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1.
Recurso de Internet en Inglés | LIS - Localizador de Información en Salud, LIS-ES-PROF | ID: lis-LISBR1.1-47001

RESUMEN

Informe del ECDC dirigido a autoridades de Salud Pública y administradores de hospitales de países de la UE/EEE, cuyo objetivo es apoyar los planes de preparación de salud pública, relacionados con los equipos de protección personal en los centros sanitarios en los que se estén tratando a pacientes infectados por el nuevo coronavirus 2019-nCoV o en los que se sospecha la infección.


Asunto(s)
Betacoronavirus , Infecciones por Coronavirus , Equipo de Protección Personal , Planificación en Desastres , Planes de Emergencia , Planes de Contingencia , Planificación Hospitalaria , Neumonía Viral
2.
Disasters ; 44(1): 3-24, 2020 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31231813

RESUMEN

There is an assumption that with the disintegration of the Soviet Union, the Second World ceased to exist. Yet the demise of the Communist bloc as a geopolitical reality did not mean that it stopped exerting a defining influence over how people think and behave. This article examines how the postsocialist state in Kazakhstan deals with potential crises such as earthquakes and the extent to which the Soviet legacy still shapes intellectual debates, state structures, and civil society organisations in in that country. Drawing on fieldwork and interviews, this paper re-examines the Second World in its historical context and re-establishes it as a conceptual framework for considering disaster risk reduction in the former Soviet bloc. It argues that it is essential to pay attention to this legacy in Kazakhstan both in policy and practice if earthquake risk reduction is to be made more effective.


Asunto(s)
Terremotos , Socialismo , Planificación en Desastres/organización & administración , Humanos , Kazajstán , Políticas
3.
Disasters ; 44(1): 125-151, 2020 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31231816

RESUMEN

Resilience has become a dominant disaster governance discourse. It has been criticised for insufficiently addressing systemic vulnerabilities while urging the vulnerable to self-organise. The urban resilience discourse involves a particular disconnect: it evokes 'robustness' and unaffectedness at the city scale on the one hand, and self-organisation of disaster-affected people and neighbourhoods on the other. This paper explains and illustrates the dual discourse through a case study on the reconstruction of informal and low-income settlements in the aftermath of the fire in Valparaíso, Chile, in 2014, focusing on the communication contents of two non-governmental organisations (NGOs). These NGOs deployed the discourse differently, yet both called for affected neighbourhoods to build a more robust city through self-organisation, and both suggested their work as the missing link between self-organisation and robustness. A danger in deploying the dual discourse is that it requires people who live in informal and low-income settlements to earn their right to the robust city through 'better' self-organisation based on fragmented visions.


Asunto(s)
Planificación en Desastres/organización & administración , Características de la Residencia , Resiliencia Psicológica , Población Urbana , Chile , Ciudades , Humanos
4.
Disasters ; 44(1): 103-124, 2020 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31231821

RESUMEN

Urban planning can serve to minimise the effects of a tsunami and enhance community resilience. This study explores to what extent urban planning has addressed tsunami resilience in four villages on Chile's South Pacific coast, each of which was struck by tsunamis in 1960, 2010, and 2015. Through a detailed policy review and semi-structured interviews with residents, this paper analyses whether tsunami mitigation policies were incorporated into regional and local planning tools. It finds that although the government proposed relocation to tsunami-safe areas after the tsunami of 1960, urban development continued mainly in tsunami inundation zones-in the context of weak local planning frameworks and in the absence of community participation. In only one of the four case studies did participatory planning bring about the relocation of an entire village to a safe location. This paper concludes that incorporating participatory risk zone planning into urban planning enhances tsunami resilience.


Asunto(s)
Planificación de Ciudades/organización & administración , Participación de la Comunidad/psicología , Planificación en Desastres/organización & administración , Resiliencia Psicológica , Tsunamis , Chile , Humanos , Riesgo
5.
Disasters ; 44(1): 179-204, 2020 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31231847

RESUMEN

New Zealand introduced a seismic retrofitting policy in the wake of the catastrophic Canterbury earthquakes of 2010-11. The aim was to enforce seismic strengthening of earthquake-prone commercial buildings throughout the country. This study focuses on regional urban centres and the economic obstacles to strengthening their aging building stock. In investigating one town, Whanganui, we describe conditions, analyse cases, and identify incentives that apply equally to many other towns in New Zealand. We argue that incentives that suit high-growth, high-value major urban centres are a poor fit for the periphery. Around the world, many places need to upgrade their privately-owned building stock to protect it from disasters, while governments face similar challenges as they struggle to initiate the strengthening of commercial buildings. We analyse the current incentive schemes that aim to support the achievement of policy goals and suggest alternative incentive schemes that can be implemented to improve strengthening outcomes.


Asunto(s)
Planificación en Desastres , Terremotos , Arquitectura y Construcción de Instituciones de Salud , Políticas , Ciudades , Humanos , Nueva Zelanda
6.
FP Essent ; 487: 11-16, 2019 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31799815

RESUMEN

Understanding common public health threats is critical in preparing for disasters and improving community resilience. Disasters can be natural (eg, earthquakes, landslides, floods, hurricanes, wildfires) or technological (ie, man-made) (eg, mass shootings, bioterrorism). Disasters caused by climate change constitute a combination of these two types-cases in which man-made actions have long-term consequences through natural disasters. After a disaster, immediate public health concerns include access to water and sanitation. Other concerns include safety and security, possible infectious disease outbreaks, mental health issues, and increased risk of human trafficking. Disease outbreaks often occur due to lack of potable water and disruption of sewage disposal systems. Mental stress and mental disorders, such as acute stress disorders and anxiety disorders, should be recognized and addressed. Chaos after disasters can overwhelm law enforcement, increasing the risk of violence and human trafficking for vulnerable populations. Disasters can have a devastating effect on health care infrastructure, increase the need for mortuary and morgue services, and increase demands on the health care system.


Asunto(s)
Tormentas Ciclónicas , Medicina de Desastres , Planificación en Desastres , Desastres , Humanos , Salud Pública
7.
FP Essent ; 487: 17-22, 2019 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31799816

RESUMEN

The phases of emergency management are mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. Optimal disaster response requires knowledge and understanding of the US disaster response structure. In a disaster, the local government is the first to start a response. It initiates the incident command system, activates the local emergency management plan, sets up an emergency operations center (EOC), and activates mutual aid agreements as needed. Assistance from the state and federal governments may be requested. Hospitals respond using the hospital incident command system. The incident commander declares a hospital emergency, sets up an EOC, and uses the predisaster hazard vulnerability analysis tool to choose the incident action plan specific to the hazard. Principles of the crisis standard of care are used in disaster response when health care needs overwhelm available resources. Alert systems are critical to inform personnel and the public about weather conditions, evacuation orders, and closures of roads and health care facilities. Family physicians can play an important role during disaster response, including patient notification and immediate discharge or transfer of patients with less serious acute conditions from the hospital and emergency department to free beds.


Asunto(s)
Medicina de Desastres , Planificación en Desastres , Servicio de Urgencia en Hospital , Humanos , Desastres Naturales , Salud Pública
8.
FP Essent ; 487: 23-26, 2019 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31799817

RESUMEN

Family physicians are well positioned to educate patients about creating their own disaster plans. Disaster preparedness education for individuals and families should include information about creation of Go Bags and personal and family emergency kits. Patients should be advised to include an updated printed or electronic list of their drugs and dosages in case of emergencies. To ensure disaster preparedness education is provided, physicians can offer printed materials or provide information on the office website. Patients who are part of vulnerable populations (eg, elderly patients, pregnant women, children, patients with disabilities) and patients with significant health issues need individualized disaster preparedness plans. During a disaster, patients receiving chemotherapy or facility-based dialysis should be prioritized for transport to facilities that can provide these services. Family physician offices should have disaster plans that are scalable to meet needs during any type of disaster. Planning should include alert systems for patients and staff, access to electronic health records, simulations and drills, mutual aid agreements with local organizations, and personal physician and staff needs during a disaster.


Asunto(s)
Personas con Discapacidad , Medicina de Desastres , Planificación en Desastres , Desastres , Anciano , Niño , Femenino , Humanos , Embarazo
9.
FP Essent ; 487: 27-33, 2019 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31799818

RESUMEN

Volunteering during a disaster is helpful only if there is a need for assistance. Clinicians should not self-deploy to disaster areas. Disaster responders should understand the incident command system, know how to perform reverse triage, and be familiar with the three commonly used mass casualty triage algorithms. The medical supplies needed and types of injuries expected depend on the disaster type and severity. The safety of responders is a priority. As such, they may be required to receive appropriate vaccinations, take prophylactic antibiotics, use personal protective equipment, and take measures to minimize the risk of injury and manage stress. Law enforcement should ensure the safety of a disaster scene before responders enter the area. Patients with life-threatening injuries require immediate stabilization and evacuation to a health care facility. Trauma complications, vector-borne diseases, and mental disorders should be addressed the first day after a disaster and should be managed continuously.


Asunto(s)
Medicina de Desastres , Planificación en Desastres , Servicios Médicos de Urgencia , Incidentes con Víctimas en Masa , Humanos , Triaje
10.
J Bus Contin Emer Plan ; 13(2): 102-110, 2019 Jan 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31779738

RESUMEN

In today's 24/7 business world, any disruption of operations is often disastrous - from both a reputational as well as a financial perspective. This paper discusses why this reality has diminished the perceived value of traditional 'recovery capability' business continuity management programmes among many organisations and executives. The paper proposes three steps to resiliency to show how resiliency programmes can reposition themselves to reverse this perception and provide increased value to the organisations they protect. The paper describes innovative, concrete steps to develop a programme that spans from a simple compliance, or recovery, programme, to becoming a resiliency risk service provider that can become the backbone of an organisation's ability to maintain 24/7 availability.


Asunto(s)
Planificación en Desastres , Desastres , Comercio , Organizaciones , Gestión de Riesgos
11.
J Bus Contin Emer Plan ; 13(2): 111-119, 2019 Jan 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31779739

RESUMEN

Responding to a major disaster requires coordination and communication across all critical infrastructure sectors, including emergency management and drinking water and wastewater. This paper describes how in planning for an earthquake in the Cascadia Subduction Zone, the various bureaus in the City of Portland developed robust relationships by participating in joint exercises and events, coordinating on damage assessments and collaborating on planning efforts. The paper also describes the various tools and resources provided by the US Environmental Protection Agency to help water utilities and emergency management agencies to strengthen their relationships.


Asunto(s)
Planificación en Desastres , Desastres , Agua Potable , Terremotos , Aguas Residuales
12.
J Bus Contin Emer Plan ; 13(2): 120-135, 2019 Jan 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31779740

RESUMEN

The hype surrounding cloud-based disaster recovery (DR) continues to gain steam - and with good reason. That said, due to cost, compatibility and/or organisational restrictions, cloud-based DR is not necessarily the best fit for all systems. This paper presents case studies and a structured approach to evaluate the various options, including public/private cloud DR, DR as a service (DRaaS) and hybrid solutions. For example, the pay-per-use model for cloud DR saves money while the cloud environment is dormant, but results in higher run-time costs than co-location or on-premises solutions when DR is executed. Similarly, organisations need to understand the range of DRaaS options to make an informed decision. Where cloud is not a good fit for all systems, a hybrid solution can satisfy conflicting requirements while leveraging the benefits of cloud where appropriate. Finally, organisational constraints can tip the balance away from what may appear to be the best fit on paper.


Asunto(s)
Planificación en Desastres , Desastres , Nube Computacional , Sistemas de Computación
13.
J Bus Contin Emer Plan ; 13(2): 136-149, 2019 Jan 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31779741

RESUMEN

Nearly one fifth of the US population has a disability that impacts their communicative, mental or physical function. There are often not enough opportunities for people with disabilities to receive basic emergency preparedness training to help them be more resilient in times of crisis as preparedness education typically targets the general population. The Kent County Health Department, in collaboration with local disability advocates and preparedness educators, developed an inclusive preparedness programme to provide basic preparedness training for the whole community. This paper describes the evolution of the programme along with lessons learned by the participants and instructors.


Asunto(s)
Defensa Civil , Personas con Discapacidad , Planificación en Desastres , Comunicación , Humanos
14.
J Bus Contin Emer Plan ; 13(2): 150-159, 2019 Jan 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31779742

RESUMEN

Over the years, the 'cloud' has gained increasing traction in assisting organisations to become more resilient. Building on such successes as migrating office applications using Office 365, organisations are now looking to move disaster recovery to the cloud as a viable solution to protect critical applications at the time of disaster. This paper explores one organisation's journey through the maze that is disaster recovery cloud deployment. Using a case study format, it will explore the organisation's previous experience with cloud applications, the challenges it faced, the solutions put in place to address those challenges, the results of the deployment, the risks, and finally the benefits of the solution going forward. Finally, the paper will walk the reader through the ten steps that an organisation should take to move its own disaster recovery environment to the cloud.


Asunto(s)
Planificación en Desastres , Desastres , Organizaciones
15.
J Bus Contin Emer Plan ; 13(2): 160-173, 2019 Jan 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31779743

RESUMEN

Understanding the explosive threat landscape is paramount to having a sound evacuation protocol. Security procedures and response to threats can no longer be static and uniformly applied; rather, they must be tailored to ever-evolving terrorist and criminal tactics. This paper introduces recent statistics regarding the decreasing number of domestic bombings in the USA. Data related to the increasing number of bomb threats is also brought into the discussion, along with data showing how threats are almost exclusively hoaxes. A case study of the disparate responses of two major cities to the same bomb threat reveals how and why the threat was handled differently, along with ramifications. Terrorist and criminal bombings often target evacuees and first responders, and devices, if they exist, are generally small and ineffective; therefore, sheltering in place, in the protection of the building, may be a better course of action than evacuation. The concept of treating a bomb threat as a possible dry run is discussed, along with information regarding detection of surveillance. The paper also ventures beyond data-gathering and explores the use of intuition in decision-making. These perspectives should be factored into bomb threat preparation, mitigation and response policy and procedures.


Asunto(s)
Bombas (Dispositivos Explosivos) , Planificación en Desastres , Socorristas , Terrorismo , Humanos
16.
J Bus Contin Emer Plan ; 13(2): 174-185, 2019 Jan 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31779744

RESUMEN

Within South Africa and on the African continent, the various reports of the KING Committees on Corporate Governance have become guiding principles for organisations in both the public and private sector. This paper focuses on the KING IV report and discusses its relevance to the different but interrelated fields of business continuity, organisational resilience and risk management. The paper suggests that organisations seeking to comply with KING IV will need to familiarise themselves with ISO 22301 and the BCI Good Practice Guidelines, as well as ISO 31000.


Asunto(s)
Comercio , Planificación en Desastres , Organizaciones , Sector Privado , Gestión de Riesgos
17.
J Bus Contin Emer Plan ; 13(2): 186-192, 2019 Jan 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31779745

RESUMEN

Nothing strikes a heightened level of awareness among coastal and island communities, emergency managers and critical infrastructure owners like the start of another hurricane season. Even though the season starts at the same time every year - 15th May for the Eastern Pacific region, and 1st June for the Atlantic and Central Pacific regions - too many organisations, agencies and communities are ill-prepared for a hurricane to strike. For emergency management professionals and critical infrastructure owners, however, this is not an option: the communities served by these organisations are counting on them to be prepared. This paper provides a reminder that when it comes to getting ready, there is no time like the present.


Asunto(s)
Tormentas Ciclónicas , Planificación en Desastres , Urgencias Médicas , Humanos
18.
J Emerg Manag ; 17(5): 343-347, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31736040

RESUMEN

Communities need to be aware of all the risks and consequences of disasters, which have increased both in numbers, economic and human losses in the recent decades. This study aims to show how town watching technique has a positive effect in raising disaster awareness in different types of learning experiences for different target groups so that individuals understand the disaster risks and make plans to decrease their vulnerabilities. Application of town watching for two different target audiences are explained; undergraduate engineering major students, local government officials, and volunteer community members. Results of surveys conducted for an elective humanities course for engineering major undergraduates named disaster awareness are presented. Interviews with volunteers from other target groups who participated in community-based disaster capacity building projects are also included in this study. It can be clearly seen that town watching creates synergy while disaster awareness is internalized, and the participants learn about disasters, risks, and resources at hand that may also help toward the countries' resilience to disasters.


Asunto(s)
Creación de Capacidad , Planificación en Desastres , Desastres , Desastres/prevención & control , Humanos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Voluntarios
19.
J Emerg Manag ; 17(5): 349-357, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31736041

RESUMEN

At a national and international level, governments have advanced all-hazards readiness and implemented disaster management systems within multiple industries, services, and sectors. This scope included public health agencies and healthcare providers, whose roles evolved in purpose and expectation within their respective communities, but their core mission remained unchanged. Real-world emergencies and disasters routinely challenge hospitals and affirm that healthcare providers must be prepared to provide, sustain, and expand critical services during times of crisis. This study reviews emergency management (EM) and disaster preparedness programing specifically within hospitals and healthcare systems to assess overall effectiveness. Analysis includes a review of existing program administration literature and regulatory and accreditation agency standards. Initial findings suggest ongoing efforts are needed nationwide to improve hospital EM capabilities and enhance the resiliency of American healthcare infrastructure. Identified gaps include limitations of pertinent research, inconsistent program evaluation metrics and processes, and hindering perceptions of profession role and purpose. Recommendations are provided to refine the traditional hospital EM profession and advance overall program administration competencies, as well as considerations for future research opportunities.


Asunto(s)
Planificación en Desastres/organización & administración , Desastres , Urgencias Médicas , Servicios Médicos de Urgencia/organización & administración , Competencia Profesional , Personal de Salud , Hospitales , Humanos , Salud Pública , Estados Unidos
20.
J Emerg Manag ; 17(5): 371-379, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31736043

RESUMEN

Emergency management has traditionally been led by an attitude to react and respond and implement effective recovery efforts. The focus has now shifted to a preparedness perspective, promoting measures which encourage the public and responders to be better equipped leading to an increased level of resiliency. Effective use of Recreation-based stakeholders and facilities, in emergency planning, boasts a number of positive elements to all phases of emergency management. A literature review will focus on the importance of Recreation in relation to preparedness. Findings will seek to articulate how the involvement of Recreation, in the realm of preparedness, builds community resilience, enhances response and recovery operations and provides a unique leadership and knowledge base regarding the use of recreational infrastructure. This effort in turn leads to a community more capable of managing an incident and returning to normalcy.


Asunto(s)
Defensa Civil , Planificación en Desastres , Urgencias Médicas , Recreación , Canadá , Humanos
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