Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 6.056
Filtrar
1.
Health Aff (Millwood) ; 41(2): 195-202, 2022 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35130060

RESUMEN

Few studies have illustrated how racism influences Black women's use of reproductive health care services. This article presents findings of a collaborative study conducted by a research team and a reproductive justice organization to understand Black women's concerns with sexual and reproductive health services. The qualitative research was conducted with Black women living in Georgia and North Carolina, using a community-based participatory research approach. Themes were developed from participant accounts that highlight how racism, both structural and individual, influenced their reproductive health care access, utilization, and experience. Structural racism affected participants' finances and led some to forgo care or face barriers to obtaining care. Individual racism resulted in some women electing to receive care only from same-race medical providers. These findings suggest a need for policies and practices that address structural barriers to reproductive health care access and improve the reproductive health experience of Black women.


Asunto(s)
Racismo , Servicios de Salud Reproductiva , Femenino , Accesibilidad a los Servicios de Salud , Humanos , Salud Reproductiva , Conducta Sexual
2.
Curr Opin Obstet Gynecol ; 34(3): 138-146, 2022 06 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35645012

RESUMEN

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To examine the status of racial and ethnic inequalities in fertility care in the United States (U.S.) at inception of 2022. This review highlights addressable underpinnings for the prevalent differentials in access to and utilization of infertility treatments and underscores gaps in preventive care as key contributors to racial and ethnic disparities in risk burden for subfertility and infertility. RECENT FINDINGS: Significant gaps in access to and utilization of fertility care are consistently reported among racial and ethnic minorities, particularly Black and Hispanic women. Access to and utilization of contraceptives, human papilloma virus vaccination rates, preexposure prophylaxis use, and differentials in treatment of common gynecologic disorders are relevant to the prevalent racial and ethnic disparities in reproductive health. The spectrum of differential in reproductive wellness and the magnitude of reproductive health burden afflicting racial minorities in the U.S. raise concerns regarding systemic and structural racism as plausible contributors to the prevalent state of affairs. SUMMARY: Despite efforts to reform unequal reproductive health practices and policies, racial and ethnic disparities in fertility care are pervasive and persistent. In addition to measures aimed at reducing barriers to care, societal efforts must prioritize health disparity research to systematically examine underpinnings, and addressing structural racism and interpersonal biases, to correct the prevalent racial inequities and mitigate disparities.


Asunto(s)
Infertilidad , Salud Reproductiva , Femenino , Fertilidad , Humanos , Infertilidad/terapia , Estados Unidos/epidemiología
3.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35682160

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: Poor privacy and confidentiality practices and provider bias are believed to compromise adolescent and young adult sexual and reproductive health service quality. The results of focus group discussions with global youth leaders and sexual and reproductive health implementing organizations indicated that poor privacy and confidentiality practices and provider bias serve as key barriers to care access for the youth. METHODS: A narrative review was conducted to describe how poor privacy and confidentiality practices and provider bias impose barriers on young people seeking sexual and reproductive health services and to examine how point of service evaluations have assessed these factors. RESULTS: 4544 peer-reviewed publications were screened, of which 95 met the inclusion criteria. To these articles, another 16 grey literature documents were included, resulting in a total of 111 documents included in the review. CONCLUSION: Poor privacy and confidentiality practices and provider bias represent significant barriers for young people seeking sexual and reproductive health services across diverse geographic and sociocultural contexts. The authors found that present evaluation methods do not appropriately account for the importance of these factors and that new performance improvement indicators are needed.


Asunto(s)
Privacidad , Servicios de Salud Reproductiva , Adolescente , Confidencialidad , Accesibilidad a los Servicios de Salud , Humanos , Salud Reproductiva , Conducta Sexual , Adulto Joven
4.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 1165, 2022 Jun 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35689180

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Edutainment aims to spread educational messages in an entertaining way, and often reaches large audiences. While studies increasingly report the impacts of edutainment interventions, there is limited context-specific evidence on the underlying processes and barriers to effective delivery, especially in rural areas. This article presents results from a process evaluation of a community-based edutainment intervention designed to improve knowledge, attitudes, and practices on gender-based violence (GBV), sexual and reproductive health (SRH), and maternal and child health. The intervention focused on the television series, C'est la Vie!, screened through biweekly film clubs in rural Senegal and included post-screening discussions and thematic workshops, meant to reinforce messages, increase knowledge, and change social norms. The objectives of this study were to assess intervention adaptation, implementation fidelity, participants' responsiveness or engagement, and series appropriateness. METHODS: The intervention was implemented from December 2019 to March 2020 in 120 villages in Kaolack and Kolda regions of Senegal, and targeted adolescent girls and young women aged 14 to 34. The process evaluation was carried out in March 2020 in 14 villages using: i) individual semi-structured interviews with implementers (n = 3), village chiefs (n = 8), married women (n = 9), adolescent girls (n = 8), and men (n = 8); ii) focus groups with men (n = 7, 29 participants) and women (n = 10, 100 participants); and iii) observations of screening sessions (n = 4) and post-screening discussions (n = 2). Data were analyzed using thematic and content analysis. RESULTS: The results highlight that adaptation of the intervention helped reach the target population and improved participant attendance, but might have compromised fidelity to original design, as intervention components were shortened and modified for rural delivery and some facilitators made ad hoc modifications. The screenings coverage and frequency were adequate; however, their duration was shortened due to COVID-19 restrictions in Senegal. Participant responsiveness was excellent, as was the series appropriateness for most topics, including GBV. SRH remains a sensitive topic for youth, especially when the film clubs included non-peers, such as slightly older women. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that using film clubs to deliver sensitive edutainment content in rural areas is feasible and has potential for scale-up.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Violencia de Género , Adolescente , Anciano , Niño , Salud del Niño , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Salud Reproductiva , Senegal
5.
Med (N Y) ; 3(6): 348-350, 2022 Jun 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35690051

RESUMEN

Access to reproductive health and maternal care in the US is fraught with inequities deeply rooted in systemic racial issues. Here, experts share their experiences on the disparities that afflict this field of research. Their voices highlight their commitment to, and hope for, more equitable reproductive health.


Asunto(s)
Disparidades en Atención de Salud , Servicios de Salud Materna , Femenino , Humanos , Embarazo , Salud Reproductiva
6.
Med (N Y) ; 3(6): 364-368, 2022 Jun 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35690057

RESUMEN

Despite recent efforts from governments and international organizations to promote adolescent sexual and reproductive health (SRH) rights, some of the current policies fall short of achieving the desired outcomes because of a failure to understand adolescent emerging needs and capacity, the diversity of adolescent populations, and the recognition that deliberate and intense actions are required to make this a reality.


Asunto(s)
Salud Reproductiva , Salud Sexual , Adolescente , Humanos , Kenia , Derechos Sexuales y Reproductivos , Conducta Sexual
8.
Sex Reprod Health Matters ; 30(1): 2077283, 2022 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35666196

RESUMEN

Globally, significant progress has been made in the realm of adolescent sexual and reproductive health. We conceptualised "last mile" adolescents as having two or more of the following factors of identity: refugee, Indigenous, 2SLGBTQIA+, out of school, rurally or remotely located, slum dwelling, incarcerated or previously incarcerated, HIV/AIDS infected, and living with a disability. We conducted a scoping review with an aim to synthesise evidence and identify research gaps in the literature pertaining to the sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) of last mile adolescents. We conducted searches in three databases (Embase, Global Health, and Medline). Fifty-four publications met our inclusion criteria. Our results revealed that the state of evidence on the SRHR of last mile adolescents is poor. Very few studies used qualitative and mixed-method inquiry. The number of studies carried out in North America, Europe, and Oceania were limited. We found insufficient disaggregated data with respect to SRHR-related knowledge, behaviour, and access to services. Adopting an intersectional lens is critical to uncover the multiplicative effects of last mile adolescents' factors of identity on their SRHR. National data systems should be strengthened to enable the collection of quality disaggregated data which can play a vital role in identifying SRHR inequities affecting last mile adolescents. Research priorities should be realigned to generate data globally on the SRHR of last mile adolescents whose lives are marked by intersecting vulnerabilities.


Asunto(s)
Servicios de Salud Reproductiva , Salud Sexual , Adolescente , Humanos , Salud Reproductiva , Derechos Sexuales y Reproductivos , Conducta Sexual
9.
Health Syst Reform ; 8(1): e2064792, 2022 Jan 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35666262

RESUMEN

This paper determines the effect of international remittances on the healthcare utilization of childbearing mothers in Pakistan using the Pakistan Social and Living Standards Measurement (PSLM) survey, 2018-19. The study reports a significant and positive effect of international remittances on the healthcare outcomes of childbearing mothers. Importantly, the remittance-receiving households have 0.615, 0.208 and 0.306 times the odds of the non-receiving households, utilizing prenatal healthcare, postnatal healthcare, and healthcare decision making, respectively, and all of them are statistically significant. Consequently, the analysis confirms that remittance receiving-households do in fact influence and increase the likelihood of utilizing prenatal healthcare, postnatal healthcare and decisions about medical treatment for women. As regression-based estimation of remittances is prone to selection bias due to the nature of the non-experimental data set, we also used propensity score matching methods, which also confirmed a significant and positive effect of international remittances on healthcare outcomes of the childbearing mothers. Thus, financial support or social development programs by the government or non-governmental organization are pivotal in enhancing the healthcare outcomes and ultimately the living standards of childbearing mothers.


Asunto(s)
Aceptación de la Atención de Salud , Salud Reproductiva , Atención a la Salud , Femenino , Humanos , Pakistán , Embarazo , Factores Socioeconómicos
10.
J Nurs Educ ; 61(6): 326-329, 2022 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35667112

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Experiential learning provides undergraduate nursing students with hands-on opportunities to integrate knowledge and clinical skills. Using educational theory, nurse educators can integrate experiential laboratory experiences into didactic courses to increase comprehension of knowledge and skills required in the clinical setting. METHOD: Experiential laboratory experiences were coordinated with didactic content in an undergraduate reproductive health course, and student scores on weekly quizzes and a standardized final examination were compared for three cohorts. One cohort participated in a generic laboratory at the start of the semester, one cohort received 4 synchronized laboratory days throughout the semester, and another cohort received the same content in 2-day laboratory sessions. RESULTS: Weekly quiz scores and standardized final examination scores were significantly higher among students who had synchronized experiential laboratory experiences than for students who had a generic laboratory experience. CONCLUSION: Experiential laboratory experiences are helpful in integrating clinical skills and course knowledge comprehension in didactic undergraduate courses. [J Nurs Educ. 2022;61(6):326-329.].


Asunto(s)
Bachillerato en Enfermería , Estudiantes de Enfermería , Competencia Clínica , Humanos , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas , Salud Reproductiva
11.
Reprod Health ; 19(1): 135, 2022 Jun 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35668397

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: There is often collateral damage to health systems during epidemics, affecting women and girls the most, with reduced access to non-outbreak related services, particularly in humanitarian settings. This rapid case study examines sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services in the Democratic Republic of the Congo when the COVID-19 hit, towards the end of an Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) outbreak, and in a context of protracted insecurity. METHODS: This study draws on quantitative analysis of routine data from four health zones, a document review of policies and protocols, and 13 key-informant interviews with staff from the Ministry of Public Health, United Nations agencies, international and national non-governmental organizations, and civil society organizations. RESULTS: Utilization of SRH services decreased initially but recovered by August 2020. Significant fluctuations remained across areas, due to the end of free care once Ebola funding ceased, insecurity, number of COVID-19 cases, and funding levels. The response to COVID-19 was top-down, focused on infection and prevention control measures, with a lack of funding, technical expertise and overall momentum that characterized the EVD response. Communities and civil society did not play an active role for the planning of the COVID-19 response. While health zone and facility staff showed resilience, developing adaptations to maintain SRH provision, these adaptations were short-lived and inconsistent without external support and funding. CONCLUSION: The EVD outbreak was an opportunity for health system strengthening that was not sustained during COVID-19. This had consequences for access to SRH services, with limited-resources available and deprioritization of SRH.


Women and girls often face increased challenges to accessing healthcare during epidemics on top of pre-existing health disparities. There is emerging evidence that COVID-19 has had negative impacts on the health of women and girls in sub-Saharan Africa due to diverted funding, reduced services, negative socioeconomic impacts, and increased or new barriers to access. In the DRC, COVID-19 hit shortly after the end of an Ebola epidemic within a context of protracted insecurity. This study used mixed methods and drew upon 13 interviews to examine the effects of COVID-19 on SRH services in North Kivu and how the health system did or did not adapt to ensure continued access and utilization of SRH services. There was limited prioritization of SRH during COVID-19. Although the government issued policies on how to adapt SRH services, these were developed centrally, without much guidance on how to operationalize these policies in different contexts. Consequently, healthcare providers and civil society actors developed their own ways to continue activities at local levels, not necessarily in a systematic way. There was limited longer-term strengthening of the health system that could adapt to the subsequent COVID-19 pandemic aside from increased capacity of healthcare providers to manage infection prevention and control measures. However, this was hampered by the lack of personal protective equipment that received no external support. Therefore, donors need to consider how resources can be leveraged to support sustained strengthening of the health system to be able to adapt to shocks even when resources are limited.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Fiebre Hemorrágica Ebola , Servicios de Salud Reproductiva , COVID-19/epidemiología , Brotes de Enfermedades , Femenino , Fiebre Hemorrágica Ebola/epidemiología , Humanos , Salud Reproductiva , Conducta Sexual
12.
Front Public Health ; 10: 860650, 2022.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35669737

RESUMEN

Background: Reproductive health rights in Africa are unknown. According to international studies, reproductive health rights of young people particularly university students, are violated, and most of these violations go unreported due to a lack of information and awareness of these rights. The aim of this study was to assess the level of knowledge and associated factors on sexual and reproductive health rights in Ethiopia. Methods: Institution-based cross-sectional study using an interviewer-administered and structured questionnaire was conducted. The study population consisted of students of the selected department between November, 2018 and June, 2019. A simple random sampling method technique was used to select 420 students. Bi-variate and multi-variate logistic regression analysis was performed. Results: The knowledge level of the respondents was 16.4%. The majority of students 205 (51%) were in the age group < 20 years. Male [AOR: 1.46, 95% CI: 1.09-1.95]; coming from urban areas [AOR: 2.11, 95% CI: (1.02-4.37)]; provision of sexuality education or lecture in departments [AOR: 1.39, 95% CI: 1.02-1.91] and discussion about reproductive health with anyone else [AOR: 2.31, 95% CI: 1.48-3.62] were significant association for the knowledge of sexual and reproductive health rights. Conclusions: Respondents' knowledge level was found to be very low. Therefore, strengthening students' lectures or education on reproductive health in the curricula of high school, encouraging discussions with parents, and anyone might improve the knowledge toward sexual and reproductive health rights.


Asunto(s)
Accesibilidad a los Servicios de Salud , Salud Reproductiva , Adolescente , Adulto , Estudios Transversales , Etiopía/epidemiología , Derechos Humanos , Humanos , Masculino , Salud Reproductiva/educación , Estudiantes , Universidades , Adulto Joven
13.
BMJ Open ; 12(6): e051389, 2022 Jun 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35676003

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: This study explored the perceptions of adult stakeholders on adolescents sexual and reproductive health (SRH) needs, variations of perceived needs by different social stratifiers and adolescent's perceived interventions to address these needs. This will provide evidence that could be useful for policy and programme reviews for improving access and use of services in to meet the SRH needs of adolescents. DESIGN: A qualitative cross-sectional study was conducted in Ebonyi state, Southeast, Nigeria. Data were analysed using thematic framework and content analysis approaches. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: This qualitative study was conducted in six selected local government areas in Ebonyi state, Nigeria. The study participants comprised of adult stakeholders including community leaders, adolescent boys and girls aged 13-18 years. Adolescents were purposively selected from schools, skill acquisition centres and workplaces. A total of 77 in-depth interviews, 6 (with community leaders) and 12 (with adolescents) focus group discussions were conducted using pretested question guides. RESULTS: Adolescent SRH needs were perceived to be unique and special due to their vulnerability, fragility and predisposition to explore new experiences. Recurring adolescent SRH needs were: SRH education and counselling; access to contraceptive services and information. These needs were perceived to vary based on sex, schooling and marital status. Adolescent girls were perceived to have more psychological needs, and more prone to negative health outcomes. Out-of-school adolescents were described as more vulnerable, less controlled, less supervised and more prone to sexual abuse. Unmarried adolescents were perceived more vulnerable to sexual exploitation and risks, while married were perceived to have more maternal health service needs. CONCLUSIONS: Perceptions of adolescents' SRH needs converge among stakeholders (including adolescents) and are thought to vary by gender, schooling and marital status. This calls for well-designed gender-responsive interventions that also take into consideration other social stratifiers and adolescent's perceived SRH intervention strategies.


Asunto(s)
Servicios de Salud Reproductiva , Salud Sexual , Adolescente , Adulto , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Nigeria , Investigación Cualitativa , Salud Reproductiva/educación , Conducta Sexual/psicología , Salud Sexual/educación
14.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 757, 2022 Jun 07.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35672763

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Self-care is the ability of individuals, families, and communities to promote health, prevent disease, maintain health, and manage illness and disability with or without a health care provider. In resource-constrained settings with disrupted sexual and reproductive health (SRH) service coverage and access, SRH self-care could play a critical role. Despite SRH conditions being among the leading causes of mortality and morbidity among women of reproductive age in humanitarian and fragile settings, there are currently no reviews of self-care interventions in these contexts to guide policy and practice. METHODS: We undertook a scoping review to identify the design, implementation, and outcomes of self-care interventions for SRH in humanitarian and fragile settings. We defined settings of interest as locations with appeals for international humanitarian assistance or identified as fragile and conflict-affected situations by the World Bank. SRH self-care interventions were described according to those aligned with the Minimum Initial Services Package for Reproductive Health in Crises. We searched six databases for records using keywords guided by the PRISMA statement. The findings of each included paper were analysed using an a priori framework to identify information concerning effectiveness, acceptability and feasibility of the self-care intervention, places where self-care interventions were accessed and factors relating to the environment that enabled the delivery and uptake of the interventions. RESULTS: We identified 25 publications on SRH self-care implemented in humanitarian and fragile settings including ten publications on maternal and newborn health, nine on HIV/STI interventions, two on contraception, two on safe abortion care, one on gender-based violence, and one on health service provider perspectives on multiple interventions. Overall, the findings show that well-supported self-care interventions have the potential to increase access to quality SRH for crisis-affected communities. However, descriptions of interventions, study settings, and factors impacting implementation offer limited insight into how practical considerations for SRH self-care interventions differ in stable, fragile, and crisis-affected settings. CONCLUSION: It is time to invest in self-care implementation research in humanitarian settings to inform policies and practices that are adapted to the needs of crisis-affected communities and tailored to the specific health system challenges encountered in such contexts.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por VIH , Servicios de Salud Reproductiva , Enfermedades de Transmisión Sexual , Femenino , Promoción de la Salud , Humanos , Recién Nacido , Embarazo , Salud Reproductiva , Autocuidado
15.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 1108, 2022 Jun 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35658847

RESUMEN

AIM: To identify the impact of COVID-19 measures on sexual behaviors and sexual satisfaction in Luxembourg residents. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional online survey of adults (> 18 years of age) residing in Luxembourg, while COVID-19 restrictions were in place. The survey was available from January 15 to February 12, 2021 in four languages (French, German, English and Portuguese). Survey questions focused on masturbation, cuddling, condom use, sex frequency, sexting, cybersex, watching porn, and sexual satisfaction. RESULTS: 557 volunteers completed the survey (35.5% men, 64.3% women). Sexual satisfaction and sexual problems variables were assessed on 4-point Likert scales (0 = not at all/never to 3 = very/often). Sexual problems increased during the COVID-19 measures while sexual satisfaction decreased compared to before the introduction of COVID-19 restrictions (assessed retrospectively). Factors associated with increased odds of sexual satisfaction included having a steady relationship before COVID-19 restrictions, engaging in sexting, reporting good mental health and not altering alcohol intake. CONCLUSIONS: The context of the COVID-19 pandemic and the measures implemented in Luxembourg affected sexual behaviors and sexual satisfaction. Sexual and reproductive health care centers and health professionals in general should take these results into consideration when providing care. Recommendations on the importance of sexual health for general wellbeing and behaviors associated with sexual satisfaction should be offered and possibilities to experience sexuality while reducing contamination risks be discussed.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Salud Sexual , Adulto , COVID-19/epidemiología , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Encuestas Epidemiológicas , Humanos , Luxemburgo/epidemiología , Masculino , Orgasmo , Pandemias , Salud Reproductiva , Estudios Retrospectivos , Conducta Sexual
16.
Reprod Health ; 19(1): 126, 2022 May 28.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35643538

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Sexual and reproductive health (SRH) care services are essential to improving the lives of women and achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. In Cameroon, the Catholic Church is one the largest non-governmental suppliers of health care, but its role in providing SRH care is restricted by religious norms. METHODS: This study explored doctors' experiences and perceptions of providing SRH care at Catholic hospitals in a conflict-affected area in Cameroon by using 10 in-depth interviews with doctors from three Catholic hospitals in the North-West region. Qualitative coding was done with NVivo, and data were analysed using thematic analysis. RESULTS: Three themes and seven categories were identified. The respondents described strict rules and a broad range of challenges to providing comprehensive sexual and reproductive health care services. Nonetheless, there is evidence of doctors overcoming obstacles to providing SRH care despite the religious and political climate. However, whilst attempting to overcome challenges, participants described numerous examples of poor SRH care and health outcomes. CONCLUSION: The study highlights the importance of understanding the intersect between religion and women's health, particularly in improving access to SRH for vulnerable populations in conflict-affected areas. It further provides insight into doctors' motivations in practicing medicine and how doctors cope and make efforts to provide care and minimize harm.


Asunto(s)
Salud Reproductiva , Salud Sexual , Camerún , Catolicismo , Femenino , Hospitales , Humanos
18.
Reprod Health ; 19(1): 128, 2022 Jun 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35655221

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Globally, experiences of menarche and subsequent menstruation are embedded in social and cultural beliefs, norms and practices. Menarche is an important developmental milestone in sexual and reproductive health (SRH) for females. Menarche is intertwined with socio-cultural norms, beliefs and practices, which can impact on women's ability to manage menstruation with dignity. This paper reviews the social and cultural factors that affect women's ability to effectively manage their menstrual health and hygiene (MHH) in Pacific Island Countries and Territories (PICTs). METHODS: A scoping review was conducted following PRISMA scoping review guidelines and inclusion/exclusion criteria. An online search was conducted for peer-reviewed publications in Medline/OVID; Medline/PubMED; PsycINFO; CINAHL; Scopus and JSTOR, and Google Scholar. A search for grey literature was conducted in Google Scholar and websites of international and local organizations. Experts in the field also contributed additional references. Extracted data were summarised in an Excel spreadsheet. Searches were conducted between May and June, 2019, and then repeated in July, 2020. RESULTS: A total of 11 studies were included; 10 qualitative and one mixed methods study. Studies were conducted in Melanesian (n = 9), Polynesian (n = 1) and Micronesian (n = 1) PICTs. All 11 studies reported elements of societal and personal factors; ten studies reported evidence relating to interpersonal factors; nine studies reported elements relating to environmental factors; and two studies presented evidence linked to biological factors. Managing menstrual health with dignity is challenging for many women and girls because menstruation is associated with menstrual taboos and shame. CONCLUSION: This review found that the MHH experiences of women in PICTs are affected by social and cultural beliefs, norms and practices. Beliefs, norms and practices about menarche need to be incorporated in SRH planning, programs and education in order to be relevant to diverse village and urban settings.


Asunto(s)
Menstruación , Salud de la Mujer , Femenino , Humanos , Menarquia , Islas del Pacífico , Salud Reproductiva
19.
20.
Semin Nephrol ; 42(2): 142-152, 2022 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35718362

RESUMEN

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is frequently accompanied by reproductive health challenges in females and males alike. Progression of CKD is associated with escalating impairment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, which facilitates evolving ovarian, testicular, and sexual dysfunction. Common clinical reproductive health complications in CKD include abnormal menstruation, impaired sexual health, and reduced fertility. Though sex-specific factors, such as sex hormones and gonadal function, have a strong influence on reproductive health outcomes in CKD, a person's gender and gendered experience also have important implications. Institutionalized gender, gendered perceptions of health, and health care-seeking behaviors, as well as adherence to medical care, all have critical effects on reproductive health in CKD. This review endeavors to explore the implications of both sex and gender on overall reproductive health in individuals living with CKD.


Asunto(s)
Insuficiencia Renal Crónica , Disfunciones Sexuales Fisiológicas , Femenino , Fertilidad , Hormonas Esteroides Gonadales , Humanos , Masculino , Insuficiencia Renal Crónica/complicaciones , Salud Reproductiva , Disfunciones Sexuales Fisiológicas/etiología
SELECCIÓN DE REFERENCIAS
DETALLE DE LA BÚSQUEDA
...