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2.
BMJ Health Care Inform ; 28(1)2021 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33419870

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Numerous scientific journal articles related to COVID-19 have been rapidly published, making navigation and understanding of relationships difficult. METHODS: A graph network was constructed from the publicly available COVID-19 Open Research Dataset (CORD-19) of COVID-19-related publications using an engine leveraging medical knowledge bases to identify discrete medical concepts and an open-source tool (Gephi) to visualise the network. RESULTS: The network shows connections between diseases, medications and procedures identified from the title and abstract of 195 958 COVID-19-related publications (CORD-19 Dataset). Connections between terms with few publications, those unconnected to the main network and those irrelevant were not displayed. Nodes were coloured by knowledge base and the size of the node related to the number of publications containing the term. The data set and visualisations were made publicly accessible via a webtool. CONCLUSION: Knowledge management approaches (text mining and graph networks) can effectively allow rapid navigation and exploration of entity inter-relationships to improve understanding of diseases such as COVID-19.


Asunto(s)
Inteligencia Artificial , Descubrimiento del Conocimiento/métodos , Publicaciones Periódicas como Asunto/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Procesamiento de Lenguaje Natural
4.
PLoS One ; 16(1): e0244839, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33411846

RESUMEN

As the COVID-19 pandemic unfolds, researchers from all disciplines are coming together and contributing their expertise. CORD-19, a dataset of COVID-19 and coronavirus publications, has been made available alongside calls to help mine the information it contains and to create tools to search it more effectively. We analyse the delineation of the publications included in CORD-19 from a scientometric perspective. Based on a comparison to the Web of Science database, we find that CORD-19 provides an almost complete coverage of research on COVID-19 and coronaviruses. CORD-19 contains not only research that deals directly with COVID-19 and coronaviruses, but also research on viruses in general. Publications from CORD-19 focus mostly on a few well-defined research areas, in particular: coronaviruses (primarily SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2); public health and viral epidemics; molecular biology of viruses; influenza and other families of viruses; immunology and antivirals; clinical medicine. CORD-19 publications that appeared in 2020, especially editorials and letters, are disproportionately popular on social media. While we fully endorse the CORD-19 initiative, it is important to be aware that CORD-19 extends beyond research on COVID-19 and coronaviruses.


Asunto(s)
Conjuntos de Datos como Asunto , Publicaciones , Investigación Biomédica , Análisis por Conglomerados , Coronavirus , Infecciones por Coronavirus , Humanos , Modelos Estadísticos , Publicaciones Periódicas como Asunto , Preimpresos como Asunto , Terminología como Asunto
9.
J Psychiatr Res ; 132: 198-206, 2021 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33131830

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Both the COVID-19 pandemic and its management have had a negative impact on mental health worldwide. There is a growing body of research on mental health as it relates to the pandemic. The objective of this study is to use bibliometric analyses to assess the mental health research output related to the COVID-19 pandemic and compare it to that of the West Africa Ebola and H1N1 outbreaks. METHODOLOGY: We performed comprehensive searches in Embase, PubMed, and Scopus databases, and included all types of documents related to the three outbreaks published since the respective beginnings up to August 26, 2020. RESULTS: Despite the shorter time since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, relative to Ebola and H1N1, we found a much greater number of mental health documents related to COVID-19 (n = 3070) compared to the two other outbreaks (127 for Ebola and 327 for H1N1). The proportion of documents in the top 10% journals was 31% for COVID-19, 24% for Ebola, and 40% for H1N1. Authors affiliated with institutions located in high-income countries published or contributed to 79% of all documents followed by authors from upper-middle-income countries (23%), lower-middle-income countries (10%), and low-income countries (2%). Approximately 19% of the documents reported receiving funding and 23% were the product of international collaboration. CONCLUSION: Mental health research output is already greater for COVID-19 compared to Ebola and H1N1 combined. A minority of documents reported funding, was the product of international collaboration, or was published by authors located in low-income countries during the three outbreaks in general, and the COVID-19 pandemic in particular.


Asunto(s)
Investigación Biomédica/estadística & datos numéricos , Brotes de Enfermedades , Fiebre Hemorrágica Ebola , Subtipo H1N1 del Virus de la Influenza A , Gripe Humana , Salud Mental/estadística & datos numéricos , Publicaciones Periódicas como Asunto/estadística & datos numéricos , Bibliometría , Humanos
14.
Immunology ; 162(1): 1-2, 2021 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33305861

RESUMEN

2020 was a year unlike any other for Immunology. Through the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, with fantastic support from the global immunology community, we worked together to reach new heights. Here, we look back at some of the highlights for Immunology in a challenging and memorable year.


Asunto(s)
Alergia e Inmunología/tendencias , Investigación Biomédica/tendencias , Publicaciones Periódicas como Asunto/tendencias , Políticas Editoriales , Humanos , Difusión de la Información , Factor de Impacto de la Revista
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