female rural-to-urban migrants are recommended.


Asunto(s)
Migrantes , Neoplasias del Cuello Uterino , China/epidemiología , Estudios Transversales , Detección Precoz del Cáncer , Utilización de Instalaciones y Servicios , Femenino , Humanos , Salud Pública , Población Rural , Apoyo Social
17.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34501496

RESUMEN

International mobility has increased steadily in recent times, bringing along a myriad of health, social and health system challenges to migrants themselves and the host nations. Mental health issues have been identified as a significant problem among migrants, with poor accessibility and underutilisation of the available mental health services (MHSs) repeatedly reported, including in Australia. Using a qualitative inquiry and one-on-one in-depth interviews, this study explored perspectives of African migrants and service providers on barriers to accessing MHSs among African migrants in South Australia. The data collection took place during the COVID-19 pandemic with lockdown and other measures to combat the pandemic restricting face to face meetings with potential participants. Online platforms including Zoom and/or WhatsApp video calls were used to interview 20 African migrants and 10 service providers. Participants were recruited from community groups and/or associations, and organisations providing services for migrants and/or refugees in South Australia using the snowball sampling technique. Thematic framework analysis was used to guide the data analysis. Key themes centred on personal factors (health literacy including knowledge and the understanding of the health system, and poor financial condition), structural factors related to difficulties in navigating the complexity of the health system and a lack of culturally aware service provision, sociocultural and religious factors, mental health stigma and discrimination. The findings provide an insight into the experiences of African migrants of service provision to them and offer suggestions on how to improve these migrants' mental health outcomes in Australia. Overcoming barriers to accessing mental health services would need a wide range of strategies including education on mental health, recognising variations in cultures for effective service provision, and addressing mental health stigma and discrimination which strongly deter service access by these migrants. These strategies will facilitate help-seeking behaviours as well as effective provision of culturally safe MHSs and improvement in access to MHSs among African migrants.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Servicios de Salud Mental , Refugiados , Migrantes , Control de Enfermedades Transmisibles , Accesibilidad a los Servicios de Salud , Humanos , Pandemias , Investigación Cualitativa , SARS-CoV-2 , Australia del Sur
18.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34501520

RESUMEN

Health risk communication plays a crucial role in preventing the spread of infectious disease outbreaks such as the current coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2). Yet, migrants are far too often forgotten in health risk communication responses. We investigate the challenges and efforts made by migrants in Denmark-in the initial months of the pandemic-to access information about COVID-19. We draw on 18 semi-structured interviews conducted in May and June 2020. All interviews are thematically coded and analyzed. Our analysis reveals that many of the migrants faced several challenges, including accessing information in a language understandable to them and navigating constant streams of official news flows issuing instructions about which actions to take. However, we also note that the participating migrants found numerous creative ways to address some of these challenges, often aided by digital tools, helping them access crucial health and risk information. This paper highlights that migrants constitute an underserved group in times of crises. They are vulnerable to getting left behind in pandemic communication responses. However, we also identify key protective factors, social resources, and agentic capabilities, which help them cope with health and risk information deficits. National governments need to take heed of these findings to inform future pandemic responses.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Migrantes , Dinamarca/epidemiología , Brotes de Enfermedades , Humanos , Pandemias , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Glob Health Action ; 14(1): 1962039, 2021 01 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34404337

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Evidence suggests that migration increases vulnerability to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other sexually transmitted infections (STI). However, there is limited knowledge about what has been done or needs to be done to address migrants' vulnerability in receiving countries. OBJECTIVES: A scoping review was carried out to map the existing literature in this field, describe its characteristics, identify gaps in knowledge and determine whether a Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR)-perspective was applied. METHODS: We used the Arksey and O'Malley framework and the Joanna Briggs Institute guidelines for scoping reviews and subsequent enhancements proposed by other authors. We searched three databases and grey literature to identify relevant publications. RESULTS: A total of 1,147 records were found across the three electronic databases and compiled. Of these, only 29 papers that met the inclusion criteria were included. The review shows that research in this field is dominated by studies from the USA that mostly include behavioural interventions for HIV and HBV prevention among migrants from Latin America and Asian countries, respectively. None of the interventions integrated an SRHR perspective. The intervention effects varied across studies and measured outcomes. The observed effects on knowledge, attitudes, perceptions, behavioural intentions and skills were largely positive, but reported effects on testing and sexual risk behaviours were inconsistent. CONCLUSIONS: There is a need for good quality research, particularly in parts of the world other than the USA that will address all STIs and specifically target the most vulnerable subgroups of migrants. Further research requires greater scope and depth, including the need to apply an SRHR perspective and incorporate biomedical and structural interventions to address the interacting causes of migrants' vulnerability to HIV/STIs.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por VIH , Enfermedades de Transmisión Sexual , Migrantes , Infecciones por VIH/prevención & control , Humanos , Salud Reproductiva , Conducta Sexual , Enfermedades de Transmisión Sexual/prevención & control
20.
Rev Saude Publica ; 55: 49, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34406277

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: To explore the experiences of irregular (undocumented) Venezuelan migrants in accessing prenatal health services in Colombia and to examine the economic, social, and cultural resources mobilized by them to gain access to care. METHODS: Data was retrieved from the qualitative component of a multi-method research conducted with pregnant immigrants in Barranquilla, Colombia, between 2018 and 2019, and triangulated with a review of regulations established by the Ministry of Health and Social Protection. RESULTS: Having limited economic capital, participants use social capital from personal networks and migrant organizations. They obtain cultural health capital in the form of information on the health system and use their cultural competencies to interact with this system. CONCLUSIONS FOR PRACTICE: Migrants exert their agency through the use of capitals, although with certain constraints. Policies aimed at this social group should consider the strengths of migrants.


Asunto(s)
Atención Prenatal , Migrantes , Brasil , Colombia , Atención a la Salud , Femenino , Accesibilidad a los Servicios de Salud , Humanos , Embarazo , Investigación Cualitativa
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