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1.
Rev. enferm. UERJ ; 28: e39729, jan.-dez. 2020.
Artículo en Inglés, Portugués | LILACS, BDENF - Enfermería | ID: biblio-1116093

RESUMEN

Objetivo: identificar as principais causas de óbito entre adolescentes de 10 a 19 anos em um município no interior do estado do Rio de Janeiro. Método: estudo descritivo, exploratório de abordagem quantitativa, a partir do levantamento de dados em registros de óbitos do município de Rio das Ostras. O desfecho foi causa básica do óbito. Os dados foram processados no Programa R. Resultados: foram observados 84 (100%) óbitos, com maior prevalência entre adolescentes de 17 a 19 anos, 49 (58,3%), do sexo masculino, 71 (84,5%) e de cor parda, 38 (45,2%). As principais causas de óbitos foram homicídio/perfuração por arma de fogo, 35 (41,7%), e acidentes, 32 (38,1%). Conclusão: o reconhecimento dessa vulnerabilidade configura importante caminho para o enfrentamento e resolução desse grave problema, sobretudo municípios localizados longe de centros urbanos, parece muitas vezes esquecido, no que tange o cumprimento de estatutos e políticas públicas a favor desse grupo etário.


Objective: to identify the main causes of death among adolescents aged 10 to 19 years in a municipality in the state of Rio de Janeiro. Method: in this exploratory, descriptive, quantitative study, based on data collected from death records in the municipality of Rio das Ostras, the basic cause of death was the outcome. The data were processed in the statistics software, R. Results: of the 84 (100%) deaths observed, prevalence was higher among adolescents aged 17 to 19 years (49; 58.3%), males (71; 84.5%), and pardos (38; 45.2%). The main causes of deaths were firearm Injury / homicide (35; 41.7%) and accidents (32; 38.1%). Conclusion: one important step towards confronting and solving this serious problem is to acknowledge this vulnerability, especially in municipalities distant from urban centers, which often seem neglected as regards compliance with statutes and public policies in favor of this age group.


Objetivo: identificar las principales causas de muerte entre adolescentes de 10 a 19 años en un municipio del estado de Río de Janeiro. Método: en este estudio exploratorio, descriptivo, cuantitativo, basado en los datos recopilados de los registros de defunciones en el municipio de Rio das Ostras, la causa básica de la muerte fue el resultado. Los datos se procesaron en el programa estadístico R. Resultados: de las 84 (100%) muertes observadas, la prevalencia fue mayor entre los adolescentes de 17 a 19 años (49; 58.3%), varones (71; 84.5%) y pardos (38; 45,2%). Las principales causas de muerte fueron lesiones por arma de fuego / homicidio (35; 41.7%) y accidentes (32; 38.1%). Conclusión: un paso importante para enfrentar y resolver este grave problema es reconocer esta vulnerabilidad, especialmente en municipios alejados de los centros urbanos, que a menudo parecen descuidados en cuanto al cumplimiento de los estatutos y las políticas públicas a favor de este grupo de edad.


Asunto(s)
Humanos , Masculino , Femenino , Niño , Adolescente , Adulto Joven , Accidentes/estadística & datos numéricos , Causas de Muerte , Poblaciones Vulnerables/estadística & datos numéricos , Homicidio/estadística & datos numéricos , Brasil , Epidemiología Descriptiva , Factores de Edad , Vulnerabilidad Social , Mortalidad Prematura
2.
S Afr Med J ; 110(7): 629-634, 2020 05 26.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32880337

RESUMEN

Pandemics challenge clinicians and scientists in many ways, especially when the virus is novel and disease expression becomes variable or unpredictable. Under such circumstances, research becomes critical to inform clinical care and protect future patients. Given that severely ill patients admitted to intensive care units are at high risk of mortality, establishing the cause of death at a histopathological level could prove invaluable in contributing to the understanding of COVID-19. Postmortem examination including autopsies would be optimal. However, in the context of high contagion and limited personal protective equipment, full autopsies are not being conducted in South Africa (SA). A compromise would require tissue biopsies and samples to be taken immediately after death to obtain diagnostic information, which could potentially guide care of future patients, or generate hypotheses for finding needed solutions. In the absence of an advance written directive (including a will or medical record) providing consent for postmortem research, proxy consent is the next best option. However, obtaining consent from distraught family members, under circumstances of legally mandated lockdown when strict infection control measures limit visitors in hospitals, is challenging. Their extreme vulnerability and emotional distress make full understanding of the rationale and consent process difficult either before or upon death of a family member. While it is morally distressing to convey a message of death telephonically, it is inhumane to request consent for urgent research in the same conversation. Careful balancing of the principles of autonomy, non-maleficence and justice becomes an ethical imperative. Under such circumstances, a waiver of consent, preferably followed by deferred proxy consent, granted by a research ethics committee in keeping with national ethics guidance and legislation, would fulfil the basic premise of care and research: first do no harm. This article examines the SA research ethics framework, guidance and legislation to justify support for a waiver of consent followed by deferred proxy consent, when possible, in urgent research after death to inform current and future care to contain the pandemic in the public interest.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Cuidados Críticos/ética , Enfermedad Crítica/terapia , Mortalidad Hospitalaria , Consentimiento Informado/ética , Pandemias/estadística & datos numéricos , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Causas de Muerte , Infecciones por Coronavirus/prevención & control , Cuidados Críticos/legislación & jurisprudencia , Enfermedad Crítica/mortalidad , Países en Desarrollo , Femenino , Humanos , Control de Infecciones/organización & administración , Unidades de Cuidados Intensivos/ética , Unidades de Cuidados Intensivos/estadística & datos numéricos , Masculino , Evaluación de Necesidades , Pandemias/prevención & control , Neumonía Viral/prevención & control , Proyectos de Investigación , Medición de Riesgo , Sudáfrica , Poblaciones Vulnerables/estadística & datos numéricos
3.
Sensors (Basel) ; 20(17)2020 Sep 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32887338

RESUMEN

COVID-19 has shown a relatively low case fatality rate in young healthy individuals, with the majority of this group being asymptomatic or having mild symptoms. However, the severity of the disease among the elderly as well as in individuals with underlying health conditions has caused significant mortality rates worldwide. Understanding this variance amongst different sectors of society and modelling this will enable the different levels of risk to be determined to enable strategies to be applied to different groups. Long-established compartmental epidemiological models like SIR and SEIR do not account for the variability encountered in the severity of the SARS-CoV-2 disease across different population groups. The objective of this study is to investigate how a reduction in the exposure of vulnerable individuals to COVID-19 can minimise the number of deaths caused by the disease, using the UK as a case study. To overcome the limitation of long-established compartmental epidemiological models, it is proposed that a modified model, namely SEIR-v, through which the population is separated into two groups regarding their vulnerability to SARS-CoV-2 is applied. This enables the analysis of the spread of the epidemic when different contention measures are applied to different groups in society regarding their vulnerability to the disease. A Monte Carlo simulation (100,000 runs) along the proposed SEIR-v model is used to study the number of deaths which could be avoided as a function of the decrease in the exposure of vulnerable individuals to the disease. The results indicate a large number of deaths could be avoided by a slight realistic decrease in the exposure of vulnerable groups to the disease. The mean values across the simulations indicate 3681 and 7460 lives could be saved when such exposure is reduced by 10% and 20% respectively. From the encouraging results of the modelling a number of mechanisms are proposed to limit the exposure of vulnerable individuals to the disease. One option could be the provision of a wristband to vulnerable people and those without a smartphone and contact-tracing app, filling the gap created by systems relying on smartphone apps only. By combining very dense contact tracing data from smartphone apps and wristband signals with information about infection status and symptoms, vulnerable people can be protected and kept safer.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/prevención & control , Infecciones por Coronavirus/transmisión , Transmisión de Enfermedad Infecciosa/estadística & datos numéricos , Modelos Teóricos , Pandemias/prevención & control , Neumonía Viral/prevención & control , Neumonía Viral/transmisión , Salud Pública/métodos , Cuarentena/organización & administración , Poblaciones Vulnerables , Trazado de Contacto/métodos , Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Brotes de Enfermedades/prevención & control , Directrices para la Planificación en Salud , Necesidades y Demandas de Servicios de Salud , Humanos , Control de Infecciones/métodos , Control de Infecciones/organización & administración , Control de Infecciones/estadística & datos numéricos , Invenciones/estadística & datos numéricos , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Servicios Preventivos de Salud/métodos , Servicios Preventivos de Salud/organización & administración , Servicios Preventivos de Salud/normas , Salud Pública/estadística & datos numéricos , Administración en Salud Pública/métodos , Cuarentena/métodos , Cuarentena/estadística & datos numéricos , Reino Unido/epidemiología , Poblaciones Vulnerables/estadística & datos numéricos
4.
BMJ Glob Health ; 5(8)2020 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32839197

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic calls for precision public health reflecting our improved understanding of who is the most vulnerable and their geographical location. We created three vulnerability indices to identify areas and people who require greater support while elucidating health inequities to inform emergency response in Kenya. METHODS: Geospatial indicators were assembled to create three vulnerability indices; Social VulnerabilityIndex (SVI), Epidemiological Vulnerability Index (EVI) and a composite of the two, that is, Social Epidemiological Vulnerability Index (SEVI) resolved at 295 subcounties in Kenya. SVI included 19 indicators that affect the spread of disease; socioeconomic deprivation, access to services and population dynamics, whereas EVI comprised 5 indicators describing comorbidities associated with COVID-19 severe disease progression. The indicators were scaled to a common measurement scale, spatially overlaid via arithmetic mean and equally weighted. The indices were classified into seven classes, 1-2 denoted low vulnerability and 6-7, high vulnerability. The population within vulnerabilities classes was quantified. RESULTS: The spatial variation of each index was heterogeneous across Kenya. Forty-nine northwestern and partly eastern subcounties (6.9 million people) were highly vulnerable, whereas 58 subcounties (9.7 million people) in western and central Kenya were the least vulnerable for SVI. For EVI, 48 subcounties (7.2 million people) in central and the adjacent areas and 81 subcounties (13.2 million people) in northern Kenya were the most and least vulnerable, respectively. Overall (SEVI), 46 subcounties (7.0 million people) around central and southeastern were more vulnerable, whereas 81 subcounties (14.4 million people) were least vulnerable. CONCLUSION: The vulnerability indices created are tools relevant to the county, national government and stakeholders for prioritisation and improved planning. The heterogeneous nature of the vulnerability indices underpins the need for targeted and prioritised actions based on the needs across the subcounties.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus , Pandemias , Neumonía Viral , Salud Pública , Poblaciones Vulnerables , Betacoronavirus , Comorbilidad , Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Infecciones por Coronavirus/prevención & control , Humanos , Kenia/epidemiología , Pandemias/prevención & control , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Neumonía Viral/prevención & control , Factores Socioeconómicos , Análisis Espacial , Poblaciones Vulnerables/etnología , Poblaciones Vulnerables/estadística & datos numéricos
5.
Int J Equity Health ; 19(1): 141, 2020 08 20.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32819364

RESUMEN

An estimated 2 million foreign-born migrants of working age (15-64) were living in South Africa (SA) in 2017. Structural and practical xenophobia has driven asylum-seekers, refugees, and undocumented migrants in SA to abject poverty and misery. The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) containment measures adopted by the SA government through the lockdown of the nation have tremendously deepened the unequal treatment of asylum-seekers and refugees in SA. This can be seen through the South African government's lack of consideration of this marginalized population in economic, poverty, and hunger alleviation schemes. Leaving this category of our society out of the national response safety nets may lead to negative coping strategies causing mental health issues and secondary health concerns. An effective response to the socioeconomic challenges imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic should consider the economic and health impact of the pandemic on asylum-seekers, refugees, and undocumented migrants.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Disparidades en el Estado de Salud , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Refugiados/estadística & datos numéricos , Inmigrantes Indocumentados/estadística & datos numéricos , Poblaciones Vulnerables/estadística & datos numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , Infecciones por Coronavirus/prevención & control , Gobierno , Humanos , Persona de Mediana Edad , Pandemias/prevención & control , Neumonía Viral/prevención & control , Factores Socioeconómicos , Sudáfrica/epidemiología , Adulto Joven
6.
Health Aff (Millwood) ; 39(8): 1362-1367, 2020 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32744946

RESUMEN

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has highlighted the importance of intensive care unit (ICU) beds in preventing death from the severe respiratory illness associated with COVID-19. However, the availability of ICU beds is highly variable across the US, and health care resources are generally more plentiful in wealthier communities. We examined disparities in community ICU beds by US communities' median household income. We found a large gap in access by income: 49 percent of the lowest-income communities had no ICU beds in their communities, whereas only 3 percent of the highest-income communities had no ICU beds. Income disparities in the availability of community ICU beds were more acute in rural areas than in urban areas. Policies that facilitate hospital coordination are urgently needed to address shortages in ICU hospital bed supply to mitigate the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on mortality rates in low-income communities.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Cuidados Críticos/organización & administración , Accesibilidad a los Servicios de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Disparidades en Atención de Salud/economía , Unidades de Cuidados Intensivos/estadística & datos numéricos , Pandemias/estadística & datos numéricos , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Infecciones por Coronavirus/terapia , Femenino , Necesidades y Demandas de Servicios de Salud , Capacidad de Camas en Hospitales , Humanos , Renta , Masculino , Pandemias/prevención & control , Neumonía Viral/terapia , Pobreza/estadística & datos numéricos , Estados Unidos , Poblaciones Vulnerables/estadística & datos numéricos
9.
J Am Med Dir Assoc ; 21(7): 924-927, 2020 Jul.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32674820

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: In the United States, home health agencies (HHAs) provide essential services for patients recovering from post-acute care and older adults who are aging in place. During the COVID-19 pandemic, HHAs may face additional challenges caring for these vulnerable patients. Our objective was to explore COVID-19 preparedness of US HHAs and compare results by urban/rural location. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: Using a stratified random sample of 978 HHAs, we conducted a 22-item online survey from April 10 to 17, 2020. METHODS: Summary statistics were computed; open-ended narrative responses were synthesized using qualitative methods. RESULTS: Similar to national data, most responding HHAs (n = 121, 12% response rate) were for-profit and located in the South. Most HHAs had infectious disease outbreaks included in their emergency preparedness plan (76%), a staff member in charge of outbreak/disaster preparedness (84%), and had provided their staff with COVID-19 education and training (97%). More urban HHAs had cared for confirmed and recovered COVID-19 patients than rural HHAs, but urban HHAs had less capacity to test for COVID-19 than rural HHAs (9% vs 21%). Most (69%) experienced patient census declines and had a current and/or anticipated supply shortage. Rural agencies were affected less than urban agencies. HHAs have already rationed (69%) or implemented extended use (55%) or limited reuse (61%) of personal protective equipment (PPE). Many HHAs reported accessing supplemental PPE from state/local resources, donations, and do-it-yourself efforts; more rural HHAs had accessed these additional resources compared with urban HHAs. CONCLUSIONS/IMPLICATIONS: This survey reveals challenges that HHAs are having in responding to the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly among urban agencies. Of greatest concern are the declines in patient census, which drastically affect agency revenue, and the shortages of PPE and disinfectants. Without proper protection, HHA clinicians are at risk of self-exposure and viral transmission to patients and vulnerable family members.


Asunto(s)
Defensa Civil/organización & administración , Infecciones por Coronavirus/prevención & control , Brotes de Enfermedades/prevención & control , Agencias de Atención a Domicilio/organización & administración , Evaluación de Resultado en la Atención de Salud , Pandemias/prevención & control , Neumonía Viral/prevención & control , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Control de Infecciones , Masculino , Pandemias/estadística & datos numéricos , Equipo de Protección Personal/estadística & datos numéricos , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Medición de Riesgo , Población Rural , Estados Unidos , Población Urbana , Poblaciones Vulnerables/estadística & datos numéricos
10.
PLoS One ; 15(7): e0235094, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32609731

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Between 2014 and 2017, a program aimed at reducing HIV risk and promoting safe sex through consistent use of condoms sought to work through addressing social and economic vulnerabilities and strengthening community-led organizations (COs) of female sex workers (FSWs). This study examines if the program was effective by studying relationship between strengthening of COs, vulnerability reduction, and sustaining of consistent condom use behavior among FSWs. METHODS: We used a longitudinal study design to assess the change in outcomes. A three-stage sampling design was used to select FSWs for the study. Panel data of 2085 FSWs selected from 38 COs across five states of India was used to examine the change in various outcomes from 2015 (Survey Round 1) to 2017 (Survey Round 2). The CO level program pillar measuring institutional development assessed performance of COs in six domains critical for any organization's functionality and sustainability: governance, project management, financial management, program monitoring, advocacy and networking, and resource mobilization. Overall, 32 indicators from all these domains were used to compute the CO strength score. A score was computed by taking mean of average dimension scores. The overall score was divided into two groups based on the median cutoff; COs which scored below the median were considered to have low CO strength, while COs which scored above or equal to median were considered to have high CO strength. Multivariable regression modeling techniques were used to examine the effect of program pillars on outcome measures. RESULTS: Analyses showed a significant improvement in the strength of the COs over time; percentage of COs having high strength improved from 50% in 2015 to 87% in Round 2. The improvement in CO's strength increased financial security (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR]: 2.18, p<0.01), social welfare security (AOR: 1.71, p<0.01), and socio-legal security (AOR: 2.20, p<0.01) among FSWs. Further, improvement in financial security led to significant increase in consistent condom use with client among FSWs (AOR: 1.69, p<0.01) who were members of COs having high strength. Sustained consistent condom use was positively associated with young age (<30 years), ability to negotiate with clients for condom use, membership in self-help groups, high self-efficacy, self-confidence, and client solicitation in streets and brothels. CONCLUSIONS: Improving financial security and strengthening FSW led CO can improve sustained and consistent condom use. In addition, the program should focus on enhancing ability of FSWs to negotiate with clients for condom use, promote membership in self-help groups and target FSWs who are 30 years or older, and soliciting from homes to sustain consistent condom use across all FSWs.


Asunto(s)
Sexo Seguro , Trabajo Sexual , Trabajadores Sexuales , Adulto , Condones/estadística & datos numéricos , Femenino , Humanos , India , Sexo Seguro/estadística & datos numéricos , Grupos de Autoayuda/estadística & datos numéricos , Trabajo Sexual/estadística & datos numéricos , Trabajadores Sexuales/estadística & datos numéricos , Poblaciones Vulnerables/estadística & datos numéricos
11.
Methodist Debakey Cardiovasc J ; 16(2): 146-154, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32670475

RESUMEN

Since early 2020, the world has been facing a pandemic caused by the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. Although this positive single-stranded RNA virus primarily causes pulmonary infection and failure, it has been associated with multiple cardiovascular diseases including troponin elevation, myocarditis, and cardiac arrhythmias. Cardiac patients are susceptible to developing more severe infection from SARS-COV-2, making management complicated. In this review we discuss the cardiac manifestations of COVID-19 infections as well as considerations for the management of primary cardiac pathologies during this pandemic.


Asunto(s)
Enfermedades Cardiovasculares/epidemiología , Causas de Muerte , Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Pandemias/estadística & datos numéricos , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Adulto , Factores de Edad , Anciano , Arritmias Cardíacas/diagnóstico , Arritmias Cardíacas/epidemiología , Enfermedades Cardiovasculares/diagnóstico por imagen , China/epidemiología , Comorbilidad , Infecciones por Coronavirus/prevención & control , Femenino , Salud Global , Humanos , Imagen por Resonancia Cinemagnética/métodos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Infarto del Miocardio/diagnóstico , Infarto del Miocardio/epidemiología , Miocarditis/diagnóstico , Miocarditis/epidemiología , Pandemias/prevención & control , Neumonía Viral/prevención & control , Prevalencia , Medición de Riesgo , Índice de Severidad de la Enfermedad , Factores Sexuales , Análisis de Supervivencia , Tomografía Computarizada por Rayos X/métodos , Troponina T/sangre , Poblaciones Vulnerables/estadística & datos numéricos
13.
Rev Bras Enferm ; 73Suppl 2(Suppl 2): e20200302, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés, Portugués | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32609250

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To examine the impact of the infection by the novel coronavirus on Brazilian children in situation of social vulnerability based on the Millennium Sustainable Development Goals. METHOD: Reflective study based on discursive formulation in three aspects: principles of the objectives and goals for the millennium sustainable development; impact of the pandemic on the health of children and their families living in social vulnerability; and the role of pediatric nursing in the care provided - limits and challenges. RESULTS: In January 2020, the news of COVID 19 is released as a pandemic. In Brazil, children and families are still without access to basic rights, thereby increasing their risks of social vulnerability because of the quarantine. The nursing field has an important role in monitoring children and their families, offering guidance in search for solutions and preventing contamination. CONCLUSION: There are still challenges to be overcome by the children and their families in situations of vulnerability against COVID-19.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Evaluación del Impacto en la Salud , Pandemias/prevención & control , Pandemias/estadística & datos numéricos , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Salud Pública/estadística & datos numéricos , Poblaciones Vulnerables/estadística & datos numéricos , Adolescente , Betacoronavirus , Brasil/epidemiología , Niño , Preescolar , Femenino , Humanos , Lactante , Recién Nacido , Masculino
16.
Eur Psychiatry ; 63(1): e52, 2020 06 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-456901

RESUMEN

As COVID-19 has plagued our world, the term "social distancing" has been widely used with the aim to encourage the general population to physically distance themselves from others in order to reduce the spread of the virus. However, this term can have unintended but detrimental effects, as it evokes negative feelings of being ignored, unwelcome, left alone with one's own fears, and even excluded from society. These feelings may be stronger in people with mental illnesses and in socio-economically disadvantaged groups, such as stigmatized minorities, migrants, and homeless persons [1], many of them also having high risk for suicidal behaviors [2]. Mental health disorders are pervasive worldwide; the global burden accounting for approximately 21.2-32.4% of years lived with disability-more than any other group of illnesses [3]. So, the vulnerable group of people with mental health disorders represents a considerable share of the total global population.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Emociones , Trastornos Mentales/epidemiología , Trastornos Mentales/psicología , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Distancia Social , Terminología como Asunto , Niño , Personas con Discapacidad/psicología , Personas con Discapacidad/estadística & datos numéricos , Femenino , Humanos , Salud Mental/estadística & datos numéricos , Pandemias , Estereotipo , Poblaciones Vulnerables/psicología , Poblaciones Vulnerables/estadística & datos numéricos
17.
Rev Med Suisse ; 16(698): 1262-1264, 2020 Jun 17.
Artículo en Francés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-606829

RESUMEN

The current new coronavirus pandemic has highlighted the importance of taking into consideration population groups particularly at risk of contracting Covid-19 disease or developing severe forms of the disease. The medical literature, the press and the authorities have thus stepped up the use of the expression «â€…vulnerable populations ¼ in recent weeks to refer to it. However, behind this general expression there are diverse but often interdependent realities whose specific consideration and understanding seem essential for the effective management of the epidemic and its health and socio-economic consequences.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Poblaciones Vulnerables/estadística & datos numéricos , Betacoronavirus/patogenicidad , Infecciones por Coronavirus/economía , Humanos , Pandemias/economía , Neumonía Viral/economía
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