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1.
Nurs Educ Perspect ; 40(6): 317-321, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31658217

RESUMEN

AIM: The purpose of this study was to identify whether differences exist in nursing professional values based on program type and/or geographic location. BACKGROUND: Deliberate inclusion of values formation is critical to nursing education and high-quality nursing care. There is limited research comparing professional values development among students in all types of prelicensure RN programs and no research comparing students' professional values between geographic regions. METHOD: A secondary analysis was completed of original data collected in three descriptive studies using the Nursing Professional Value Scale-Revised®. RESULTS: Findings indicate prelicensure nursing students are educated with the values integrated within the American Nurses Association Code of Ethics. Significant differences (p < .05) were found when comparing geographic locations, program types, and Nursing Professional Value Scale-Revised factor scores. CONCLUSION: Additional research is needed to identify best practices for overall values formation in all program types.


Asunto(s)
Bachillerato en Enfermería/organización & administración , Ética en Enfermería/educación , Profesionalismo/educación , Estudiantes de Enfermería/psicología , Geografía , Humanos , Investigación en Educación de Enfermería , Investigación en Evaluación de Enfermería , Estados Unidos
2.
BMC Med Educ ; 19(1): 239, 2019 Jul 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31262283

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Professionalism instruction and assessment is a core component of medical education, and essential for professional identity formation (PIF). Thus, understanding the socialization of medical students to the values of the profession (i.e., medical professionalism), and how these may evolve, warrants continued understanding. METHODS: The purpose of this study was to examine and compare pre-clerkship (first and second year) medical students' perceptions of professionalism. First and second year medical students participate in this study. This was a two-phase mixed-methods cohort study conducted across two academic years (2014-2015 and 2015-2016). In Phase I, first and second year medical students participated in a nominal group technique (NGT) session. NGT data was analyzed qualitatively to generate a card-sorting exercise of professionalism attributes for Phase II. In Phase II, data from the sorting task was analyzed using Principle Component Analysis (PCA). RESULTS: The PCA for first year students derived a 7-factor solution. Factors (i.e., professionalism domains) identified were: Self-management and patient-centeredness, ethics and professional reputation, dependability, self-awareness and self-improvement, image, proficiency and lifelong learning and integrity. The PCA for second year students derived a 5-factor solution; factors identified were: "Good Doctor" attributes, responsibility, ethics, innovation and self-improvement and unbiased. CONCLUSIONS: Identification and organization of attributes into an overarching professionalism mental model provide a window into the active reconstruction of students' professional identity during the nascent stages of medical education. M1 professionalism domains were more consistent with the conventional professional image of the physician (e.g. Ethics and Professional reputation, Dependability, Integrity), whereas, M2 domains reflected a more global view (e.g., "Good Doctor" attributes, Responsibility, Ethics). This study provides a lens into the dynamic nature of students' PIF and encourages educators to evaluate PIF pedagogy at their own institutions.


Asunto(s)
Actitud , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina , Profesionalismo/educación , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Formación de Concepto , Florida , Humanos , Facultades de Medicina
4.
Teach Learn Med ; 31(3): 335-341, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31157561

RESUMEN

Issue: With the proliferation of social media and the blurring of online and real-world lives, today's healthcare professionals must constantly work to protect and manage their online reputation. Unfortunately, they are often not taught this skill as part of their healthcare education. Although many healthcare educators agree that this topic needs to be taught to students, researchers have not presented a formalized pathway to support this type of instruction. Evidence: Research on e-professionalism, a concept that addresses an individual's online professional image, was originally presented in 2009 and has continued to be investigated with research supporting its importance. Scholars in the field have found that the cost of having a nonexistent or poor online reputation can cause a lack of trust in the patient-provider relationship and, in extreme situations, can cause healthcare providers to face criminal charges, lose their jobs, or be expelled from healthcare programs. For example, in 2014 an emergency room nurse posted a photo to Instagram of an empty trauma room and was fired from her position for what the hospital called "insensitivity." These types of social media posts have occurred consistently over the last decade, highlighting the need for formalized online professionalism instruction in healthcare education. Implications: This article suggests the use of the extended parallel process model as a guide for healthcare educators to use when creating instruction on issues related to e-professionalism and online reputation management. The extended parallel process model has been successfully used to create health campaigns since the 1970s and is a respected and frequently used health communication model. This article shows that the extended parallel process model supports a systematic approach to e-professionalism instruction that allows it to be easily integrated into existing healthcare curricula.


Asunto(s)
Personal de Salud/educación , Modelos Educacionales , Profesionalismo/educación , Medios de Comunicación Sociales , Humanos
5.
Acad Med ; 94(8): 1081-1083, 2019 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31094726

RESUMEN

This Invited Commentary highlights the prevalence of adverse childhood experiences and the potential effect that such experiences can have in the medical education setting on trainees, colleagues, and faculty. The author draws on 20 years of experience working in organizations devoted to helping physicians with disruptive behavior learn new behavioral skills to enable them to function within the complex medical environment. A case example-an amalgam of individuals who have presented for remediation-is used to illustrate the issues that result from adverse childhood experiences. There is a broad and well-understood literature demonstrating a correlation between early life trauma and medical and mental health issues. Adverse early life experiences can also contribute to attachment-related difficulties including problems with boundaries, trust, and suspiciousness; lack of reciprocity; lack of attunement with others' emotional states; as well as regulation issues, including difficulties labeling and expressing feelings and internal states. Difficulties with self-concept, including a lack of continuous and predictable sense of self, low self-esteem, and shame and guilt, are also associated with exposure to adverse childhood experiences. Given the documented high proportion of health care workers, including physicians, who are trauma survivors, trauma-sensitive education must be a priority, not only in medical school but across the educational continuum.


Asunto(s)
Experiencias Adversas de la Infancia/métodos , Profesionalismo/normas , Adaptación Psicológica , Experiencias Adversas de la Infancia/tendencias , Humanos , Relaciones Interprofesionales , Médicos/psicología , Médicos/normas , Profesionalismo/educación
7.
Paediatr Anaesth ; 29(4): 345-352, 2019 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30710425

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Previously published work established the need for a specialty-specific definition of professionalism in pediatric anesthesiology. That work established a composite definition consisting of 11 domains and their component "defining themes" for professionalism in pediatric anesthesiology. As a next step toward assessing generalizability of our single-center findings, we sought to gain input from a national sample of pediatric anesthesiologists. AIMS: The aim of this study was to establish the construct validity of our previously published multidimensional definition of professionalism in pediatric anesthesiology using a nationally representative sample of pediatric anesthesiologists. METHODS: A survey was distributed via snowball sampling to the leaders of every pediatric anesthesiology fellowship program and pediatric anesthesia department or clinical division in the United States. Survey items were designed to validate individual component themes in the working definition. For affirmed items, the respondent was asked to rate the importance of the item. Respondents were also invited to suggest novel themes to be included in the definition. RESULTS: A total of 216 pediatric anesthesiologists representing a variety of experience levels and practice settings responded to the survey. All 40 themes were strongly supported by the respondents, with the least supported theme receiving 71.6% approval. 92.8% of respondents indicated that the 11 domains previously identified formed a comprehensive list of domains for professionalism in pediatric anesthesiology. Four additional novel themes were suggested by respondents, including wellness/self-care/burnout prevention, political advocacy, justice within a practice organization, and respect for leadership/experienced partners. These are topics for future study. The survey responses also indicated a near-universal agreement that didactic lectures would be ineffective for teaching professionalism. CONCLUSION: This national survey of pediatric anesthesiologists serves to confirm the construct validity of our prior working definition of professionalism in pediatric anesthesiology, and has uncovered several opportunities for further study. This definition can be used for both curriculum and policy development within the specialty.


Asunto(s)
Anestesiólogos/normas , Anestesiología/normas , Pediatría/normas , Profesionalismo/normas , Anestesiólogos/educación , Anestesiología/educación , Humanos , Internado y Residencia , Pediatría/educación , Profesionalismo/educación , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
8.
Anat Sci Educ ; 12(4): 349-359, 2019 Jul.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30739388

RESUMEN

Medical schools are increasingly integrating professionalism training into their gross anatomy courses, teaching ethical behavior and humanistic attitudes through the dissection experience. However, many schools continue to take a traditional, technical approach to anatomical education while teaching professionalism in separate courses. This interview-based study explored how students viewed the body donor and the professional lessons they learned through dissection at one such medical school. All students oscillated involuntarily between seeing the cadaver as a specimen for learning and seeing the cadaver as a person, with some students intentionally cultivating one of these ways of seeing over the other. These views shaped students' emotional and moral responses to the experiences of dissection. The "specimen" view facilitated a technical, detached approach to dissection, while the "person" view made students engage emotionally. Further, students who intentionally cultivated a "specimen" view generally felt less moral distress about dissection than students who intentionally cultivated a "person" view. The concept of respect gave students permission to perform dissections, but "person-minded" students developed more complex rules around what constituted respectful behavior. Both groups of students connected the gross anatomy experience to their professional development, but in different ways. "Specimen-minded" students intentionally objectified the body to learn the emotional control physicians need, while "person-minded" students humanized the body donor to promote the emotional engagement required of physicians. These findings support efforts to integrate professionalism teaching into gross anatomy courses, particularly content, addressing the balance between professional detachment and concern.


Asunto(s)
Anatomía/educación , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/ética , Emociones , Profesionalismo/ética , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Anatomía/ética , Curriculum , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Femenino , Humanismo , Humanos , Laboratorios/ética , Masculino , Profesionalismo/educación , Investigación Cualitativa , Facultades de Medicina/ética
9.
Eur J Dent Educ ; 23(2): 190-198, 2019 May.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30659761

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: It is recognised that professionalism should play a central role in dental education. However, its implementation into the curricula of dental schools is still limited. Our objective was to identify the main values related to professionalism based on the perceptions of students and faculty members from the Faculty of Dentistry, University of Chile. METHODS: A Dental Values Survey was validated and culturally adapted in order to guarantee the greatest possible internal validity. The adapted survey was administered to students and faculty members (416 and 225, respectively). The final survey contained 64 items rated on a Likert scale of 1-5. Each item was categorised according to five dimensions: Altruism, Consciousness, Personal Satisfaction, Quality of Life and Professional Status. The values were compared between faculty and students and among students at different courses. A values scale was constructed by selecting the five items with the highest average score for each dimension. RESULTS: Survey respondents composed 34.32% of the universe, of which 50.46% were faculty and 49.54% were students. Values associated with Altruism, Consciousness and Professional Status, were the highest rated by students and faculty. Values associated with Personal Satisfaction and Quality of Life received the lowest scores for both groups. CONCLUSIONS: To provide the best possible attention to patients (Consciousness), and that patients have access to affordable dental care (Altruism), are the values at the top of our scale. On the other hand, to maintain financial stability and to be well paid (Quality of Life) were the less considered.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Odontología , Docentes de Odontología/psicología , Percepción , Profesionalismo/educación , Facultades de Odontología , Estudiantes de Odontología/psicología , Universidades , Adolescente , Adulto , Anciano , Chile , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Adulto Joven
10.
J Dent Educ ; 83(3): 334-341, 2019 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30692193

RESUMEN

Recognition that professionalism is at the heart of dentistry's contract with society has led to an emphasis on educational strategies designed to improve cultivation of professional behaviors. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a project based on situated learning theory and using an Ignite format to support dental students' learning and promote professionalism. Learning activities were evaluated in terms of new thinking, changing perspectives, and professional relationships. Professional relationship development and professional self-identity were explored. First-year dental students (n=108) enrolled in a two-semester professional development course at one U.S. dental school in fall 2017 comprised the study sample; all participated in the study. The mixed-methods study design used simultaneous triangulation with the qualitative component adding insight to the evaluation results. A 25-question evaluation form was used to collect quantitative data, and student self-assessment essays provided qualitative information. On the survey, the students' responses were generally agree/strongly agree and ranged from 60% (creating the presentation, changed perspective on academic integrity) to 98% (interaction and discussion with facilitators, appreciate professional relationships beyond dental school). Four themes emerged from content analysis of the essays: Behavior and Consequences: Academic Integrity and Professionalism, Patient Trust: Conflicts of Interest, Professional Interactions, and Professional Standards and Reputation. Overall, this Ignite project was found to advance the desired learning goals with respect to initial professional development. The social interactions with peers and outside practitioners facilitated introspection and learning. Students saw themselves as part of a profession, they started to appreciate and develop professional relationships, and many left the event with a deeper understanding of issues related to academic integrity, professional behavior, and conflicts of interests in dental practice.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Odontología/métodos , Modelos Educacionales , Profesionalismo/educación , Entrenamiento Simulado/métodos , Estudiantes de Odontología , Adulto , Curriculum , Femenino , Humanos , Aprendizaje , Masculino , Adulto Joven
11.
Med Teach ; 41(3): 303-308, 2019 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29703096

RESUMEN

The relatively new term "Professional Identity Formation" (PIF) complements behavior-based and attitude-based perspectives on professionalism. Unprofessional behavior and its remediation should also be addressed from this perspective. However, a framework is needed to guide discussion and remediation of unprofessional behavior, which can encompass behavior-based, attitude-based, and identity-based perspectives on professionalism. To this end, the authors propose a multi-level professionalism framework which describes, apart from professional behavior, more levels which influence professional performance: environment, competencies, beliefs, values, identity, and mission. The different levels can provide tools for educators to address and discuss unprofessional behavior with their students in a comprehensive way. By reflecting on all the different levels of the framework, educators guard themselves against narrowing the discussion to either professional behavior or professional identity. The multi-level professionalism framework can help educators and students to gain a better understanding of the root of unprofessional behavior, and of remediation strategies that would be appropriate. For despite the recent emphasis on PIF, unprofessional behavior and its remediation will remain important issues in medical education.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Clínica/normas , Ética Clínica/educación , Mala Conducta Profesional/psicología , Profesionalismo/educación , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Educación Médica , Humanos , Rol del Médico , Competencia Profesional
12.
J Nurs Manag ; 27(1): 154-160, 2019 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30171644

RESUMEN

AIM: To evaluate the effectiveness of a professionalism taskforce and the prevalence of negative behaviours across interdisciplinary groups at a south-eastern US academic medical centre. BACKGROUND: Negative behaviours within health care organisations may undermine patient safety. These behaviours are associated with decreased productivity, increased turnover, and poor patient and staff outcomes. METHODS: A pre-post study design using an adapted instrument, the Negative Behaviors in HealthCare (NBHC) survey, assessed perceptions of negative behaviours by physicians, clinical, and managerial staff both before and after a professionalism taskforce was convened in 2012 to identify and promulgate key strategies to improve behaviours. RESULTS: The 1,980 respondents completed the pre-survey in January 2012 and 1,423 completed the post-survey in 2014. Significant reductions in use of lateral aggression (LA) and vertical aggression (VA) (χ2  = 5.65, p < 0.017), observation of LA and VA (χ2  = 4.90, p < 0.027), and experience with contributing factors associated with negative behaviours (χ2  = 9.03, p < 0.003) were identified. CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggest that a professionalism taskforce guiding key strategies to elevate professionalism significantly affected beliefs about lateral and vertical aggression. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Decreasing negative behaviours in health care will require additional strategies and consistent implementation. Additional research addressing fear, retaliation, and job stress, and linking these behaviours to patient safety outcomes, is required.


Asunto(s)
Personal de Salud/psicología , Problema de Conducta/psicología , Profesionalismo/normas , Centros Médicos Académicos/organización & administración , Centros Médicos Académicos/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto , Anciano , Acoso Escolar/psicología , Femenino , Personal de Salud/normas , Personal de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Prevalencia , Profesionalismo/educación , Profesionalismo/tendencias , Psicometría/instrumentación , Psicometría/métodos , Sudeste de Estados Unidos , Estadísticas no Paramétricas , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Lugar de Trabajo/psicología , Lugar de Trabajo/normas
14.
Curr Pharm Teach Learn ; 10(9): 1243-1247, 2018 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30497628

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Encouraging and assessing professionalism among pharmacy students can be challenging. While non-punitive approaches are preferred as part of professional socialization, our program found this insufficient to ensure professional behaviour, especially during ungraded simulation lab activities. EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITY AND SETTING: In Winter 2015, we included a discretionary grade deduction within the assessments applied to a professional practice lab course in order to provide both intrinsic and extrinsic motivation to follow lab policies on professionalism. FINDINGS: A professionalism code was developed and discussed with students, and was also used as a template to guide professional behaviour throughout the course. Students not exhibiting these behaviours in lab could be subject to up to a five percent deduction from their final course grade at the instructor's discretion. DISCUSSION: Instructors considering this strategy are encouraged to introduce it in the first year of the program to ensure consistent expectations throughout the duration of students' training, and to not determine the magnitude of deductions applied until the end of the semester to ensure consistency and consideration of ongoing behaviour. Documentation of actions leading to deductions should be kept to support the decision. SUMMARY: A deduction-only approach to address unprofessional behaviours in addition to discussion offers additional motivation to students to exhibit professionalism across both graded and ungraded educational activities with minimal additional workload for instructors. The strategy has since been adopted across all lab courses in our program and has also been recommended in lecture-based courses.


Asunto(s)
Retroalimentación , Profesionalismo/educación , Entrenamiento Simulado/métodos , Estudiantes de Farmacia/estadística & datos numéricos , Curriculum/tendencias , Educación en Farmacia/métodos , Humanos , Profesionalismo/normas , Entrenamiento Simulado/tendencias
15.
Curr Pharm Teach Learn ; 10(11): 1512-1517, 2018 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30514543

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The purpose of this project was to impact pharmacy students' personal and professional development through simulation of a board of pharmacy disciplinary hearing regarding addiction. EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITY AND SETTING: The mock board hearing was conducted as part of the required curriculum. Faculty obtained materials from a prior board hearing. The actual respondent, lawyer, former executive director, and a board agent participated. Students served as board members and president, asked questions of the witnesses, and deliberated per board procedure. After the event, student learning and perceptions were assessed through knowledge-based, opinion-based questions, and open-ended questions. FINDINGS: Of the 141 students who attended the event, 97% completed the assessment. The average score on the knowledge-based questions was 95%. Ratings of perceptions and reflections of the experience were used in tandem to understand the experience. In general, students indicated the experience was positive and impactful towards their education. Students indicated they felt that the experience allowed them to better understand addiction and empathize with someone called before the board. In fact, there were fundamental differences in perceptions regarding the "addicted person," going from a penalizing and stigmatized perspective to one of caring and compassion. SUMMARY: Students were knowledgeable about the board and its regulatory process after the event. More than knowledge, students indicated fundamental changes in their views of addiction. Other institutions may consider implementing similar exercises to engender empathy and professionalism regarding drug addiction and regulatory compliance.


Asunto(s)
Empatía , Disciplina Laboral/métodos , Legislación de Medicamentos/tendencias , Profesionalismo/educación , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Curriculum/tendencias , Educación en Farmacia/métodos , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Humanos , Organización y Administración , Estudiantes de Farmacia/estadística & datos numéricos
17.
Int J Med Educ ; 9: 246-252, 2018 Sep 28.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30269110

RESUMEN

Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to determine whether consensuses on the definition of emergency physician professionalism exist within and among four different generations. Our secondary objective was to describe the most important characteristic related to emergency physician professionalism that each generation values. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional survey study, using a card-sorting technique, at the emergency departments of two university-based medical centers in the United States. The study was conducted with 288 participants from February to November 2017. Participants included adult emergency department patients, emergency medicine supervising physicians, emergency medicine residents, emergency department nurses, and fourth- and second-year medical students who independently ranked 39 cards that represent qualities related to emergency physician professionalism. We used descriptive statistics, quantitative cultural consensuses and Spearman's correlation coefficients to analyze the data. Results: We found cultural consensuses on emergency physician professionalism in Millennials and Generation X overall, with respect for patients named the most important quality (eigenratio 5.94, negative competency 0%; eigenratio 3.87, negative competency 1.64%, respectively). There were consensuses on emergency physician professionalism in healthcare providers throughout all generations, but no consensuses were found across generations in the patient groups. Conclusions: While younger generations and healthcare providers had consensuses on emergency physician professionalism, we found that patients had no consensuses on this matter. Medical professionalism curricula should be designed with an understanding of each generation's values concerning professionalism. Future studies using qualitative methods across specialties, to assess definitions of medical professionalism in each generation, should be pursued.


Asunto(s)
Medicina de Emergencia/normas , Relaciones Intergeneracionales , Médicos , Profesionalismo , Adolescente , Adulto , Factores de Edad , Anciano , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Competencia Clínica/normas , Competencia Clínica/estadística & datos numéricos , Estudios Transversales , Curriculum , Medicina de Emergencia/educación , Medicina de Emergencia/estadística & datos numéricos , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Satisfacción del Paciente/estadística & datos numéricos , Rol del Médico , Relaciones Médico-Paciente , Médicos/psicología , Médicos/estadística & datos numéricos , Profesionalismo/educación , Profesionalismo/normas , Calidad de la Atención de Salud/normas , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Estados Unidos/epidemiología , Adulto Joven
18.
Curr Pharm Teach Learn ; 10(7): 875-885, 2018 07.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30236424

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Professionalism in pharmacy students is an area of great focus with the release of Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) Standards 2016. This study assessed and compared student pharmacists' professionalism at one college of pharmacy to inform the implementation of a co-curricular professional engagement program. METHODS: Two validated instruments (Behavioral Professionalism Assessment Instrument [BPAI] and Pharmacy Professionalism Instrument [PPI]) were administered to assess baseline professionalism. Kruskall-Wallis tests compared responses among the three pharmacy classes. Analysis was conducted using SPSS. This research was approved by the Mercer University's Institutional Review Board. RESULTS: A total of 362 students completed the survey (75% response rate), of which 131 were first-year, 139 were second-year, and 92 were third-year students. There were significant differences in agreement among these classes of students as to whether a program focused on professional engagement was important and helpful (p < 0.001). Seven BPAI statements and five PPI statements demonstrated significant differences in the level of agreement among the professional years. These behaviors include: completing assignments independently and without supervision (p = 0.004); commitment to helping others (p = 0.004); reporting a medication error (p = 0.005); using time efficiently (p = 0.02); and being respectful (p = 0.04). DISCUSSION: At baseline, 12 statements were significantly different in the level of agreement among the three pharmacy classes. Differences may be explained by perceived professionalism (in first-year students) versus actual professional behaviors (second- and third-year students), as well as breadth and depth of experience. A co-curricular professional engagement program could increase student awareness of professionalism and professional behaviors and be tailored to meet assessed student needs.


Asunto(s)
Actitud del Personal de Salud , Curriculum/tendencias , Profesionalismo/educación , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Acreditación , Adulto , Ética Farmacéutica/educación , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Estudiantes de Farmacia/estadística & datos numéricos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
20.
Int J Med Educ ; 9: 206-212, 2018 Jul 27.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30055101

RESUMEN

Objectives: This study aims to gain an understanding of the perceptions of host clinical preceptors in Malawi and Lesotho of the professionalism exhibited by short-term learners from the United States and Canada during short-term global health electives. Methods: Focus group discussions were conducted with 11 host clinical preceptors at two outpatient pediatric HIV clinics in sub-Saharan Africa (Malawi and Lesotho). These clinics host approximately 50 short-term global health learners from the United States and Canada each year. Focus group moderators used open-ended discussion guides to explore host clinical preceptors' perceptions of the professionalism of short-term global health learners. Thematic analysis with an inductive approach was used to identify salient themes from these focus group discussions. Results: Eleven of the 18 possible respondents participated in two focus group discussions. Adaptability, eagerness to learn, active listening, gratitude, initiative, and punctuality was cited as professional behaviors among short-term global health learners. Cited unprofessional behaviors included disregard of local clinicians' expertise and unresponsiveness to feedback. Host clinical preceptors described difficulty providing feedback to short-term global health learners and discrepancies between what may be considered professional in their home setting versus in the study settings. Respondents requested pre-departure orientation for learners and their own orientation before hosting learners. Conclusions: Both host clinical preceptors and short-term global health learners should be aware that behaviors that may be considered best practice in one clinical setting may be perceived as unprofessional in another. Future studies to develop a common definition of professionalism during short-term global health electives are merited.


Asunto(s)
Actitud del Personal de Salud , Salud Global/educación , Percepción , Preceptoría , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas , Profesionalismo , Estudiantes de Medicina , Adulto , Canadá , Competencia Clínica , Femenino , Grupos Focales , Humanos , Internacionalidad , Internado y Residencia , Aprendizaje , Masculino , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas/normas , Profesionalismo/educación , Profesionalismo/normas , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Estados Unidos
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