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1.
Am J Epidemiol ; 190(2): 220-229, 2021 02 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33524119

RESUMEN

Mental health (MH) and behavioral health are fundamental to a good quality of life. Only a few studies have investigated the association between behavioral health (e.g., physical activity (PA), screen time (ST)) and MH from childhood to adolescence. Therefore, we investigated the relationships of PA and ST with MH by sex in an 11-year longitudinal cohort study of German schoolchildren during 2003-2017. A subsample (n = 686; 55.2% female) of participants from the German Motorik-Modul (MoMo) Longitudinal Study who participated in all 3 measurement phases (mean ages: time 1 (baseline; 2003-2006), 5.57 (standard deviation (SD), 1.00) years; time 2 (wave 1; 2009-2012), 11.85 (SD, 1.03) years; time 3 (wave 2; 2014-2017), 16.86 (SD, 1.04) years) were analyzed with regard to PA, ST, and MH (emotional symptoms, conduct problems, hyperactivity/inattention, peer relationship problems, prosocial behavior, and overall strengths and difficulties). Path panel prediction models were fitted with time 1, time 2, and time 3 PA, ST, and MH indicators. PA predicted less television (TV)/video watching in females, and TV/video watching predicted personal computer (PC)/Internet use in both sexes. Behavior and MH results suggested that, for females, higher TV/video watching and PC/Internet use was related to higher MH challenges over the course of maturation. Some preadolescent males' MH challenges increased ST (TV/video watching and PC/Internet use) in adolescence. Researchers should explore innovative and effective methods for reducing childhood ST, especially among females with early signs of MH issues, and addressing preadolescent males' MH challenges.


Asunto(s)
Trastornos de la Conducta Infantil/epidemiología , Ejercicio Físico , Salud Mental/estadística & datos numéricos , Tiempo de Pantalla , Adolescente , Niño , Preescolar , Emociones , Femenino , Alemania/epidemiología , Humanos , Estudios Longitudinales , Masculino , Conducta Sedentaria , Factores Sexuales , Factores Socioeconómicos
2.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(2): e25363, 2021 02 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33523828

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a negative impact on both the physical and mental health of individuals worldwide. Evidence regarding the association between mental health problems and information exposure among Thai citizens during the COVID-19 outbreak is limited. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to explore the relationship between information exposure and mental health problems during the COVID-19 pandemic in Thailand. METHODS: Between April 21 and May 4, 2020, we conducted a cross-sectional, nationwide online survey of the general population in Thailand. We categorized the duration of exposure to COVID-19-related information as follows: <1 h/day (reference group), 1-2 h/day, and ≥3 h/day. Mental health outcomes were assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 scale, the Perceived Stress Scale-10, and the Insomnia Severity Index for symptoms of depression, anxiety, perceived stress, and insomnia, respectively. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to evaluate the relationship between information exposure and the risk of developing the aforementioned symptoms. An ancillary analysis using multivariable multinomial logistic regression models was also conducted to assess the possible dose-response relationship across the severity strata of mental health problems. RESULTS: Of the 4322 eligible participants, 4004 (92.6%) completed the online survey. Of them, 1481 (37.0%), 1644 (41.1%), and 879 (22.0%) participants were exposed to COVID-19-related information for less than 1 hour per day, 1 to 2 hours per day, or 3 or more hours per day, respectively. The major source of information related to the COVID-19 pandemic was social media (95.3%), followed by traditional media (68.7%) and family members (34.9%). Those exposed to information for 3 or more hours per day had a higher risk of developing symptoms of depression (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.35, 95% CI 1.03-1.76; P=.03), anxiety (adjusted OR 1.88, 95% CI 1.43-2.46; P<.001), and insomnia (adjusted OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.17-1.97; P=.001) than people exposed to information for less than 1 hour per day. Meanwhile, people exposed to information for 1 to 2 hours per day were only at risk of developing symptoms of anxiety (adjusted OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.08-1.69; P=.008). However, no association was found between information exposure and the risk of perceived stress. In the ancillary analysis, a dose-response relationship was observed between information exposure of 3 or more hours per day and the severity of mental health problems. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that social media is the main source of COVID-19-related information. Moreover, people who are exposed to information for 3 or more hours per day are more likely to develop psychological problems, including depression, anxiety, and insomnia. Longitudinal studies investigating the long-term effects of COVID-19-related information exposure on mental health are warranted.


Asunto(s)
Ansiedad/epidemiología , Depresión/epidemiología , Educación en Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Salud Mental/estadística & datos numéricos , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/epidemiología , Estrés Psicológico/epidemiología , Adulto , Estudios Transversales , Brotes de Enfermedades , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Pandemias , Medios de Comunicación Sociales/provisión & distribución , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Tailandia/epidemiología
3.
Hist Philos Life Sci ; 43(1): 15, 2021 Feb 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33532922

RESUMEN

This note introduces a framework incorporating multiple sources of evidence into the response to COVID-19 to overcome the neglect of social and psychological causes of illness. By using the example of psychological research on loneliness and its effects on physical and mental health with particular focus on aging and disability, I seek to open further inquiry into how relevant psychological and social aspects of health can be addressed at policy level.


Asunto(s)
/psicología , Política de Salud , Soledad/psicología , Trastornos Mentales/psicología , Salud Mental/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos
4.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(5): e24503, 2021 Feb 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33592903

RESUMEN

ABSTRACT: Recently, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemic has greatly threatened global public health. The responsibility of healthcare-associated infection control professionals (ICPs) is to prevent and control the nosocomial infections. The mental health status of ICPs deserves more attention, however, the correlational research is still lacking. This study aims to investigate the incidence and risk factors of mental health status among ICPs in China during the outbreak of COVID-19.A national cross-sectional survey was performed. The online questionnaire was completed by 9228 ICPs from 3776 hospitals throughout China. Data collection tools were used, including demographics data questionnaire, the Chinese version of the 12-item general health questionnaire (GHQ-12) and the Chinese version of the psychological capital questionnaire (PCQ) for medical staff. Univariate and multivariable analyses were conducted.The total score of mental health of Chinese ICPs was 3.45 ±â€Š2.57. 5608 (60.77%) ICPs might have mental health problems. The psychological capital was in the upper-middle level with an average score of 3.72 ±â€Š0.38. An increased mental health problem risk was associated with the greater self-efficacy and working in the public hospital; a significantly lower risk was obtained by working in the second-class hospital rather than in the third-class hospitals. Besides, mental health problem risk of ICPs working in hospitals of the western economic region or northeast economic region was more significant than that in hospitals of the central economic region. However, a lower risk was caused by the unmarried than married, and working years in department ≤1 year contributed to the lower risk than that >20 years. Moreover, fewer working hours per week, higher values of hope, and optimism each were contributed to a lower risk.Chinese healthcare-associated ICPs were under different levels of mental health problems in fighting against COVID-19. More importantly, we should actively deal with the mental health problem of ICPs and help them get rid of psychological disorders.


Asunto(s)
Infección Hospitalaria , Profesionales para Control de Infecciones , Control de Infecciones , Exposición Profesional , Estrés Laboral , Adulto , /prevención & control , China/epidemiología , Infección Hospitalaria/epidemiología , Infección Hospitalaria/prevención & control , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Control de Infecciones/métodos , Control de Infecciones/organización & administración , Profesionales para Control de Infecciones/psicología , Profesionales para Control de Infecciones/estadística & datos numéricos , Masculino , Salud Mental/estadística & datos numéricos , Exposición Profesional/prevención & control , Exposición Profesional/estadística & datos numéricos , Estrés Laboral/epidemiología , Estrés Laboral/etiología , Estrés Laboral/prevención & control , Medición de Riesgo , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
6.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(4): e24334, 2021 Jan 29.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33530225

RESUMEN

ABSTRACT: The aim of this study is to examine the mutual effects of self-esteem and common mental health problems (CMHPs) as well as the mutual effects of self-esteem and resilience in early adolescence. The recruited participants were 1015 adolescents aged 12.7 years (SD = 0.5 years) from two junior high schools. Data were repeatedly collected at five time points at 6-month intervals over 2-year years. The Social Support Rating Scale (SSRS), Block and Kremen's Ego-Resiliency Scale (ER89), Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale (RSES), and Mental Health Inventory of Middle School Students (MMHI-60) were used to measure social support, resilience, self-esteem, and CMHPs, respectively. Nonrecursive structural equation modeling (SEM) was performed to analyze the data.There were bivariate partial correlations among the five-time measurements for the SSRS, ER89, RSES, and MMHI-60 scores. Self-esteem negatively predicted CMHPs with a standardized direct effect of -0.276 (95% CI: -0.425 to -0.097), and the opposite effect was -0.227 (95% CI: -0.383 to -0.072). Self-esteem positively predicted resilience with the standardized direct effect of 0.279 (95% CI: 0.093-0.425), and the opposite effect was 0.221 (95% CI: 0.063-0.376). Social support was a protective factor for mental health status.The findings of mutual effects of self-esteem and CMHPs as well as self-esteem and resilience can provide researchers and practitioners with a conceptual framework that can help them build effective intervention methods to promote adolescent mental health status.


Asunto(s)
Trastornos Mentales/psicología , Resiliencia Psicológica , Autoimagen , Apoyo Social , Estudiantes/psicología , Adolescente , Niño , Femenino , Humanos , Análisis de Clases Latentes , Estudios Longitudinales , Masculino , Salud Mental/estadística & datos numéricos , Escalas de Valoración Psiquiátrica , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
7.
BMJ Open ; 11(1): e045794, 2021 01 31.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33518530

RESUMEN

SETTING: The State of Qatar has had one of the highest COVID-19 infection rates globally and has used state-managed quarantine and isolation centres to limit the spread of infection. Quarantine and isolation have been shown to negatively affect the mental health of individuals. Qatar has a unique population, with around 90% of the population being economic migrants and a majority being blue-collar workers and labourers. OBJECTIVES: This study was carried out to evaluate the psychological impact of institutional isolation and quarantine during the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak in Qatar. The study also explored the sociodemographic correlates of this psychological impact. DESIGN, PARTICIPANTS AND INTERVENTION: A cross-sectional study involving 748 consenting individuals in institutional quarantine and isolation in Qatar during the months of June and July 2020 was carried out. Relevant sociodemographic data along with depressive and anxiety symptomatology scores were collected from consenting adults at these facilities. RESULTS: 37.4% (n=270) of respondents reported depressive symptoms and 25.9% (n=189) reported anxiety symptoms. The scores were higher for individuals in isolation facilities and higher for migrants from poor socioeconomic group (p<0.001 for both). Within this group, although worries about infection were widely reported, lack of contact with the family was cited as one of the most important sources of distress. Respondents reported that contact with the family and reliable information were important factors that helped during the duration of isolation and quarantine. CONCLUSIONS: Our study reported significantly elevated scores for depression and anxiety during institutional quarantine, which is in keeping with emerging evidence. However, in contrast to other studies reporting mostly from native populations, this study of a population with an overwhelming majority of immigrants highlights the special mental health needs of this specific group and can inform future healthcare policies.


Asunto(s)
Ansiedad , Control de Enfermedades Transmisibles , Depresión , Distrés Psicológico , Cuarentena/psicología , Adulto , Ansiedad/epidemiología , Ansiedad/etiología , /prevención & control , Control de Enfermedades Transmisibles/métodos , Control de Enfermedades Transmisibles/estadística & datos numéricos , Estudios Transversales , Demografía , Depresión/epidemiología , Depresión/etiología , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Salud Mental/estadística & datos numéricos , Evaluación de Necesidades , Qatar/epidemiología , Factores Socioeconómicos , Migrantes/psicología
8.
Mo Med ; 118(1): 7-12, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33551470

RESUMEN

Medical students, residents, and practicing physicians experience high burnout, depression, and suicide rates, and the COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated stress for many.1-6 While laudable, current well-being efforts appear insufficient to meet the challenges that so many are facing. This essay explores approaches that individuals and organizations can take to promote mental health and well-being from medical school to practice.


Asunto(s)
/psicología , Salud Mental/normas , Médicos/psicología , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Adaptación Psicológica/fisiología , Agotamiento Profesional/epidemiología , Agotamiento Profesional/terapia , /epidemiología , Terapia Cognitivo-Conductual/métodos , Depresión/epidemiología , Depresión/terapia , Humanos , Sistema Límbico/fisiopatología , Salud Mental/estadística & datos numéricos , Atención Plena/métodos , Facultades de Medicina/organización & administración , Facultades de Medicina/normas , Estrés Psicológico/complicaciones , Estrés Psicológico/epidemiología , Estrés Psicológico/psicología , Suicidio/prevención & control , Suicidio/psicología , Suicidio/estadística & datos numéricos
9.
Aust N Z J Public Health ; 45(1): 46-52, 2021 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33460196

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: This study reports findings from an uncontrolled evaluation of a course designed to educate participants in how to recognise and respond to mental health problems until professional help is received. METHODS: Utilising a mixed methods design, participants in 21 different courses, delivered across two Australian states, were invited to complete pre-, post-, and follow-up surveys and provide qualitative feedback on their training experiences. RESULTS: Participants reported feeling more confident in their capacity to respond appropriately to a person presenting with a mental health need and believed they would be more likely to provide assistance. Satisfaction was attributed to the skills and sensitivities of instructors who had lived experience of mental health concerns in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. CONCLUSION: This course holds promise in improving mental health literacy in relation to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mental health. Implications for public health: Few courses are available that address issues relating to the social and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People. This study illustrates how community engagement with primary health and specialist mental health services might be strengthened.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Cultural , Primeros Auxilios/métodos , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Servicios de Salud del Indígena , Salud Mental/estadística & datos numéricos , Grupo de Ascendencia Oceánica/psicología , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud/métodos , Adulto , Australia , Evaluación Educacional , Femenino , Humanos , Entrevistas como Asunto , Masculino , Grupo de Ascendencia Oceánica/estadística & datos numéricos , Satisfacción Personal , Investigación Cualitativa , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
10.
Lancet Public Health ; 6(2): e97-e105, 2021 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33516292

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Existing studies evaluating the association between maternal risk factors and specific infant outcomes such as birthweight, injury admissions, and mortality have mostly focused on single risk factors. We aimed to identify routinely recorded psychosocial characteristics of pregnant women most at risk of adverse infant outcomes to inform targeting of early intervention. METHODS: We created a cohort using administrative hospital data (Hospital Episode Statistics) for all births to mothers aged 15-44 years in England, UK, who gave birth on or after April 1, 2010, and who were discharged before or on March 31, 2015. We used generalised linear models to evaluate associations between psychosocial risk factors recorded in hospital records in the 2 years before the 20th week of pregnancy (ie, teenage motherhood, deprivation, pre-pregnancy hospital admissions for mental health or behavioural conditions, and pre-pregnancy hospital admissions for adversity, including drug or alcohol abuse, violence, and self-harm) and infant outcomes (ie, birthweight, unplanned admission for injury, or death from any cause, within 12 months from postnatal discharge). FINDINGS: Of 2 520 501 births initially assessed, 2 137 103 were eligible and were included in the birth outcome analysis. Among the eligible births, 93 279 (4·4%) were births to teenage mothers (age <20 years), 168 186 (7·9%) were births to previous teenage mothers, 51 312 (2·4%) were births to mothers who had a history of hospital admissions for mental health or behavioural conditions, 58 107 (2·7%) were births to mothers who had a history of hospital admissions for adversity, and 580 631 (27·2%) were births to mothers living in areas of high deprivation. 1 377 706 (64·5%) of births were to mothers with none of the above risk factors. Infants born to mothers with any of these risk factors had poorer outcomes than those born to mothers without these risk factors. Those born to mothers with a history of mental health or behavioural conditions were 124 g lighter (95% CI 114-134 g) than those born to mothers without these conditions. For teenage mothers compared with older mothers, 3·6% (95% CI 3·3-3·9%) more infants had an unplanned admission for injury, and there were 10·2 (95% CI 7·5-12·9) more deaths per 10 000 infants. INTERPRETATION: Health-care services should respond proactively to pre-pregnancy psychosocial risk factors. Our study demonstrates a need for effective interventions before, during, and after pregnancy to reduce the downstream burden on health services and prevent long-term adverse effects for children. FUNDING: Wellcome Trust.


Asunto(s)
Salud Mental/estadística & datos numéricos , Resultado del Embarazo/epidemiología , Factores Socioeconómicos , Adolescente , Adulto , Inglaterra/epidemiología , Femenino , Humanos , Vigilancia de la Población , Embarazo , Embarazo en Adolescencia/psicología , Nacimiento Prematuro , Características de la Residencia/estadística & datos numéricos , Factores de Riesgo , Conducta Autodestructiva/epidemiología , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias/epidemiología , Violencia/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto Joven
11.
Epidemiol Psychiatr Sci ; 30: e3, 2021 Jan 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33416043

RESUMEN

AIMS: Family carers supporting an individual with psychosis often experience poorer mental health, however, little is known about specific risk factors among these carers. We investigated the associations between demographic, caregiving characteristics and mental health outcomes in family carers supporting an individual with psychosis and compared carers' outcomes with general population norms. METHODS: We analysed baseline data from the COPe-support randomised controlled trial of online psychoeducation and peer support for adult carers supporting an individual with psychosis between 2018 and 2020. We collected carers' demographic and health outcome data, including wellbeing using Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale (WEMWBS as primary outcome), quality of life using EQ-5D-5L and caregiving experience assessed with Experience of Caregiving Inventory. We tested associations between carers' demographic and caregiving characteristics for each outcome in turn and meta-analysed carers' WEMWBS and EQ-5D-5L with Health Survey England (HSE) general population data from 2016 and 2017, respectively. RESULTS: The 407 carers of people with psychosis had a mean WEMWBS score of 42.2 (s.d. 9.21) and their overall weighted pooled WEMWBS score was 7.3 (95% confidence interval (CI) -8.6 to -6.0, p < 0.01) lower than the HSE general population sample, indicating carers have poorer mental wellbeing by more than double the minimum clinically important difference of 3 points on WEMWBS. Among all caring relationships, partners had poorer wellbeing compared to parents with lower WEMWBS score (-6.8, -16.9 to 3.3, p = 0.03). Single carers had significantly poorer wellbeing (-3.6, -5.6 to -1.5, p < 0.01) and a more negative caregiving experience than those who were cohabiting. Spending more than 35 h per week caregiving increased carers' negative experience significantly (p = 0.01). CONCLUSION: Carers of people with psychosis have poorer mental health than non-carers. Partners, lone carers and those spending more than 35 h per week on caring were found to be most at risk of poor mental health. Based on the results, we advocate that the details of carers for individuals with psychosis should be added to the existing carers or severe mental illness registers at all general practitioner surgeries and for their wellbeing screened routinely. Future large-scale prospective studies are needed to develop a predictive model to determine risk factors, hence to aid early identification of carers' support needs. Such understandings are also useful to inform tailored intervention development.


Asunto(s)
Cuidadores/psicología , Familia/psicología , Salud Mental/estadística & datos numéricos , Trastornos Psicóticos/psicología , Calidad de Vida/psicología , Adolescente , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Adulto Joven
12.
J Urban Health ; 98(1): 13-26, 2021 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33420551

RESUMEN

It is suggested that the nationwide social distancing due to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has adverse mental health consequences despite its necessity. We investigated the associations of social distancing measures with mental health problems. Using national representative sample of 509,062 adults in the USA, we examined the associations of small business closure and reduced urban mobility with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and major depression disorder (MDD). Multilevel regression models were fitted with individual, household, and state-level covariates, in addition to state and census-region-level random effects. Living in state with the highest quartile of small business closures was associated with increased prevalence of GAD (OR: 1.06; CI: 1.03-1.11) compared to lowest quartile, but had no association with MDD. Living in the highest quartile of urban mobility was associated with lower prevalence of both GAD (OR: 0.88; CI: 0.85-0.93) and MDD (OR: 0.90; CI: 0.86-0.95) relative to the lowest quartile. Our findings suggest that small business closures and reduced mobility during COVID-19 pandemic were negatively associated with the two mental health outcomes in the USA, despite their important roles in preventing the infection.


Asunto(s)
Trastornos de Ansiedad/etiología , Trastorno Depresivo Mayor/etiología , Salud Mental/estadística & datos numéricos , Pequeña Empresa/estadística & datos numéricos , Estrés Psicológico/complicaciones , Adolescente , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Trastornos de Ansiedad/epidemiología , Trastorno Depresivo Mayor/epidemiología , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Pandemias/prevención & control , Pandemias/estadística & datos numéricos , Prevalencia , Estados Unidos/epidemiología , Adulto Joven
13.
Health Place ; 67: 102505, 2021 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33454564

RESUMEN

This study examined how neighborhood conditions changed and how neighborhood conditions were associated with physical activity and mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic among Americans. The major outcomes were stratified by the neighborhood's poverty and regression models were used to assess the associations between neighborhood conditions and their change during the pandemic and the outcomes of physical activity and mental health. The results show that low-poverty neighborhoods had more health-promoting neighborhood conditions before the outbreak and more positive changes during the outbreak. Health-promoting neighborhood conditions were associated with higher physical activity and moderate physical activity and lack of negative neighborhood conditions such as crime/violence and traffic were associated with a lower risk of mental health problems including loneliness, depression, and anxiety. Mental health problems were also significantly associated with the COVID-19 infection and death and household income level. Our findings suggest that it is plausible that the disparities of physical activity and mental health by neighborhood exacerbate due to the pandemic and people who living in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhoods bear increasingly disproportionate burden.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Ejercicio Físico/psicología , Disparidades en el Estado de Salud , Salud Mental/estadística & datos numéricos , Características de la Residencia/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Estados Unidos
14.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(1): e23126, 2021 01 29.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33439853

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Since the COVID-19 outbreak was first reported, considerable attention has been drawn to mental health problems among college students. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to estimate the prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms among college students in different geographical areas of China during the early stage of the COVID-19 outbreak. METHODS: A nationwide cross-sectional survey was conducted among Chinese college students of 16 provinces or municipalities from February 4 to 12, 2020. A web-based survey was adopted to collect information from these college students, including demographics, perceived risk of infection, attitudes toward the epidemic and its control, and mental health status. Anxiety symptoms were assessed using the Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale, and depressive symptoms were assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire. Chi-square test was used to compare the percentage of perceived risk of infection and attitude toward COVID-19 among college students in different geographic locations. Binary logistic models were used to identify associations between geographic locations and mental health problems after controlling for covariates. RESULTS: A total of 11,787 participants were analyzed in this study (response rate: 79.7%). The prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms among college students was 17.8% (95% CI 17.1%-18.5%) and 25.9% (95% CI 25.1%-26.7%), respectively. After controlling for covariates, current residence area in Wuhan city was found to have a positive association with anxiety symptoms (odds ratio [OR] 1.37, 95% CI 1.11-1.68) and depressive symptoms (OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.09-1.59). Similarly, college location in Wuhan city was found to have a positive association with anxiety symptoms (OR 1.20, 95% CI 1.07-1.35) and depressive symptoms (OR 1.22, 95% CI 1.10-1.36). History of residence in or travel to Wuhan city in the past month was also positively associated with anxiety symptoms (OR 1.62, 95% CI 1.46-1.80) and depressive symptoms (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.35-1.63). Furthermore, the perceived risk of COVID-19 was higher among students whose college location and current residence area were in Wuhan city, and it was positively associated with anxiety and depressive symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, mental health problems among Chinese college students were widespread and geographically diverse. Our study results provide further insight for policymakers to develop targeted intervention strategies.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Encuestas Epidemiológicas , Internet , Salud Mental/estadística & datos numéricos , Estudiantes/psicología , Estudiantes/estadística & datos numéricos , Ansiedad/epidemiología , Ansiedad/psicología , China/epidemiología , Estudios Transversales , Depresión/epidemiología , Depresión/psicología , Brotes de Enfermedades , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Pandemias , Prevalencia , Universidades , Adulto Joven
15.
J Nepal Health Res Counc ; 18(4): 655-660, 2021 Jan 21.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33510505

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Frontline Health Care Workers are at risk of developing mental and psychological distress during Corona virus disease 2019 pandemic. This study aimed to assess level of stress, anxiety, depression and their associated factors among health care workers during Corona virus disease 2019 pandemic in Nepal. METHODS: This is a web based cross-sectional survey conducted among 404 Health Care Workers during early phase of Corona virus disease 2019 pandemic. The participants were selected using convenience sampling technique and were invited to participate via various online networks. Depression, anxiety and stress were assessed using the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21) and their associated factors were measured using structured questionnaires. Multivariable logistic regression was carried out to determine the associated factors. RESULTS: The symptoms of stress, anxiety and depression among health care workers were found to be 28.9%, 35.6% and 17.0% respectively. Females were found to be 2 fold more likely to have anxiety and depression than male. Nurses were found to be two times more likely to have anxiety than doctors. Laboratory personnel were almost three folds more likely to have anxiety than doctors. Health care workers with insufficient/ no PPE were almost three fold more likely to have depression. health care workers working in high-risk areas had almost 2 fold higher odds of having depression. CONCLUSIONS: Health care workers experienced symptoms of stress, anxiety and depression in varied level of severity. This experience was higher among the nurses and laboratory workers than doctors. Pandemic preparedness assuring PPE and appropriate psychological interventions may be beneficial to promote mental health and well-being of health care workers.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Personal de Salud/psicología , Salud Mental/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto , Ansiedad/epidemiología , Estudios Transversales , Depresión/epidemiología , Femenino , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Nepal/epidemiología , Estrés Laboral/epidemiología , Pandemias , Índice de Severidad de la Enfermedad , Factores Sexuales , Factores Socioeconómicos , Adulto Joven
17.
Public Health ; 190: 101-107, 2021 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33387848

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: We aimed to compare the prevalence of depression and anxiety symptoms before and during the pandemic and identify factors associated with aggravated mental health symptoms. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. METHODS: We identified the proportion of normal, mild, moderate, and severe symptoms of depression and anxiety before and during the social distancing restrictions in adults from southern Brazil. An online, self-administered questionnaire was delivered for residents within the state of Rio Grande do Sul. Depressive and anxiety symptoms were examined by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. RESULTS: Most of the participants (n = 2314) aged between 31 and 59 years (54.2%), were women (76.6%), White (90.6%) with a university degree (66.6%). Moderate-to-severe symptoms of depression and anxiety were reported in 3.9% and 4.5% of participants, respectively, before COVID-19. During the pandemic (June-July, 2020), these proportions increased to 29.1% (6.6-fold increase) and 37.8% (7.4-fold increase), respectively. Higher rates of depressive and anxiety symptoms were observed among women, those aged 18-30 years, diagnosed with chronic disease and participants who had their income negatively affected by social restrictions. Remaining active or becoming physically active during social distancing restrictions reduced the probability of aggravated mental health disorders. CONCLUSIONS: Depressive and anxiety symptoms had a 6.6- and 7.4-fold increase since the COVID-19 pandemic. Public policies such as physical activity promotion and strategies to reduce the economic strain caused by this pandemic are urgently needed to mitigate the impact of the pandemic on mental health.


Asunto(s)
Ansiedad/epidemiología , Depresión/epidemiología , Salud Mental/estadística & datos numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Ansiedad/etiología , Trastornos de Ansiedad/epidemiología , Trastornos de Ansiedad/etiología , Brasil/epidemiología , /epidemiología , Estudios de Cohortes , Depresión/etiología , Femenino , Humanos , Renta , Estudios Longitudinales , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Pandemias , Prevalencia , Estudios Retrospectivos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Adulto Joven
18.
Clin J Oncol Nurs ; 25(1): 69-75, 2021 Feb 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33480882

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The risk of psychological effects from the COVID-19 pandemic is significant and manifests as stress, anxiety, depression, sleeplessness, and, in some cases, suicide. The need for psychological support services for healthcare providers should be included in all pandemic and disaster planning. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this article is to explore the potential psychological sequelae of nursing during a pandemic and to provide recommendations to support a psychologically healthy work environment. METHODS: Highlights from the literature on psychological sequelae, symptoms, and outcomes related to COVID-19 and prior pandemics is presented, along with insight from the experiences of oncology nurses caring for patients with COVID-19. FINDINGS: Destigmatizing mental health needs for healthcare providers empowers them to seek support. Hospital administrators must develop proactive wellness plans for the triage and management of mental and emotional health needs during a pandemic that prioritize transparent communication, resources for healthcare providers within and beyond the clinical setting, and training.


Asunto(s)
Agotamiento Profesional/psicología , /psicología , Salud Mental/estadística & datos numéricos , Atención de Enfermería/psicología , Personal de Enfermería en Hospital/psicología , Estrés Psicológico , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Pandemias
19.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33401605

RESUMEN

This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of an online high-intensity interval training (HIIT) intervention and health education on the behaviors, mental health, and cognitive function of sedentary young females. A single-blinded, six-week, randomized controlled pilot trial involving 70 sedentary young Chinese females, aged 18-30 years, was conducted. An intervention group (IG) (n = 33) underwent a HIIT intervention and health education, while a waitlist group (WG) (n = 37) only received health education. In pre-, mid-, and post-tests, both groups filled out questionnaires about physical activity, sedentary behavior, and mental health. Cognitive functions were assessed at the pre- and post-tests by computer-administered cognitive tests. A mixed-effect model with repeated measures was used to analyze outcomes of interest. The retention rate of the IG and WG was 100% and 78.38%, respectively. The IG were found to have significantly increased rates of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) (Mdiff = 940.61, p < 0.001, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 576.67, 1304.55) from pre-test to post-test, while the WG demonstrated a more marked reduction in sedentary time (Mdiff = -73.02, p = 0.038, 95% CI: -141.90, -4.14) compared with the IG in the post-test. Moreover, anxiety and stress levels were shown to significantly reduce in the IG over the six-week period (Mdiff = -4.73, p = 0.002, 95% CI: -7.30, -2.15 and Mdiff = -5.09, p = 0.001, 95% CI: -8.29, -1.89, respectively). In addition, we observed a significant improvement in verbal ability (p = 0.008, ηp2 = 0.19) following the HIIT intervention and effects of the interaction with time on processing speed (p = 0.050, ηp2 = 0.10) and episodic memory (p = 0.048, ηp2 = 0.11). Moreover, the IG had better global cognitive performance than the WG in the post-test (Mdiff = 8.28, p = 0.003, 95% CI: 3.06, 13.50). In summary, both an online bodyweight HIIT intervention combined with health education, or health education alone, can effectively improve health-related behaviors, but the behavioral consequences may differ based on the emphasis of different intervention modalities. Furthermore, the "bodyweight HIIT plus health education" modality might be a more promising online intervention strategy to mitigate against negative emotions and improve cognitive function.


Asunto(s)
Cognición , Educación en Salud , Entrenamiento de Intervalos de Alta Intensidad , Intervención basada en la Internet , Salud Mental , Adolescente , Adulto , Peso Corporal , China , Cognición/fisiología , Femenino , Educación en Salud/métodos , Entrenamiento de Intervalos de Alta Intensidad/métodos , Humanos , Salud Mental/estadística & datos numéricos , Proyectos Piloto , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud , Conducta Sedentaria , Método Simple Ciego , Adulto Joven
20.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 57(1)2021 Jan 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33429989

RESUMEN

Background and objectives: It has been suggested that the COVID-19 pandemic impaired people's moods and general levels of physical activity, but the way in which each country is coping with the situation may result in different outcomes. The aim of the present study was to compare the mental health and physical activity levels between residents of Brazil and Switzerland during the social distancing period associated with COVID-19 pandemic. Materials and Methods: A self-administered questionnaire aiming to assess personal, quarantine, physical activity, and mood state disorders data was answered by 114 participants (57 from each country) of both sexes. Results: Swiss participants presented a higher frequency of people (47.4%) not abiding by social distancing measures compared to Brazilian participants (1.8%; p < 0.001, effect size = 0.56). There were no significant differences between the participants from the two countries regarding physical activity levels (p = 0.09). The Swiss presented a higher frequency (78.9%) of people without symptoms of depression compared to Brazilians (31.6%; p < 0.001, effect size = 0.48). The Swiss also presented a higher frequency (77.2%) of people without symptoms of anxiety compared to Brazilians (35.1%; p < 0.001, effect size = 0.43). There was a significant association between the restriction level and depression symptoms (p = 0.01, effect size = 0.25) but not with anxiety symptoms (p = 0.21, effect size = 0.16). Conclusions: According to the preliminary results, Brazilians presented a much higher frequency of depression and anxiety symptoms, which can be explained by characteristics other than the restriction level.


Asunto(s)
/psicología , Ejercicio Físico , Trastornos Mentales/epidemiología , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Ansiedad/epidemiología , Brasil/epidemiología , Depresión/epidemiología , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Salud Mental/estadística & datos numéricos , Persona de Mediana Edad , Cuarentena/psicología , Cuarentena/estadística & datos numéricos , Factores Socioeconómicos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Suiza/epidemiología
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