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1.
J Nurs Care Qual ; 38(1): 11-18, 2023.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36409656

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Workplace violence (WPV) against nurses has a negative impact on the nurses and the care they provide. Formal reporting of WPV is necessary to understand the nature of violent incidents, develop proactive coping strategies, and provide support for nurses affected by WPV. PURPOSE: This study explored the relationships among nurses' WPV experiences, burnout, patient safety, and the moderating effect of WPV-reporting culture on these relationships. METHODS: This descriptive cross-sectional study used secondary data collected from 1781 nurses at a large academic medical center. RESULTS: Workplace violence increased nurse burnout, which in turn negatively affected patient safety. A strong WPV-reporting culture increased the negative effect of WPV on burnout but mitigated the negative effect of burnout on patient safety. CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicate that nurses may perceive WPV-reporting behavior as a stressor. Violence-reporting systems and procedures need to be improved to reduce the burden of reporting.


Asunto(s)
Violencia Laboral , Humanos , Seguridad del Paciente , Estudios Transversales , Agotamiento Psicológico , Centros Médicos Académicos
2.
Health Care Manage Rev ; 48(1): 52-60, 2023.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35713571

RESUMEN

ISSUE: Health care management is faced with a basic conundrum about organizational behavior; why do professionals who are highly dedicated to their work choose to remain silent on critical issues that they recognize as being professionally and organizationally significant? Speaking-up interventions in health care achieve disappointing outcomes because of a professional and organizational culture that is not supportive. CRITICAL THEORETICAL ANALYSIS: Our understanding of the different types of employee silence is in its infancy, and more ethnographic and qualitative work is needed to reveal the complex nature of silence in health care. We use the sensemaking theory to elucidate how the difficulties to overcoming silence in health care are interwoven in health care culture. INSIGHT/ADVANCE: The relationship between withholding information and patient safety is complex, highlighting the need for differentiated conceptualizations of silence in health care. We present three Critical Challenge points to advance our understanding of silence and its roots by (1) challenging the predominance of psychological safety, (2) explaining how we operationalize sensemaking, and (3) transforming the role of clinical leaders as sensemakers who can recognize and reshape employee silence. These challenges also point to how employee silence can also result in a form of dysfunctional professionalism that supports maladaptive health care structures in practice. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Delineating the contextual factors that prompt employee silence and encourage speaking up among health care workers is crucial to addressing this issue in health care organizations. For clinical leaders, the challenge is to valorize behaviors that enhance adaptive and deep psychological safety among teams and within professions while modeling the sharing of information that leads to improvements in patient safety and quality of care.


Asunto(s)
Liderazgo , Cultura Organizacional , Humanos , Atención a la Salud , Personal de Salud/psicología , Seguridad del Paciente
3.
J Nurs Care Qual ; 38(1): 26-32, 2023.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35984709

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Literature shows that interdisciplinary huddles help promote clear communication and proactive reporting of potential errors. LOCAL PROBLEM: High reliability organization (HRO) and just culture models were implemented, yet fragmented team communication about patient safety remained. Huddles were implemented to identify and address patient safety issues. METHODS: A pre/postintervention design was used. Near-miss and actual event safety metrics, patient satisfaction, and employee satisfaction/work group perceptions were measured at 3 time points over 1 year. INTERVENTIONS: Daily interdisciplinary huddles were implemented to improve communication, reduce errors, and improve patient and employee satisfaction. RESULTS: Near-miss reporting increased across time points. Patient satisfaction with how the staff worked together to provide care significantly increased over time. Employee satisfaction and perception of work group communication, collaboration, and psychological safety scores improved, however, were not statistically significant. CONCLUSION: Implementing huddles demonstrated improved outcomes in patient safety, patient satisfaction, and employee satisfaction/work group perceptions.


Asunto(s)
Comunicación , Seguridad del Paciente , Humanos , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados , Satisfacción del Paciente , Grupo de Atención al Paciente
4.
J Nurs Care Qual ; 38(1): 61-68, 2023.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36112964

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Understanding patients' cognitive functional status is critical to prevent adverse outcomes, such as falls and injuries. However, there is variation in nurses' proficiency in assessing patients' cognitive status, and cognitive screening tools often do not provide guidance on safety interventions to keep patients safe. PROBLEM: Lack of appropriate cognitive screening and interventions may have contributed to increased fall rates on an acute care trauma unit. APPROACH: A comprehensive 6-level Cognitive Pyramid, including guidance on safety interventions for each level, was developed and used during interprofessional Rapid Safety Rounds to assess patients' cognitive status. OUTCOMES: The Cognitive Pyramid demonstrated appropriate face validity from 12 subject matter experts. After implementing the Cognitive Pyramid during interdisciplinary rounds, the fall rate decreased to 0 per 1000 admissions. CONCLUSIONS: Assessment of patients' cognition using the Cognitive Pyramid, and implementing appropriate interventions, may help improve patient safety.


Asunto(s)
Rondas de Enseñanza , Humanos , Cuidados Críticos , Seguridad del Paciente , Cognición
5.
J Nurs Care Qual ; 38(1): E1-E8, 2023.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36112966

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Patient safety culture is influenced by factors such as professional category, experience, and age. Understanding these factors can inform initiatives to improve safety. PURPOSE: To evaluate the relationship between sociodemographic and occupational characteristics on health professionals' perception of patient safety culture. METHODS: A cross-sectional study involving 514 health care professionals from Brazilian neonatal intensive care units was conducted using the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. RESULTS: Several sociodemographic and occupational characteristics were associated with higher perceptions of safety culture, including older age and having a higher level of education. CONCLUSION: Sociodemographic and occupational factors may influence the safety culture in neonatal intensive care units and should be considered when developing and implementing strategies to improve safety.


Asunto(s)
Cuidado Intensivo Neonatal , Administración de la Seguridad , Recién Nacido , Humanos , Brasil , Estudios Transversales , Seguridad del Paciente , Unidades de Cuidado Intensivo Neonatal , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
6.
J Nurs Care Qual ; 38(1): 82-88, 2023.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36112974

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Patient safety is a priority in health care systems. Nurses' safety competence along with environmental and personal factors plays a role in patient safety. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships among safety competency, structural empowerment, systems thinking, level of education, and certification. METHODS: A cross-sectional exploratory design was used to collect data from nurses (n = 163) practicing in a large Midwestern hospital system. RESULTS: There were significant positive correlations between safety competency and ( a ) structural empowerment, ( b ) systems thinking, and ( c ) certification. Systems thinking explained 12.9% of the variance in the knowledge component of safety competency and 6.8% of the variance in the skill component of safety competency. Certification explained 2.4% of the variance in the skill component of safety competency. CONCLUSIONS: Understanding factors that affect safety competency supports the development of effective interventions that may improve safety.


Asunto(s)
Certificación , Competencia Clínica , Humanos , Estudios Transversales , Seguridad del Paciente , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
8.
Res Social Adm Pharm ; 19(1): 28-56, 2023 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35989221

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Regulatory medicines risk communications aim to prevent patient harm through the dissemination of safety information to healthcare professionals (HCPs), patients, and the public. Evidence suggests that in addition to implementing the required changes, HCPs also respond to these communications through unintended and unwarranted actions and behaviours such as stopping medicine courses unnecessarily, and blanket actions spilling over to unintended patients' populations. Misunderstanding and mis-implementation of medicines risk communications could jeopardise patients' safety and clinical outcomes. Therefore, it is important to understand the determinants that affect HCPs responses to medicines risk communications. This systematic review aims to identify the factors that affect the implementation of risk communications by healthcare professionals. METHODS: Fifteen databases, including EMBASE, PubMed, Scopus, Web of science, CINAHL PLUS were searched in April-May 2018, and the search was updated again in June 2021 to identify studies reporting on factors influencing HCPs' uptake of medicine risk alerts. We used keywords such as risk communication, safety update, and safety regulation. Studies were excluded if they did not involve pharmacovigilance or patient safety alerts; or if they only focused on measuring HCPs' practice after alerts; or evaluating the effectiveness of risk minimisation measures without reporting on factors affecting HCPs' actions. Studies relating to occupational hazards, case reports, interventional studies, and studies not involving HCPs were also excluded. The Mixed Method Appraisal Tool (MMAT) was used to assess the quality of the included studies. A Narrative synthesis approach was undertaken using thematic analysis and concept mapping, followed by a critical reflection of the synthesis. RESULTS: Twenty-eight studies met our criteria and were included in the synthesis. We identified four themes summarising the factors influencing HCPs' implementation of risk communications. These include HCPs: knowledge of medicine alerts; perceptions of alerts; attitudes, and concerns regarding medicine alerts; and the self-reported impact of these alerts. Our concept mapping exercise identified key interactions between different stakeholders, and these interactions determine HCPs' implementation of medicine risk communications. These stakeholders comprise of alert developers, including the sources and senders of safety information, and the receivers of safety information including health care institutions, HCPs, patients and their carers. CONCLUSIONS: Healthcare professionals are crucial to translating risk communication messages into clinical practice. However, if they have inadequate information about the content of the alert, and have inaccurate perceptions about the alert, they may not implement the required clinical changes as intended. Communication of medicine risk alerts does not always translate into improved patient care, due to a complex interaction between stakeholders involved in the creation and implementation of these alerts. These complex interactions should be the subject of future research efforts to understand the alert-implementation trajectory and identify the mediators for change and interventions to improve implementation.


Asunto(s)
Comunicación , Personal de Salud , Humanos , Personal de Salud/educación , Cuidadores , Atención a la Salud , Seguridad del Paciente
10.
Res Social Adm Pharm ; 19(1): 144-154, 2023 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36088188

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Computerized decision support systems (CDSSs) help hospital-based clinical pharmacists to perform medication reviews and so are promising tools for improving medication safety. However, their poor usability can reduce effectiveness and acceptability. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the usability and perceived usefulness of a CDSS for medication review by hospital-based pharmacists and to draw up guidelines on improving its usability. METHODS: We performed a convergent, parallel evaluation. Firstly, three researchers conducted a heuristic evaluation of the CDSS. Secondly, clinical pharmacists who use the CDSS filled out the Usefulness, Satisfaction and Ease of Use (USE) questionnaire. Lastly, semi-structured interviews with the pharmacists enabled us to understand their opinions and experiences. The results of the heuristic evaluation were used to identify potential improvements in the CDSS. We performed a statistical analysis of the USE questionnaire data. Interviews were analyzed based on the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT), together with a task-technology fit model. The results generated by these three approaches were compared in order to determine convergences and divergences, identify challenges related to the usability and usefulness of the CDSS, and draw up guidelines for its improvement. RESULTS: Forty-seven usability problems were discovered; they variously concerned the graphical user interface, the pharmacists' needs, and the medication review model implemented in the CDSS. Only the "usefulness" dimension of the USE was not scored positively. All the UTAUT dimensions and the task-technology fit dimension emerged in the interviews. Cross-comparisons of the results from the three approaches led to the identification of four challenges and the corresponding formulation of 23 guidelines. CONCLUSIONS: The guidelines developed here should help to improve the design and acceptability of CDSSs. Hence, CDSSs will be able to assist clinical pharmacists more fully with their medication reviews and help to further improve patient safety.


Asunto(s)
Sistemas de Apoyo a Decisiones Clínicas , Farmacéuticos , Humanos , Revisión de Medicamentos , Hospitales , Seguridad del Paciente
11.
rev.cuid. (Bucaramanga.2010) ; 13(1): 1-14, 20221213.
Artículo en Español | LILACS, BDENF - Enfermería, COLNAL | ID: biblio-1369115

RESUMEN

Introducción: Las Infecciones Asociadas a la Atención en Salud (IAAS) son un grave problema de salud pública, que puede ser prevenidas al identificar los factores de riesgo con el uso de escalas. Objetivo: Adaptar transculturalmente y realizar la validación de contenido y de face de la escala Rodríguez-Almeida-Cañon (RAC) de evaluación del riesgo de infección en adultos hospitalizados. Materiales y Métodos: Estudio metodológico de adaptación transcultural. La recolección de datos se realizó de junio a noviembre de 2020. La muestra estuvo compuesta por 11 especialistas. La escala RAC se evaluó en su conjunto, determinando su alcance, los ítems fueron evaluados individualmente, verificando su claridad, relevancia y pertinencia. Para evaluar cada ítem se utilizó una escala tipo Likert de cuatro niveles. La validez de contenido fue evaluada a través del índice de validez de contenido (IVC). Resultados: Por medio de la evaluación del comité de especialistas fue posible determinar que la escala RAC es apta para uso en el contexto cultural colombiano. Se realizaron ajustes para mejorar la interpretación de algunos ítems. El IVC de los ítems estuvo entre 0.90 a 1.0 y el IVC promedio de la escala fue de 0.98. Discusión: Esta escala permite medir el riesgo de IAAS a un bajo costo, con el fin de poder planear y ejecutar intervenciones por parte del equipo multidisciplinario que tiene a cargo la salud y el cuidado del paciente. Conclusiones: La escala RAC en su versión en español es un instrumento apropiado para la evaluación del riesgo de IAAS en el adulto hospitalizado en Colombia.


Introduction: Health care­associated infections (HAI) are a serious public health problem, which can be prevented by identifying risk factors with the use of scales. Objective: To adapt cross-culturally and perform content and face validation of the Rodríguez-Almeida-Cañon (RAC) scale for assessing the risk of infection in hospitalized adults. Materials and Methods: Methodological study of cross-cultural adaptation. Data collection was carried out from June to November 2020. The sample consisted of 11 specialists. The RAC scale was evaluated as a whole, determining its scope, the items were evaluated individually, verifying their clarity, relevance and pertinence. To evaluate each item, a four-level Likert-type scale was used. The content validity was evaluated through the content validity index (CVI). Results: Through the evaluation of the committee of specialists it was possible to determine that the RAC scale is suitable for use in the Colombian cultural context. Adjustments were made to improve the interpretation of some items. The CVI of the items was between 0.90 to 1.0 and the average CVI of the scale was 0.98. Discusión: This scale makes it possible to measure the HAI risk at a low cost, in order to be able to plan and execute interventions by the multidisciplinary team in charge of the health and care of the patient. Conclusions: The RAC scale in its Spanish version is an appropriate instrument for assessing the risk of HAI in hospitalized adults in Colombia.


Introdução: As infecções associadas à assistência à saúde (IAAS) são um grave problema de saúde pública, que pode ser prevenido por meio da identificação de fatores de risco com o uso de escalas. Objetivo: Adaptar transculturalmente e realizar a validação de conteúdo e de face da escala Rodríguez-Almeida-Cañon (RAC), de avaliação do risco de infecção em adultos hospitalizados. Materiais e Métodos: Estudo metodológico de adaptação transcultural. A coleta de dados foi realizada no período de junho a novembro de 2020. A amostra foi composta por 11 especialistas. A escala RAC foi avaliada como um todo, determinando seu escopo, os itens foram avaliados individualmente, verificando sua clareza, relevância e pertinência. Para avaliar cada item, foi utilizada uma escala do tipo Likert de quatro níveis. A validade de conteúdo foi avaliada por meio do índice de validade de conteúdo (IVC). Resultados: Por meio da avaliação do comitê de especialistas, foi possível constatar que a escala RAC é adequada para uso no contexto cultural colombiano. Ajustes foram feitos para melhorar a interpretação de alguns itens. O IVC dos itens ficou entre 0,90 a 1,0 e o IVC médio da escala foi de 0,98. Discussão: Esta escala permite mensurar o risco de IAAS a baixo custo, de forma a poder planejar e executar intervenções da equipe multiprofissional responsável pela saúde e cuidado do paciente. Conclusões: A escala RAC em sua versão em espanhol é um instrumento adequado para a avaliação do risco de IAAS em adultos hospitalizados na Colômbia.


Asunto(s)
Humanos , Masculino , Femenino , Comparación Transcultural , Control de Infecciones , Medición de Riesgo , Estudio de Validación , Seguridad del Paciente
13.
PLoS One ; 17(12): e0277121, 2022.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36454806

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: French Nursing Homes (NHs) are in the early stages of implementing their Risk Management (RM) approach. A regional structure, which was mandated to provide independent support in RM, designed a training package. OBJECTIVE: To study the impact of the RM training package on safety culture (SC) in NHs and drivers for improvement in SC scores. METHOD AND ANALYSIS: This randomised controlled study targeted French NHs. Inclusion criteria were voluntary participation, no external support provided on the topic of adverse incidents upstream of the project, and the commitment of top management to its implementation. The 61 NHs were randomly allocated to one of two groups: the first benefited from a training package; support was given to the second after the impact measurement. Seven dimensions of SC were measured, at an 18-month interval, using the validated Nursing Home Survey on Patient Safety Culture questionnaire (22 items), which was administered to all of the professionals working in NHs. Eleven variables were captured, relating to the structural profile of the NH, the choices of top management in terms of healthcare safety, and the implementation of the system. Further modelling identified predictive factors for changes in SC scores. RESULTS: 95% of NHs completed both rounds of the questionnaire. The dimension Feedback and communication about incidents (SC = 85.4% before the intervention) significantly improved (+2.8%; p = 0.044). Improvement in the dimension Overall perceptions of resident safety-organizational learning was close to significant (+3.1%; p = 0.075). Drivers for improvement in scores were a pre-existing quality improvement approach, and a steering group that showed RM leadership. CONCLUSIONS: The system appears to have improved several dimensions of SC. Our findings are all the more important given the current crisis in the healthcare sector. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Retrospectively registered as NCT02908373 (September 21, 2016).


Asunto(s)
Casas de Salud , Gestión de Riesgos , Humanos , Proyectos de Investigación , Seguridad del Paciente , Administración de la Seguridad
14.
PLoS One ; 17(12): e0278615, 2022.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36455042

RESUMEN

The ability of any incident reporting system to improve patient care is dependent upon robust reporting practices. However, under-reporting is still a problem worldwide. We aimed to reveal the barriers experienced while reporting an incident through a nationwide survey in Japan. We conducted a cross-sectional survey. All first- and second-year residents who took the General Medicine In-Training Examination (GM-ITE) from February to March 2021 in Japan were selected for the study. The voluntary questionnaire asked participants regarding the number of safety incidents encountered and reported within the previous year and the barriers to reporting incidents. Demographics were obtained from the GM-ITE. The answers of respondents who indicated they had never previously reported an incident (non-reporting group) were compared to those of respondents who had reported at least one incident in the previous year (reporting group). Of 5810 respondents, the vast majority indicated they had encountered at least one safety incident in the past year (n = 4449, 76.5%). However, only 2724 (46.9%) had submitted an incident report. Under-reporting (more safety incidents compared to the number of reports) was evident in 1523 (26.2%) respondents. The most frequently mentioned barrier to reporting an incident was the time required to file the report (n = 2622, 45.1%). The barriers to incident reporting were significantly different between resident physicians who had previously reported and those who had never previously reported an incident. Our study revealed that resident physicians in Japan commonly encounter patient safety incidents but under-report them. Numerous perceived and experienced barriers to reporting remain, which should be addressed if incident reporting systems are to have an optimal impact on improving patient safety. Incident reporting is essential for improving patient safety in an institution, and this study recommends establishing appropriate interventions according to each learner's barriers for reporting.


Asunto(s)
Seguridad del Paciente , Gestión de Riesgos , Humanos , Japón , Estudios Transversales , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
15.
Hu Li Za Zhi ; 69(6): 65-74, 2022 Dec.
Artículo en Chino | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36455915

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND & PROBLEMS: Older adult patients receiving surgery experience a relatively high rate of developing acute delirium due to factors related to the environment, surgery and anesthesia, pain, and indwelling line, which puts these patients at higher risk of patient safety incidents. The incidence of delirium among older patients receiving surgery in our ward was 12.3%. Moreover, in our ward, delirium-attributed self-extraction accounted for 84.2% of the "tubing events" reported via the Taiwan Patient-safety Reporting System and delirium-attributed falls accounted for 33.3% of the "fall events". Thus, delirium in this patient population had a serious effect on patient safety and increased medical expenses. PURPOSE: Reduce the incidence of delirium in older adult patients receiving surgery from 12.3% to 6.6%. METHODS: Strategies used included providing delirium care education and training to improve the delivery of delirium preventive treatments and the care implementation rate by care teams; formulating a surgical delirium high-risk factor assessment scale for the early screening of high-risk patients; adopting the "RADAR" delirium identification method for the rapid identification of cognition changes; establishing delirium prevention and treatment care guidelines for quality-of-care improvement; introducing bedside exercise equipment to increase patient mobility; and designating a dedicated delirium ward for these patients to provide high-quality delirium care services. RESULTS: The incidence rate of delirium in older adult patients receiving surgery was reduced to 6.5%. In addition, the implementation rate of delirium prevention treatment was increased to 98% in physicians and 100% in nurses. CONCLUSIONS: This project resulted in significantly improved outcomes and was expanded to the other surgical wards. The innovative concept of incorporating a designated delirium ward for older patients receiving surgery into other wards may be referenced in future ward planning and strategies for improving the quality of medical care.


Asunto(s)
Anestesia , Delirio , Humanos , Anciano , Incidencia , Hospitales , Seguridad del Paciente , Delirio/epidemiología , Delirio/prevención & control
16.
Crit Care Nurse ; 42(6): e1-e6, 2022 Dec 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36453063

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Pulse oximetry is commonly used in critical care settings to monitor oxygenation status and assist with decision-making regarding oxygen therapy. Although it is imperative that nurses follow manufacturer guidelines, off-label use is common and could affect patient safety. OBJECTIVE: To increase staff members' knowledge and reduce the frequency of off-label pulse oximeter placement in the critical care setting. METHODS: A preintervention audit was completed to assess the frequency of off-label use, and a preintervention survey was given to staff. Health care staff in the critical care units received an educational intervention. A postintervention survey for health care staff and a postintervention audit were completed to assess outcomes. With the support of hospital management, 90 ear probes were purchased for critical care settings to address supply barriers to the use of appropriate pulse oximetry sensors. RESULTS: In the preintervention audit (508 observations), a finger probe was used off label on the ear in 77 patients (15.2%). In the postintervention audit (365 observations), a finger probe was used on the ear in only 3 patients (0.8%). CONCLUSION: Providing a brief educational session and making ear pulse oximeter probes readily available in the critical care setting increased compliance with manufacturer guidelines and helped ensure safe pulse oximetry monitoring.


Asunto(s)
Práctica Clínica Basada en la Evidencia , Seguridad del Paciente , Humanos , Cuidados Críticos , Unidades de Cuidados Intensivos , Oximetría
17.
Clin Med (Lond) ; 22(6): 518-521, 2022 Nov.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36427897

RESUMEN

The National Early Warning Score (NEWS) has been widely adopted for use in clinical practice in the UK since its introduction in 2012. It is designed to improve patient safety. The original score was adapted in 2017 to improve patient safety further by introducing a separate score for oxygen saturation to be used in selected patients with respiratory diseases. In this article, evidence for the effectiveness of the improved score is reviewed.


Asunto(s)
Seguridad del Paciente , Insuficiencia Respiratoria , Humanos , Estudios Retrospectivos , Insuficiencia Respiratoria/terapia
18.
BMC Emerg Med ; 22(1): 178, 2022 11 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36368934

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The work environment in prehospital emergency medical care setting is dynamic and complex and includes many stressors. However, little is known about the perceived human factors from the perspective of paramedics. In this study, we investigated, from the perspective of paramedics, what are the human factors, and how are they linked to prehospital emergency medical care? METHODS: Data were collected through semi-structured interviews (n = 15) with Finnish paramedics. The material was analyzed using inductive content analysis. RESULTS: Three main categories of human factors were identified. The first main category consisted of factors related to work which were divided into two generic categories: "Challenging organizational work environment" and "Changing external work environment." The second main category comprised factors related to paramedics themselves and were divided into three generic categories: "Issues linked to personality," "Personal experiences", and "Factors resulting from personal features." The third main category described that paramedics have difficulties in understanding and describing human factors. CONCLUSION: This study revealed numerous factors that can affect paramedics' work in the EMS setting. Increased knowledge about human factors in the EMS setting provides organizations with the opportunity to develop procedures that can support paramedics' cognitive and physical work. Human factors in different situations can be addressed to improve occupational and patient safety.


Asunto(s)
Servicios Médicos de Urgencia , Auxiliares de Urgencia , Humanos , Técnicos Medios en Salud/psicología , Investigación Cualitativa , Servicios Médicos de Urgencia/métodos , Seguridad del Paciente , Finlandia , Auxiliares de Urgencia/psicología
19.
Int J Pharm Compd ; 26(6): 522-526, 2022.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36445771

RESUMEN

Continuous infusions of heparin and furosemide are often required for hospitalized patients to treat cardiac-related disease states. Concomitant infusion of heparin and furosemide through the same intravenous line minimizes the need for multiple intravenous sites. For concomitant infusions to be administered, knowledge of the physical compatibility for intravenous medications is imperative for patient safety and administering medications to maximize their effectiveness. Currently, heparin and furosemide are listed as Y-site compatible, but precipitation was reported at a large academic medical center, which questions this compatibility. This study investigated the in vitro physical compatibility of heparin sodium premix 25,000 units/250 mL in dextrose 5% water from two different manufacturers with furosemide 40 mg/4 mL at concentrations of 4:1 for heparin sodium and furosemide. The admixtures were prepared in triplicate using aseptic technique, stored at 19°C to 24°C and examined for visual precipitation, turbidity, and pH change at baseline, 1, 5, 8, 24, and 48 hours. Heparin sodium, B. Braun Medical Inc. or Hospira, Inc. solutions, and furosemide admixtures revealed changes over 48 hours. Changes in visual appearance, absorbance, and pH were observed at hour 5 compared to baseline for the B. Braun Medical Inc. admixture. The Hospira, Inc. admixture revealed visual changes by hour 48, but demonstrative changes in absorbance and pH did not occur. Our observations found demonstrative changes in physical compatibility in the admixtures of heparin sodium and furosemide at a ratio of 4:1. The findings suggest that a combination of the solutions in this study be avoided until further research is completed.


Asunto(s)
Furosemida , Heparina , Humanos , Administración Intravenosa , Seguridad del Paciente
20.
Rev Gaucha Enferm ; 43(spe): e20210348, 2022.
Artículo en Inglés, Portugués | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36383826

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To verify the association between a multiprofessional round with the use of checklists and patient safety practices by health professionals in an intensive care unit. METHOD: Mixed-method study, delineated by the sequential explanatory approach, conducted in a hospital in southern Brazil. Quantitative data were analyzed using Poisson regression, and qualitative data, using content analysis. The integrated analysis was performed through the explained/connected combination. RESULTS: In the post-implementation period of the rounds with systematic use of the checklist, there was a significant improvement in the prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism, light sedation, reduction in the days of use of mechanical ventilation, central venous catheter and indwelling urinary catheter. CONCLUSION: The multiprofessional round with the systematic use of checklist, associated with the improvement in patient safety practices, was considered as a strategy that ensures better care in intensive care and favors job satisfaction.


Asunto(s)
Lista de Verificación , Rondas de Enseñanza , Humanos , Seguridad del Paciente , Cuidados Críticos/métodos , Unidades de Cuidados Intensivos
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