Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 7.161
Filtrar
1.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(22): e26258, 2021 Jun 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34087916

RESUMEN

ABSTRACT: We aimed to study the epidemiological changes in geriatric trauma in Al-Ain City, United Arab Emirates, in the past decade to give recommendations on injury prevention.Trauma patients aged 65 years and above who were hospitalized at Al-Ain Hospital for more than 24 hours or died in the hospital after their arrival regardless of the length of stay were studied. Data were extracted from the Al-Ain Hospital trauma registry. Two periods were compared; March 2003 to March 2006 and January 2014 to December 2017. Studied variables which were compared included demography, mechanism of injury and its location, and clinical outcome.There were 66 patients in the first period and 200 patients in the second period. The estimated annual incidence of hospitalized geriatric trauma patients in Al-Ain City was 8.5 per 1000 geriatric inhabitants in the first period compared with 7.8 per 1000 geriatric inhabitants in the second period. Furthermore, mortality was reduced from 7.6% to 2% (P = 0.04). There was a significant increase in falls on the same level by14.9% (62.1%-77%, P = 0.02, Pearson χ2 test). This was associated with a significant increase of injuries occurring at home (55.4%-78.7% P = 0.0003, Fisher Exact test). There was also a strong trend in the reduction of road traffic collision injuries which was reduced by 10.8% (27.3%-16.5%, P = 0.07, Fisher Exact test).Although the incidence and severity of geriatric trauma did not change over the last decade, in-hospital mortality has significantly decreased over time. There was a significant increase in injuries occurring at homes and in falls on the same level. The home environment should be targeted in injury prevention programs so as to reduce geriatric injuries.


Asunto(s)
Accidentes por Caídas/prevención & control , Servicios de Salud para Ancianos/estadística & datos numéricos , Heridas y Lesiones/epidemiología , Heridas y Lesiones/prevención & control , Accidentes por Caídas/mortalidad , Accidentes por Caídas/estadística & datos numéricos , Accidentes de Tránsito/estadística & datos numéricos , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Femenino , Escala de Coma de Glasgow/normas , Escala de Coma de Glasgow/estadística & datos numéricos , Servicios de Salud para Ancianos/tendencias , Mortalidad Hospitalaria/tendencias , Hospitalización/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Incidencia , Puntaje de Gravedad del Traumatismo , Masculino , Estudios Prospectivos , Sistema de Registros , Emiratos Árabes Unidos/epidemiología , Heridas y Lesiones/mortalidad
2.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(5): e2110314, 2021 05 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33999162

RESUMEN

Importance: After the emergence of COVID-19, studies reported a decrease in hospitalizations of patients with ischemic stroke (IS), but there are little to no data regarding hospitalizations for the remainder of 2020, including outcome data from a large cohort of patients with IS and comorbid COVID-19. Objective: To assess hospital discharge rates, demographic factors, and outcomes of hospitalization associated with the COVID-19 pandemic among US patients with IS before vs during the COVID-19 pandemic. Design, Setting, and Participants: This retrospective cohort study used data from the Vizient Clinical Data Base on 324 013 patients with IS at 478 nonfederal hospitals in 43 US states between January 1, 2019, and December 31, 2020. Patients were eligible if they were admitted to the hospital on a nonelective basis and were not receiving hospice care at the time of admission. A total of 41 166 discharged between January and March 2020 were excluded from the analysis because they had unreliable data on COVID-19 status, leaving 282 847 patients for the study. Exposure: Ischemic stroke and laboratory-confirmed COVID-19. Main Outcomes and Measures: Monthly counts of discharges among patients with IS in 2020. Demographic characteristics and outcomes, including in-hospital death, among patients with IS who were discharged in 2019 (control group) were compared with those of patients with IS with or without comorbid COVID-19 (COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 groups, respectively) who were discharged between April and December 2020. Results: Of the 282 847 patients included in the study, 165 912 (50.7% male; 63.4% White; 26.3% aged ≥80 years) were allocated to the control group; 111 418 of 116 935 patients (95.3%; 51.9% male; 62.8% White; 24.6% aged ≥80 years) were allocated to the non-COVID-19 group and 5517 of 116 935 patients (4.7%; 58.0% male; 42.5% White; 21.3% aged ≥80 years) to the COVID-19 group. A mean (SD) of 13 846 (553) discharges per month among patients with IS was reported in 2019. Discharges began decreasing in February 2020, reaching a low of 10 846 patients in April 2020 before returning to a prepandemic level of 13 639 patients by July 2020. A mean (SD) of 13 492 (554) discharges per month was recorded for the remainder of 2020. Black and Hispanic patients accounted for 21.4% and 7.0% of IS discharges in 2019, respectively, but accounted for 27.5% and 16.0% of those discharged with IS and comorbid COVID-19 in 2020. Compared with patients in the control and non-COVID-19 groups, those in the COVID-19 group were less likely to smoke (16.0% vs 17.2% vs 6.4%, respectively) and to have hypertension (73.0% vs 73.1% vs 68.2%) or dyslipidemia (61.2% vs 63.2% vs 56.6%) but were more likely to have diabetes (39.8% vs 40.5% vs 53.0%), obesity (16.2% vs 18.4% vs 24.5%), acute coronary syndrome (8.0% vs 9.2% vs 15.8%), or pulmonary embolus (1.9% vs 2.4% vs 6.8%) and to require intubation (11.3% vs 12.3% vs 37.6%). After adjusting for baseline factors, patients with IS and COVID-19 were more likely to die in the hospital than were patients with IS in 2019 (adjusted odds ratio, 5.17; 95% CI, 4.83-5.53; National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale adjusted odds ratio, 3.57; 95% CI, 3.15-4.05). Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort study, after the emergence of COVID-19, hospital discharges of patients with IS decreased in the US but returned to prepandemic levels by July 2020. Among patients with IS between April and December 2020, comorbid COVID-19 was relatively common, particularly among Black and Hispanic populations, and morbidity was high.


Asunto(s)
/complicaciones , Hospitalización/estadística & datos numéricos , Evaluación de Resultado en la Atención de Salud/normas , Pacientes/clasificación , Adolescente , Adulto , Factores de Edad , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Estudios de Cohortes , Grupos de Población Continentales/etnología , Grupos de Población Continentales/estadística & datos numéricos , Femenino , Mortalidad Hospitalaria/tendencias , Hospitalización/tendencias , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Evaluación de Resultado en la Atención de Salud/métodos , Evaluación de Resultado en la Atención de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Pandemias/prevención & control , Pandemias/estadística & datos numéricos , Pacientes/estadística & datos numéricos , Estudios Retrospectivos , Factores de Riesgo , Estados Unidos/epidemiología
4.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(5): e218828, 2021 05 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33938933

RESUMEN

Importance: In-hospital mortality rates from COVID-19 are high but appear to be decreasing for selected locations in the United States. It is not known whether this is because of changes in the characteristics of patients being admitted. Objective: To describe changing in-hospital mortality rates over time after accounting for individual patient characteristics. Design, Setting, and Participants: This was a retrospective cohort study of 20 736 adults with a diagnosis of COVID-19 who were included in the US American Heart Association COVID-19 Cardiovascular Disease Registry and admitted to 107 acute care hospitals in 31 states from March through November 2020. A multiple mixed-effects logistic regression was then used to estimate the odds of in-hospital death adjusted for patient age, sex, body mass index, and medical history as well as vital signs, use of supplemental oxygen, presence of pulmonary infiltrates at admission, and hospital site. Main Outcomes and Measures: In-hospital death adjusted for exposures for 4 periods in 2020. Results: The registry included 20 736 patients hospitalized with COVID-19 from March through November 2020 (9524 women [45.9%]; mean [SD] age, 61.2 [17.9] years); 3271 patients (15.8%) died in the hospital. Mortality rates were 19.1% in March and April, 11.9% in May and June, 11.0% in July and August, and 10.8% in September through November. Compared with March and April, the adjusted odds ratios for in-hospital death were significantly lower in May and June (odds ratio, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.58-0.76; P < .001), July and August (odds ratio, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.49-0.69; P < .001), and September through November (odds ratio, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.47-0.73). Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort study, high rates of in-hospital COVID-19 mortality among registry patients in March and April 2020 decreased by more than one-third by June and remained near that rate through November. This difference in mortality rates between the months of March and April and later months persisted even after adjusting for age, sex, medical history, and COVID-19 disease severity and did not appear to be associated with changes in the characteristics of patients being admitted.


Asunto(s)
Mortalidad Hospitalaria/tendencias , Hospitalización/estadística & datos numéricos , Unidades de Cuidados Intensivos/estadística & datos numéricos , Neumonía Viral/diagnóstico por imagen , Factores de Tiempo , Factores de Edad , /terapia , Estudios de Cohortes , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Evaluación del Resultado de la Atención al Paciente , Neumonía Viral/etiología , Sistema de Registros , Factores de Riesgo , Índice de Severidad de la Enfermedad , Factores Sexuales , Estados Unidos/epidemiología , Signos Vitales
5.
BMJ Health Care Inform ; 28(1)2021 May.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33962987

RESUMEN

New York City quickly became an epicentre of the COVID-19 pandemic. An ability to triage patients was needed due to a sudden and massive increase in patients during the COVID-19 pandemic as healthcare providers incurred an exponential increase in workload,which created a strain on the staff and limited resources. Further, methods to better understand and characterise the predictors of morbidity and mortality was needed. METHODS: We developed a prediction model to predict patients at risk for mortality using only laboratory, vital and demographic information readily available in the electronic health record on more than 3395 hospital admissions with COVID-19. Multiple methods were applied, and final model was selected based on performance. A variable importance algorithm was used for interpretability, and understanding of performance and predictors was applied to the best model. We built a model with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 83-97 to identify predictors and patients with high risk of mortality due to COVID-19. Oximetry, respirations, blood urea nitrogen, lymphocyte per cent, calcium, troponin and neutrophil percentage were important features, and key ranges were identified that contributed to a 50% increase in patients' mortality prediction score. With an increasing negative predictive value starting 0.90 after the second day of admission suggests we might be able to more confidently identify likely survivors DISCUSSION: This study serves as a use case of a machine learning methods with visualisations to aide clinicians with a better understanding of the model and predictors of mortality. CONCLUSION: As we continue to understand COVID-19, computer assisted algorithms might be able to improve the care of patients.


Asunto(s)
/mortalidad , Mortalidad Hospitalaria/tendencias , Aprendizaje Automático , Algoritmos , Predicción/métodos , Humanos , Ciudad de Nueva York , Estudios Retrospectivos , Medición de Riesgo
6.
Neurology ; 96(16): e2037-e2047, 2021 04 20.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33970881

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To determine contemporary trends in case fatality, discharge destination, and admission to long-term care after acute ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) using a large, population-based cohort. METHODS: We used linked administrative data to identify all emergency department visits and hospital admissions for first-ever ischemic stroke or ICH in Ontario, Canada, from 2003 to 2017. We calculated crude and age-/sex-standardized risk of death at 30 days and 1 year from stroke onset. We stratified crude trends by stroke type, age, and sex and used the Kendall τ-b correlation coefficient to evaluate the significance of trends. We determined trends in discharge home and to rehabilitation and admission to long-term care at 1 year. We used Cox proportional hazard and logistic regression models to assess whether trends in outcomes persisted after adjustment for baseline factors, estimated stroke severity, and use of life-sustaining care. RESULTS: There were 163,574 people with acute ischemic stroke or ICH across the study period. Between 2003 and 2017, age-/sex-standardized 30-day stroke case fatality decreased from 20.5% to 13.2% (7.3% absolute and 36% relative reduction) while that at 1 year decreased from 32.2% to 22.8% (9.3% absolute and 29% relative reduction). Findings were consistent across age, sex, and stroke type, and after adjustment for comorbid conditions, stroke severity, and use of life-sustaining care. There was a reduction in long-term care admission after ischemic stroke and an increase in discharge home or to rehabilitation for both stroke types. CONCLUSION: We observed substantial reductions in acute stroke case fatality from 2003 to 2017 with a concurrent increase in discharge to home or rehabilitation and a decrease in long-term care admissions, suggesting continuous improvements in stroke systems of care.


Asunto(s)
Mortalidad Hospitalaria/tendencias , Cuidados a Largo Plazo/tendencias , Alta del Paciente/tendencias , Accidente Cerebrovascular/mortalidad , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Ontario/epidemiología
7.
BMJ ; 373: n1135, 2021 05 24.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34035000

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence of hospital admissions and associated mortality rates for non-covid medical conditions during the covid-19 pandemic. DESIGN: Nationwide, population based cohort study. SETTING: Denmark from 13 March 2019 to 27 January 2021. PARTICIPANTS: All Danish residents >1 year of age. MAIN OUTCOMES MEASURES: Population based healthcare registries that encompass the entire Danish population were used to compare hospital admission and mortality rates during the covid-19 pandemic (from 11 March 2020 to 27 January 2021) with the prepandemic baseline data (from 13 March 2019 to 10 March 2020). Hospital admissions were categorised as covid-19 when patients were assigned a diagnosis code for covid-19 within five days of admission. All patients were followed until migration, death, or end of follow-up, whichever came first. Rate ratios for hospital admissions were computed using Poisson regression and were directly standardised using the Danish population on 1 January 2019 as reference. 30 day mortality rate ratios were examined by Cox regression, adjusted for age and sex, and covid-19 diagnosis was used as a competing risk. RESULTS: 5 753 179 residents were identified during 567.8 million person weeks of observation, with 1 113 705 hospital admissions among 675 447 people. Compared with the prepandemic baseline period (mean hospital admission rate 204.1 per 100 000/week), the overall hospital admission rate for non-covid-19 conditions decreased to 142.8 per 100 000/week (rate ratio 0.70, 95% confidence interval 0.66 to 0.74) after the first national lockdown, followed by a gradual return to baseline levels until the second national lockdown when it decreased to 158.3 per 100 000/week (0.78, 0.73 to 0.82). This pattern was mirrored for most major diagnosis groups except for non-covid-19 respiratory diseases, nervous system diseases, cancer, heart failure, sepsis, and non-covid-19 respiratory infections, which remained lower throughout the study period. Overall 30 day mortality rates were higher during the first national lockdown (mortality rate ratio 1.28, 95% confidence interval 1.23 to 1.32) and the second national lockdown (1.20, 1.16 to 1.24), and these results were similar across most major diagnosis groups. For non-covid-19 respiratory diseases, cancer, pneumonia, and sepsis, the 30 day mortality rate ratios were also higher between lockdown periods. CONCLUSIONS: Hospital admissions for all major non-covid-19 disease groups decreased during national lockdowns compared with the prepandemic baseline period. Additionally, mortality rates were higher overall and for patients admitted to hospital with conditions such as respiratory diseases, cancer, pneumonia, and sepsis. Increased attention towards management of serious non-covid-19 medical conditions is warranted.


Asunto(s)
Mortalidad Hospitalaria/tendencias , Hospitalización/tendencias , Adolescente , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , /prevención & control , Niño , Preescolar , Estudios de Cohortes , Dinamarca/epidemiología , Femenino , Humanos , Lactante , Estimación de Kaplan-Meier , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Pandemias , Modelos de Riesgos Proporcionales , Sistema de Registros , Adulto Joven
8.
Int Heart J ; 62(3): 540-545, 2021 May 29.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33952805

RESUMEN

This study aims to evaluate the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on patient admissions to Hunan's cardiac intensive care units (CCUs).We conducted a retrospective, single-center study. Data were collected from patients who were confirmed to have critical cardiovascular disease and admitted to the CCU of the Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Hunan, from January 23 to April 23, 2020. Compared with the same period in 2019, the results show that the number of hospitalization decreased by 19.6%; the inhospital mortality rate of CCU was decreased (28.57% versus 16.67%; odds ratio (OR), 0.50; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.251-0.996; P = 0.047); hospital stay was decreased (7.97 versus 12.36, P < 0.001); hospital emergency percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) rate in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) significantly decreased (76.00% versus 39.00%, P < 0.001); among this, the PCI rate of patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) decreased (76.32% versus 55.17%, P = 0.028) as well. In addition, the number of patients transferred from other hospitals significantly decreased (76.79% versus 56.67%, P = 0.002), and the number of patients transferred from other cities also decreased by 10.75%.During the outbreak of the COVID-19 epidemic in Hunan Province, the number of patients admitted to CCU decreased, as well as the mortality rate; fewer patients with severe cardiovascular disease can be transported to better hospitals from remote rural areas. In addition to epidemic prevention and control, experts in China should focus on improved emergency transport medical services to reduce this impact.


Asunto(s)
Enfermedades Cardiovasculares/mortalidad , Unidades de Cuidados Coronarios/tendencias , Mortalidad Hospitalaria/tendencias , Admisión del Paciente/tendencias , Transferencia de Pacientes/tendencias , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , /prevención & control , Enfermedades Cardiovasculares/diagnóstico , Enfermedades Cardiovasculares/terapia , China/epidemiología , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Pandemias , Estudios Retrospectivos
9.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(4): e216556, 2021 04 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33830226

RESUMEN

Importance: Mortality is an important measure of the severity of a pandemic. This study aimed to understand how mortality by age of hospitalized patients who were tested for SARS-CoV-2 has changed over time. Objective: To evaluate trends in in-hospital mortality among patients who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. Design, Setting, and Participants: This retrospective cohort study included patients who were hospitalized for at least 1 day at 1 of 209 US acute care hospitals of variable size, in urban and rural areas, between March 1 and November 21, 2020. Eligible patients had a SARS-CoV-2 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or antigen test within 7 days of admission or during hospitalization, and a record of discharge or in-hospital death. Exposure: SARS-CoV-2 positivity. Main Outcomes and Measures: SARS-CoV-2 infection was defined as a positive SARS-CoV-2 PCR or antigen test within 7 days before admission or during hospitalization. Mortality was extracted from electronically available data. Results: Among 503 409 admitted patients, 42 604 (8.5%) had SARS-CoV-2-positive tests. Of those with SARS-CoV-2-positive tests, 21 592 (50.7%) were male patients. Hospital admissions among patients with SARS-CoV-2-positive tests were highest in the group aged 65 years or older (19 929 [46.8%]), followed by those aged 50 to 64 years (11 602 [27.2%]) and 18 to 49 years (10 619 [24.9%]). Hospital admissions among patients 18 to 49 years of age increased from 1099 of 5319 (20.7%) in April to 1266 of 4184 (30.3%) in June and 2156 of 7280 (29.6%) in July, briefly exceeding those in the group 50 to 64 years of age (June: 1194 of 4184 [28.5%]; 2039 of 7280 [28.0%]). Patients with SARS-CoV-2-positive tests had higher in-hospital mortality than patients with SARS-CoV-2-negative tests (4705 [11.0%] vs 11 707 of 460 805 [2.5%]; P < .001). In-hospital mortality rates increased with increasing age for both patients with SARS-CoV-2-negative tests and SARS-CoV-2-positive tests. In patients with SARS-CoV-2-negative tests, mortality increased from 45 of 11 255 (0.4%) in those younger than 18 years to 4812 of 107 394 (4.5%) in those older than 75 years. In patients with SARS-CoV-2-positive tests, mortality increased from 1 of 454 (0.2%) of those younger than 18 years to 2149 of 10 287 (20.9%) in those older than 75 years. In-hospital mortality rates among patients with SARS-CoV-2-negative tests were similar for male and female patients (6273 of 209 086 [3.0%] vs 5538 of 251 719 [2.2%]) but higher mortality was observed among male patients with SARS-CoV-2-positive tests (2700 of 21 592 [12.5%]) compared with female patients with SARS-CoV-2-positive tests (2016 of 21 012 [9.60%]). Overall, in-hospital mortality increased from March to April (63 of 597 [10.6%] to 1047 of 5319 [19.7%]), then decreased significantly to November (499 of 5350 [9.3%]; P = .04), with significant decreases in the oldest age groups (50-64 years: 197 of 1542 [12.8%] to 73 of 1341 [5.4%]; P = .02; 65-75 years: 269 of 1182 [22.8%] to 137 of 1332 [10.3%]; P = .006; >75 years: 535 of 1479 [36.2%] to 262 of 1505 [17.4%]; P = .03). Conclusions and Relevance: This nationally representative study supported the findings of smaller, regional studies and found that in-hospital mortality declined across all age groups during the period evaluated. Reductions were unlikely because of a higher proportion of younger patients with lower in-hospital mortality in the later period.


Asunto(s)
/mortalidad , Mortalidad Hospitalaria/tendencias , Adolescente , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Estudios Retrospectivos , Estados Unidos/epidemiología , Adulto Joven
11.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(15): e25206, 2021 Apr 16.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33847618

RESUMEN

ABSTRACT: Primarily we aimed to examine the crude and standardized schizophrenia hospitalization trend from 2005 to 2014. We hypothesized that there will be a statistically significant linear trend in hospitalization rates for schizophrenia from 2005 to 2014. Secondarily we also examined trends in hospitalization by race/ethnicity, age, gender, as well as trends in hospitalization Length of Stay (LOS) and inflation adjusted cost.In this observational study, we used Nationwide Inpatient Sample data and International Classification of Diseases, Eleventh Revisions codes for Schizophrenia, which revealed 6,122,284 cases for this study. Outcomes included crude and standardized hospitalization rates, race/ethnicity, age, cost, and LOS. The analysis included descriptive statistics, indirect standardization, Rao-Scott Chi-Square test, t-test, and adjusted linear regression trend.Hospitalizations were most prevalent for individuals ages 45-64 (38.8%), African Americans were overrepresented (25.8% of hospitalizations), and the gender distribution was nearly equivalent. Mean LOS was 9.08 days (95% confidence interval 8.71-9.45). Medicare was the primary payer for most hospitalizations (55.4%), with most of the costs ranging from $10,000-$49,999 (57.1%). The crude hospitalization rates ranged from 790-1142/100,000 admissions, while the US 2010 census standardized rates were 380-552/100,000 from 2005-2014. Linear regression trend analysis showed no significant difference in trend for race/ethnicity, age, nor gender (P > .001). The hospitalizations' overall rates increased while LOS significantly decreased, while hospitalization costs and Charlson's co-morbidity index increased (P < .001).From 2005-2014, the overall US hospitalization rates significantly increased. Over this period, observed disparities in hospitalizations for middle-aged and African Americans were unchanged, and LOS has gone down while costs have gone up. Further studies addressing the important disparities in race/ethnicity and age and reducing costs of acute hospitalization are needed.


Asunto(s)
Precios de Hospital/estadística & datos numéricos , Mortalidad Hospitalaria/tendencias , Tiempo de Internación/economía , Tiempo de Internación/estadística & datos numéricos , Esquizofrenia/epidemiología , Adolescente , Adulto , Factores de Edad , Anciano , Comorbilidad , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Hospitalización/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Masculino , Medicare/estadística & datos numéricos , Persona de Mediana Edad , Factores de Riesgo , Esquizofrenia/etnología , Esquizofrenia/mortalidad , Factores Sexuales , Factores Socioeconómicos , Estados Unidos/epidemiología , Adulto Joven
12.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(15): e25404, 2021 Apr 16.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33847638

RESUMEN

ABSTRACT: Previous studies have shown an independent association between increased red cell distribution width (RDW) and mortality after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, evidence regarding the predictive significance of repeated measures of RDW in patients with AMI remains scarce. We aimed to investigate the association between the dynamic profile of RDW and in-hospital mortality in patients with AMI.This was a cross-sectional study. We extracted clinical data from the Medical Information Mart for Intensive Care IIIV1.4 database. Demographic data, vital signs, laboratory test data, and comorbidities were collected from the database. The clinical endpoint was in-hospital mortality. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the prognostic values of basic RDW, and the Kaplan-Meier method was used to plot survival curves. Subgroup analyses were performed to measure mortality across various subgroups. The repeated-measures data were compared using a generalized additive mixed model.In total, 3101eligible patients were included. In multivariate analysis, adjusted for age, sex, and ethnicity, RDW was a significant risk predictor of in-hospital mortality. Furthermore, after adjusting for more confounding factors, RDW remained a significant predictor of in-hospital mortality (tertile 3 vs tertile 1: hazard ratio 2.3; 95% confidence interval 1.39-4.01; P for trend <.05). The Kaplan-Meier curve for tertiles of RDW indicated that survival rates were highest when RDW was ≤13.2% and lowest when RDW was ≥14.2% after adjustment for age, sex, and ethnicity. During the intensive care unit stay, the RDW of nonsurvivors progressively increased until death occurred.Our findings showed that a higher RDW was associated with an increased risk of in-hospital mortality in patients with AMI.


Asunto(s)
Índices de Eritrocitos , Eritrocitos/citología , Mortalidad Hospitalaria/tendencias , Infarto del Miocardio/mortalidad , Anciano , Comorbilidad , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Estimación de Kaplan-Meier , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Modelos de Riesgos Proporcionales , Factores Socioeconómicos
13.
PLoS One ; 16(4): e0249285, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33793600

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has affected millions of people across the globe. It is associated with a high mortality rate and has created a global crisis by straining medical resources worldwide. OBJECTIVES: To develop and validate machine-learning models for prediction of mechanical ventilation (MV) for patients presenting to emergency room and for prediction of in-hospital mortality once a patient is admitted. METHODS: Two cohorts were used for the two different aims. 1980 COVID-19 patients were enrolled for the aim of prediction ofMV. 1036 patients' data, including demographics, past smoking and drinking history, past medical history and vital signs at emergency room (ER), laboratory values, and treatments were collected for training and 674 patients were enrolled for validation using XGBoost algorithm. For the second aim to predict in-hospital mortality, 3491 hospitalized patients via ER were enrolled. CatBoost, a new gradient-boosting algorithm was applied for training and validation of the cohort. RESULTS: Older age, higher temperature, increased respiratory rate (RR) and a lower oxygen saturation (SpO2) from the first set of vital signs were associated with an increased risk of MV amongst the 1980 patients in the ER. The model had a high accuracy of 86.2% and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 87.8%. While, patients who required MV, had a higher RR, Body mass index (BMI) and longer length of stay in the hospital were the major features associated with in-hospital mortality. The second model had a high accuracy of 80% with NPV of 81.6%. CONCLUSION: Machine learning models using XGBoost and catBoost algorithms can predict need for mechanical ventilation and mortality with a very high accuracy in COVID-19 patients.


Asunto(s)
/mortalidad , Aprendizaje Automático , Pandemias/estadística & datos numéricos , Respiración Artificial/estadística & datos numéricos , Ventiladores Mecánicos/estadística & datos numéricos , Anciano , Servicio de Urgencia en Hospital/tendencias , Femenino , Mortalidad Hospitalaria/tendencias , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Estudios Retrospectivos
14.
Epidemiol Infect ; 149: e102, 2021 04 27.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33902779

RESUMEN

Estimating the lengths-of-stay (LoS) of hospitalised COVID-19 patients is key for predicting the hospital beds' demand and planning mitigation strategies, as overwhelming the healthcare systems has critical consequences for disease mortality. However, accurately mapping the time-to-event of hospital outcomes, such as the LoS in the intensive care unit (ICU), requires understanding patient trajectories while adjusting for covariates and observation bias, such as incomplete data. Standard methods, such as the Kaplan-Meier estimator, require prior assumptions that are untenable given current knowledge. Using real-time surveillance data from the first weeks of the COVID-19 epidemic in Galicia (Spain), we aimed to model the time-to-event and event probabilities of patients' hospitalised, without parametric priors and adjusting for individual covariates. We applied a non-parametric mixture cure model and compared its performance in estimating hospital ward (HW)/ICU LoS to the performances of commonly used methods to estimate survival. We showed that the proposed model outperformed standard approaches, providing more accurate ICU and HW LoS estimates. Finally, we applied our model estimates to simulate COVID-19 hospital demand using a Monte Carlo algorithm. We provided evidence that adjusting for sex, generally overlooked in prediction models, together with age is key for accurately forecasting HW and ICU occupancy, as well as discharge or death outcomes.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Predicción/métodos , Tiempo de Internación/tendencias , Modelos Estadísticos , Factores de Edad , Ocupación de Camas/estadística & datos numéricos , Ocupación de Camas/tendencias , Mortalidad Hospitalaria/tendencias , Hospitales , Humanos , Unidades de Cuidados Intensivos/estadística & datos numéricos , Unidades de Cuidados Intensivos/tendencias , Tiempo de Internación/estadística & datos numéricos , Alta del Paciente/estadística & datos numéricos , Alta del Paciente/tendencias , Factores Sexuales , España/epidemiología , Estadísticas no Paramétricas , Análisis de Supervivencia
15.
J Cardiothorac Surg ; 16(1): 31, 2021 Mar 19.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33741040

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of an early extubation strategy on outcomes following complete repair of pulmonary atresia, ventricular septal defect, and hypoplastic pulmonary artery. METHODS: One hundred thirteen patients undergoing complete repair surgery of pulmonary atresia, ventricular septal defect, and hypoplastic pulmonary artery between 2016 and 2018 were included in our retrospective propensity-score matched study. Propensity score matching was conducted in 1 to 2 ratio to balance the covariables impacting on clinical outcomes between groups. The primary outcomes were defined as length of intensive care unit stay, postoperative length of hospital stay and in-hospital medical cost. The secondary outcomes included postoperative complications such as re-intubation, re-exploration, in-hospital mortality, arrhythmia and etc.. In addition, blood product consumption were also abstracted. RESULTS: Compared with matched controls, patients in the early extubation group were demonstrated with a significant reduced length of intensive care unit stay (Median: 1.9 d νs. 4.1 d, p = 0.039), postoperative length of hospital stay (Median: 9.0 d νs. 17.0 d, p = 0.007) and in-hospital medical cost (Median: 69.5 × 1000CNY νs. 113.6× 1000CNY, p = 0.041). As for the postoperative complications, the occurrence of re-intubation, re-exploration, in-hospital mortality, arrhythmia and renal replacement therapy was similar between groups. However, pulmonary complications (p = 0.049) were with a significantly lower rate in the early extubation group. In addition, fresh frozen plasma (p = 0.041) transfusion volume were significantly reduced in the early extubation group rather than packed red blood cells and platelets. CONCLUSIONS: Early extubation following complete repair of pulmonary atresia improved clinical outcomes and reduced in-hospital medical cost without increasing any postoperative complications.


Asunto(s)
Extubación Traqueal/métodos , Defectos de los Tabiques Cardíacos/cirugía , Complicaciones Posoperatorias/epidemiología , Atresia Pulmonar/cirugía , Preescolar , China/epidemiología , Femenino , Estudios de Seguimiento , Defectos de los Tabiques Cardíacos/mortalidad , Mortalidad Hospitalaria/tendencias , Humanos , Incidencia , Tiempo de Internación/tendencias , Masculino , Complicaciones Posoperatorias/prevención & control , Atresia Pulmonar/mortalidad , Estudios Retrospectivos , Factores de Tiempo
17.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 5012, 2021 03 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33658619

RESUMEN

The effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) in the treatment of COVID-19 are highly debated. This study was aimed to assess aggregated risk by investigating the association of ACEIs/ARBs users against non-users of ACEIs/ARBs with the risk of mortality or severe clinical manifestations or magnitude of SARS-CoV-2 test positivity in COVID-19 patients. Systematic literature search was carried out in different databases for eligible studies. The pooled relative risks (RRs) were measured using RevMan software where P<0.05 was set as statistical significance. In total, 10 studies were included in this analysis. After pooled estimation, it was demonstrated that SARS-CoV-2 positive patients taking ACEIs/ARBs were not associated with an increased risk of mortality compared to those not taking ACEIs/ARBs (RR 0.89; 95% CI 0.64-1.23; P=0.48). Furthermore, the risk of composite severe clinical manifestations was not significantly different between the positive patients with or without ACEIs/ARBs users (RR 1.29; 95% CI 0.81-2.04; P=0.28). There was no risk difference for SARS-CoV-2 test positivity in patients with or without ACEIs/ARBs users (RR 1.00; 95% CI 0.95-1.05; P=0.91). These findings may augment current professional society guidelines for not discontinuing ACEIs/ARBs in treating COVID-19 patients where it is clinically indicated.


Asunto(s)
Antagonistas de Receptores de Angiotensina/uso terapéutico , Inhibidores de la Enzima Convertidora de Angiotensina/uso terapéutico , /tratamiento farmacológico , /metabolismo , Mortalidad Hospitalaria/tendencias , Hospitalización/tendencias , Humanos , Factores de Riesgo , Resultado del Tratamiento
18.
Open Heart ; 8(1)2021 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33723014

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: The clinical impact of SARS-CoV-2 has varied across countries with varying cardiovascular manifestations. We review the cardiac presentations, in-hospital outcomes and development of cardiovascular complications in the initial cohort of SARS-CoV-2 positive patients at Imperial College Healthcare National Health Service Trust, UK. METHODS: We retrospectively analysed 498 COVID-19 positive adult admissions to our institute from 7 March to 7 April 2020. Patient data were collected for baseline demographics, comorbidities and in-hospital outcomes, especially relating to cardiovascular intervention. RESULTS: Mean age was 67.4±16.1 years and 62.2% (n=310) were male. 64.1% (n=319) of our cohort had underlying cardiovascular disease (CVD) with 53.4% (n=266) having hypertension. 43.2%(n=215) developed acute myocardial injury. Mortality was significantly increased in those patients with myocardial injury (47.4% vs 18.4%, p<0.001). Only four COVID-19 patients had invasive coronary angiography, two underwent percutaneous coronary intervention and one required a permanent pacemaker implantation. 7.0% (n=35) of patients had an inpatient echocardiogram. Acute myocardial injury (OR 2.39, 95% CI 1.31 to 4.40, p=0.005) and history of hypertension (OR 1.88, 95% CI 1.01 to 3.55, p=0.049) approximately doubled the odds of in-hospital mortality in patients admitted with COVID-19 after other variables had been controlled for. CONCLUSION: Hypertension, pre-existing CVD and acute myocardial injury were associated with increased in-hospital mortality in our cohort of COVID-19 patients. However, only a low number of patients required invasive cardiac intervention.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Enfermedades Cardiovasculares/epidemiología , Pandemias , Anciano , Comorbilidad , Femenino , Mortalidad Hospitalaria/tendencias , Humanos , Incidencia , Londres , Masculino , ARN Viral/análisis , Estudios Retrospectivos , Tasa de Supervivencia/tendencias
19.
BMC Endocr Disord ; 21(1): 56, 2021 Mar 26.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33771154

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Diabetes is associated with poor coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outcomes. However, little is known on the impact of undiagnosed diabetes in the COVID-19 population. We investigated whether diabetes, particularly undiagnosed diabetes, was associated with an increased risk of death from COVID-19. METHODS: This retrospective study identified adult patients with COVID-19 admitted to Tongji Hospital (Wuhan) from January 28 to April 4, 2020. Diabetes was determined using patients' past history (diagnosed) or was newly defined if the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level at admission was ≥6.5% (48 mmol/mol) (undiagnosed). The in-hospital mortality rate and survival probability were compared between the non-diabetes and diabetes (overall, diagnosed, and undiagnosed diabetes) groups. Risk factors of mortality were explored using Cox regression analysis. RESULTS: Of 373 patients, 233 were included in the final analysis, among whom 80 (34.3%) had diabetes: 44 (55.0%) reported a diabetes history, and 36 (45.0%) were newly defined as having undiagnosed diabetes by HbA1c testing at admission. Compared with the non-diabetes group, the overall diabetes group had a significantly increased mortality rate (22.5% vs. 5.9%, p <  0.001). Moreover, the overall, diagnosed, and undiagnosed diabetes groups displayed lower survival probability in the Kaplan-Meier survival analysis (all p <  0.01). Using multivariate Cox regression, diabetes, age, quick sequential organ failure assessment score, and D-dimer ≥1.0 µg/mL were identified as independent risk factors for in-hospital death in patients with COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of undiagnosed pre-existing diabetes among patients with COVID-19 is high in China. Diabetes, even newly defined by HbA1c testing at admission, is associated with increased mortality in patients with COVID-19. Screening for undiagnosed diabetes by HbA1c measurement should be considered in adult Chinese inpatients with COVID-19.


Asunto(s)
/sangre , Diabetes Mellitus/sangre , Diabetes Mellitus/mortalidad , Hemoglobina A Glucada/metabolismo , Mortalidad Hospitalaria/tendencias , Anciano , China/epidemiología , Diabetes Mellitus/diagnóstico , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Estudios Retrospectivos , Factores de Riesgo
20.
J Ayub Med Coll Abbottabad ; 33(1): 20-25, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33774948

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Many factors have been identified which can predict severe outcomes and mortality in hospitalized patients of COVID-19. This study was conducted with the objective of finding out the association of various clinical and laboratory parameters as used by International Severe Acute Respiratory and emerging Infections Consortium (ISARIC) World Health Organization (WHO)- ISARIC/WHO 4C Mortality score in predicting high risk patients of COVID-19. Ascertaining the parameters would help in triage of patients of severe disease at the outset, and shall prove beneficial in improving the standard of care. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was carried out in COVID-19 Department of Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad. All COVID-19 patients admitted from 15th April to 15th July 2020 were included. RESULTS: A total of 347 patients were included in the study. The mean age was 56.46±15.44 years. Male patients were 225 (65%) and female 122 (35%). Diabetes (36%) was the most common co-morbidity, followed by hypertension (30.8%). Two hundred & six (63.8%) patients recovered and 117 (36.2%) patients died. Shortness of breath (80%), fever (79%) and cough (65%) were the most common presenting symptoms. Patients admitted with a 4C Mortality score of 0-3 (Low Risk Category), the patients who recovered were 36 (90%) and those who died were 4 (10.0%). In patients admitted with a 4C Mortality score of more than 14 (Very High-Risk Category), the number of patients who recovered was 1 (20%), and those who died were 4 (80%). The difference in mortality among the categories was statistically significant (p<0.001). Hypertension was a risk factor for death in patients of COVID-19 (Odds ratio=1.24, 95% CI [0.76-2.01]). Lymphopenia was not associated with statistically significant increased risk for mortality. CONCLUSIONS: The ISARIC 4C mortality score can be used for stratifying and predicting mortality in COVID-19 patients on arrival in hospital. We propose that it should be used in every patient of COVID-19 presenting to the hospital. Those falling in Low and Intermediate Risk Category should be managed in ward level. Those falling in High and Very High Category should be admitted in HDU/ICU with aggressive treatment from the start.


Asunto(s)
/mortalidad , Hospitales de Enseñanza/estadística & datos numéricos , Pandemias , Comorbilidad , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Mortalidad Hospitalaria/tendencias , Hospitalización/tendencias , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Pakistán/epidemiología , Factores de Riesgo
SELECCIÓN DE REFERENCIAS
DETALLE DE LA BÚSQUEDA
...