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2.
J Clin Microbiol ; 56(3)2018 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29237786

RESUMEN

Our mostly manual, agar-based clinical microbiology laboratory is slowly but steadily being redefined by automation and innovation. Ironically, the oldest test, the Gram stain test, is still manually read and interpreted by trained personnel. In a proof-of-concept study, Smith et al. (J. Clin. Microbiol. 56:e01521-17, 2018, https://doi.org/10.1128/JCM.01521-17) used computer imaging with a deep convolutional neural network to examine and interpret Gram-stained slides from positive blood culture bottles. In light of the shortage of medical technologists/microbiologists and the need for results from positive blood culture bottles 24/7, this paper paves the way for the next innovations for the clinical microbiology laboratory of the future.


Asunto(s)
Automatización de Laboratorios , Técnicas Bacteriológicas/tendencias , Violeta de Genciana , Fenazinas , Coloración y Etiquetado/tendencias , Técnicas Bacteriológicas/normas , Errores Diagnósticos/prevención & control , Humanos , Personal de Laboratorio Clínico/normas , Personal de Laboratorio Clínico/provisión & distribución , Técnicas de Diagnóstico Molecular/tendencias , Coloración y Etiquetado/normas
4.
Rinsho Byori ; 63(3): 397-9, 2015 Mar.
Artículo en Japonés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26524864

RESUMEN

The management of clinical laboratories in hospitals has to be changed in accordance with the trends in the healthcare-providing system. In this symposium, six presenters talked about various issues associated with their laboratories. The issues raised included conflict between specialty and generality, phlebotomy as a duty of laboratory technologists, management of the phlebotomy section, imbalance of numbers between retirees and newcomers, and cooperation with the division of clinical research. Presenters, chairmen, and the audience were able to understand that we are now facing these issues, and we could identify some of their solutions.


Asunto(s)
Servicios de Laboratorio Clínico/tendencias , Personal de Laboratorio Clínico/provisión & distribución , Personal de Laboratorio Clínico/tendencias , Humanos , Flebotomía , Jubilación , Especialización , Recursos Humanos
5.
Rinsho Byori ; 63(3): 400-3, 2015 Mar.
Artículo en Japonés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26524865

RESUMEN

In Japan, the primary 'baby-boomer' generation, born between 1947 and 1949, is now in its retirement. This has caused a marked shortage of human resources nationwide. Clinical laboratory technologists are no exception, and many clinical laboratories in Japanese healthcare facilities are struggling with management because the number of new graduates, i.e., newly licensed technologists, is mostly fixed and, therefore, their recruitment is becoming more and more competitive. Our laboratory is now facing a wave of mass-retirement associated with our history. In addition, in the early 2000s, there was almost no position for new graduates replacing those retiring because of the change in the social healthcare system as well as our hospital's policy. This resulted in uneven numbers of technologists in generations, and it seemed to be getting worse. Fortunately, five years ago, the direction of social health care was changed and lots of positions became available as a result. We have been trying to recruit new graduates and experienced technologists as well, and were able to hire 18 people. Among them, 8 were non-freshmen. The generation gap has been mostly resolved. We will continue to make our laboratory more attractive not just to new graduates but also to experienced technologists, especially those who wish to return to work after a several-year absence to raise their children. We believe that this will energize our laboratory.


Asunto(s)
Servicios de Laboratorio Clínico , Personal de Laboratorio Clínico/provisión & distribución , Jubilación , Adulto , Distribución por Edad , Servicios de Laboratorio Clínico/tendencias , Humanos , Japón , Personal de Laboratorio Clínico/tendencias , Persona de Mediana Edad , Recursos Humanos , Adulto Joven
6.
Nat Immunol ; 15(12): 1092-4, 2014 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25396341

RESUMEN

Physician scientists bridge the gap between biomedical research and clinical practice. However, the continuing decrease in number of people who choose this career path poses a threat to the advancement of biomedical science and the translation of research findings to clinical practice.


Asunto(s)
Investigación Biomédica , Personal de Laboratorio Clínico/provisión & distribución , Médicos/provisión & distribución , Investigación en Medicina Traslacional , Educación Médica , Recursos Humanos
7.
Bone Marrow Transplant ; 49(8): 1098-105, 2014 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24933209

RESUMEN

The Graft Processing subcommittee of the Worldwide Network for Blood and Marrow Transplantation wrote this guideline to assist physicians and laboratory technologists with the setting up of a cell processing laboratory (CPL) to support a hematopoietic stem cell transplant program, thereby facilitating the start-up of a transplant program in a new location and improving patient access to transplantation worldwide. This guideline describes the minimal essential features of designing such a laboratory and provides a list of equipment and supply needs and staffing recommendations. It describes the typical scope of services that a CPL is expected to perform, including product testing services, and discusses the basic principles behind the most frequent procedures. Quality management (QM) principles specific to a CPL are also discussed. References to additional guidance documents that are available worldwide to assist with QM and regulatory compliance are also provided.


Asunto(s)
Trasplante de Células Madre Hematopoyéticas , Células Madre Hematopoyéticas , Laboratorios de Hospital/organización & administración , Laboratorios de Hospital/normas , Personal de Laboratorio Clínico/organización & administración , Personal de Laboratorio Clínico/normas , Humanos , Personal de Laboratorio Clínico/provisión & distribución , Guías de Práctica Clínica como Asunto
8.
Hum Resour Health ; 11: 38, 2013 Aug 17.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23958152

RESUMEN

Effective implementation and sustainability of quality laboratory programmes in Sub-Saharan Africa relies on the development of appropriate staff retention strategies. Assessing the factors responsible for job satisfaction and retention is key for tailoring specific interventions aiming at improving the overall impact of health programmes. A survey was developed to assess these factors among 224 laboratorians working in the laboratory programme the University of Maryland implemented in seven Sub-Saharan African countries. Lack of professional development was the major reason for leaving the previous job for 28% of interviewees who changed jobs in the past five years. Professional development/training opportunities was indicated by almost 90% (195/224) of total interviewees as the most important or a very important factor for satisfaction at their current job. Similarly, regular professional development/opportunities for training was the highest rated incentive to remain at their current job by 80% (179/224). Laboratory professionals employed in the private sector were more likely to change jobs than those working in the public sector (P = 0.002). The findings were used for developing specific strategies for human resources management, in particular targeting professional development, aiming at improving laboratory professionals within the University of Maryland laboratory programme and hence its long-term sustainability.


Asunto(s)
Satisfacción en el Trabajo , Personal de Laboratorio Clínico/psicología , Reorganización del Personal/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto , África del Sur del Sahara , Factores de Edad , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Personal de Laboratorio Clínico/educación , Personal de Laboratorio Clínico/provisión & distribución , Persona de Mediana Edad , Sector Privado , Sector Público , Investigación Cualitativa , Factores Sexuales , Desarrollo de Personal , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Adulto Joven
11.
J Radiat Res ; 53(3): 489-91, 2012.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22739017

RESUMEN

This is a pilot study that aims to elucidate regional disparities in the distribution of medical resources in Japan. For this purpose, we employed the Gini coefficient (GC) in order to analyze the distribution of radiotherapy resources, which are allocated to each prefecture in Japan depending on the size of its population or physical area. Our study used data obtained from the 2005 and 2007 national surveys on the structure of radiation oncology in Japan, conducted by the Japanese Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (JASTRO). Our analysis showed that the regional disparities regarding the radiation oncologists and radiotherapy technologists were small, and concluded that such resources were almost equitably distributed. However, medical physicists are inequitably distributed. Thus, policymakers should create and implement measures to train and retain medical physicists in areas with limited radiotherapy resources. Further, almost 26% of the secondary medical service areas lacked radiotherapy institutions. We attribute this observation to the existence of tertiary medical service areas, and almost all of prefectures face a shortage of such resources. Therefore, patients' accessibility to these resources in such areas should be improved.


Asunto(s)
Oncología por Radiación , Física Sanitaria/educación , Física Sanitaria/estadística & datos numéricos , Recursos en Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Disparidades en Atención de Salud , Humanos , Japón , Personal de Laboratorio Clínico/provisión & distribución , Proyectos Piloto , Oncología por Radiación/educación , Oncología por Radiación/estadística & datos numéricos , Radioterapia , Recursos Humanos
12.
Am J Clin Pathol ; 136(6): 829-33, 2011 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22095366

RESUMEN

Forty years ago, Lundberg introduced the concept of the brain-to-brain loop for laboratory testing. In this concept, in the brain of the physician caring for the patient, the first step involves the selection of laboratory tests and the final step is the transmission of the test result to the ordering physician. There are many intermediary steps, some of which are preanalytic, ie, before performance of the test; some are analytic and relate to the actual performance of the test; and others are postanalytic and involve transmission of test results into the medical record. The introduction of this concept led to a system to identify and classify errors associated with laboratory test performance. Errors have since been considered as preanalytic, analytic, and postanalytic. During the past 4 decades, changes in medical practice have significantly altered the brain-to-brain loop for laboratory testing. This review describes the changes and their implications for analysis of errors associated with laboratory testing.


Asunto(s)
Técnicas de Laboratorio Clínico , Médicos , Técnicas de Laboratorio Clínico/normas , Errores Diagnósticos/prevención & control , Humanos , Laboratorios , Errores Médicos/prevención & control , Personal de Laboratorio Clínico/provisión & distribución , Sistemas de Atención de Punto/normas , Control de Calidad , Gestión de Riesgos/métodos
13.
J Infect Dis ; 204 Suppl 4: S1102-9, 2011 Nov 15.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-21996692

RESUMEN

Clinical and logistic systems to support the timely diagnosis of tuberculosis are currently not preventing large numbers of tuberculosis deaths in South Africa. Context-appropriate systems for the diagnosis of tuberculosis are entirely dependent on effective and responsive management of human resources and an uninterrupted supply of clinical materials. Attention to these components of the tuberculosis program is urgently needed before new diagnostic technologies can be expected to impact on tuberculosis mortality in resource constrained settings.


Asunto(s)
Tuberculosis/diagnóstico , Adulto , Niño , Técnicas de Laboratorio Clínico , Prestación de Atención de Salud , Países en Desarrollo , Humanos , Laboratorios de Hospital/organización & administración , Laboratorios de Hospital/provisión & distribución , Personal de Laboratorio Clínico/organización & administración , Personal de Laboratorio Clínico/provisión & distribución , Sudáfrica , Esputo/microbiología
14.
BMC Public Health ; 11: 812, 2011 Oct 18.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22008721

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Kenya experienced rapid scale up of HIV testing and counselling services in government health services from 2001. We set out to examine the human resource policy implications of scaling up HIV testing and counselling in Kenya and to analyse the resultant policy against a recognised theoretical framework of health policy reform (policy analysis triangle). METHODS: Qualitative methods were used to gain in-depth insights from policy makers who shaped scale up. This included 22 in-depth interviews with Voluntary Counselling and Testing (VCT) task force members, critical analysis of 53 sets of minutes and diary notes. We explore points of consensus and conflict amongst policymakers in Kenya and analyse this content to assess who favoured and resisted new policies, how scale up was achieved and the importance of the local context in which scale up occurred. RESULTS: The scale up of VCT in Kenya had a number of human resource policy implications resulting from the introduction of lay counsellors and their authorisation to conduct rapid HIV testing using newly introduced rapid testing technologies. Our findings indicate that three key groups of actors were critical: laboratory professionals, counselling associations and the Ministry of Health. Strategic alliances between donors, NGOs and these three key groups underpinned the process. The process of reaching consensus required compromise and time commitment but was critical to a unified nationwide approach. Policies around quality assurance were integral in ensuring standardisation of content and approach. CONCLUSION: The introduction and scale up of new health service initiatives such as HIV voluntary counselling and testing necessitates changes to existing health systems and modification of entrenched interests around professional counselling and laboratory testing. Our methodological approach enabled exploration of complexities of scale up of HIV testing and counselling in Kenya. We argue that a better understanding of the diverse actors, the context and the process, is required to mitigate risks and maximise impact.


Asunto(s)
Serodiagnóstico del SIDA/normas , Consejo , Fuerza Laboral en Salud , Formulación de Políticas , Consejo/normas , Política de Salud , Fuerza Laboral en Salud/normas , Humanos , Kenia , Personal de Laboratorio Clínico/normas , Personal de Laboratorio Clínico/provisión & distribución , Investigación Cualitativa , Garantía de la Calidad de Atención de Salud , Análisis y Desempeño de Tareas
15.
Health Care Manag (Frederick) ; 30(2): 148-55, 2011.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-21537137

RESUMEN

Most clinical laboratories in the nation report severe difficulties in recruitment and retention of most types of personnel. Other important factors impacting this problem include work complexities, increased automation, and a graying workforce. As a further challenge, institutional needs for clinical laboratory personnel are expected to grow significantly in the next decade. This article examines the current situation of the clinical laboratory workforce. It analyzes the different types of personnel; the managerial, supervision, and line positions that are key for different types of laboratories; the job outlook and recent projections for different types of staff; and the current issues, trends, and challenges of the laboratory workforce. Laboratory managers need to take action with strategies suggested for overcoming these challenges. Most importantly, they need to become transformational leaders by developing effective staffing models, fostering healthy and productive work environments, and creating value with a strategic management culture and implementation of knowledge management.


Asunto(s)
Administradores de Instituciones de Salud , Personal de Laboratorio Clínico/provisión & distribución , Admisión y Programación de Personal/organización & administración , Empleo/tendencias , Humanos , Estados Unidos
20.
J Allied Health ; 38(4): e113-7, 2009.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-20011812

RESUMEN

Licensing of laboratory professionals has been a controversial issue for the individuals working in these professions for many years. In New York State (NYS), licensing of laboratory professionals has been debated for over three decades and did not become law until 2005. The NYS licensure law stipulates specific educational requirements that include course work as well as curricular content areas. In addition to these educational requirements, the licensure law stipulates successful completion of a certification examination for new licensure applicants. To determine if the new legislation in NYS has had a demonstrable impact on the ability to recruit qualified laboratory professionals, a survey tool was developed to gather baseline data for a longitudinal study on the same topic. A 20 item survey along with a letter of explanation and a self addressed return envelope was distributed by mail to managers and/or supervisors of laboratories in 150 hospitals that ranged in size from small community hospitals to large medical centers across the state of New York. Questions were created addressing each of the following categories: day to day laboratory staffing, increased cost of recruiting to the facility after licensure law, impact on ability to cross train and staff evenings and weekends, and impact on patient care. It is apparent from the survey results that the employers have already started experiencing difficulty to staff certain laboratory vacancies especially for Clinical Laboratory Technologists (CLT) and fear that this trend might continue over the years not only pertaining to CLT but also to other laboratory vacancies such as Histotechnologists-Histotechnicians and Cytotechnologists. The impact of the NYS licensure law on staffing, facility costs, patient care, and laboratory professionals are discussed.


Asunto(s)
Laboratorios de Hospital/estadística & datos numéricos , Concesión de Licencias/estadística & datos numéricos , Personal de Laboratorio Clínico/provisión & distribución , Selección de Personal/organización & administración , Admisión y Programación de Personal/organización & administración , Humanos , Laboratorios de Hospital/economía , Concesión de Licencias/economía , Personal de Laboratorio Clínico/normas , New York , Calidad de la Atención de Salud/organización & administración
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