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1.
Kidney360 ; 3(7): 1197-1209, 2022 Jul 28.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35919522

RESUMEN

Background: Recent innovations have the potential to disrupt the current paradigm for kidney failure treatment. The US Food and Drug Administration is committed to incorporating valid scientific evidence about how patients weigh the benefits and risks of new devices into their decision making, but to date, premarket submission of patient preference information (PPI) has been limited for kidney devices. With input from stakeholders, we developed a survey intended to yield valid PPI, capturing how patients trade off the potential benefits and risks of wearable dialysis devices and in-center hemodialysis. Methods: We conducted concept elicitation interviews with individuals receiving dialysis to inform instrument content. After instrument drafting, we conducted two rounds of pretest interviews to evaluate survey face validity, comprehensibility, and perceived relevance. We pilot tested the survey with in-center hemodialysis patients to assess comprehensibility and usability further. Throughout, we used participant input to guide survey refinements. Results: Thirty-six individuals receiving in-center or home dialysis participated in concept elicitation (N=20) and pretest (N=16) interviews. Participants identified reduced fatigue, lower treatment burden, and enhanced freedom as important benefits of a wearable device, and many expressed concerns about risks related to device disconnection-specifically bleeding and infection. We drafted a survey that included descriptions of the risks of serious bleeding and serious infection and an assessment of respondent willingness to wait for a safer device. Input from pretest interviewees led to various instrument modifications, including treatment descriptions, item wording, and risk-level explanations. Pilot testing of the updated survey among 24 in-center hemodialysis patients demonstrated acceptable survey comprehensibility and usability, although 50% of patients required some assistance. Conclusions: The final survey is a 54-item web-based instrument that will yield estimates of the maximal acceptable risk for the described wearable device and willingness to wait for wearable devices with lower risk.


Asunto(s)
Fallo Renal Crónico , Dispositivos Electrónicos Vestibles , Humanos , Fallo Renal Crónico/terapia , Prioridad del Paciente , Diálisis Renal , Terapia de Reemplazo Renal , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
2.
J Prim Care Community Health ; 13: 21501319221115946, 2022.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35920033

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Addressing social needs, health behaviors, and mental health may help patients more than traditional medical care. However, these root causes of poor health are difficult to address and the role of primary care is unclear. This qualitative study assesses patient's willingness and motivations to discuss and accept assistance for these needs from their primary care team. METHODS: In July and August of 2020, semi-structured virtual interviews were conducted with family medicine patients (n = 6) and residents of low resource neighborhoods (n = 11) in Richmond, Virginia. Interviews were conducted over Zoom. We conducted a qualitative analysis of patient and resident interview transcripts. A rapid qualitative analysis approach and immersion-crystallization processes were used to identify themes and categories. RESULTS: Interviewees reported varying degrees of comfort discussing topics with their health care team. They were less comfortable discussing needs they considered outside the realm of "traditional primary care" including finances, transportation, and housing, but interviewees expressed willingness to discuss these needs under certain conditions. Important factors were a strong patient-clinician relationship to create a trusted and safe space for discussion, adequate time for discussion during visits, communication of practices' ability to provide resources to help patients, and ensuring appropriate high quality referrals. CONCLUSIONS: Primary care provides opportunity for identifying and addressing needs that adversely impact health. Some needs are more sensitive for patients to work with their care team on, though, there was willingness to work on any need when a strong provider relationship and clinic structure for providing support were in place. This study highlights critical care delivery factors which may be used to enhance patient comfort accepting support for their needs and ultimately improve clinical care and chronic disease management.


Asunto(s)
Grupo de Atención al Paciente , Prioridad del Paciente , Comunicación , Humanos , Atención Primaria de Salud , Investigación Cualitativa
3.
BMJ Open ; 12(8): e058799, 2022 Aug 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35918108

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: We aimed to quantify patient preferences for efficacy, safety and convenience features of atopic dermatitis (AD) treatments. DESIGN AND SETTING: Online discrete choice experiment survey. PARTICIPANTS: Adults in the UK, France and Spain who had used AD treatments during the past 2 years. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Preferences for attributes were analysed using a multinomial logit model. Willingness to make trade-offs was expressed as the maximum acceptable decrease (MAD) in the probability of achieving clear/almost clear skin at week 16. RESULTS: The survey was completed by 404 patients (44.1±12.0 years; 65% women; 64% moderate/severe eczema). Most patients (68%) had no prior experience of using self-injectable treatments for AD or any other illness. Participants most valued increasing the chance of achieving a meaningful reduction in itch at week 16 from 20% to 50%, followed by reducing the risks of serious infections from 6% to 0% and of eye inflammation from 20% to 0%. Participants were willing to accept a decrease in the possibility of achieving clear/almost clear skin to obtain a treatment that can be paused (MAD=24.1%), requires occasional check-ups (MAD=16.1%) or no check-ups (MAD=20.9%) over frequent check-ups, is administered as a one time per day or two times per day oral pill versus a subcutaneous injection every 2 weeks (MAD=16.6%), has a 2-day over 2-week onset of action (MAD=11.3%), and can be used for flare management (MAD=5.8%). CONCLUSIONS: Although patients with AD most valued treatment benefits and risks, they were willing to tolerate reduced efficacy to obtain a rapid onset, oral administration, less frequent monitoring and a treatment that can be paused. Understanding patients' preferences for AD therapies, including new targeted therapies, can aid shared decision-making between clinicians and patients and support health technology assessments.


Asunto(s)
Dermatitis Atópica , Prioridad del Paciente , Adulto , Conducta de Elección , Dermatitis Atópica/tratamiento farmacológico , Femenino , Francia , Humanos , Masculino , España , Reino Unido
4.
BMC Palliat Care ; 21(1): 122, 2022 Jul 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35820845

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Caregivers frequently assume the role of surrogate decision-makers but often are unable to accurately predict patients' preferences. This trial aims to find if the use of the Advance Directives documents as a communication tool, improves the agreement between patients and caregivers. METHODS: This trial occurred in a palliative care service of a Portuguese hospital center. A prospective, single-blinded, controlled, randomized trial, enrolling patients and caregivers as a dyad was conducted. Participants individually fulfilled an Advance Directive document, in which patients reported their end-of-life preferences and caregivers reported their decisions as patients' health surrogates. Dyads were randomly assigned to the Intervention or the Control group, in which the physician respectively promoted an open discussion about patients' Advance Directives or evaluated patients' clinical condition. Caregivers' Advance Directives as surrogates were collected one month later. Proportions of agreement and Cohen's κ were used to access agreement and reliability, respectively, between the dyads. RESULTS: Results from 58 dyads were analyzed. We observed an improvement in agreement between the caregivers' answers and the patients' wishes on two-thirds (8/12) of the answers, in the Intervention group, contrasting to one-quarter (3/12) of the answers, in the Control group, despite statistical significance in differences wasn´t obtained. CONCLUSIONS: Although not reaching statistical significance, the results suggest that discussions of advance directives with physicians may lead to better prepared surrogates. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT05090072 . Retrospectively registered on 22/10/2021.


Asunto(s)
Prioridad del Paciente , Médicos , Directivas Anticipadas , Humanos , Estudios Prospectivos , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados
6.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35886406

RESUMEN

Person-centered care (PCC) requires knowledge about patient preferences. An analytic hierarchy process (AHP) is one approach to quantify, weigh and rank patient preferences suitable for People living with Dementia (PlwD), due to simple pairwise comparisons of individual criteria from a complex decision problem. The objective of the present study was to design and pretest a dementia-friendly AHP survey. Methods: Two expert panels consisting of n = 4 Dementia Care Managers and n = 4 physicians to ensure content-validity, and "thinking-aloud" interviews with n = 11 PlwD and n = 3 family caregivers to ensure the face validity of the AHP survey. Following a semi-structured interview guide, PlwD were asked to assess appropriateness and comprehensibility. Data, field notes and partial interview transcripts were analyzed with a constant comparative approach, and feedback was incorporated continuously until PlwD had no further comments or struggles with survey completion. Consistency ratios (CRs) were calculated with Microsoft® Excel and ExpertChoice Comparion®. Results: Three main categories with sub-categories emerged: (1) Content: clear task introduction, (sub)criteria description, criteria homogeneity, (sub)criteria appropriateness, retest questions and sociodemography for heterogeneity; (2) Format: survey structure, pairwise comparison sequence, survey length, graphical design (incl. AHP scale), survey procedure explanation, survey assistance and response perspective; and (3) Layout: easy wording, short sentences and visual aids. Individual CRs ranged from 0.08 to 0.859, and the consolidated CR was 0.37 (0.038). Conclusions: Our formative qualitative study provides initial data for the design of a dementia-friendly AHP survey. Consideration of our findings may contribute to face and content validity in future quantitative preference research in dementia.


Asunto(s)
Proceso de Jerarquía Analítica , Demencia , Demencia/terapia , Humanos , Prioridad del Paciente , Investigación Cualitativa , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
7.
Am J Manag Care ; 28(7): 314-320, 2022 Jul.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35852880

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: To assess provider and patient preferences for an oncologist selection tool, value-based care, involvement in cancer care, and end-of-life planning. STUDY DESIGN: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of primary care providers (PCPs) and insured patients with cancer. METHODS: We asked PCPs about their method of oncologist referral; utilization of an oncologist selection tool that directs patients to high-quality, high-value oncologists; involvement in cancer care and value-based care; and when an advance directive should be established. We asked patients to reflect upon their personal experience when selecting their oncologist, utilization of an oncologist selection tool, and establishing an advance directive. RESULTS: PCPs tend to refer patients to oncologists who are part of their health system (67.9%). Most PCPs (79.2%) were not currently utilizing an oncologist selection tool; most (77.3%) expressed a willingness to use such a tool. Most PCPs (69.8%) believe the best time to talk about an advance directive is at the time of cancer diagnosis. Patients ranked a PCP referral (52.7%) as "very important" when selecting an oncologist. One-third of patients used a web-based oncologist selection tool; 65.2% responded that an oncologist selection tool would be "somewhat" or "very" important. Most (54.5%) patients had an advance directive. CONCLUSIONS: These results present a compelling rationale for developing a data-driven oncologist selection tool, optimizing patient and provider involvement in care, and expanding the portion of patients who have an advance directive at the start of their cancer care to optimize their cancer journey.


Asunto(s)
Neoplasias , Oncólogos , Estudios Transversales , Humanos , Oncología Médica , Neoplasias/terapia , Prioridad del Paciente
8.
Future Oncol ; 18(25): 2791-2804, 2022 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35837970

RESUMEN

Aim: We quantified patient preferences for second-line diffuse large B-cell lymphoma therapies, including attributes of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy. Materials & methods: Using a discrete choice experiment, we surveyed 224 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients from the USA and Europe. Patients chose between two treatment options defined by six attributes with predefined levels for overall survival, adverse events (severe cytokine-release syndrome, severe neurological toxicities, severe infection) and time to return to pre-treatment functioning. Results: Increasing the probability of 1-year survival was most important to patients, followed by avoiding risks of cytokine-release syndrome and neurological toxicities. Respondents required a 13-14 percentage point increased 1-year survival probability to accept risks of treatment-associated adverse events. Conclusion: Patients prioritize survival and will accept certain adverse event risks to gain survival improvements.


Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy is a new treatment for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. CAR T-cell therapies are made from a patient's own cells, modified in a laboratory and used to attack cancer cells. While CAR T-cell therapies may increase long-term survival, they can also cause temporary but serious side effects, including neurological issues (e.g., headache, confusion, brain swelling) and cytokine-release syndrome (CRS), an inflammatory condition that can cause fever, breathing difficulties and organ dysfunction. To understand how patients' perspectives of CAR T-cell therapy compared with their perspectives on other treatments for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, we surveyed 224 patients in the USA and Europe. They were asked to choose between two treatments in a series of choice sets, each displaying varying levels of aspects of cancer therapies, including survival and risks of serious side effects. Their choices allowed us to measure which factors were most important to patients when making decisions about treatment. We found that increasing the probability of survival was most important, followed by avoiding risks of neurological complications and CRS. Patients were willing to accept increased risks of neurological toxicities and CRS if they could obtain a 13­14 percentage point increase in the probability of surviving for at least 1 year after treatment.


Asunto(s)
Linfoma de Células B Grandes Difuso , Linfoma no Hodgkin , Antígenos CD19 , Citocinas , Humanos , Inmunoterapia Adoptiva/efectos adversos , Linfoma de Células B Grandes Difuso/patología , Linfoma no Hodgkin/etiología , Prioridad del Paciente
9.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35805286

RESUMEN

Background: Person-centered care (PCC) requires knowledge about patient preferences. This formative qualitative study aimed to identify (sub)criteria of PCC for the design of a quantitative, choice-based instrument to elicit patient preferences for person-centered dementia care. Method: Interviews were conducted with n = 2 dementia care managers, n = 10 People living with Dementia (PlwD), and n = 3 caregivers (CGs), which followed a semi-structured interview guide including a card game with PCC criteria identified from the literature. Criteria cards were shown to explore the PlwD's conception. PlwD were asked to rank the cards to identify patient-relevant criteria of PCC. Audios were verbatim-transcribed and analyzed with qualitative content analysis. Card game results were coded on a 10-point-scale, and sums and means for criteria were calculated. Results: Six criteria with two sub-criteria emerged from the analysis; social relationships (indirect contact, direct contact), cognitive training (passive, active), organization of care (decentralized structures and no shared decision making, centralized structures and shared decision making), assistance with daily activities (professional, family member), characteristics of care professionals (empathy, education and work experience) and physical activities (alone, group). Dementia-sensitive wording and balance between comprehensibility vs. completeness of the (sub)criteria emerged as additional themes. Conclusions: Our formative study provides initial data about patient-relevant criteria of PCC to design a quantitative patient preference instrument. Future research may want to consider the balance between (sub)criteria comprehensibility vs. completeness.


Asunto(s)
Demencia , Prioridad del Paciente , Proceso de Jerarquía Analítica , Cuidadores/psicología , Demencia/psicología , Demencia/terapia , Humanos , Atención Dirigida al Paciente/métodos , Investigación Cualitativa , Proyectos de Investigación
10.
Value Health ; 25(7): 1218-1226, 2022 Jul.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35779943

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to develop the Indian 5-level version EQ-5D (EQ-5D-5L) value set, which is a key input in health technology assessment for resource allocation in healthcare. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey using the EuroQol Group's Valuation Technology was undertaken in a representative sample of 3548 adult respondents, selected from 5 different states of India using a multistage stratified random sampling technique. The participants were interviewed using a computer-assisted personal interviewing technique. This study adopted a novel extended EuroQol Group's Valuation Technology design that included 18 blocks of 10 composite time trade-off (c-TTO) tasks, comprising 150 unique health states, and 36 blocks of 7 discrete choice experiment (DCE) tasks, comprising 252 DCE pairs. Different models were explored for their predictive performance. Hybrid modeling approach using both c-TTO and DCE data was used to estimate the value set. RESULTS: A total of 2409 interviews were included in the analysis. The hybrid heteroscedastic model with censoring at -1 combining c-TTO and DCE data yielded the most consistent results and was used for the generation of the value set. The predicted values for all 3125 health states ranged from -0.923 to 1. The preference values were most affected by the pain/discomfort dimension. CONCLUSIONS: This is the largest EQ-5D-5L valuation study conducted so far in the world. The Indian EQ-5D-5L value set will promote the effective conduct of health technology assessment studies in India, thereby generating credible evidence for efficient resource use in healthcare.


Asunto(s)
Estado de Salud , Calidad de Vida , Adulto , Estudios Transversales , Humanos , India , Prioridad del Paciente , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
11.
BMJ Open ; 12(7): e059949, 2022 07 21.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35863829

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To explore how respondents with common chronic conditions-hypertension (HTN) and diabetes mellitus (DM)-make healthcare-seeking decisions. SETTING: Three health facilities in Nakaseke District, Uganda. DESIGN: Discrete choice experiment (DCE). PARTICIPANTS: 496 adults with HTN and/or DM. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Willingness to pay for changes in DCE attributes: getting to the facility, interactions with healthcare providers, availability of medicines for condition, patient peer-support groups; and education at the facility. RESULTS: Respondents were willing to pay more to attend facilities that offer peer-support groups, friendly healthcare providers with low staff turnover and greater availabilities of medicines. Specifically, we found the average respondent was willing to pay an additional 77 121 Ugandan shillings (UGX) for facilities with peer-support groups over facilities with none; and 49 282 UGX for 1 month of medicine over none, all other things being equal. However, respondents would have to compensated to accept facilities that were further away or offered health education. Specifically, the average respondent would have to be paid 3929 UGX to be willing to accept each additional kilometre they would have to travel to the facilities, all other things being equal. Similarly, the average respondent would have to be paid 60 402 UGX to accept facilities with some health education, all other things being equal. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings revealed significant preferences for health facilities based on the availability of medicines, costs of treatment and interactions with healthcare providers. Understanding patient preferences can inform intervention design to optimise healthcare service delivery for patients with HTN and DM in rural Uganda and other low-resource settings.


Asunto(s)
Diabetes Mellitus , Hipertensión , Adulto , Diabetes Mellitus/terapia , Humanos , Hipertensión/terapia , Prioridad del Paciente , Población Rural , Uganda
12.
BMJ Open ; 12(6): e058303, 2022 06 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35649604

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: Precision medicine in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) creates new opportunities to involve patients in early identification of accurate indicators of health trajectories. The aim of this study was to explore patient perspectives on patient-centredness in precision medicine for RA treatment. DESIGN: Semistructured interviews were conducted to explore patients' perspectives on a new personalised approach to RA treatment. The interview guide was developed together with patient research partners and health care professionals. SETTING: An invitation to the interviews was sent through a mobile application. The interviews were one-on-one, using an interview guide with open-ended questions. Interviews were conducted digitally (October 2020-February 2021) via Zoom or telephone, depending on each participant's preferences. PARTICIPANTS: Patients with RA (N=12) were purposively recruited. Patients were eligible if they had an RA diagnosis, were aged 18-80 years, and understood and expressed themselves in Swedish. Participants and researchers did not know each other prior to the interviews. RESULTS: Participants expressed desires and needs for patients to have an active role in precision medicine by making shared treatment decisions together with a healthcare professional. In order for that to work, patients need information on potential treatment options, an ability to express their preferences, an individual treatment plan and identification of personal treatment goals. Patients also identified two requirements of healthcare professional in precision medicine: a safe environment to express personal matters and two-way communication with healthcare professionals. CONCLUSION: Communication between patients and healthcare professionals needs to be more focused on patients' individual treatment preferences and expressed needs, in order to increase patient-centredness in treatment decisions, so shared decision-making can become a reality. More research is needed to design multifaceted implementation strategies to support patients and healthcare professionals to increase patient-centredness throughout treatment personalisation.


Asunto(s)
Artritis Reumatoide , Prioridad del Paciente , Artritis Reumatoide/terapia , Toma de Decisiones , Humanos , Medicina de Precisión , Investigación Cualitativa
13.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 730, 2022 Jun 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35650598

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: The burden and costs of abdominal surgery for chronic conditions are on the rise, but could be reduced through self-management support. However, structured support to prepare for colorectal surgery is not routinely offered to patients in Canada. This study aimed to describe experiences and explore preferences for multimodal prehabilitation among colorectal surgery patients. METHODS: A qualitative descriptive study using three focus groups (FG) was held with 19 patients who had a surgical date for abdominal surgery (April 2017-April 2018) and lived close (≤ 50 km radius) to a tertiary hospital in Western Canada (including a Surgical Lead for the British Columbia Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) Collaborative). FGs were audio-taped and verbatim transcribed with coding and pile-and-sort methods performed by two independent reviewers, confirmed by a third reviewer, in NVivo v9 software; followed by thematic analysis and narrative synthesis. RESULTS: Four themes emerged: support, informed decision-making, personalization of care, and mental/emotional health, which patients felt was particularly important but rarely addressed. Patient preferences for prehabilitation programming emphasised regular support from a single professional source, simple health messages, convenient access, and flexibility. CONCLUSIONS: There is an unmet need for structured preoperative support to better prepare patients for colorectal surgery. Future multimodal prehabilitation should be flexible and presented with non-medical information so patients can make informed decisions about their preoperative care and surgical outcomes. Healthcare providers have an important role in encouraging healthy lifestyle changes before colorectal surgery, though clearer communication and accurate advice on self-care, particularly mental health, are needed for improving patient outcomes.


Asunto(s)
Cirugía Colorrectal , Colombia Británica , Grupos Focales , Humanos , Prioridad del Paciente , Investigación Cualitativa
16.
Radiol Med ; 127(8): 866-871, 2022 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35752659

RESUMEN

The advent of immune checkpoint inhibitors for recurrent/metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (RM-HNSCC) has revolutionized the standard of care approach in first-line treatment. The heterogeneity of disease presentation and treatment-related toxicities can be associated with suboptimal patient compliance to oncologic care. Hence, prioritizing quality of life and well-being are crucial aspects to be considered in tailoring the best treatment choice. The aim of our work is to present a short report on the topic of the patient's preference in regard to treatment and its consequences on quality of life in the recurrent/metastatic setting. According to the literature, there's an unmet need on how to assess patient attitude in respect to the choice of treatment. In view of the availability of different therapeutic strategies in first-line management of RM-HNSCC, increasing emphasis should be put on integrating patient preferences into the medical decision-making.


Asunto(s)
Neoplasias de Cabeza y Cuello , Prioridad del Paciente , Algoritmos , Neoplasias de Cabeza y Cuello/tratamiento farmacológico , Humanos , Recurrencia Local de Neoplasia/tratamiento farmacológico , Calidad de Vida , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas de Cabeza y Cuello/tratamiento farmacológico
17.
N Z Med J ; 135(1550): 146-156, 2022 Feb 25.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35728160

RESUMEN

AIMS: We investigated whether patient choice of follow-up type improves health-related quality of life (HrQOL) and follow-up attendance in women who have undergone large loop excision of the transformation zone (LLETZ) for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 to 3 (CIN 2-3). METHODS: A three-armed randomised controlled trial including women with newly diagnosed CIN 2-3 post-LLETZ treatment was performed. Consenting women were randomised (1:1:1) to either: (a) colposcopy review at the hospital, (b) follow-up with high-risk human papilloma virus (HrHPV) and smear test in the community or (c) a choice of the aforementioned follow-up options, six months post-treatment. HrQOL was measured and participants were surveyed at baseline and six months regarding preferences for follow-up. RESULTS: Sixty-eight participants were randomised to follow-up (a), 67 to follow-up (b) and 65 to follow-up (c) (n=200). At six months post-treatment, 47% of patients indicated a preference for (a), 24% for (b) and 26% for (c). We found no significant difference in HrQOL between the study arms. Attendance was greater among patients who chose their follow-up (95.5% vs 91.1%, p=0.06). CONCLUSION: Choice of follow-up was associated with greater attendance. However, larger studies examining the effects of HrQOL and attendance to different follow-ups are warranted.


Asunto(s)
Neoplasia Intraepitelial Cervical , Neoplasias del Cuello Uterino , Neoplasia Intraepitelial Cervical/diagnóstico , Neoplasia Intraepitelial Cervical/cirugía , Colposcopía , Detección Precoz del Cáncer , Femenino , Estudios de Seguimiento , Humanos , Nueva Zelanda , Prioridad del Paciente , Embarazo , Calidad de Vida , Neoplasias del Cuello Uterino/diagnóstico , Neoplasias del Cuello Uterino/cirugía
19.
Palliat Support Care ; 20(3): 383-388, 2022 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35713351

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: Preferences for end-of-life (EoL) care settings is of considerable interest for developing public health policy and EoL care strategies. Culture, the cause of illness, and background characteristics may impact preferences. The present study aimed to explore preferences for EoL care settings: homes, hospitals, and inpatient hospice units among the general healthy population in Israel. Possible associations between the setting preferences and socio-demographic characteristics were also examined. METHOD: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 311 healthy adults who were recruited through a representative internet panel of the Israeli population using the Israeli census sampling method. The sex ratio was almost 1:1 with 158 women (50.8%) and 153 men (49.2%). All participants completed self-report measures using an online survey system. The questionnaires assessed sociodemographics and preferences for EoL care settings. RESULTS: This survey revealed that 52.1% of the participants expressed preference for being cared for at home rather than in an inpatient hospice unit, 40.8% expressed being cared for at home rather than in a hospital, while 36.7% had no preference regarding being cared for in hospital or in a hospice unit. Among the socio-demographic variables, only age and gender were found to be significantly associated with preferences for EoL care settings. SIGNIFICANCE OF RESULTS: The present study highlights the need to be cautious when regarding home as the preferred EoL care setting, as some individuals declared that they would prefer EoL hospice/hospital care. Age and gender should be considered when discussing and tailoring strategies regarding EoL preferences.


Asunto(s)
Hospitales para Enfermos Terminales , Cuidado Terminal , Adulto , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Estado de Salud , Humanos , Israel , Masculino , Prioridad del Paciente
20.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35682021

RESUMEN

Shared decision making (SDM) about medicine with older poly-medicated patients is vital to improving adherence and preventing medication-related hospital admissions, but it is difficult to achieve in practice. This study's primary aim was to provide insight into the extent of SDM in medication decisions in the Emergency Department (ED) and to compare how it aligns with older poly-medicated patients' preferences and needs. We applied a mixed-methods design to investigate SDM in medication decisions from two perspectives: (1) observational measurements with the observing patient involvement (OPTION 5) instrument of healthcare professionals' SDM behavior in medication decisions and (2) semi-structured interviews with older poly-medicated patients. A convergent parallel analysis was performed. Sixty-five observations and fourteen interviews revealed four overall themes: (1) a low degree of SDM about medication, (2) a variation in the pro-active and non-active patients approach to conversations about medicine, (3) no information on side effects, and (4) a preference for medication reduction. The lack of SDM with older patients in the ED may increase inequality in health. Patients with low health literacy are at risk of safety threats, nonadherence, and preventable re-admissions. Therefore, healthcare professionals should systematically investigate older poly-medicated patients' preferences and discuss the side effects and the possibility of reducing harmful medicine.


Asunto(s)
Toma de Decisiones Conjunta , Participación del Paciente , Toma de Decisiones , Servicio de Urgencia en Hospital , Hospitalización , Humanos , Participación del Paciente/métodos , Prioridad del Paciente
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