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1.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(24): e20469, 2020 Jun 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32541468

RESUMEN

RATIONALE: Dislocation, wear, metallosis, and implant loosening are well-known complications of a failed total-hip arthroplasty (THA), and acetabular liner dissociation is an uncommon but catastrophic complication. To our knowledge, this is the first description of metallosis due to acetabular liner dissociation, but not presenting as a result of wear of a metal-on-metal articulation and a polyethylene liner of other articulation. PATIENT CONCERNS: We described a 61-year-old man who had a 2-year history of pain in the right groin region after THA. Postoperative period of primary THA was uneventful. However, he did not undergo postoperative follow-up, and often participated in strenuous sports activities including mountain climbing and long-distance running. DIAGNOSIS: Radiographs demonstrated superior subluxation of the femoral head and direct articulation and abrasion wear of the ceramic femoral head on the cup. Preoperative laboratory data revealed no signs of infection. INTERVENTIONS: We performed revision THA using a direct lateral approach with ceramic-on-ceramic hip prosthesis. OUTCOMES: Postoperatively, the patient wore a hip orthosis for 6 weeks to prevent dislocation but was allowed full weight bearing. At 1-year follow-up, there was no recurrence of hip pain. LESSONS: Wear of THA components can result in catastrophic failure of the implants and significant soft-tissue metallosis. Therefore, regular postoperative follow-up is necessary for early intervention, even in those with asymptomatic hips.


Asunto(s)
Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Cadera/efectos adversos , Prótesis de Cadera/efectos adversos , Falla de Prótesis/etiología , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Reoperación
2.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(22): e20468, 2020 May 29.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32481454

RESUMEN

RATIONALE: Although prosthetic loosening caused by poor prosthesis positioning is common after total hip arthroplasty (THA), an inflammation caused by poor prosthesis positioning is rare. We report a case in which a THA-related inflammation was indeed caused by poor prosthesis positioning. PATIENT CONCERNS: A 64-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with a history of persistent hip pain that had started after she had undergone THA 4 years previously. In addition, she complained of swelling of the hip that had begun 2 months ago. DIAGNOSIS: Her pain and swelling was initially thought to be caused by an infection, but was eventually diagnosed as inflammation caused by prosthesis loosening, that was in line with finding that her preoperative and intraoperative cultures showed no bacterial or fungal growth. This case posed many questions and difficulties during the diagnostic and treatment stages. INTERVENTIONS: Routine diagnosis of periprosthetic suspected infection includes blood test, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein level, bacterial and fungal cultures, and pathology examinations, which were performed. Finally, this case was eventually diagnosed as inflammation, the prosthesis was removed and antibiotics administered. It was replaced 6 months later. OUTCOMES: Except for the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein levels, X rays, routine blood tests, bacterial and fungal cultures (3 times), and other tests were within the normal range. Positive pathological examinations of synovium during and after the operation indicated chronic inflammation and eliminated inflammation in other areas. Postoperative effect of the second-stage THA was good, with the patient highly satisfied after 6 months. LESSONS: The operative method and position of a joint prosthesis are extremely important. A poorly positioned prosthesis worsens with wear. Wear particles then lead to long-term localized aseptic inflammation with swelling and fever and eventually to low-virulence infection. Prosthetic loosening may be found even at long-term follow-up evaluations after THA in patients with a poorly positioned prosthesis, eventually leading to the need for revision. We had 2 questions: should early revision be considered when a prosthesis had not been properly positioned? In the absence of any confirmation of infection, should a patient suspected of having a periprosthetic infection be treated as early as possible?


Asunto(s)
Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Cadera , Prótesis de Cadera , Inflamación/etiología , Falla de Prótesis , Diagnóstico Diferencial , Femenino , Humanos , Inflamación/diagnóstico , Inflamación/patología , Inflamación/terapia , Persona de Mediana Edad
3.
Bone Joint J ; 102-B(6_Supple_A): 3-9, 2020 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32475278

RESUMEN

AIMS: The aim of this study was to determine if a three-month course of microorganism-directed oral antibiotics reduces the rate of failure due to further infection following two-stage revision for chronic prosthetic joint infection (PJI) of the hip and knee. METHODS: A total of 185 patients undergoing a two-stage revision in seven different centres were prospectively enrolled. Of these patients, 93 were randomized to receive microorganism-directed oral antibiotics for three months following reimplantation; 88 were randomized to receive no antibiotics, and four were withdrawn before randomization. Of the 181 randomized patients, 28 were lost to follow-up, six died before two years follow-up, and five with culture negative infections were excluded. The remaining 142 patients were followed for a mean of 3.3 years (2.0 to 7.6) with failure due to a further infection as the primary endpoint. Patients who were treated with antibiotics were also assessed for their adherence to the medication regime and for side effects to antibiotics. RESULTS: Nine of 72 patients (12.5%) who received antibiotics failed due to further infection compared with 20 of 70 patients (28.6%) who did not receive antibiotics (p = 0.012). Five patients (6.9%) in the treatment group experienced adverse effects related to the administered antibiotics severe enough to warrant discontinuation. CONCLUSION: This multicentre randomized controlled trial showed that a three-month course of microorganism-directed, oral antibiotics significantly reduced the rate of failure due to further infection following a two-stage revision of total hip or knee arthroplasty for chronic PJI. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2020;102-B(6 Supple A):3-9.


Asunto(s)
Antibacterianos/administración & dosificación , Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Cadera , Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Rodilla , Prótesis de Cadera/efectos adversos , Prótesis de la Rodilla/efectos adversos , Falla de Prótesis , Infecciones Relacionadas con Prótesis/etiología , Infecciones Relacionadas con Prótesis/prevención & control , Reoperación , Administración Oral , Anciano , Enfermedad Crónica , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Falla de Prótesis/etiología , Infecciones Relacionadas con Prótesis/cirugía , Factores de Tiempo
4.
Bone Joint J ; 102-B(6_Supple_A): 138-144, 2020 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32475286

RESUMEN

AIMS: In patients with a "dry" aspiration during the investigation of prosthetic joint infection (PJI), saline lavage is commonly used to obtain a sample for analysis. The aim of this study was to investigate prospectively the impact of saline lavage on synovial fluid analysis in revision arthroplasty. METHODS: Patients undergoing revision hip (THA) or knee arthroplasty (TKA) for any septic or aseptic indication were enrolled. Intraoperatively, prior to arthrotomy, the maximum amount of fluid possible was aspirated to simulate a dry tap (pre-lavage) followed by the injection with 20 ml of normal saline and re-aspiration (post-lavage). Pre- and post-lavage synovial white blood cell (WBC) count, percent polymorphonuclear cells (%PMN), and cultures were compared. RESULTS: A total of 78 patients had data available for analysis; 17 underwent revision THA and 61 underwent revision TKA. A total of 16 patients met modified Musculoskeletal Infection Society (MSIS) criteria for PJI. Pre- and post-lavage %PMNs were similar in septic patients (87% vs 85%) and aseptic patients (35% vs 39%). Pre- and post-lavage synovial fluid WBC count were far more disparate in septic (53,553 vs 8,275 WBCs) and aseptic (1,103 vs 268 WBCs) cohorts. At a cutoff of 80% PMN, the post-lavage aspirate had a sensitivity of 75% and specificity of 95%. At a cutoff of 3,000 WBCs, the post-lavage aspirate had a sensitivity of 63% and specificity of 98%. As the post-lavage synovial WBC count increased, the difference between pre- and post-lavage %PMN decreased (mean difference of 5% PMN in WBC < 3,000 vs mean difference 2% PMN in WBC > 3,000, p = 0.013). Of ten positive pre-lavage fluid cultures, only six remained positive post-lavage. CONCLUSION: While saline lavage aspiration significantly lowered the synovial WBC count, the %PMN remained similar, particularly at WBC counts of > 3,000. These findings suggest that in patients with a dry-tap, the %PMN of a saline lavage aspiration has reasonable sensitivity (75%) for the detection of PJI. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2020;102-B(6 Supple A):138-144.


Asunto(s)
Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Cadera , Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Rodilla , Prótesis de Cadera/efectos adversos , Prótesis de la Rodilla/efectos adversos , Infecciones Relacionadas con Prótesis/diagnóstico , Infecciones Relacionadas con Prótesis/etiología , Manejo de Especímenes/métodos , Líquido Sinovial/citología , Anciano , Femenino , Humanos , Recuento de Leucocitos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Neutrófilos , Estudios Prospectivos , Reoperación , Solución Salina , Irrigación Terapéutica/métodos
5.
Bone Joint J ; 102-B(6): 709-715, 2020 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32475233

RESUMEN

AIMS: Femoral revision component subsidence has been identified as predicting early failure in revision hip surgery. This comparative cohort study assessed the potential risk factors of subsidence in two commonly used femoral implant designs. METHODS: A comparative cohort study was undertaken, analyzing a consecutive series of patients following revision total hip arthroplasties using either a tapered-modular (TM) fluted titanium or a porous-coated cylindrical modular (PCM) titanium femoral component, between April 2006 and May 2018. Clinical and radiological assessment was compared for both treatment cohorts. Risk factors for subsidence were assessed and compared. RESULTS: In total, 65 TM and 35 PCM cases were included. At mean follow-up of seven years (1 to 13), subsidence was noted in both cohorts during the initial three months postoperatively (p < 0.001) then implants stabilized. Subsidence noted in 58.7% (38/65 cases) of the TM cohort (mean 2.3 mm, SD 3.5 mm) compared to 48.8% (17/35) of PCM cohort (mean 1.9 mm, SD 2.6 mm; p = 0.344). Subsidence of PCM cohort were significantly associated with extended trochanteric osteotomy (ETO) (p < 0.041). Although the ETO was used less frequently in PCM stem cohort (7/35), subsidence was noted in 85% (6/7) of them. Significant improvement of the final mean Oxford Hip Score (OHS) was reported in both treatment groups (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Both modular TM and PCM revision femoral components subsided within the femur. TM implants subsided more frequently than PCM components if the femur was intact but with no difference in clinical outcomes. However, if an ETO is performed then a PCM component will subside significantly more and suggests the use of a TM implant may be advisable. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2020;102-B(6):709-715.


Asunto(s)
Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Cadera , Prótesis de Cadera , Complicaciones Posoperatorias/epidemiología , Diseño de Prótesis , Falla de Prótesis , Reoperación , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Estudios de Cohortes , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Medición de Riesgo , Factores de Riesgo , Resultado del Tratamiento
6.
Bone Joint J ; 102-B(6): 699-708, 2020 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32475246

RESUMEN

AIMS: Short, bone-conserving femoral components are increasingly used in total hip arthroplasty (THA). They are expected to allow tissue-conserving implantation and to render future revision surgery more straightforward but the long-term data on such components is limited. One such component is the global tissue-sparing (GTS) stem. Following the model for stepwise introduction of new orthopaedic implants, we evaluated early implant fixation and clinical outcome of this novel short-stem THA and compared it to that of a component with established good long-term clinical outcome. METHODS: In total, 50 consecutive patients ≤ 70 years old with end-stage symptomatic osteo-arthritis were randomized to receive THA with the GTS stem or the conventional Taperloc stem using the anterior supine intermuscular approach by two experienced hip surgeons in two hospitals in the Netherlands. Primary outcome was implant migration. Patients were followed using routine clinical examination, patient reported outcome using Harris Hip Score (HHS), Hip Disability And Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), EuroQol five-dimension questionnaire (EQ5D), and Roentgen Stereophotogrammetric Analysis (RSA) at three, six, 12, and 24 months. This study evaluated the two-year follow-up results. RESULTS: In addition to the initial migration pattern of distal migration (subsidence, Y-translation) and retroversion (Y-rotation) also exhibited by the Taperloc stem, the GTS stem showed an initial migration pattern of varization (X-translation combined with Z-rotation) and posterior translation (Z-translation). However, all components stabilized aside from one Taperloc stem which became loose secondary to malposition and was later revised. Clinical outcomes and complications were not statistically significantly different with the numbers available. CONCLUSION: A substantially different and more extensive initial migration pattern was seen for the GTS stem compared to the Taperloc stem. Although implant stabilization was achieved, excellent long-term survival similar to that of the Taperloc stem should not be inferred. Especially in the absence of clinically proven relevant improvement, widespread usage should be postponed until long-term safety has been established. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2020;102-B(6):699-708.


Asunto(s)
Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Cadera/métodos , Prótesis de Cadera , Osteoartritis de la Cadera/cirugía , Anciano , Femenino , Estudios de Seguimiento , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Diseño de Prótesis
7.
Surg Technol Int ; 36: 418-425, 2020 May 28.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32359165

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is reaching a broader spectrum of younger patients who struggle with incapacitating hip disease. This study aimed to explore national bearing surface trends for young THA recipients. Specifically, we evaluated bearing surface utilization, patient demographics, and hospital demographics in 20- to 50-year-old THA recipients in the United States from 2009 to 2016. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The National Inpatient Sample database was queried for patients aged 20 to 50 who underwent primary THA from 2009-2016 (n=279,190). Patients were grouped according to bearing surface type (metal-on-polyethylene [MOP], metal-on-metal [MOM], ceramic-on-ceramic [COC], and ceramic-on-polyethylene [COP]). Demographics included sex, age, race, obesity status, age-adjusted Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI), primary payer, median household income, region, and teaching status. Chi-square analyses were employed for categorical variables, while independent t-tests were utilized for continuous variables. RESULTS: The incidence of THA for patients aged 20 to 50 increased slightly from 33,003 in 2009 to 33,545 in 2016 (p<0.001). Overall, bearing surface type was reported in 46.8% (n=127,876) of THAs. Of the THAs with bearing surface codes, the use of MOP (29.6 to 18.7%) and MOM (39.6 to 4.4%) decreased, while COC (9.0 to 14.3%) and COP (21.8 to 62.6%) utilization increased (p<0.001 for all). Those receiving COC implants had the youngest average age (42 years) (p<0.001). Females were more likely to receive COC (44.2%) or COP (43.6%) implants (p<0.001). Obese individuals were more likely to receive MOP (21.3%) or COP (21.2%) (p<0.001). CONCLUSION: Over an 8-year period, considerable shifts in bearing surface trends have occurred across the United States among 20 to 50-year-old patients. Advantages of ceramic femoral heads, along with increased acceptance of highly cross-linked polyethylene, appear to be reasons for the selection of COP over other bearing surfaces.


Asunto(s)
Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Cadera , Prótesis de Cadera , Adulto , Cerámica , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Polietileno , Diseño de Prótesis , Falla de Prótesis , Reoperación , Estados Unidos , Adulto Joven
8.
Surg Technol Int ; 36: 426-431, 2020 May 28.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32359167

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Malpositioning of the acetabular cup during total hip arthroplasty (THA) increases the risk of certain complications and shortens the lifespan of the prosthetic joint. Therefore, the accurate placement of the acetabular component during a THA is a necessary contributing factor to its successful outcome. The different methods of intraoperative estimation of acetabular component positioning are quite varied and sometimes may be inaccurate. The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of intraoperative acetabular component orientation with the assistance of three-dimensional (3D), patient-specific guidance alone. MATERIALS AND METHODS: At a single institution, a total of 56 patients were prospectively enrolled into this study. Acetabular cup positioning was achieved with a described method using a laser beam technique minus the placement of pelvic pins. Comparison was made between the planned, preoperative inclination and version angles with the achieved postoperative inclination and version of the acetabular component in all THAs performed. The accuracy of placement of the acetabular cup was assessed using postoperative computed tomography (CT) scans. Evaluation was performed by an independent orthopaedic surgeon. RESULTS: Fifty-eight hips were included in the present study. The mean absolute deviation from the preoperative planned inclination and anteversion was 4.0° (0.1° to 14.6°; p<0.05) and 4.4° (0.2° to 12.2°; p<0.05) respectively. The planned inclination and anteversion were achieved within a +/- 10° target in 98% of the cases respectively. CONCLUSION: Accuracy of acetabular cup orientation in total hip arthroplasty can be achieved to a high degree with 3D patient-specific guidance alone. This eliminates the pins in the pelvis and has the potential to reduce costs and patient trauma without impacting accuracy.


Asunto(s)
Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Cadera , Prótesis de Cadera , Acetábulo , Humanos , Pelvis , Tomografía Computarizada por Rayos X
9.
Surg Technol Int ; 36: 379-387, 2020 May 28.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32359168

RESUMEN

Dual mobility constructs have become an increasingly popular option for primary and revision total hip arthroplasty. Two monoblock implants and three modular implants are available for use in the United States. Although short- and mid-term outcome data have been positive overall for these systems, each construct has unique features that the orthopaedic surgeon might consider when selecting the appropriate implant for his or her patient. In this review article, we discuss the design specifications and published literature for each dual mobility system and organize this information into a concise resource that can be easily referenced during preoperative planning.


Asunto(s)
Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Cadera , Prótesis de Cadera , Humanos , Diseño de Prótesis , Falla de Prótesis , Reoperación , Estados Unidos
10.
Surg Technol Int ; 36: 360-363, 2020 May 28.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32359169

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Hip dislocation is a devastating complication after total hip arthroplasty (THA), which is slightly higher when using the traditional posterior approach. The piriformis tendon is the most important dynamic posterior stabilizing structure. The piriformis-sparing technique provides a reproducible method for THA, greatly reducing the dislocation rate. MATERIALS AND METHODS: After exposure and identifying piriformis, the inferior border of the piriformis is released from the short rotators and capsule with a BOVIE® (Symmetry Surgical, Inc, Nashville, Tennessee). This dissection is continued to the lesser trochanter as one sleeve and then tagged. The anterior/inferior capsule is released with a BOVIE® from the femur to aid in acetabular exposure. The femur is roughly placed in 30° of adduction, 70° of flexion, and slight internal rotation. An anterior retractor is used to displace the proximal femur anteriorly and superiorly. The reamer is placed inside the acetabulum through the inferior approach. Next, the acetabulum is progressively reamed to the appropriate size and depth, and the final component is placed in proper anteversion and abduction angles based on preoperative functional assessment. After insertion of final components and final hip reduction, the interval beneath the piriformis tendon and superior portion of the capsule is repaired with ETHIBOND® sutures (Johnson & Johnson Inc., New Brunswick, New Jersey). Then, two tunnels in the proximal femur with a 2.7mm drill bit is made and posterior capsule and short rotators are secured through these tunnels. RESULTS: This technique was used in 150 THAs with a minimum follow up of six months and a mean of 1.2 years ± 1.5 years. There was no dislocation at final follow up. The mean anteversion and abduction was 23 ± 2.7 and 42 ± 3.1, respectively. CONCLUSION: Preserving the piriformis tendon may cause less visualization of the superior portion of the acetabulum. However, the anterior/inferior capsular release, and proper placement of the femur with flexion, internal rotation, and adduction, makes it possible to achieve highly reproducible results.


Asunto(s)
Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Cadera , Prótesis de Cadera , Acetábulo , Cadera , Luxación de la Cadera , Articulación de la Cadera , Humanos
11.
Surg Technol Int ; 36: 63-69, 2020 May 28.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32372404

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Acetabular cup malposition is very common in total hip arthroplasty (THA) and is significantly associated with many serious postoperative complications, such as dislocation, wear and loosening, and decreased range of motion. To improve the accuracy of intraoperative assessment, we recently developed an innovative sensor-based navigation system (Force-PRO device) using an inertial measurement unit and a 3D-printed liner for acetabular cup measurement, and aimed to evaluate its reliability and correlate its accuracy with that of a computer-assisted navigation system (CANS). DESIGN: Method-comparison study between the Force-PRO device and a standard CANS in a 1:1 pelvic bone model. METHODS: The test-retest reliability of both the Force-PRO device and CANS, and agreement between the Force-PRO device and CANS, for the measurement of acetabular inclination and anteversion angles, were examined using 40 random acetabular cup positions. Statistical analysis was performed by using limits of agreement and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). RESULTS: The mean differences in the inclination angle and anteversion angle in test-retest of the Force-PRO device were -0.43°±1.03° and -0.40°±0.78°, respectively. The mean differences in the inclination angle and anteversion angle between the Force-PRO device and CANS were 0.70°±0.94° and -0.10°±0.44°, respectively. Excellent reliability in the inclination and anteversion angles of the Force-PRO device and excellent agreement between the Force-PRO device and CANS were demonstrated, with ICC values of 0.994 and 0.997, and 0.993 and 0.999, respectively. CONCLUSION: The Force-PRO device showed excellent reliability equivalent to CANS with excellent agreement in acetabular cup position measurement comparable to that with CANS. Future clinical studies will be needed to evaluate the efficacy of this device.


Asunto(s)
Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Cadera , Prótesis de Cadera , Acetábulo , Humanos , Complicaciones Posoperatorias , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados , Cirugía Asistida por Computador
12.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 337, 2020 May 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32398027

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) represent a serious burden to individual safety and healthcare sustainability. Identifying which patients, procedures and settings are most at risk would offer a significant contribution to HAI management and prevention. The purpose of this study is to estimate 1) orthopaedic implantable device-related infection (OIDRI) prevalence in Italian hospitals and 2) the gap between the remuneration paid by the Italian healthcare system and the real costs sustained by Italian hospitals to treat these episodes. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study based on hospital discharge forms registered in 2012 and 2014. To address the first goal of this study, the national database was investigated to identify 1) surgical procedures associated with orthopaedic device implantation and 2) among them, which patient characteristics (age, sex), type of admission, and type of discharge were associated with a primary diagnosis of infection. To address the second goal, 1) each episode of infection was multiplied by the remuneration paid by the Italian healthcare system to the hospitals, based on the diagnosis-related group (DRG) system, and 2) the total days of hospitalization required to treat the same episodes were multiplied by the average daily cost of hospitalization, according to estimates from the Ministry of the Economy and Finance (MEF). RESULTS: In 2014, 1.55% of the total hospitalizations for orthopaedic device implantation procedures were associated with a main diagnosis of infection, with a negligible increase of 0.04% compared with 2012. Hip and knee replacement revisions, male patients and patients older than 65 years were more exposed to infection. A total of 51.63% of patients were planned admissions to the hospital, 68.75% had an ordinary discharge to home, and 0.9% died. The remuneration paid by the healthcare system to the hospitals was € 37,519,084 in 2014, with 3 DRGs covering 70.6% of the total. The cost of the actual days of hospitalization to treat these episodes was 17.5 million more than the remuneration received. CONCLUSIONS: The OIDRI prevalence was lower than that described in recent surveys in acute care settings, although the numbers were likely underestimated. The cost of treatment varied significantly depending on the remuneration system adopted.


Asunto(s)
Infección Hospitalaria/epidemiología , Prótesis de Cadera/efectos adversos , Prótesis de la Rodilla/efectos adversos , Infecciones Relacionadas con Prótesis/epidemiología , Adolescente , Adulto , Anciano , Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Cadera/efectos adversos , Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Rodilla/efectos adversos , Niño , Preescolar , Infección Hospitalaria/economía , Estudios Transversales , Prestación de Atención de Salud/economía , Grupos Diagnósticos Relacionados , Femenino , Humanos , Lactante , Recién Nacido , Italia/epidemiología , Tiempo de Internación/economía , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Alta del Paciente , Prevalencia , Infecciones Relacionadas con Prótesis/economía , Estudios Retrospectivos , Adulto Joven
13.
Bone Joint J ; 102-B(5): 573-579, 2020 May.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32349597

RESUMEN

AIMS: We evaluated a large database with mechanical failure of a single uncemented modular femoral component, used in revision hip arthroplasty, as the end point and compared them to a control group treated with the same implant. Patient- and implant-specific risk factors for implant failure were analyzed. METHODS: All cases of a fractured uncemented modular revision femoral component from one manufacturer until April 2017 were identified and the total number of implants sold until April 2017 was used to calculate the fracture rate. The manufacturer provided data on patient demographics, time to failure, and implant details for all notified fractured devices. Patient- and implant-specific risk factors were evaluated using a logistic regression model with multiple imputations and compared to data from a previously published reference group, where no fractures had been observed. The results of a retrieval analysis of the fractured implants, performed by the manufacturer, were available for evaluation. RESULTS: There were 113 recorded cases with fracture at the modular junction, resulting in a calculated fracture rate of 0.30% (113/37,600). The fracture rate of the implant without signs of improper use was 0.11% (41/37,600). In 79% (89/113) of cases with a failed implant, either a lateralized (high offset) neck segment, an extralong head, or the combination of both were used. Logistic regression analysis revealed male sex, high body mass index (BMI), straight component design, and small neck segments were significant risk factors for failure. Investigation of the implants (76/113) showed at least one sign of improper use in 72 cases. CONCLUSION: Implant failure at the modular junction is associated with patient- and implant-specific risk factors as well as technical errors during implantation. Whenever possible, the use of short and lateralized neck segments should be avoided with this revision system. Implantation instructions and contraindications need to be adhered to and respected. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2020;102-B(5):573-579.


Asunto(s)
Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Cadera/instrumentación , Prótesis de Cadera/efectos adversos , Falla de Prótesis , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Femenino , Alemania , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Diseño de Prótesis , Reoperación , Factores de Riesgo
15.
Bone Joint J ; 102-B(4): 414-422, 2020 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32228075

RESUMEN

AIMS: To compare long-term survival of all-cemented and hybrid total hip arthroplasty (THA) using the Exeter Universal stem. METHODS: Details of 1,086 THAs performed between 1999 and 2005 using the Exeter stem and either a cemented (632) or uncemented acetabular component (454) were collected from local records and the New Zealand Joint Registry. A competing risks regression survival analysis was performed with death as the competing risk with adjustments made for age, sex, approach, and bearing. RESULTS: There were 61 revisions (9.7%; 0.82 revisions/100 observed component years, (OCYs)) in the all-cemented group and 18 (4.0%; 0.30/100 OCYs) in the hybrid group. The cumulative incidence of revision at 18 years was 12.1% for cemented and 5.2% for hybrids. There was a significantly greater risk of revision for all-cemented compared with hybrids (unadjusted sub-hazard ratio (SHR) 2.44; p = 0.001), and of revision for loosening, wear, or osteolysis (unadjusted SHR 3.77; p < 0.001). After adjustment, the increased risk of all-cause revision did not reach significance at age 70 years and above. The advantage for revision for loosening, wear, and osteolysis remained at all ages. CONCLUSION: This study supports the use of uncemented acetabular fixation when used in combination with the Exeter stem with improved survivorship for revision for aseptic loosening, wear, and osteolysis at all ages and for all-cause revision in patients less than 70 years. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2020;102-B(4):414-422.


Asunto(s)
Acetábulo/cirugía , Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Cadera/métodos , Cementación/métodos , Factores de Edad , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Cadera/efectos adversos , Cementos para Huesos , Cementación/efectos adversos , Femenino , Prótesis de Cadera , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Osteólisis/etiología , Osteólisis/cirugía , Complicaciones Posoperatorias/cirugía , Diseño de Prótesis , Falla de Prótesis/etiología , Sistema de Registros , Reoperación/estadística & datos numéricos , Factores de Riesgo , Análisis de Supervivencia
16.
Bone Joint J ; 102-B(4): 423-425, 2020 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32228082

RESUMEN

AIMS: Dislocation remains a significant complication after total hip arthroplasty (THA), being the third leading indication for revision. We present a series of acetabular revision using a dual mobility cup (DMC) and compare this with our previous series using the posterior lip augmentation device (PLAD). METHODS: A retrospective review of patients treated with either a DMC or PLAD for dislocation in patients with a Charnley THA was performed. They were identified using electronic patient records (EPR). EPR data and radiographs were evaluated to determine operating time, length of stay, and the incidence of complications and recurrent dislocation postoperatively. RESULTS: A total of 28 patients underwent revision using a DMC for dislocation following Charnley THA between 2013 and 2017. The rate of recurrent dislocation and overall complications were compared with those of a previous series of 54 patients who underwent revision for dislocation using a PLAD, between 2007 and 2013. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean distribution of sex or age between the groups. The mean operating time was 71 mins (45 to 113) for DMCs and 43 mins (21 to 84) for PLADs (p = 0.001). There were no redislocations or revisions in the DMC group at a mean follow-up of 55 months (21 to 76), compared with our previous series of PLAD which had a redislocation rate of 16% (n = 9) and an overall revision rate of 25% (n = 14, p = 0.001) at a mean follow-up of 86 months (45 to 128). CONCLUSION: These results indicate that DMC outperforms PLAD as a treatment for dislocation in patients with a Charnley THA. This should therefore be the preferred form of treatment for these patients despite a slightly longer operating time. Work is currently ongoing to review outcomes of DMC over a longer follow-up period. PLAD should be used with caution in this patient group with preference given to acetabular revision to DMC. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2020;102-B(4):423-425.


Asunto(s)
Acetábulo/cirugía , Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Cadera/instrumentación , Luxación de la Cadera/cirugía , Prótesis de Cadera , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Cadera/efectos adversos , Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Cadera/métodos , Registros Electrónicos de Salud , Femenino , Luxación de la Cadera/etiología , Humanos , Tiempo de Internación/estadística & datos numéricos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Tempo Operativo , Diseño de Prótesis , Falla de Prótesis/etiología , Reoperación/métodos , Estudios Retrospectivos
17.
Bone Joint J ; 102-B(4): 463-469, 2020 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32228083

RESUMEN

AIMS: Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) remains a major clinical challenge. Neutrophil CD64 index, Fc-gamma receptor 1 (FcγR1), plays an important role in mediating inflammation of bacterial infections and therefore could be a valuable biomarker for PJI. The aim of this study is to compare the neutrophil CD64 index in synovial and blood diagnostic ability with the standard clinical tests for discrimination PJI and aseptic implant failure. METHODS: A total of 50 patients undergoing revision hip and knee arthroplasty were enrolled into a prospective study. According to Musculoskeletal Infection Society (MSIS) criteria, 25 patients were classified as infected and 25 as not infected. In all patients, neutrophil CD64 index and percentage of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN%) in synovial fluid, serum CRP, ESR, and serum CD64 index levels were measured preoperatively. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and the area under the curve (AUC) were analyzed for each biomarker. RESULTS: Serum CD64 index showed no significant difference between the two groups (p = 0.091). Synovial fluid CD64 index and PMN% discriminated good differentiation between groups of PJI and aseptic failure with AUC of 0.946 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.842 to 0.990) and 0.938 (95% CI 0.832 to 0.987) separately. The optimal threshold value of synovial CD64 index for the diagnosis of PJI was 0.85, with a sensitivity of 92.00%, a specificity of 96.00%, and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) of 227.11. CONCLUSION: The present study demonstrates that CD64 index in synovial fluid could be a promising laboratory marker for screening PJI. The cut-off values of 0.85 for synovial CD64 index has the potential to distinguish aseptic failure from PJI. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2020;102-B(4):463-469.


Asunto(s)
Prótesis de Cadera/efectos adversos , Prótesis de la Rodilla/efectos adversos , Neutrófilos/inmunología , Infecciones Relacionadas con Prótesis/diagnóstico , Receptores de IgG/análisis , Líquido Sinovial/inmunología , Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Cadera , Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Rodilla , Biomarcadores/análisis , Sedimentación Sanguínea , Proteína C-Reactiva/análisis , Diagnóstico Diferencial , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Osteoartritis de la Cadera/cirugía , Osteoartritis de la Rodilla/cirugía , Estudios Prospectivos , Falla de Prótesis/etiología , Infecciones Relacionadas con Prótesis/etiología , Curva ROC , Reoperación , Sensibilidad y Especificidad
18.
Bone Joint J ; 102-B(4): 524-529, 2020 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32228068

RESUMEN

AIMS: The consensus is that bipolar hemiarthroplasty (BHA) in allograft-prosthesis composite (APC) reconstruction of the proximal femur following primary tumour resection provides more stability than total hip arthroplasty (THA). However, no comparative study has been performed. In this study, we have compared the outcome and complication rates of these two methods. METHODS: In a retrospective study, 57 patients who underwent APC reconstruction of proximal femur following the primary tumour resection, either using BHA (29) or THA (28), were included. Functional outcome was assessed using the Musculoskeletal Tumour Society (MSTS) scoring system and Harris Hip Score (HHS). Postoperative complications of the two techniques were also compared. RESULTS: The mean follow-up of the patients was 8.3 years (standard deviation (SD) 5.5) in the BHA and 6.9 years (SD 4.7) in the THA group. The mean HHS was 65 (SD 16.6) in the BHA group and 88 (SD 11.9) in the THA group (p = 0.036). The mean MSTS score of the patients was 73.3% (SD 16.1%) in the BHA and 86.7% (SD 12.2%) in the THA group (p = 0.041). Limping was recorded in 19 patients (65.5%) of the BHA group and five patients (17.8%) of the THA group (p < 0.001). Dislocation occurred in three patients (10.3%) of the BHA group and two patients (7.1%) of the THA group. CONCLUSION: While the dislocation rate was not higher in THA than with BHA, the functional outcome was significantly superior. Based on our results, we recommend THA in APC reconstruction of the proximal femur. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2020;102-B(4):524-529.


Asunto(s)
Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Cadera/métodos , Neoplasias Femorales/cirugía , Fémur/cirugía , Hemiartroplastia/métodos , Prótesis de Cadera , Adolescente , Adulto , Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Cadera/efectos adversos , Femenino , Neoplasias Femorales/diagnóstico por imagen , Fémur/diagnóstico por imagen , Estudios de Seguimiento , Hemiartroplastia/efectos adversos , Luxación de la Cadera/etiología , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Cuidados Posoperatorios/métodos , Complicaciones Posoperatorias , Radiografía , Estudios Retrospectivos , Resultado del Tratamiento , Adulto Joven
19.
Surg Technol Int ; 36: 63-69, 2020 May 28.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32294226

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Although primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) stem designs have evolved from conventional lengths to shorter lengths, revision stems have not undergone a similar change. Tapered, conical prostheses have performed well in primary THA, however their use in revision THA has not been thoroughly investigated. Our purpose was to report the short-term radiographic and clinical outcomes of the Wagner Cone Prosthesis® (Zimmer Biomet, Warsaw, Indiana) in revision THA. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An institutional review board approved retrospective study was performed to identify all revision THAs with minimum one-year clinical and radiographic follow up between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2018, which used a short conical tapered stem to reconstruct the femur. Demographic, surgical, and radiographic variables were collected for each patient. RESULTS: Fifteen hips that fit inclusion criteria were identified. Implant survivorship was 93.3% with a mean follow up of 33.6 months. Radiographic analysis revealed mean subsidence of 2.57mm ± 4.31mm and a limb-length difference of 0.69mm ± 12.4mm longer than the contralateral side. Furthermore, pedestal sign was observed on preoperative radiographs of six patients, none of whom suffered periprosthetic fracture or femoral cortex perforation upon insertion of the conical prosthesis. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that the Wagner Cone Prosthesis® is as a useful implant for revision THA. In our sample, it had excellent survivorship, impressive postoperative radiographic measurements obtained from most recent follow up, minimal mean subsidence, and minimal complication rates. Further prospective studies with longer follow up are needed to determine the efficacy of this stem in revision THA.


Asunto(s)
Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Cadera , Prótesis de Cadera , Fémur , Estudios de Seguimiento , Humanos , Diseño de Prótesis , Falla de Prótesis , Reoperación , Estudios Retrospectivos , Resultado del Tratamiento
20.
Orthopade ; 49(5): 408-416, 2020 May.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32240324

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The progress of 3D imaging and manufacturing of implants has made it possible to achieve a custom-made concept in THA. The custom-made cementless femoral stem provides optimal implant stability combined with restoration of the native hip mechanics. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term survivorship of custom-made hip femoral stems in two populations of patients undergoing THA: patients under 50 years old (young patients group) and patients with high-grade developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH group). METHODS: A series of 232 primary custom-made cementless THA stems were retrospectively evaluated in patients less than 50 years old at the time of surgery and at follow-up after an average of 20 years. A second series of 26 custom-made cementless stem THAs for late DDH (21 patients) including only Crowe grade III and grade IV were also retrospectively evaluated with an average follow-up of 16 years. The clinical and radiological evaluations were performed preoperatively and at yearly intervals. RESULTS: For the young patient group, the follow-up ranged from 14 to 27 years. The HHS and the Merle D'Aubigne-Postel score significantly improved from preoperatively to a mean of 94.1 (range 48-100) and 15.9 (range 9-18), respectively. Taking stem revision for aseptic loosening as an endpoint, survivorship was 96.8% at 20 years (95% confidence interval, CI 95.1-98.5). For the DDH group, the follow-up ranged from 10 to 22 years. The mean HHS increased significantly from preoperative 49 ± 22 points to the most recent follow-up examination with 86 13 points and survivorship was 96.1% (95% CI, 92.7-99.9). CONCLUSION: Custom-made femoral stems provide good functional outcome and long-term survivorship in two specific populations of patients undergoing THAs: patients under 50 years old with high expectations and patients with high-grade DDH.


Asunto(s)
Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Cadera/estadística & datos numéricos , Fémur/cirugía , Prótesis de Cadera , Sobrevivientes , Adulto , Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Cadera/métodos , Femenino , Estudios de Seguimiento , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Diseño de Prótesis , Falla de Prótesis , Reoperación , Estudios Retrospectivos , Resultado del Tratamiento
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