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1.
Rev Esp Salud Publica ; 942020 Oct 30.
Artículo en Español | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33124619

RESUMEN

This paper aims to share the reflections related to the community actions in which the Agència de Salut Pública de Barcelona has been involved during the emergency of COVID-19. The tasks carried out can be arranged in three stages, frequently overlapping: detection of needs and problems; contact with key stakeholders to assess what to do and how to do it; adaptation of the interventions to the "new normal" and generation of new responses. The emerging problems included: not being able to do the confinement (due to homelessness, material conditions, living in a situation of violence); digital gap (lack of knowledge, devices, access to Wifi); greater exposure to COVID-19 in the essential but precarious, feminized and racialized jobs (care, cleaning, food shops) that are the most frequent in the neighborhoods in where we work; language and cultural barriers that preclude to follow recommendations; to lose employment; insufficient income to cover basic needs; social isolation; and the deterioration of emotional health caused by the situation. During the process, some interventions were adapted to be delivered on-line. Solidarity networks and local resources were key to meet basic needs, but also other needs related to lack of digital knowledge or device. Community action in health, from a critical, intersectional and local perspective, and with intersectoral work and community participation, can contribute to: facilitate a contextualized response in the event of a health crisis; mitigate the effects derived from its economic and social crisis.


Asunto(s)
Betacoronavirus , Servicios de Salud Comunitaria/métodos , Infecciones por Coronavirus/prevención & control , Política de Salud , Promoción de la Salud/métodos , Evaluación de Necesidades , Pandemias/prevención & control , Neumonía Viral/prevención & control , Salud Pública/métodos , Servicios de Salud Comunitaria/organización & administración , Participación de la Comunidad , Promoción de la Salud/organización & administración , Humanos , España
2.
BMC Emerg Med ; 20(1): 82, 2020 10 15.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33059583

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Emergency department personnel routinely bear witness to traumatic experiences and critical incidents that can affect their own well-being. Peer support through debriefing has demonstrated positive impacts on clinicians' well-being following critical incidents. This study explored community hospital emergency department staff's perceptions of critical incidents, assessed openness to debriefing and measured baseline well-being. Our analysis provides a baseline of provider well-being immediately prior to the local onset of COVID-19. The potential need for additional resources to support frontline providers during the pandemic can be evaluated. METHOD: We conducted a cross-sectional study for 4-weeks prior to the first COVID-19 case in Connecticut using a survey offered to an interprofessional group of emergency department clinical staff. The main outcome measures were the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Professional Quality of Life (ProQOL) scale. Pearson's chi-square test was used to identify significant differences in perceptions of critical incidents and debriefings between professional categories. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's test were used to analyze significant differences in well-being between professional categories. RESULTS: Thirty-nine clinical personnel from St. Vincent's Emergency Department responded to the survey. Events frequently selected as critical incidents were caring for critically ill children (89.7%), mass casualty events (84.6%), and death of a patient (69.2%). Critical incidents were commonly reported (81.6%) as occurring once per week. Additionally, 76.2% of participants reported wanting to discuss a critical incident with their team. Across all respondents, 45.7% scored borderline or abnormal for anxiety, 55.9% scored moderate for burnout, and 55.8% scored moderate to high for secondary traumatic stress. CONCLUSIONS: At baseline, providers reported caring for critically ill children, mass casualty events, and death of a patient as critical incidents, which typically occurred once per week. Death of a patient occurs at increased frequency during the protracted mass casualty experience of COVID-19 and threatens provider well-being. Receptiveness to post-event debriefing is high but the method is still underutilized. With nearly half of staff scoring borderline or abnormal for anxiety, burnout, and secondary traumatic stress at baseline, peer support measures should be implemented to protect frontline providers' well-being during and after the pandemic.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Servicio de Urgencia en Hospital/organización & administración , Retroalimentación , Promoción de la Salud/organización & administración , Personal de Hospital/psicología , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Lugar de Trabajo/psicología , Adulto , Betacoronavirus , Agotamiento Profesional/epidemiología , Agotamiento Profesional/prevención & control , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Hospitales Comunitarios/organización & administración , Humanos , Masculino , Incidentes con Víctimas en Masa/psicología , Persona de Mediana Edad , Pandemias , Percepción , Calidad de Vida , Apoyo Social , Factores Socioeconómicos , Estrés Psicológico/epidemiología , Estrés Psicológico/prevención & control
3.
Przegl Epidemiol ; 74(2): 303-315, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33115219

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: At the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum (A-BSM) actions have been undertaken to effectively protect employees and minimise risk of SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus spreading from the beginning of the COVID-19 epidemic. AIM OF THE ARTICLE: The aim was to present the actions, instructions and procedures introduced at the A-BSM to provide information how to deal with pandemic caused by the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus in institutions taking care of cultural heritage before and after closure of the Museum for visitors and after reopening. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The described activities were developed at the Museum by a specially established Expert Team. RESULTS: Groups of employees and places in which they were most exposed to contact with visitors and, as a consequence, at the highest risk of getting infected, were characterised. The employees were provided with personal protective equipment, and at the Museum site, devices essential for maintaining the microbiological cleanliness of the rooms, were placed. In the next stage, instructions and procedures for particular groups of employees were prepared. Visitors were educated about the need of taking precautions and were allowed to disinfect in several places at the Memorial Site. Steps to reduce attendance at this time has also been taken. Procedures for employees of the A-BSM were developed in such way that they can also be used after reopening of the Museum for visitors. CONCLUSIONS: The actions which ensured the microbiological safety of the A-BSM employees, brought satisfying results. In more than 21 days after closing of the Museum for visitors, no cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection or COVID-19 were found among employees, despite a very high threat.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/prevención & control , Promoción de la Salud/organización & administración , Museos/organización & administración , Enfermedades Profesionales/prevención & control , Pandemias/prevención & control , Neumonía Viral/prevención & control , Prevención Primaria/organización & administración , Lugar de Trabajo/organización & administración , Betacoronavirus , Conductas Relacionadas con la Salud , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Humanos , Polonia , Desarrollo de Programa
4.
East Mediterr Health J ; 26(10): 1148-1150, 2020 Oct 13.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33103740

RESUMEN

The global COVID-19 pandemic has demonstrated the impact of a major public health emergency on mental health, and the ways that individuals, communities, professionals and systems can react positively to such a crisis. The Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR) has substantial experience in mental health and psychosocial support (MHPSS) in crises, and COVID-19 has driven further innovation to support mental health and well-being.Global and regional guidance has been developed quickly, applying lessons learnt from previous disease outbreaks to respond to the pandemic at a systems level, for different population groups, and for countries of different income levels. Preliminary results from a global rapid assessment survey to assess the impact of COVID-19 on MHPSS services, indicate that 20 of the 22 EMR Member States have MHPSS as integral components of national COVID-19 response plans; one-third have allocated additional funding. However, MHPSS services have been severely impacted by the pandemic, including psychotherapy, psychosocial interventions, community services, and services for children/adolescents. Innovative solutions such as crisis hotlines, tele-consultations, digital self-help platforms, novel approaches to ensure supply of psychotropic medicines, and task sharing/shifting for basic psychosocial support, are being used in many countries to overcome service disruptions and maintain care for those with mental conditions.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Infecciones por Coronavirus/psicología , Servicios de Salud Mental/organización & administración , Salud Mental , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Neumonía Viral/psicología , África del Norte/epidemiología , Betacoronavirus , Desastres , Salud Global , Conductas Relacionadas con la Salud , Promoción de la Salud/organización & administración , Accesibilidad a los Servicios de Salud/organización & administración , Humanos , Medio Oriente/epidemiología , Pandemias , Resiliencia Psicológica , Determinantes Sociales de la Salud , Factores Socioeconómicos
5.
Health Educ Behav ; 47(5): 665-670, 2020 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32896177

RESUMEN

Health education and promotion researchers and practitioners are committed to eliminating health disparities, and the Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE) has continuously supported this effort through its journals, professional development, annual conferences, and advocacy. The COVID-19 pandemic elucidated inequities directly caused by racism and other social determinants of health. In order to achieve health equity, we need to become antiracist in our research, practice, and advocacy work by standing united against racist policies and practices. I invite us all to heed the call to action on these five points: place racism on the agenda, practice cultural humility, claim your privilege and eliminate microaggressions, utilize strategies that promote inclusion and equity, and embrace your inner leader and activist. Just as SOPHE as an organization pivoted its annual conference from on ground to virtual in March 2020, so can we be innovative and brave as professionals to face the hard work and dedication needed to become antiracist.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Equidad en Salud/organización & administración , Promoción de la Salud/organización & administración , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Determinantes Sociales de la Salud/etnología , Betacoronavirus , Equidad en Salud/normas , Promoción de la Salud/normas , Humanos , Pandemias , Racismo
6.
BMC Public Health ; 20(1): 1475, 2020 Sep 29.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32993606

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: In Japan, a high-sodium diet is the most important dietary risk factor and is known to cause a range of health problems. This study aimed to forecast Japan's disability-adjusted life year (DALYs) for chronic diseases that would be associated with high-sodium diet in different future scenarios of salt intake. We modelled DALY forecast and alternative future scenarios of salt intake for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), chronic kidney diseases (CKDs), and stomach cancer (SC) from 2017 to 2040. METHODS: We developed a three-component model of disease-specific DALYs: a component on the changes in major behavioural and metabolic risk predictors including salt intake; a component on the income per person, educational attainment, and total fertility rate under 25 years; and an autoregressive integrated moving average model to capture the unexplained component correlated over time. Data on risk predictors were obtained from Japan's National Health and Nutrition Surveys and from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017. To generate a reference forecast of disease-specific DALY rates for 2017-2040, we modelled the three diseases using the data for 1990-2016. Additionally, we generated better, moderate, and worse scenarios to evaluate the impact of change in salt intake on the DALY rate for the diseases. RESULTS: In our reference forecast, the DALY rates across all ages were predicted to be stable for CVDs, continuously increasing for CKDs, and continuously decreasing for SC. Meanwhile, the age group-specific DALY rates for these three diseases were forecasted to decrease, with some exceptions. Except for the ≥70 age group, there were remarkable differences in DALY rates between scenarios, with the best scenario having the lowest DALY rates in 2040 for SC. This represents a wide scope of future trajectories by 2040 with a potential for tremendous decrease in SC burden. CONCLUSIONS: The gap between scenarios provides some quantification of the range of policy impacts on future trajectories of salt intake. Even though we do not yet know the policy mix used to achieve these scenarios, the result that there can be differences between scenarios means that policies today can have a significant impact on the future DALYs.


Asunto(s)
Enfermedad Crónica/tendencias , Personas con Discapacidad/estadística & datos numéricos , Promoción de la Salud/organización & administración , Años de Vida Ajustados por Calidad de Vida , Cloruro de Sodio Dietético/efectos adversos , Adulto , Enfermedades Cardiovasculares/epidemiología , Dieta/estadística & datos numéricos , Predicción , Humanos , Japón , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Encuestas Nutricionales , Insuficiencia Renal Crónica/epidemiología , Factores de Riesgo , Cloruro de Sodio Dietético/administración & dosificación
10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32796754

RESUMEN

Treatment and prevention alone are unlikely to make a significant difference in reducing the burden of poor mental health and mental illness. Therefore, mental health promotion (MHP) initiatives are advocated. In 2014, the ABCs of mental health (ABCs) partnership was established in Denmark; in the partnership, partner organisations, e.g., municipalities and NGOs, use a research-based framework for MHP, the ABC-framework, to develop and implement MHP initiatives. This paper has two aims: (1) to outline the overall characteristics of these MHP initiatives; and (2) to explore local coordinator and stakeholder perceptions of the implementation processes and the impact of the MHP initiatives. Questionnaire surveys, individual interviews and group interviews were conducted during 2017-2020. The MHP initiatives were grouped according to three strategies: building MHP capacity, campaign activities to promote mental health awareness and knowledge and establishing and promoting opportunities to engage in mentally healthy activities. The ABC-framework was positively received and viewed as providing relevant knowledge for working with MHP as well as fostering intersectoral and interprofessional collaborations. However, using a bottom-up approach to develop and implement MHP initiatives can be time-consuming and resource demanding, and it requires a deliberate balancing of local adaptability and concrete guidance when engaging stakeholders and implementers. Overall, using the ABC-framework to develop and implement MHP initiatives holds great promise for advancing and promoting MHP practice.


Asunto(s)
Promoción de la Salud/organización & administración , Trastornos Mentales/prevención & control , Salud Mental , Dinamarca/epidemiología , Humanos , Trastornos Mentales/epidemiología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
11.
PLoS One ; 15(8): e0236169, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32745081

RESUMEN

In line with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the target for achieving Universal Health Coverage (UHC), state level initiatives to promote health with "no-one left behind" are underway in India. In Kerala, reforms under the flagship Aardram mission include upgradation of Primary Health Centres (PHCs) to Family Health Centres (FHCs, similar to the national model of health and wellness centres (HWCs)), with the proactive provision of a package of primary care services for the population in an administrative area. We report on a component of Aardram's monitoring and evaluation framework for primary health care, where tracer input, output, and outcome indicators were selected using a modified Delphi process and field tested. A conceptual framework and indicator inventory were developed drawing upon literature review and stakeholder consultations, followed by mapping of manual registers currently used in PHCs to identify sources of data and processes of monitoring. The indicator inventory was reduced to a list using a modified Delphi method, followed by facility-level field testing across three districts. The modified Delphi comprised 25 participants in two rounds, who brought the list down to 23 approved and 12 recommended indicators. Three types of challenges in monitoring indicators were identified: appropriateness of indicators relative to local use, lack of clarity or procedural differences among those doing the reporting, and validity of data. Further field-testing of indicators, as well as the revision or removal of some may be required to support ongoing health systems reform, learning, monitoring and evaluation.


Asunto(s)
Reforma de la Atención de Salud/organización & administración , Atención Primaria de Salud/organización & administración , Indicadores de Calidad de la Atención de Salud , Desarrollo Sostenible , Cobertura Universal del Seguro de Salud/organización & administración , Instituciones de Atención Ambulatoria/organización & administración , Instituciones de Atención Ambulatoria/estadística & datos numéricos , Centros de Acondicionamiento/organización & administración , Centros de Acondicionamiento/estadística & datos numéricos , Reforma de la Atención de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Implementación de Plan de Salud/organización & administración , Implementación de Plan de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Promoción de la Salud/organización & administración , Promoción de la Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , India , Atención Primaria de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Cobertura Universal del Seguro de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos
12.
Bogotá; Organización Panamericana de la Salud; jul. 17, 2020. 13 p.
No convencional en Español | LILACS | ID: biblio-1103541

RESUMEN

Este documento tiene el propósito de actualizar las líneas de acción estratégicas de la OPS/OMS para el abordaje de la epidemia de la COVID-19 en Honduras. La pandemia ha tenido una evolución acelerada a nivel mundial, considerándose de una gravedad alta con impactos que van mucho más allá del sector salud y que han perturbado todos los aspectos sociales y económicos de casi todos los países del mundo. Por lo tanto, es necesario ir adaptando y actualizando las intervenciones para que reflejen de mejor manera las lecciones aprendidas de otros países, los mandatos y las necesidades nacionales y las recomendaciones de la Organización Mundial de la Salud/Organización Panamericana de la Salud, de acuerdo con las políticas emergentes tanto al nivel nacional, subregional y mundial.


Asunto(s)
Neumonía Viral/prevención & control , Infecciones por Coronavirus/prevención & control , Pandemias/prevención & control , Betacoronavirus , Estrategias Nacionales , Planificación , Promoción de la Salud/organización & administración , Honduras
14.
BMC Public Health ; 20(1): 1050, 2020 Jul 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32615957

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Faith-based health promotion has shown promise for supporting healthy lifestyles, but has limited evidence of reaching scale or sustainability. In one recent such effort, volunteers from a diverse range of faith organizations were trained as peer educators to implement diabetes self-management education (DSME) classes within their communities. The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated with provision of these classes within six months of peer-educator training. METHODS: This study used the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) to identify patterns from interviews, observations, attendance records, and organizational background information. Two research team members thematically coded interview transcripts and observation memos to identify patterns distinguishing faith organizations that did, versus did not, conduct DSME classes within six months of peer-educator training. Bivariate statistics were also used to identify faith organizational characteristics associated with DSME class completion within this time frame. RESULTS: Volunteers from 24 faith organizations received peer-educator training. Of these, 15 led a DSME class within six months, graduating a total of 132 participants. Thematic analyses yielded two challenges experienced disproportionately by organizations unable to complete DSME within six months: [1] Their peer educators experienced DSME as complex, despite substantial planning efforts at simplification, and [2] the process of engaging peer educators and leadership within their organizations was often more difficult than anticipated, despite initial communication by Faith and Diabetes organizers intended to secure informed commitments by both groups. Many peer educators were overwhelmed by training content, the responsibility required to start and sustain DSME classes, and other time commitments. Other priorities competed for time in participants' lives and on organizational calendars, and scheduling processes could be slow. In an apparent dynamic of "crowding out," coordination was particularly difficult in larger organizations, which were less likely than smaller organizations to complete DSME classes despite their more substantial resources. CONCLUSIONS: Initial commitment from faith organizations' leadership and volunteers may not suffice to implement even relatively short and low cost health promotion programs. Faith organizations might benefit from realistic previews about just how challenging it is to make these programs a sufficiently high organizational and individual priority.


Asunto(s)
Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/prevención & control , Organizaciones Religiosas , Promoción de la Salud/organización & administración , Educación del Paciente como Asunto/organización & administración , Agentes Comunitarios de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Recolección de Datos , Educación en Salud/organización & administración , Humanos , Liderazgo , Obesidad/terapia , Grupo Paritario
16.
PLoS One ; 15(7): e0235264, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32658921

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To identify health systems-level barriers to treatment for women who screened positive for high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) in a cervical cancer prevention program in Kenya. METHODS: In a trial of implementation strategies for hrHPV-based cervical cancer screening in western Kenya in 2018-2019, women underwent hrHPV testing offered through community health campaigns, and women who tested positive were referred to government health facilities for cryotherapy. The current analysis draws on treatment data from this trial, as well as two observational studies that were conducted: 1) periodic assessments of the treatment sites to ascertain availability of resources for treatment and 2) surveys with treatment providers to elicit their views on barriers to care. Bivariate analyses were performed for the site assessment data, and the provider survey data were analyzed descriptively. RESULTS: Seventeen site assessments were performed across three treatment sites. All three sites reported instances of supply stockouts, two sites reported treatment delays due to lack of supplies, and two sites reported treatment delays due to provider factors. Of the 16 providers surveyed, ten (67%) perceived lack of knowledge of HPV and cervical cancer as the main barrier in women's decision to get treated, and seven (47%) perceived financial barriers for transportation and childcare as the main barrier to accessing treatment. Eight (50%) endorsed that providing treatment free of cost was the greatest facilitator of treatment. CONCLUSION: Patient education and financial support to reach treatment are potential areas for intervention to increase rates of hrHPV+ women presenting for treatment. It is also essential to eliminate barriers that prevent treatment of women who present, including ensuring adequate supplies and staff for treatment.


Asunto(s)
Crioterapia/estadística & datos numéricos , Detección Precoz del Cáncer/estadística & datos numéricos , Tamizaje Masivo/estadística & datos numéricos , Infecciones por Papillomavirus/terapia , Neoplasias del Cuello Uterino/prevención & control , Adulto , Servicios de Salud Comunitaria/economía , Servicios de Salud Comunitaria/organización & administración , Servicios de Salud Comunitaria/estadística & datos numéricos , Crioterapia/economía , Detección Precoz del Cáncer/economía , Femenino , Asignación de Recursos para la Atención de Salud/economía , Asignación de Recursos para la Atención de Salud/organización & administración , Asignación de Recursos para la Atención de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Implementación de Plan de Salud/economía , Implementación de Plan de Salud/organización & administración , Implementación de Plan de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Promoción de la Salud/economía , Promoción de la Salud/organización & administración , Promoción de la Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Accesibilidad a los Servicios de Salud/economía , Accesibilidad a los Servicios de Salud/organización & administración , Accesibilidad a los Servicios de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Fuerza Laboral en Salud/organización & administración , Fuerza Laboral en Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Kenia/epidemiología , Tamizaje Masivo/economía , Tamizaje Masivo/organización & administración , Estudios Observacionales como Asunto , Papillomaviridae/aislamiento & purificación , Infecciones por Papillomavirus/diagnóstico , Infecciones por Papillomavirus/epidemiología , Infecciones por Papillomavirus/virología , Educación del Paciente como Asunto , Derivación y Consulta/estadística & datos numéricos , Población Rural/estadística & datos numéricos , Neoplasias del Cuello Uterino/epidemiología , Neoplasias del Cuello Uterino/patología , Neoplasias del Cuello Uterino/virología
18.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 84(6): ajpe8154, 2020 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32665725

RESUMEN

The novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has changed the way we live, work, and study. As faculty members, staff members, and students attempt to create and maintain a new normal because of this pandemic, the preservation of wellbeing becomes the responsibility of each and every one of us. The pandemic has taught us not to presume the importance of wellbeing and has allowed us time to reflect on establishing new assumptions and beliefs about how and when we work and study; how to be more efficient in our work and home responsibilities; and above all, what is most important. We must support ourselves and our students by maintaining a routine, modifying work and coursework expectations, and seeking psychosocial support if needed. Focusing on promoting wellbeing through leadership will move our institutions forward to a brighter future beyond COVID-19.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Educación en Farmacia/organización & administración , Docentes de Farmacia/psicología , Promoción de la Salud/organización & administración , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Betacoronavirus , Docentes de Farmacia/organización & administración , Estado de Salud , Humanos , Salud Mental , Pandemias , Resiliencia Psicológica
19.
Am J Public Health ; 110(9): 1300-1303, 2020 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32673106

RESUMEN

Cooperative Extension (Extension), part of the land-grant university system, has been engaged in rural communities for more than a century. While the focus of Extension's efforts has largely centered on agriculture, there is an important thread of work that has similarities to public health.As Extension settles into its second century, we are working to be even more engaged in efforts that improve the health and well-being of rural communities in particular. Extension faculty and staff are accomplishing this through direct-to-the-population education and through partnerships with more classically oriented public health organizations able to leverage Extension's networks and positive reputation in communities to engage them and improve their health. A component of these partnerships includes Extension faculty and staff increasingly engaging in policy, systems, and environment work and other initiatives that help ensure longer-term, systemic changes more likely to improve health outcomes.In short, Extension clearly changed the agricultural system of the United States, and because of its reach into rural communities, it has the capacity to do for health in rural communities in this second century what it did for agriculture in the first century.


Asunto(s)
Promoción de la Salud/organización & administración , Salud Pública , Salud Rural , Agricultura , Promoción de la Salud/métodos , Historia del Siglo XIX , Historia del Siglo XX , Humanos , Colaboración Intersectorial , Estados Unidos , Universidades/historia
20.
Health Info Libr J ; 37(3): 171-172, 2020 Sep.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32672399

RESUMEN

In early 2020, the world experienced an unprecedented health crisis. When the pandemic of coronavirus was declared by the World Health Organization, it brought with it sudden and dramatic changes to everyday life. In the UK, the key message from the Government was to 'Stay at home, protect the NHS, save lives', sending out a clear warning that failing to stay at home would put other lives and the ability of the NHS to cope at risk. This editorial discusses COVID-19, how society responded and the vital role that health literacy plays in saving lives during a global health emergency.


Asunto(s)
Betacoronavirus , Infecciones por Coronavirus/prevención & control , Alfabetización en Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Promoción de la Salud/organización & administración , Pandemias/prevención & control , Neumonía Viral/prevención & control , Humanos , Salud Pública , Reino Unido
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