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1.
G Ital Nefrol ; 36(3)2019 Jun 11.
Artículo en Italiano | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31250996

RESUMEN

This article contains an interview to Professor Enrico Malizia (born in 1926), who played an important role in the birth of nephrology in Italy. On April 27th, 1957 Professor Malizia was in fact among the founders of the Italian Society of Nephrology, which he also served as secretary for some years, together with Professor Luigi Migone (1912-2002). In addition, he participated in the organization of the First International Congress of Nephrology, which took place in Geneva and Evian from September 1st to 4th, 1960. Professor Malizia devoted himself to nephrology for many years, both as clinician and as researcher, by publishing many original papers and monographs on different nephrological topics, a few of which are described in detail in the present article. In addition, his interest in renal diseases led him to frequent the institutions of eminent renal scientists of the period such as the physiologist Homer Smith (1895-1962) and the pathologist Jean Oliver (1889-1976) in the United States, and the clinician Jean Hamburger (1909-1992) in Paris.


Asunto(s)
Nefrología , Historia del Siglo XX , Historia del Siglo XXI , Italia , Nefrología/historia
3.
J Vasc Access ; 20(1_suppl): 35-37, 2019 May.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31032730

RESUMEN

In Dr Ohira's era, hemodialysis was done using an external arteriovenous shunt. External arteriovenous shunts surely made repeated hemodialysis possible, but they also brought about serious complications which necessarily produced the arteriovenous fistula. Arteriovenous fistula is definitely the most important contribution to long-term survival of the hemodialysis patient. Hemodialysis therapy soon became very common, so that various kinds of patients appeared for it. Then came the era of arteriovenous grafts, because many patients lost good vessels in order to create the arteriovenous fistula. More grafts are now becoming available, which are made from different materials and in different forms, thus creating greater expectations for the future. Unfortunately, at this time, the revolutionary vascular access surpassing the arteriovenous fistula has yet to appear and we must continue to make proper application of the arteriovenous fistula. Vascular access is surely one of the important factors to assure a smooth dialysis life for patients. So, we must recognize that we play an important role in the dialysis patients' life. It is interesting to note that in every country, medical care exceeds physical care. This means that the mental factor somewhat compensates for the physical factor. Dr Ohira was a vascular surgeon, but he was also interested in the activities of daily living and quality of life, which must be one of the most delicate fields in medicine.


Asunto(s)
Derivación Arteriovenosa Quirúrgica/historia , Implantación de Prótesis Vascular/historia , Nefrología/historia , Diálisis Renal/historia , Actividades Cotidianas , Derivación Arteriovenosa Quirúrgica/tendencias , Implantación de Prótesis Vascular/tendencias , Costo de Enfermedad , Historia del Siglo XX , Historia del Siglo XXI , Humanos , Japón , Nefrología/tendencias , Calidad de Vida , Diálisis Renal/tendencias , Resultado del Tratamiento
6.
Adv Chronic Kidney Dis ; 25(6): 474-479, 2018 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30527544

RESUMEN

The history of chronic dialysis in the United States highlights the impact nephrology leaders have on improving kidney disease care. Belding Scribner and his Seattle team transformed end-stage renal disease from a fatal illness to a treatable condition with use of the first successful Scribner shunt in 1960. Advances in dialysis machines emerged from Les Babb and Richard Drake finding ways to treat more patients. Innovative nephrology leaders foster incremental change leading to the technically complex, life-sustaining treatments that are widely available to end-stage renal disease patients today. The Nephrology Oral History Project consists of interviews with patient, nurse, and nephrologist pioneers who have witnessed and contributed to these advancements in kidney disease care. This article includes Nephrology Oral History Project excerpts illustrating leadership contributions to dialysis machines, peritoneal dialysis catheters, and treatment best practices. In addition to individual contributions, improvements in treatment also come from patient and provider organizations leading the way and collectively advocating for change. Nephrology leaders continue to play a crucial role in improving dialysis outcomes and quality of life.


Asunto(s)
Fallo Renal Crónico/historia , Liderazgo , Nefrología/historia , Diálisis Renal/historia , Historia del Siglo XX , Historia del Siglo XXI , Humanos , Fallo Renal Crónico/terapia , Estados Unidos
7.
Pol Przegl Chir ; 90(3): 60-68, 2018 Jun 30.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30426938

RESUMEN

Experimental research on liver transplantation was introduced in Poland by Waldemar Olszewski with his team. It was in 1972. Not until 15 years later, in 1987, did Stanislaw Zielinski in Szczecin and Marian Pardela in Katowice make an attempt of transplanting liver in humans. In 1989, the attempt was made by Jacek Pawlak and Marek Krawczyk in Warsaw. The first successful liver transplantation in Poland was performed by Piotr Kalicinski at the Children's Memorial Health Institute, Warsaw. Also, in early 1990s the attempts were made by Jerzy Polanski in Warsaw and Piotr Szyber in Wroclaw. In the next years, liver transplantations were connected with three centers in Szczecin and were associated with the following persons: Roman Kostryka, Maciej Wójcicki and Samir Zeaira. In Warsaw, 1994, Jacek Pawlak, Bogdan Michalowicz and Krzysztof Zieniewicz performed another successful liver transplantation. The program started to develop rapidly and is still up and running. In 2000, Wojciech Rowinski and Marek Pacholczyk created another liver transplant center in Warsaw, while in 2005 Lech Cierpka and Robert Król did the same in Katowice. In the following years, liver transplantation was initiated by Maciej Slupski in Bydgoszcz (2017) and Zbigniew Sledzinski in Gdansk (2018). In the developing liver transplant centers, an exceptional contribution was made by Pawel Nyckowski, Jacek Pawlak, Krzysztof Zieniewicz, Waldemar Patkowski, Tadeusz Wróblewski, Rafal Paluszkiewicz, Marek Pacholczyk, Andrzej Chmura, Maciej Kosieradzki and Marek Krawczyk - all employees of the Medical University of Warsaw. In Wroclaw, Dariusz Patrzalek and Pawel Chudoba were very active in the field of liver transplantations. In 1996, the Organizing-Coordinating Center for Transplantation POLTRANSPLANT was brought to life. It was directed by Janusz Walaszewski, then by Roman Danielewicz and Artur Kaminski. In 1999, Piotr Kalicinski and Marek Krawczyk started the program for liver fragment harvesting and transplantation from living donors. Until the end of 2016, 4186 liver transplantations including 314 liver transplants from living donors were performed in Poland. Currently, the active centers are three centers from Warsaw, namely Pediatric Surgery and Transplantation Surgery, Children's Memorial Health Institute; Department of General, Transplant and Liver Surgery, Medical University of Warsaw; Department of General and Transplant Surgery, Medical University of Warsaw. Other active centers include Department of General and Transplant Surgery, Provincial Hospital in Szczecin, Department of General, Vascular and Transplant Surgery, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Department of Vascular, General and Transplant Surgery in Wroclaw. Liver transplant programs have also been initiated at the Department of Liver and General Surgery, Bydgoszcz, and Department of General, Endocrine and Transplant Surgery, Medical University of Gdansk.


Asunto(s)
Trasplante de Hígado/historia , Nefrología/historia , Pautas de la Práctica en Medicina/historia , Centros Médicos Académicos/historia , Historia del Siglo XX , Historia del Siglo XXI , Humanos , Polonia
11.
BMC Nephrol ; 19(1): 92, 2018 04 19.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29673324

RESUMEN

Gabriel Richet, one of the fathers of the French and international Nephrology, was a man remarkable for his courage, vision and empathy. He was proud and brave, and he presented himself proud of being brave. He opens his interview speaking about his youth, when he was injured, and went back to the fight. He cites the number of stitches he received, but doesn't cite being decorated with the Légion d'Honneur, one of the highest honours of the French Republic. This anecdote perfectly illustrates his elegance and detachment from awards and self-satisfaction. Gabriel Richet was a visionary. He was the first one to use the artificial kidney in France. Together with Jean Hamburger and Jean Crosnier at the Necker hospital, he developed the concept of renal intensive care and, later on, he was one of the first to develop the concept of translational nephrology.At a time when medical writing was not acknowledged, he authored almost 400 manuscripts indexed on Medline. He was over 90 when his last papers, dealing with the history of Nephrology, were published, some of them as sole author.In the interview, as well as in his life, he did not renounce to a provocative self-irony. A physician should never give up, he should assume the full responsibility of his actions, and practice medicine with the heart: "I am like the Queen of Holland, whose motto is: I will maintain". In our uncertain, unsafe, fragile and turbulent world, there is no better motto for us all.


Asunto(s)
Coraje , Nefrología/historia , Francia , Historia del Siglo XX , Segunda Guerra Mundial
12.
BMC Nephrol ; 19(1): 60, 2018 03 13.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29534697

RESUMEN

Gabriel Richet was one of the great pioneers of European Nephrology. After a pivotal period of work with Jean Hamburger, whom we owe the name of our discipline, Nephrology, he contributed to all aspects of this specialty and was, in particular, a forerunner in dialysis and in the study of interstitial nephropathies.In this passionate and lucid interview, recorded in Paris in 2010, he describes himself as a "lucky man", able to transform folly in happiness. He does not describe himself as an intellectual, but as a warrior, and closes a detailed history of the early days of European Nephrology with a strong statement of the moral stature a physician should have: he underlines, in line with his strong personality, that a physician is a man able to decide, to give orders and to assume their consequences. However, science and care of human beings cannot exist without a heart. "A doctor is someone who decides; when he writes a prescription, this means he prescribes and takes responsibility. Is it possible to give a prescription and decide regardless of compassion?". In his interview, he commented that this last statement is probably not uniformly agreed, but that he'll always defend it, adds freedom as a moral value that a physician should proudly defend: "Unfortunately I know that many do not share my idea, but that's life... I am like the Queen of Holland, whose motto is: I will maintain!".


Asunto(s)
Nefrología/historia , Médicos/historia , Historia del Siglo XX , Historia del Siglo XXI , Humanos
14.
G Ital Nefrol ; 35(Suppl 70): 44-49, 2018 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29482273
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