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1.
Diagn. tratamento ; 27(2): 44-7, abr-jun. 2022.
Artículo en Portugués | LILACS | ID: biblio-1369111

RESUMEN

Em geral, maior nível de estresse durante a pandemia agravou a saúde mental e sexual. Estresse financeiro refere-se à ausência de renda satisfatória e insatisfação com essa condição. Piores condições econômicas geraram o estresse financeiro e o comprometimento da qualidade de vida dos casais. O objetivo desse texto é discutir a influência de estressores financeiros no relacionamento conjugal e na saúde mental e sexual. Embora os casais iniciem a vida conjugal com expectativas positivas, dificuldades financeiras preveem aumento de depressão, diminuição da satisfação conjugal e aumento dos conflitos, com maior probabilidade de divórcio. A administração conjunta da renda tem sido associada a uma melhor qualidade e coesão nos relacionamentos, especialmente para as mulheres, enquanto contas individuais podem minar a satisfação feminina, reduzindo sentimentos de intimidade, compatibilidade sexual e satisfação com a resolução de conflitos. Na abordagem de relacionamento conjugal e saúde sexual, as percepções podem desempenhar um papel mais importante do que os fatos objetivos. A percepção da satisfação financeira e sexual prevê melhor a estabilidade conjugal do que os recursos financeiros objetivos ou a frequência de relações sexuais. O estresse financeiro está associado não só a maior insatisfação financeira como também sexual, levando a maior instabilidade conjugal. Habilidades comunicacionais saudáveis, para comunicação financeira e relacional, facilitam a abordagem de questões relativas a dinheiro e sexo, adequando a percepção dessas questões. Gestão financeira, percepção de satisfação sexual e habilidades comunicacionais juntas desempenham um papel preponderante na qualidade da vida conjugal.


Asunto(s)
Matrimonio , Salud Mental , Comunicación , Salud Sexual , Administración Financiera
4.
Reprod Health ; 19(Suppl 1): 130, 2022 Jun 13.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35698082

RESUMEN

Ethiopia has the second-largest youth population in Africa with about 37.4 million people aged 10-24 years. To meet the needs of this population group, adolescent, and youth health (AYH) programs, including those focused on sexual and reproductive health (SRH) and youth development, have gained traction in Ethiopia in the last two decades, especially following the 2005 election in Ethiopia. However, adolescents and youths in Ethiopia continue to face a high burden of morbidity and mortality from multiple factors including, teenage pregnancy, unplanned pregnancy, compromised nutrition, HIV and STIs, unsafe abortion, early and child marriage, and unmet needs for family planning. To date, adolescents and youth-related interventions in Ethiopia are fragmented under various ministries, uncoordinated, underfunded, project-oriented, lack effective policy implementation, and lack meaningful participation of young people. Addressing adolescents and youth health and development issues require evidence-based, well-tailored, at scale, intensified, coordinated, and holistic national responses. Therefore, there is a need to advocate for a realization of robust government commitment to ensure a multi-sectoral, coordinated, at scale, and well-funded national response to address the multifaceted needs of young people in Ethiopia including their sexual and reproductive health. An example to emulate is the HIV/AIDS response in Ethiopia, which was led by a national council chaired by the President of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia and spearheaded by a secretariat leveraging resources and implementing a multisectoral national plan down to the kebele level.


Asunto(s)
Salud Reproductiva , Salud Sexual , Adolescente , Niño , Etiopía/epidemiología , Femenino , Humanos , Embarazo , Educación Sexual , Conducta Sexual
5.
J Int AIDS Soc ; 25(6): e25938, 2022 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35700052

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Conditional cash transfers (CTs) augmented with other interventions are promising interventions for reducing HIV risk in adolescent girls and young women. METHODS: A multi-phase, quasi-experimental study assessed the impact of a CT (ZAR300; $22) conditional on attending a skills building intervention, Women of Worth (WoW), designed to improve sexual and reproductive health (SRH) outcomes in Cape Town, South Africa from May 2017 to December 2019. The intervention entailed 12 sessions with encouragement to attend adolescent and youth-friendly health services. Women aged 19-24 years were randomized 1:1 to receive the intervention with a CT ("cash + care" or C+C) or without a CT ("care"). The study included a pilot phase followed by a post-modification phase with improved uptake and retention without changing programme content or CT. Self-reported HIV prevalence and SRH/HIV vulnerability were assessed via a self-administered questionnaire at baseline, after 11 sessions, and 6-30 months' post-intervention for a subset. Mixed effect logistic regression models were fitted to estimate within-subject changes in outcomes. RESULTS: Of 5116 participants, 904 (452 participants per arm) were in the pilot and 4212 (2039 "care" participants and 2173 "C+C" participants) were in the post modified phase. There were 1867 (85.9%) and 135 (6,6%) participants in the "C+C" group and the "Care," respectively, that were WoW completers (≥ 11 sessions/retention). During the pilot phase, 194 (42.9%) and 18 (4.0%) participants in "C+C" and the "care" groups were retained. Receiving a CT sustained participation nearly 60-fold (OR 60.37; 95% CI: 17.32; 210.50, p <0.001). Three-hundred and thirty women were followed for a median of 15.0 months [IQR: 13.3; 17.8] to assess the durability of impact. Self-reported new employment status increased more than three-fold (p <0.001) at WoW completion and was sustained to the longer time point. Intimate partner violence indicators were reduced immediately after WoW, but this was not durable. CONCLUSIONS: Participants receiving CT had sustained participation in an SRH/HIV prevention skills building with improvement in employment and some SRH outcomes. Layered, "young woman centred" programmes to address HIV and SRH risk in young women may be enhanced with CT.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por VIH , Violencia de Pareja , Salud Sexual , Adolescente , Femenino , Infecciones por VIH/epidemiología , Infecciones por VIH/prevención & control , Humanos , Conducta Sexual , Sudáfrica/epidemiología
6.
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr ; 90(S1): S84-S89, 2022 Jul 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35703759

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Black men who have sex with men (MSM) carry the greatest burden of new HIV diagnoses in the United States. Ending the HIV epidemic requires strategic, culturally specific approaches to target factors contributing to persistent HIV disparities. SETTING: Safe Spaces 4 Sexual Health (SS4SH), a community-informed HIV/sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing strategy combining mobile van testing with online outreach, was implemented over a 14-month period from 2018 to 2019 in Baltimore, MD. METHODS: We evaluated the reach of MSM at high risk with high acquisition or transmission risk by SS4SH mobile van combined with online outreach as compared with the Baltimore City Health Department's venue-based mobile van (with no online outreach) operating during the same period based on the following HIV/STI testing outcome measures: (1) number of MSM HIV or STI tested, (2) new HIV diagnosis rate, (3) percent with new syphilis diagnosis, (4) percent at high risk for HIV acquisition, and (5) percent people living with HIV at high risk for transmission. RESULTS: Over a 14-month period, SS4SH HIV/STI tested 151 MSM. Of these, 74% were Black and the mean age was 34 (SD = 10, range = 19-68). Seven percent (10/148) were new HIV diagnoses, and 10% (13/130) were diagnosed with syphilis. The Baltimore City Health Department's venue-based mobile van strategy yielded 53% (231) more MSM (71% Black, mean age 38, SD = 14, range = 15-74), but the HIV/syphilis positivity rate was significantly lower: 0.5% new HIV diagnosis rate (P < 0.001) and 0.5% with syphilis diagnosis (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest SS4SH combing online outreach with mobile van testing may be more effective at reaching high-risk Black MSM than venue-based mobile testing.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por VIH , Salud Sexual , Minorías Sexuales y de Género , Enfermedades de Transmisión Sexual , Sífilis , Adulto , Infecciones por VIH/diagnóstico , Infecciones por VIH/epidemiología , Infecciones por VIH/prevención & control , Homosexualidad Masculina , Humanos , Masculino , Conducta Sexual , Parejas Sexuales , Enfermedades de Transmisión Sexual/diagnóstico , Enfermedades de Transmisión Sexual/epidemiología , Enfermedades de Transmisión Sexual/prevención & control , Sífilis/diagnóstico , Sífilis/epidemiología
7.
Am J Mens Health ; 16(3): 15579883221104895, 2022.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35723069

RESUMEN

One promising though understudied approach to addressing race/ethnic disparities in teen pregnancy rates is through sexual and reproductive health (SRH) programming for young men. This pilot study assessed the feasibility, quality, and preliminary efficacy of Manhood 2.0-a group-based, after-school SRH program for young Black and Latino men, which examines gender norms. This mixed-methods study describes program attendance and quality; participant experiences and engagement in the program; and changes in participant gender norms, knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy, and social support. Quantitative data from baseline and post-intervention surveys (n = 51) were analyzed using paired t-tests and McNemar's tests. Qualitative data from five post-intervention focus groups (n = 27) were transcribed, coded, and analyzed for themes. At baseline, participants were ages 15 to18 years (M = 16.4 years), 30% were Latino, 66% were Black, 34% ever had sex, and 44% of sexually active participants had sex without any contraceptive method or condom. Quality ratings by program observers were high. The majority of participants (61%) attended at least 75% of sessions, and 96% rated Manhood 2.0 as "very good" or "excellent." Pre-post comparisons showed increases in receipt of SRH information; contraception knowledge; positive attitudes about supporting partners in pregnancy prevention; self-efficacy in partner communication about sex; discussing program content with friends and family; and social competence and support. Focus group participants described benefits from the Manhood 2.0 content (i.e., full range of contraceptive methods, sexual consent, gender norms) and delivery (i.e., reflective discussion, nonjudgmental facilitators). Findings suggest that Manhood 2.0 is a promising SRH program for young men.


Asunto(s)
Embarazo no Planeado , Salud Sexual , Adolescente , Condones , Anticoncepción , Femenino , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Humanos , Masculino , Proyectos Piloto , Embarazo , Conducta Sexual
8.
Afr J Prim Health Care Fam Med ; 14(1): e1-e9, 2022 May 31.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35695444

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND:  Tanzania is a country experiencing multiple sexual health challenges, but providers receive no formal training in sexual health. AIM:  This study aimed to assess (1) what sexual health challenges are commonly seen in clinics in Tanzania, (2) which are raised by patients, (3) which are not addressed and (4) which topics to prioritise for a sexual health curriculum. SETTING:  Healthcare settings in Tanzania. METHODS:  Participants were 60 experienced and 61 student doctors, nurses and midwives working in Dar es Salaam. The authors conducted 18 focus groups stratified by profession (midwifery, nursing or medicine) and experience (practitioners vs. students). RESULTS:  Providers identified six common sexual health concerns: (1) Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and sexually transmissible infection (STI) (especially syphilis and gonorrhoea), (2) sexual violence (including intimate partner violence and female genital mutilation), (3) early and unwanted pregnancy (including early sexual debut and complications from abortion), (4) sexual dysfunctions, (5) key population concerns (e.g. lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT); sex work) and (6) non-procreative sexual behaviour (including pornography and masturbation in males and oral and anal sex practices in heterosexual couples). Across professions, few differences were observed. Homosexuality, sex work, masturbation and pornography were identified as taboo topics rarely discussed. Most participants (81%) wanted one comprehensive sexual health curriculum delivered across disciplines. CONCLUSION:  A sexual health curriculum for health students in Tanzania needs to address the most common sexual health concerns of patients. In addition to teaching sexual science and clinical care, skills training in how to address taboo topics is recommended. Students endorsed almost all sexual health topics, which suggests that a comprehensive curriculum is appropriate.


Asunto(s)
Partería , Salud Sexual , Curriculum , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Embarazo , Estudiantes , Tanzanía
9.
Fam Syst Health ; 40(2): 300-303, 2022 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35666907

RESUMEN

While the full scope of sexual health treatment is unlikely to ever be exclusively provided in primary care, it is increasingly important that interdisciplinary teams are poised to address this issue more effectively and comprehensively than we currently are. Providers need to seek out training and resources as they work toward meeting recently articulated competencies in an effort to provide whole person care. And, in the meantime, open the door to conversations about holistic sexual health by simply asking patients about their experiences. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved).


Asunto(s)
Salud Sexual , Comunicación , Humanos , Atención Primaria de Salud , Conducta Sexual
10.
JNMA J Nepal Med Assoc ; 60(250): 581-583, 2022 Jun 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35690979

RESUMEN

Sexual health requires a positive and respectful approach to sexuality and sexual relationships. It is one of the most neglected parts of an individual's health. Sexual health is not adequately covered in the medical education curriculum of Nepal. There is a lack of clinicians practising sexual medicine, which provides a fertile field for quacks in this arena. Sexual health needs to be included and incorporated into medical education. The policymakers and stakeholders need to address this need in sexual health urgently and effeciently. Comprehensive sexual education should be included for children, adolescents and young adults. Keywords: medical education; Nepal; sexual health.


Asunto(s)
Educación Médica , Salud Sexual , Adolescente , Niño , Curriculum , Humanos , Nepal , Sexualidad , Adulto Joven
11.
Am J Mens Health ; 16(3): 15579883221101274, 2022.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35726805

RESUMEN

Health care professionals' (HCPs) notions about gender may influence the provision and quality of care. If care-seeking men are met by HCPs holding idealized and stereotypical notions of masculinity, this could reinforce barriers to adequate care. This study explored notions about men and masculinities among HCPs working with men's sexual health in Sweden. Focus group interviews with 35 HCPs from primary health and sexual health clinics were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The analysis resulted in three descriptive themes: (a) Contradictory masculinity-elusive but clear. Notions of masculinity as a phenomenon or concept were elusive, but masculine and un-masculine traits, behaviors, and qualities were clear. (b) Sexual health care is a social place where men and masculinities can be challenging. Male patients were associated with unwanted sexual tensions. Masculinity could challenge professionality. Seeking sexual health care was perceived as doing un-masculinity. (c) Regarding masculinity as irrelevant-a difficult ambition to achieve. Participants strived for gender-neutrality by regarding patients as humans, individuals, or patients rather than as men and masculine. The analysis also identified a theme of meaning: Notions of masculinity are situated relationally. HCPs situate masculinity in real and hypothetical relationships. Romantic and sexual preferences were used to define preferred masculinity. This study identified themes that showed how HCPs balanced professional and private notions of men and masculinity in their patient encounters. Increased gender awareness and training are needed to professionalize the management of gendered notions in encounters with men who seek care for sexual health problems.


Asunto(s)
Masculinidad , Salud Sexual , Grupos Focales , Personal de Salud , Humanos , Masculino , Salud del Hombre , Conducta Sexual
12.
Trials ; 23(1): 521, 2022 Jun 21.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35729664

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Many community college students experience poor sexual and relationship health outcomes. Young adults consume a plethora of media content, much of which depicts unhealthy sexual and romantic relationships, and research has shown that media exposure can negatively impact health outcomes. Asynchronous, web-based media literacy education (MLE) programs have been shown to improve short-term sexual and relationship health outcomes. However, there is a dearth of research on the mechanisms by which MLE programs impact health outcomes and the long-term effects of MLE programs on sexual and relationship health outcomes among community college students. METHODS: This study will (1) evaluate the unique effects of MLE on primary and secondary sexual and relationship health outcomes; (2) compare the mechanisms underlying the effects of an asynchronous, web-based MLE sexual health program (Media Aware) to the mechanisms underlying the effects of an active control program on health outcomes; and (3) evaluate the long-term efficacy of Media Aware on media literacy skills and sexual and relationship health outcomes compared to active control and delayed intervention control groups. To address these aims, a three-arm randomized controlled trial with young adults attending community college will be conducted. It is expected that around 30 campuses will participate and approximately 67 students from each campus will be enrolled in the study (estimated n = 2010). Campuses will be randomized to either the (1) intervention group (Media Aware); (2) active control group (sexual health education from Media Aware without MLE content or methods); or (3) delayed intervention control group. Students will complete online questionnaires at pretest, posttest, 6-month, and 12-month follow-ups. DISCUSSION: This project has the potential to advance theory about the potential mechanisms through which MLE has an impact on sexual and relationship health outcomes by directly testing the impact of interventions using a randomized design. Additionally, this study is expected to establish strong evidence for the effectiveness of Media Aware for use with young adults and to help identify strategies to optimize the longer-term impact of the program on health. Students' satisfaction with programming will be discussed to inform future implementation efforts.


Asunto(s)
Salud Sexual , Humanos , Internet , Alfabetización , Ensayos Clínicos Controlados Aleatorios como Asunto , Educación Sexual/métodos , Salud Sexual/educación , Universidades , Adulto Joven
14.
J Int Assoc Provid AIDS Care ; 21: 23259582221107327, 2022.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35699978

RESUMEN

Black adolescent girls and young women (AGYW) are disproportionately affected by HIV in the southern U.S.; however, PrEP prescriptions to Black AGYW remain scarce. We conducted in-depth interviews (IDIs) with Black AGYW ages 14-24 in Alabama to explore opportunities for and barriers to sexual health care including PrEP prescription. Twelve AGYW participated in IDIs with median age 20 (range 19-24). All reported condomless sex, 1-3 sexual partners in the past 3 months, and 6 reported prior STI. Themes included: 1) Stigma related to sex contributes to inadequate discussions with educators, healthcare providers, and parents about sexual health; 2) Intersecting stigmas around race and gender impact Black women's care-seeking behavior; 3) Many AGYW are aware of PrEP but don't perceive it as an option for them. Multifaceted interventions utilizing the perspectives, voices, and experiences of Black cisgender AGYW are needed to curb the HIV epidemic in Alabama and the U.S. South.


Asunto(s)
Fármacos Anti-VIH , Infecciones por VIH , Profilaxis Pre-Exposición , Salud Sexual , Adolescente , Adulto , Fármacos Anti-VIH/uso terapéutico , Femenino , Infecciones por VIH/tratamiento farmacológico , Infecciones por VIH/epidemiología , Infecciones por VIH/prevención & control , Humanos , Conducta Sexual , Parejas Sexuales , Adulto Joven
15.
PLoS One ; 17(6): e0268298, 2022.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35714150

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Little research has been conducted on the sexual health needs and risk behaviors of queer womxn and trans men, making it difficult to identify specific health needs and disparities. This is especially the case in the Global South, where their needs are poorly understood. This study presents findings on demographics, sources of information, sexual (risk) behaviors, and substance use in Kenyan queer womxn and trans men. METHODS: An online survey among 335 Kenyan queer womxn and trans men was used to collect data on sexual health, risk behavior, health information sources, and substance use. The participants needed to have had at least one self-identified female sexual partner. RESULTS: The sample presented young, highly-educated queer womxn and trans men. A high incidence of childhood sexual trauma found was found. Risk behaviors included sexual activities with partners of multiple genders, violence, and low use of barrier methods. One in three participants had been treated for an STD in the previous year. The incidences of smoking and drinking were high, and a quarter of participants indicated having taken drugs at least once a month or more. The internet was either the first or second most important source of sexual health information for 44.1% of the participants, followed by schools (30.9%). DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that queer womxn and trans men are at risk of negative sexual health outcomes due to a lack of appropriate information, risk behavior, substance use, and low uptake of sexual health services. Kenya's Penal Code still criminalizes consensual same-sex activities and may play a role in perpetuating barriers that prohibit them from making healthier choices. Developing tailored programming and policies require local, national, and global stakeholders to engage with the inclusion of queer womxn and trans men's sexual health needs within strategic planning and healthcare delivery.


Asunto(s)
Salud Sexual , Minorías Sexuales y de Género , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Conductas Relacionadas con la Salud , Humanos , Kenia/epidemiología , Masculino , Conducta Sexual , Parejas Sexuales
16.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 1108, 2022 Jun 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35658847

RESUMEN

AIM: To identify the impact of COVID-19 measures on sexual behaviors and sexual satisfaction in Luxembourg residents. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional online survey of adults (> 18 years of age) residing in Luxembourg, while COVID-19 restrictions were in place. The survey was available from January 15 to February 12, 2021 in four languages (French, German, English and Portuguese). Survey questions focused on masturbation, cuddling, condom use, sex frequency, sexting, cybersex, watching porn, and sexual satisfaction. RESULTS: 557 volunteers completed the survey (35.5% men, 64.3% women). Sexual satisfaction and sexual problems variables were assessed on 4-point Likert scales (0 = not at all/never to 3 = very/often). Sexual problems increased during the COVID-19 measures while sexual satisfaction decreased compared to before the introduction of COVID-19 restrictions (assessed retrospectively). Factors associated with increased odds of sexual satisfaction included having a steady relationship before COVID-19 restrictions, engaging in sexting, reporting good mental health and not altering alcohol intake. CONCLUSIONS: The context of the COVID-19 pandemic and the measures implemented in Luxembourg affected sexual behaviors and sexual satisfaction. Sexual and reproductive health care centers and health professionals in general should take these results into consideration when providing care. Recommendations on the importance of sexual health for general wellbeing and behaviors associated with sexual satisfaction should be offered and possibilities to experience sexuality while reducing contamination risks be discussed.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Salud Sexual , Adulto , COVID-19/epidemiología , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Encuestas Epidemiológicas , Humanos , Luxemburgo/epidemiología , Masculino , Orgasmo , Pandemias , Salud Reproductiva , Estudios Retrospectivos , Conducta Sexual
17.
Sex Reprod Health Matters ; 30(1): 2077283, 2022 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35666196

RESUMEN

Globally, significant progress has been made in the realm of adolescent sexual and reproductive health. We conceptualised "last mile" adolescents as having two or more of the following factors of identity: refugee, Indigenous, 2SLGBTQIA+, out of school, rurally or remotely located, slum dwelling, incarcerated or previously incarcerated, HIV/AIDS infected, and living with a disability. We conducted a scoping review with an aim to synthesise evidence and identify research gaps in the literature pertaining to the sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) of last mile adolescents. We conducted searches in three databases (Embase, Global Health, and Medline). Fifty-four publications met our inclusion criteria. Our results revealed that the state of evidence on the SRHR of last mile adolescents is poor. Very few studies used qualitative and mixed-method inquiry. The number of studies carried out in North America, Europe, and Oceania were limited. We found insufficient disaggregated data with respect to SRHR-related knowledge, behaviour, and access to services. Adopting an intersectional lens is critical to uncover the multiplicative effects of last mile adolescents' factors of identity on their SRHR. National data systems should be strengthened to enable the collection of quality disaggregated data which can play a vital role in identifying SRHR inequities affecting last mile adolescents. Research priorities should be realigned to generate data globally on the SRHR of last mile adolescents whose lives are marked by intersecting vulnerabilities.


Asunto(s)
Servicios de Salud Reproductiva , Salud Sexual , Adolescente , Humanos , Salud Reproductiva , Derechos Sexuales y Reproductivos , Conducta Sexual
18.
Reprod Health ; 19(1): 126, 2022 May 28.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35643538

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Sexual and reproductive health (SRH) care services are essential to improving the lives of women and achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. In Cameroon, the Catholic Church is one the largest non-governmental suppliers of health care, but its role in providing SRH care is restricted by religious norms. METHODS: This study explored doctors' experiences and perceptions of providing SRH care at Catholic hospitals in a conflict-affected area in Cameroon by using 10 in-depth interviews with doctors from three Catholic hospitals in the North-West region. Qualitative coding was done with NVivo, and data were analysed using thematic analysis. RESULTS: Three themes and seven categories were identified. The respondents described strict rules and a broad range of challenges to providing comprehensive sexual and reproductive health care services. Nonetheless, there is evidence of doctors overcoming obstacles to providing SRH care despite the religious and political climate. However, whilst attempting to overcome challenges, participants described numerous examples of poor SRH care and health outcomes. CONCLUSION: The study highlights the importance of understanding the intersect between religion and women's health, particularly in improving access to SRH for vulnerable populations in conflict-affected areas. It further provides insight into doctors' motivations in practicing medicine and how doctors cope and make efforts to provide care and minimize harm.


Asunto(s)
Salud Reproductiva , Salud Sexual , Camerún , Catolicismo , Femenino , Hospitales , Humanos
19.
Br J Nurs ; 31(10): 534-540, 2022 May 26.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35648664

RESUMEN

This article provides an overview of key areas within sexual health examination, diagnosis and treatment options for advanced clinical practitioners (ACPs) working outside this field of practice, who may not often encounter consultations of a sexual health nature. ACPs require an understanding of appropriate and necessary investigations, alongside specific advice or education they can offer patients. Within a sexual health context especially, the consultation and subsequent steps can be challenging and distressing for the patient, and the ACP must consider their knowledge and experience when caring for a patient in this area. Increasing knowledge and awareness of common conditions and treatments, red flags, and referral processes can allow the ACP to provide reassurance and support to the patient and improve their healthcare experience. Having answers to a patient's questions regarding processes and time frames can strengthen the relationship between the ACP and their patient and help reduce a patient's anxiety and fear of the unknown.


Asunto(s)
Salud Sexual , Humanos , Solución de Problemas , Derivación y Consulta , Pensamiento
20.
Med (N Y) ; 3(6): 364-368, 2022 06 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35690057

RESUMEN

Despite recent efforts from governments and international organizations to promote adolescent sexual and reproductive health (SRH) rights, some of the current policies fall short of achieving the desired outcomes because of a failure to understand adolescent emerging needs and capacity, the diversity of adolescent populations, and the recognition that deliberate and intense actions are required to make this a reality.


Asunto(s)
Salud Reproductiva , Salud Sexual , Adolescente , Humanos , Kenia , Derechos Sexuales y Reproductivos , Conducta Sexual
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