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1.
J Med Libr Assoc ; 106(4): 483-489, 2018 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30271290

RESUMEN

Background: Hospital libraries must often demonstrate value to users who are not aware of their services. Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital (ZSFG) Library aimed to increase patient and staff awareness using innovative outreach methods through our involvement in a Summerfest health fair and a National Medical Librarians Month event. Case Presentation: At 2 hospital events, ZSFG Library staff and volunteers used a game show-style approach involving active learning to teach attendees about library resources and services. Across events, there were 300 attendees and 167 in-depth discussions of library resources with the librarian, including 54 demonstrations. After implementing these new outreach efforts, the number of attendees increased by over 240% and meaningful interactions increased by 1,300% from the previous year's event. Our value analysis indicates an overall positive effect with 14 minutes of total library staff time spent per meaningful interaction. Conclusions: The use of a spinnable wheel for asking participants library-related questions and a television monitor to demonstrate library resources greatly increased the number of attendees and fostered new staff connections, resulting in several in-service trainings and search requests. Future recommendations for outreach events include enlisting the help of volunteers to record attendance data, creating materials in multiple languages, and integrating library involvement into existing hospital events. These recommendations may decrease the amount of library staff time spent in return for each meaningful interaction, creating increased value for less time.


Asunto(s)
Servicios de Información/provisión & distribución , Bibliotecas de Hospitales/organización & administración , Materiales Bibliográficos/estadística & datos numéricos , Servicios de Biblioteca/provisión & distribución , Educación del Paciente como Asunto/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Bibliotecas Médicas/organización & administración , Estudios de Casos Organizacionales , San Francisco
2.
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak ; 13: 76, 2013 Jul 25.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23883430

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Following the completion of treatment and as they enter the follow-up phase, breast cancer patients (BCPs) often recount feeling 'lost in transition', and are left with many questions concerning how their ongoing care and monitoring for recurrence will be managed. Family physicians (FPs) also frequently report feeling ill-equipped to provide follow-up care to BCPs. In this three-phase qualitative pilot study we designed, implemented and evaluated a multi-faceted survivorship care plan (SCP) to address the information needs of BCPs at our facility and of their FPs. METHODS: In Phase 1 focus groups and individual interviews were conducted with 35 participants from three stakeholder groups (BCPs, FPs and oncology specialist health care providers (OHCPs)), to identify specific information needs. An SCP was then designed based on these findings, consisting of both web-based and paper-based tools (Phase 2). For Phase 3, both sets of tools were subsequently evaluated via focus groups and interviews with 26 participants. Interviews and focus groups were audio taped, transcribed and content analysed for emergent themes and patterns. RESULTS: In Phase 1 patients commented that web-based, paper-based and human resources components were desirable in any SCP. Patients did not focus exclusively on the post-treatment period, but instead spoke of evolving needs throughout their cancer journey. FPs indicated that any tools to support them must distill important information in a user-friendly format. In Phase 2, a pilot SCP was subsequently designed, consisting of both web-based and paper-based materials tailored specifically to the needs of BCPs as well as FPs. During Phase 3 (evaluation) BCPs indicated that the SCP was effective at addressing many of their needs, and offered suggestions for future improvements. Both patients and FPs found the pilot SCP to be an improvement from the previous standard of care. Patients perceived the quality of the BCP-FP relationship as integral to their comfort with FPs assuming follow-up responsibilities. CONCLUSIONS: This pilot multi-component SCP shows promise in addressing the information needs of BCPs and the FPs who care for them. Next steps include refinement of the different SCP components, further evaluation (including usability testing), and planning for more extensive implementation.


Asunto(s)
Neoplasias de la Mama/psicología , Continuidad de la Atención al Paciente , Servicios de Información/provisión & distribución , Evaluación de Necesidades , Médicos de Familia/psicología , Sobrevivientes/psicología , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Neoplasias de la Mama/prevención & control , Canadá , Comunicación , Femenino , Grupos Focales , Humanos , Persona de Mediana Edad , Planificación de Atención al Paciente/organización & administración , Proyectos Piloto , Investigación Cualitativa
4.
J Child Adolesc Psychiatr Nurs ; 26(1): 3-15, 2013 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23351103

RESUMEN

PROBLEM: About 10-15% of women experience postpartum depression (PPD). Doulas provide support and education about PPD. METHODS: This qualitative study used focus groups with mothers, doulas, and doula trainers to develop educational materials for doulas to help mothers identify symptoms of depression and seek treatment. FINDINGS: All participants preferred materials that use simple language and avoid psychiatric jargon. Three themes emerged: someone to talk to, flexibility, and interactivity. Materials developed include tri-fold brochure and content for an application for smartphones and digital tablets. CONCLUSIONS: Doulas can use these interactive materials to provide supportive, relationship-based care that complements nursing care.


Asunto(s)
Depresión Posparto/terapia , Doulas/educación , Doulas/psicología , Modelos Educacionales , Madres/educación , Madres/psicología , Adulto , Computadores de Bolsillo/estadística & datos numéricos , Femenino , Grupos Focales , Humanos , Servicios de Información/provisión & distribución , Folletos , Aceptación de la Atención de Salud/psicología , Guías de Práctica Clínica como Asunto , Investigación Cualitativa , Teléfono
5.
J Women Aging ; 24(4): 280-91, 2012.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23098043

RESUMEN

More women are frequently referring to the Internet for health information, yet the readability of information about menopause on the Internet has not been widely studied. To address this gap, this study examined the readability of information about menopause on 25 Internet Web sites. Findings included that information on the Web sites had a reading level higher than the recommended sixth-grade level, and culturally appropriate health information was lacking. Health educators and practitioners are in a pivotal role to help women understand information useful for healthcare decisions. Several criteria are discussed to help practitioners evaluate Web sites.


Asunto(s)
Alfabetización Digital , Servicios de Información , Internet/normas , Menopausia , Educación del Paciente como Asunto , Mujeres/psicología , Actitud Frente a la Salud , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Educadores en Salud/organización & administración , Personal de Salud/organización & administración , Humanos , Difusión de la Información/métodos , Alfabetización Informacional , Conducta en la Búsqueda de Información , Servicios de Información/normas , Servicios de Información/provisión & distribución , Educación del Paciente como Asunto/métodos , Educación del Paciente como Asunto/normas , Evaluación de la Tecnología Biomédica/métodos , Evaluación de la Tecnología Biomédica/estadística & datos numéricos
6.
J Cancer Educ ; 27(4): 606-11, 2012 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22941763

RESUMEN

Deaf community members face many barriers to accessing health information. This paper discusses the feasibility of creating a nationwide network of Deaf-friendly ministries to help disseminate cancer information in American Sign Language (ASL) to the Deaf community. Deaf-friendly ministries (N = 403), identified through Internet searches and one-on-one referrals, were sent up to three mailed invitations to join the network. Over half of the ministries responded, with 191 (47.4 %) of the ministries joining the network, completing a baseline survey and receiving ASL cancer education videos to share with members of their congregation and community. Fifteen (3.7 %) responded that they were not interested or no longer had a Deaf-friendly ministry; the rest did not respond or their invitations were returned as undeliverable. As the program progressed, an additional 238 Deaf-friendly ministries were identified. To date, 61 (25.6 %) agreed to participate after the single invitation that was mailed. This network of Deaf-friendly ministries offers a promising dissemination partner.


Asunto(s)
Educación de Personas con Discapacidad Auditiva , Agencias Gubernamentales/organización & administración , Promoción de la Salud , Servicios de Información/provisión & distribución , Neoplasias/prevención & control , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Accesibilidad a los Servicios de Salud , Humanos , Lengua de Signos , Grabación de Cinta de Video
7.
Rural Remote Health ; 12: 2018, 2012.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22866914

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: In Queensland, Australia, the incidence of cancer (all cancers combined) is 21% lower for Indigenous people compared with non-Indigenous people but mortality is 36% higher. Support services play an important role in helping cancer patients through their cancer journey. Indigenous cancer patients are likely to face greater unmet supportive care needs and more barriers to accessing cancer care and support. Other barriers include the higher proportion of Indigenous people who live remotely and in regional areas, a known difficulty for access to health services. This study describes the availability of cancer support services in Queensland for Indigenous patients and relevant location. METHODS: Using a set criteria 121 services were selected from a pre-existing database (n = 344) of cancer services. These services were invited to complete an online questionnaire. ArcGIS (http://www.esri.com/software/arcgis/index.html) was used to map the services' location (using postcode) against Indigenous population by local government area. Services were classified as an 'Indigenous' or 'Indigenous friendly' service using set criteria. RESULTS: Eighty-three services (73.6%) completed the questionnaire. Mapping revealed services are located where there are relatively low percentages of Indigenous people compared with the whole population. No 'Indigenous-specific' services were identified; however, 11 services (13%) were classed 'Indigenous-friendly'. The primary support offered by these services was 'information'. Fewer referrals were received from Indigenous liaison officers compared with other health professionals. Only 8.6% of services reported frequently having contact with an Indigenous organisation; however, 44.6% of services reported that their staff participated in cultural training. Services also identified barriers to access which may exist for Indigenous clientele, including no Indigenous staff and the costs involved in accessing the service, but were unable to address these issues due to restricted staff and funding capacity. CONCLUSION: Further research into the best models for providing culturally appropriate cancer support services to Indigenous people is essential to ensure Indigenous patients are well supported throughout their cancer journey. Emphasis should be placed on providing support services where a high Indigenous population percentage resides to ensure support is maintained in rural and remote settings. Further efforts should be placed on relationships with Indigenous organisations and mainstream support services and encouraging referral from Indigenous liaison officers.


Asunto(s)
Instituciones Oncológicas/estadística & datos numéricos , Accesibilidad a los Servicios de Salud/normas , Servicios de Salud del Indígena/provisión & distribución , Neoplasias/terapia , Grupos de Población/estadística & datos numéricos , Apoyo Social , Personal Administrativo/psicología , Personal Administrativo/estadística & datos numéricos , Instituciones Oncológicas/economía , Estudios Transversales , Prestación de Atención de Salud/métodos , Financiación Gubernamental/estadística & datos numéricos , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Accesibilidad a los Servicios de Salud/economía , Humanos , Servicios de Información/provisión & distribución , Sistemas en Línea , Aceptación de la Atención de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Queensland , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Recursos Humanos
9.
Eur J Contracept Reprod Health Care ; 17(4): 260-9, 2012 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22758772

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: To investigate satisfaction with abortion care among women and their male partners, and to identify factors associated with high overall contentment with the care received. METHODS: A multi-centre cross-sectional questionnaire survey conducted in 2009 among 798 Swedish abortion-seeking women and 590 male partners was analysed with logistic regression. RESULTS: Overall care satisfaction was rated high by two-thirds (74%) of the women and half (52%) of the men. For women, factors associated with high overall satisfaction with care were: to be well treated by the health care staff (Odds Ratio [OR] = 11.78), sufficient pain relief (OR = 3.87), adequate information about the gynaecological examination (OR = 2.25), suitable contraceptive counselling (OR = 2.23), and ease of access to the clinic by phone (OR = 1.91). For men, the factors were to be well treated by the health care staff (OR = 5.32), and adequate information about the abortion procedure (OR = 2.64). CONCLUSION: Most women and half of the men were pleased with the attention they had received, but one in four women and half the men were not, or not completely, suggesting improvement is needed, especially with regard to men. For both women and men the human aspect of the care, namely, the consideration showed by the attending staff, appears to be the most important factor associated with satisfaction regarding abortion care.


Asunto(s)
Aborto Inducido/psicología , Consejo , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Satisfacción Personal , Relaciones Profesional-Paciente , Parejas Sexuales/psicología , Aborto Inducido/estadística & datos numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , Estudios Transversales , Toma de Decisiones , Composición Familiar , Femenino , Examen Ginecologíco/psicología , Humanos , Servicios de Información/normas , Servicios de Información/provisión & distribución , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Estado Civil , Persona de Mediana Edad , Embarazo , Psicometría , Garantía de la Calidad de Atención de Salud , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Suecia
10.
Can J Psychiatry ; 57(4): 210-5, 2012 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22480585

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To introduce stepped care as a method of organizing the delivery of treatments, and to consider the factors necessary for implementation. METHOD: Stepped care is described within the context of strategies such as collaborative care that aim to increase access to mental health care through the improved coordination of care between primary and specialist mental health services. Results from the implementation of stepped care in the United Kingdom and elsewhere are used to highlight the factors required for introducing stepped care into routine services. Issues to address when implementing high-volume services for common mental health problems are derived from this experience. RESULTS: Stepped care sits within the continuum of organizational systems, from situations where responsibility rests almost entirely with primary care clinicians to systems where all patients are managed by specialists for the entire duration of their treatment. Its core principles of delivering low-burden treatments first, followed by careful patient progress monitoring to step patients up to more intensive treatment, are easy to articulate but lead to considerable implementation diversity when services attempt to work in this manner. Services need to ensure they have specific staff competency training, including skills in delivering evidence-based treatments, access to telephony, and smart patient management informatics systems. CONCLUSIONS: Stepped care can provide the delivery system for supported self-management. To be successful, health systems need high levels of clinical outcome data and appropriately trained workers. Further attention is required to ensure equity of access and to reduce patient attrition in these systems.


Asunto(s)
Prestación Integrada de Atención de Salud , Accesibilidad a los Servicios de Salud/organización & administración , Trastornos Mentales/terapia , Servicios de Salud Mental/organización & administración , Atención Primaria de Salud/organización & administración , Psicoterapia , Competencia Clínica/normas , Conducta Cooperativa , Prestación Integrada de Atención de Salud/métodos , Prestación Integrada de Atención de Salud/organización & administración , Necesidades y Demandas de Servicios de Salud , Humanos , Servicios de Información/provisión & distribución , Mejoramiento de la Calidad , Desarrollo de Personal , Reino Unido
11.
J Cancer Educ ; 27(2): 327-37, 2012 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22528628

RESUMEN

Deaf persons have a poorer understanding of cancer prevention, which is felt to be partly due to communication barriers. One hundred ninety-seven d/Deaf persons completed a survey and video on cancer prevention. Half viewed a spoken English program designed for hearing persons (control group); the other half viewed an amended program that had American Sign Language, captions, and printed English options added (experimental group). Knowledge was measured before and after the video, including 1 and 6 months later. Respondents were primarily Caucasian, had low incomes, lost hearing at young ages, and had d/Deaf spouses. Although overall knowledge improved after viewing the video, the presence of culture-specific communications (American Sign Language, captions) did not improve scores compared to the control group, either immediately after the intervention or over time. Moreover, percentage correct on all pretest, and almost all post-test, questions was <50% for both experimental and control groups. For all subjects, regardless of which group they were in, a hearing spouse (p < 0.001) and more healthcare information sources (p = 0.001) improved knowledge, while African-Americans showed a trend to lesser improvement (p = 0.06). Using culture-specific language did not improve cancer prevention knowledge in this d/Deaf population, and overall knowledge remained low. More study is needed to determine the best way to increase cancer prevention knowledge in this population.


Asunto(s)
Detección Precóz del Cáncer/estadística & datos numéricos , Educación de Personas con Discapacidad Auditiva , Promoción de la Salud , Servicios de Información/normas , Neoplasias/prevención & control , Grabación de Cinta de Video , Adolescente , Adulto , Barreras de Comunicación , Detección Precóz del Cáncer/psicología , Femenino , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Humanos , Servicios de Información/provisión & distribución , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Neoplasias/diagnóstico , Neoplasias/psicología , Selección de Paciente , Adulto Joven
12.
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak ; 12: 25, 2012 Mar 29.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22458706

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Better use of e-health services by patients could improve outcomes and reduce costs but there are concerns about inequalities of access. Previous research in outpatients suggested that anonymous personal email support may help patients with long term conditions to use e-health, but recruiting earlier in their 'journey' may benefit patients more. This pilot study explored the feasibility and cost of recruiting patients for an e-health intervention in one primary care trust. METHODS: The sample comprised 46 practices with total patient population of 250,000. We approached all practices using various methods, seeking collaboration to recruit patients via methods agreed with each practice. A detailed research diary was kept of time spent recruiting practices and patients. Researcher time was used to estimate costs. Patients who consented to participate were offered email support for their use of the Internet for health. RESULTS: Eighteen practices agreed to take part; we recruited 27 patients, most (23/27) from five practices. Practices agreed to recruit patients for an e-health intervention via waiting room leaflets (16), posters (16), practice nurses (15), doctors giving patients leaflets (5), a study website link (7), inclusion in planned mailshots (2), and a special mailshot to patients selected from practice computers (1). After low recruitment response we also recruited directly in five practices through research assistants giving leaflets to patients in waiting rooms. Ten practices recruited no patients. Those practices that were more difficult to recruit were less likely to recruit patients. Leaving leaflets for practice staff to distribute and placing posters in the practice were not effective in recruiting patients. Leaflets handed out by practice nurses and website links were more successful. The practice with lowest costs per patient recruited (£70) used a special mailshot to selected patients. CONCLUSION: Recruitment via general practice was not successful and was therefore expensive. Direct to consumer methods and recruitment of patients in outpatients to offer email support may be more cost effective. If recruitment in general practice is required, contacting practices by letter and email, not following up non-responding practices, and recruiting patients with selected conditions by special mailshot may be the most cost-effective approach.


Asunto(s)
/economía , Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria/economía , Participación del Paciente/economía , Selección de Paciente , Telemedicina/economía , /métodos , Enfermedad Crónica/epidemiología , Costos y Análisis de Costo , Correo Electrónico/estadística & datos numéricos , Inglaterra , Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria/estadística & datos numéricos , Estudios de Factibilidad , Humanos , Servicios de Información/provisión & distribución , Internet/estadística & datos numéricos , Persona de Mediana Edad , Folletos , Participación del Paciente/métodos , Participación del Paciente/estadística & datos numéricos , Proyectos Piloto , Carteles como Asunto , Investigadores , Red Social , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Telemedicina/métodos , Factores de Tiempo
13.
BMC Public Health ; 11: 67, 2011 Jan 31.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-21281478

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: This paper reports on a qualitative study of lay knowledge about health inequalities and solutions to address them. Social determinants of health are responsible for a large proportion of health inequalities (unequal levels of health status) and inequities (unfair access to health services and resources) within and between countries. Despite an expanding evidence base supporting action on social determinants, understanding of the impact of these determinants is not widespread and political will appears to be lacking. A small but growing body of research has explored how ordinary people theorise health inequalities and the implications for taking action. The findings are variable, however, in terms of an emphasis on structure versus individual agency and the relationship between being 'at risk' and acceptance of social/structural explanations. METHODS: This paper draws on findings from a qualitative study conducted in Adelaide, South Australia, to examine these questions. The study was an integral part of mixed-methods research on the links between urban location, social capital and health. It comprised 80 in-depth interviews with residents in four locations with contrasting socio-economic status. The respondents were asked about the cause of inequalities and actions that could be taken by governments to address them. RESULTS: Although generally willing to discuss health inequalities, many study participants tended to explain the latter in terms of individual behaviours and attitudes rather than social/structural conditions. Moreover, those who identified social/structural causes tended to emphasise individualized factors when describing typical pathways to health outcomes. This pattern appeared largely independent of participants' own experience of advantage or disadvantage, and was reinforced in discussion of strategies to address health inequalities. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the explicit emphasis on social/structural issues expressed in the study focus and framing of the research questions, participants did not display a high level of knowledge about the nature and causes of place-based health inequalities. By extending the scope of lay theorizing to include a focus on solutions, this study offers additional insights for public health. Specifically it suggests that a popular constituency for action on the social determinants of health is unlikely to eventuate from the current popular understandings of possible policy levers.


Asunto(s)
Participación de la Comunidad/psicología , Conductas Relacionadas con la Salud , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Disparidades en Atención de Salud , Áreas de Pobreza , Adulto , Australia , Participación de la Comunidad/estadística & datos numéricos , Femenino , Accesibilidad a los Servicios de Salud , Investigación sobre Servicios de Salud , Estado de Salud , Humanos , Servicios de Información/provisión & distribución , Relaciones Interpersonales , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Salud Pública , Características de la Residencia , Factores Sexuales , Clase Social , Medio Social
14.
Salud Publica Mex ; 53 Suppl 3: S368-74, 2011.
Artículo en Español | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22344381

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate and analyze health information systems (his) in the Mesoamerican Region. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The conceptual framework and tools of the Health Metrics Network (nhm) was used. It measures six components of the his assessment: resources, indicators, data sources, information management, products and use. RESULTS: In this study we found that the average score of the HIS in the Mesoamerican region was 57%, being the maximum value for Mexico (75%) and the minimum for El Salvador (41%). The item that had lowest scores was that referring to the Management and Administration, where the average assessment was 37%, placing it as present but not adequate. The component with the highest score was Information Products with more than 69%, adequate. In any case, no items were very adequate. CONCLUSION: The performance of his is heterogeneous between countries. It is necessary to strengthen and standardize the criteria of the his in the region, so that these are integrated and used in the decision making process based on real information.


Asunto(s)
Servicios de Información/organización & administración , Sistemas de Información/organización & administración , América Central , Difusión de la Información , Gestión de la Información , Servicios de Información/economía , Servicios de Información/provisión & distribución , Sistemas de Información/economía , Informática Médica , México , Modelos Teóricos , Indicadores de Calidad de la Atención de Salud , Proyectos de Investigación
15.
Salud pública Méx ; 53(supl.3): s368-s374, 2011. graf, tab
Artículo en Español | LILACS | ID: lil-625716

RESUMEN

OBJETIVO: Evaluar y analizar los sistemas de información en salud (sis) en la región mesoamericana. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se utilizó el marco conceptual y las herramientas de la Red de la Métrica en Salud (RMS) que evalúa seis componentes de los SIS: recursos, indicadores, fuentes de datos, administración de la información, productos y uso. RESULTADOS: La percepción sobre el desarrollo de los sis de la región mesoamericana se considera presente pero no adecuada (57%), con la mejor percepción para México (75%) y la menor para El Salvador (41%). El componente del SIS menos desarrollado, es decir, el no adecuado, fue el de administración de la información (37%). Por el contrario, el componente con mejor calificación fue el de indicadores (poco más de 69%, adecuado). En ninguno de los casos los componentes lograron ser muy adecuados. CONCLUSIÓN: El nivel de desarrollo de los sis es heterogéneo entre los países. Es necesario generar mecanismos de cooperación para el intercambio de experiencias exitosas que fomenten una colaboración horizontal y permitan mejorar los sis actuales para dar sustento a la toma de decisiones y a la evaluación de intervenciones en salud, como los de la iniciativa mesoamericana de la salud.


OBJECTIVE: To evaluate and analyze health information systems (his) in the Mesoamerican Region. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The conceptual framework and tools of the Health Metrics Network (nhm) was used. It measures six components of the his assessment: resources, indicators, data sources, information management, products and use. RESULTS: In this study we found that the average score of the HIS in the Mesoamerican region was 57%, being the maximum value for Mexico (75%) and the minimum for El Salvador (41%). The item that had lowest scores was that referring to the Management and Administration, where the average assessment was 37%, placing it as present but not adequate. The component with the highest score was Information Products with more than 69%, adequate. In any case, no items were very adequate. CONCLUSION: The performance of his is heterogeneous between countries. It is necessary to strengthen and standardize the criteria of the his in the region, so that these are integrated and used in the decision making process based on real information.


Asunto(s)
Servicios de Información/organización & administración , Sistemas de Información/organización & administración , América Central , Difusión de la Información , Gestión de la Información , Servicios de Información/economía , Servicios de Información/provisión & distribución , Sistemas de Información/economía , Informática Médica , México , Modelos Teóricos , Indicadores de Calidad de la Atención de Salud , Proyectos de Investigación
16.
J Womens Health (Larchmt) ; 19(12): 2219-25, 2010 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-20964492

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: We sought to determine the availability of e-information for women's health services and discuss the implications for access to essential preventive health services for college-age women. METHODS: California State University (CSU) Campus Student Health Center (SHC) websites are evaluated against a set of criteria developed from national directives for women's health issues. An analysis of these websites was conducted in January-July 2009. A review of related literature was also conducted. RESULTS: Inclusion of essential women's health services (EWHS) on SHC websites varies significantly across services and campuses, and no guidance exists for material to include despite well-documented concern about quality of web information and the importance of this information for college-age women. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings point to the need to more broadly assess campus health center use of the Internet to provide health service information to students and establish guidelines for SHCs to communicate EWHS to the female student population.


Asunto(s)
Servicios de Información/provisión & distribución , Internet/provisión & distribución , Informática Médica/estadística & datos numéricos , Servicios de Salud para Estudiantes/provisión & distribución , Servicios de Salud para Mujeres/provisión & distribución , Adulto , California , Femenino , Guías como Asunto , Humanos , Universidades , Adulto Joven
17.
Rev. AMRIGS ; 54(2): 133-140, abr.-jun. 2010. tab
Artículo en Portugués | LILACS | ID: lil-685598

RESUMEN

Introdução: Em 2005, no Estado do Rio Grande do Sul, foi criado o Centro de Referência para Assessoria em Fórmulas Nutricionais Especiais (CR), com a finalidade de avaliar tecnicamente as solicitações de fórmulas nutricionais especiais (FNE), pelos usuários do SUS, à Secretaria Estadual de Saúde. O objetivo deste estudo é comparar características de solicitações e usuários e estimar custos em dois períodos pós-implantação do CR no Estado do RS. Métodos: A unidade de pesquisa foi cada solicitação de FNE. Os grupos de comparação foram constituídos por todas as solicitações avaliadas no primeiro (período 1 / n = 1077) e terceiro (período 2 / n = 944) anos de funcionamento do CR. Resultados: Houve aumento da proporção de solicitações judiciais (p<0,001), melhora do preenchimento das requisições (p<0,001) e do percentual de aprovações aos pedidos de FNE (p<0,001), para mais usuários (p=0,004). Aumentaram as solicitações para desnutridos (p=0,002) e idosos (p<0,001) e reduziram as duplicidades de solicitações no período (p<0,001). O custo estimado por usuário diminuiu de US$ 8,742 para US$ 6,297. Conclusões: A implantação do CR contribuiu para aprimorar o processo de solicitação e análise de pedidos de FNE, repercutindo em mais avaliações favoráveis ao fornecimento de fórmulas, para mais usuários, a menores custos


Introduction: In 2005, the Center of Reference (CR) for Consultancy in Nutritional Special Formulas was created in the State of Rio Grande do Sul in order to technically evaluate the requests for special nutritional formulas (SNF) made by SUS users to the State Department of Health. The aim of this study is to compare the characteristics of applications and users and to estimate costs in both periods after implementation of the CR in the state of RS. Methods: The research unit was each requested SNF. The comparison groups were composed of all requests evaluated in the first (period 1 / n = 1077) and third (period 2 / n = 944) years of the CR. Results: Increased proportion of court orders (p<0.001), improvement of the fulfillment of orders (p<0.001) and of the percentage of approvals of applications for SNF (p<0.001) for more users (p=0.004). There were increased requests for malnourished (p = 0.002) and elderly (p<0.001) and decreased duplications of requests in the period (p<0.001). The estimated cost per user declined from US$ 8,742 to US$ 6,297. Conclusions: The implementation of this CR has helped to improve the process to request and review applications for SNF, reflecting more favorable ratings in the supply of formulas, to more users and at lower costs


Asunto(s)
Costos y Análisis de Costo/economía , Fórmulas Infantiles , Nutrición Enteral/economía , Servicios de Información/economía , Servicios de Información/provisión & distribución , Fenómenos Fisiológicos Nutricionales del Lactante/economía , Fenómenos Fisiológicos Nutricionales del Lactante/provisión & distribución , Programas y Políticas de Nutrición y Alimentación , Nutrición en Salud Pública , Política de Salud/economía
19.
J Pediatr Surg ; 45(2): 303-9, 2010 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-20152341

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Pediatric general surgeons volunteering internationally often work independently, some without prior assessment of the needs of those they wish to assist. Consequently, care may be inefficient, duplicated, or misdirected. A study was performed to assess whether a network for pediatric surgery volunteer work exists. METHODS: A search of the Internet was performed to determine whether a pediatric surgery network exists. Worldwide pediatric surgery societies were identified and grouped by country according to income. Web sites for medical volunteer organizations were examined for links to a network of pediatric surgery volunteer work. RESULTS: A search of the Internet revealed no pediatric surgery volunteer network. Ninety-seven pediatric surgery societies were identified. Fifty-one of the organizations were identified as residing in low- and middle-income countries. Searching 50 Web sites for these societies revealed no existing pediatric surgery network. Of 45 Web sites for volunteer medical work, 1 surgery networking Web site was identified. Only 4 pediatric general surgery international volunteer opportunities were cited on that Web site. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that no pediatric surgery volunteer network exists. By identifying pediatric surgery organizations in low- and middle-income countries, it is speculated that one might link the surgeons in these regions with those wishing to volunteer their services.


Asunto(s)
Cirugía General/estadística & datos numéricos , Servicios de Información/estadística & datos numéricos , Internet/estadística & datos numéricos , Misiones Médicas/organización & administración , Pediatría/estadística & datos numéricos , Voluntarios/estadística & datos numéricos , Niño , Cirugía General/organización & administración , Salud Global , Humanos , Renta/estadística & datos numéricos , Servicios de Información/provisión & distribución , Misiones Médicas/estadística & datos numéricos , Misiones Médicas/provisión & distribución , Área sin Atención Médica , Pediatría/organización & administración , Sociedades Médicas/organización & administración
20.
Rev. esp. geriatr. gerontol. (Ed. impr.) ; 44(6): 342-348, nov.-dic. 2009. tab
Artículo en Español | IBECS | ID: ibc-75556

RESUMEN

IntroducciónEl desarrollo y difusión de Internet ofrece nuevas posibilidades para atender las necesidades de las personas mayores. Para desarrollar este potencial debe garantizarse la accesibilidad a los recursos disponibles.En este trabajo nos proponemos1) Identificar sitios web en castellano con información sobre salud para personas mayores, y 2) evaluar la accesibilidad de los sitios web seleccionados.Material y métodosEstudio descriptivo del cumplimiento de los criterios de accesibilidad de sitios web sobre salud para mayores. Para seleccionar los sitios web con información sobre salud dirigida a personas mayores se adoptó una metodología de búsquedas con palabras clave en dos de los principales buscadores de Internet. Se realizó un estudio descriptivo a partir de un cuestionario diseñado para tal fin. Los sitios fueron evaluados independientemente por 3 evaluadores. Las dimensiones estudiadas fueron aspectos visuales, motrices, cognitivos, auditivos, otros aspectos y total general. Se calculó la accesibilidad A, AA y AAA mediante el test de accesibilidad a la web (TAW). Se realizó un análisis descriptivo del cumplimiento y se estimó el coeficiente kappa para valorar la concordancia entre evaluadores (criterios de Fleiss) y se calculó el número de errores según los criterios del TAW.ResultadosSe elaboró una lista de 35 sitios web. La mayoría de los sitios web tenía un proveedor español (74,3%), 2 sitios web provenían de Estados Unidos (5,7%) y el resto de Latinoamérica (1 de Cuba, 2 de Argentina, 2 de México y 1 de Uruguay)...(AU)


BackgroundThe development and dissemination of the Internet offers new opportunities to meet the needs of older people. To develop this potential, access to the available resources must be guaranteed.Our aims are(1) To identify web sites in Spanish with information on healthcare for older adults and (2) to assess the accessibility of the web sites selected.Instruments and methodsWe performed a descriptive study of compliance with accessibility criteria among web sites on healthcare for the elderly. To select the sites with health information aimed at older people, a search method with keywords was used in two of the major Internet search engines. The descriptive study was carried out by using a specially-designed questionnaire. The web sites were independently evaluated by three evaluators. The dimensions studied were visual, motor, cognitive, auditory and global factors. Accessibility A, AA and AAA was evaluated with the TAW test. A descriptive analysis of compliance was carried out and the kappa coefficient was estimated to evaluate the concordance between evaluators (Fleiss’ criteria), while the number of errors was calculated according to the TAW criteria.ResultsA list of 35 web sites was created. Most of the web sites had a Spanish web hosting provider (74.3%), two sites were from United States (5.7%) and the remainder were from Latin America (Cuba 1, Argentina 2, Mexico 2 and Uruguay 1)...(AU)


Asunto(s)
Humanos , Masculino , Femenino , Anciano , Internet , Acceso a la Información , Salud del Anciano , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Servicios de Información/provisión & distribución
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