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1.
J Hosp Palliat Nurs ; 22(3): 220-228, 2020 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32282557

RESUMEN

This study explored the experience of pharmacists, social workers, and nurses who participated in Medical Assistance in Dying (MAiD) in a tertiary care Canadian hospital. Consenting staff participated in qualitative semistructured interviews, which were then analyzed for thematic content. This article reports on the broad theme of "support" from the perspective of the 3 professions, focusing on the diversity in perceptions of support, how MAiD was discussed within health care teams, feelings of gratuitous or excessive gestures of support, ambivalence over debriefs, and the importance of informal support. While pharmacists and social workers generally felt part of a community that supported MAiD, nurses more often expressed opinions as highly divergent. The key finding across all themes was the central importance of the culture on any unit with respect to MAiD and specifically the role of the unit manager in creating either a positive open space for communication or a more silent or closed space. Nursing noted that in the latter setting many gestures of support were experienced as insincere and counterproductive, as were debriefs. We outline several recommendations for managers based on the study results with the intent of tailoring support for all professionals involved in MAiD.


Asunto(s)
Técnicos Medios en Salud/tendencias , Percepción , Suicidio Asistido/psicología , Adulto , Técnicos Medios en Salud/psicología , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Canadá , Femenino , Humanos , Entrevistas como Asunto/métodos , Masculino , Investigación Cualitativa , Suicidio Asistido/tendencias
2.
Nurs Forum ; 55(1): 37-44, 2020 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31432541

RESUMEN

The best policies are evidence-based, providing feasible solutions to healthcare issues to prevent unintended consequences. Nurse researchers need to generate evidence with which to create policy. The obligation to monitor the impact of policies and standards rests on nurse leaders who have the duty to advocate when policies fail. Nurses providing direct care are beholden to report failed policies. Advocacy in the situation of a failed policy often requires moral courage to prevent moral distress amongst the ranks of nurses who enact policies at the intersect of care. In this article, the impact of three healthcare policy issues on nursing end-users will be evaluated: aid in dying, titration of vasoactive medications, and the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services 30-minute rule.


Asunto(s)
Práctica Clínica Basada en la Evidencia/normas , Política de Salud , Control de Medicamentos y Narcóticos/legislación & jurisprudencia , Control de Medicamentos y Narcóticos/tendencias , Práctica Clínica Basada en la Evidencia/legislación & jurisprudencia , Humanos , Jurisprudencia , Suicidio Asistido/legislación & jurisprudencia , Suicidio Asistido/tendencias , Estados Unidos
3.
Rev. esp. sanid. penit ; 22(3): 119-123, 2020. tab, graf
Artículo en Español | IBECS | ID: ibc-201163

RESUMEN

OBJETIVO: Conocer la evolución de la opinión pública y de los médicos sobre la eutanasia entre 1995 y 2019 y su influencia en el momento actual. MATERIAL Y MÉTODO: Análisis bibliográfico de publicaciones de mayor relevancia y calidad en plataformas de acceso abierto y de acceso académico. Revisión de los principales sondeos de instituciones públicas y privadas. Revisión de los diarios de sesiones del Congreso y el Senado. RESULTADOS: Encuestas recientes muestran al colectivo médico favorable a la regulación de la eutanasia, una posición que concuerda con lo que opina la población en general y que, de manera sostenida, ha ido creciendo su respaldo en las últimas décadas. DISCUSIÓN: El apoyo social y clínico a la regulación han sido elementos importantes. Una lectura que también ha sido realizada por los partidos políticos, que en las últimas dos décadas han ido virando sus posiciones, generando una ventana de oportunidad a la regulación


OBJECTIVE: Analyse the evolution of opinions about euthanasia by the general public and clinical physicians from 1995 to 2019 and their influence at the present time. MATERIAL AND METHOD: Bibliographical review based on relevance and quality of publications in open access and academic access platforms. Main surveys review of public and private institutions. Congress and Senate Official Journal Sessions. RESULTS: Recent surveys show that clinicians support the regulation of euthanasia. This position matches the general public's belief, which has grown steadily in recent decades. DISCUSSION: Social and clinical support for the regulation of euthanasia has been fundamental. In the last two decades political parties have changed their positions, thus creating a window of opportunity


Asunto(s)
Humanos , Eutanasia/tendencias , Política Pública , Cambio Social , Eutanasia Activa Voluntaria/legislación & jurisprudencia , Suicidio Asistido/tendencias , Derecho a Morir/legislación & jurisprudencia , Eutanasia Pasiva/tendencias , España/epidemiología , Opinión Pública , Actitud Frente a la Muerte , Encuestas y Cuestionarios/estadística & datos numéricos
4.
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont) ; 32(3): 1-3, 2019 Sep.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31714203

RESUMEN

Amid the profile of Medical Assistance in Dying (MAID) and a prevailing interest to support living until death, discussions of appropriate care and care settings for dying abound. The when and how of easing the passage from this corporeal being to a state of other being, whatever you believe that to be, has been focal in healthcare discussions in recent years. I remember a time when the notion of "palliative care" was somewhat novel, in later years when a family member was the recipient of excellent end-of-life care, but still many recent instances in which we, "the system" fail to ensure that that final life journey is aligned (as much as possible) with a person's final wishes. Alas, a 2013 survey by the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) showed that a majority of Canadians preferred to die at home, but few (15%) died outside of a hospital (CIHI 2018).


Asunto(s)
Suicidio Asistido/legislación & jurisprudencia , Cuidado Terminal/métodos , Humanos , Suicidio Asistido/tendencias , Cuidado Terminal/tendencias
5.
JAMA Netw Open ; 2(8): e198648, 2019 08 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31397857

RESUMEN

Importance: The combined 28 years of data of medical aid in dying (MAID) between Oregon (OR) and Washington (WA) are the most comprehensive in North America. No reports to date have compared MAID use in different US states. Objective: To evaluate and compare patterns of MAID use between the states with the longest-running US death with dignity programs. Design, Setting, and Participants: A retrospective observational cohort study of OR and WA patients with terminal illness who received prescriptions as part of their states' legislation allowing MAID. All published annual reports, from 1998 to 2017 in OR and from 2009 to 2017 in WA, were reviewed. A total of 3368 prescriptions were included. Main Outcomes and Measures: Number of deaths from self-administration of lethal medication vs number of prescriptions written. Results: A combined 3368 prescriptions were written in OR and WA, with 2558 patient deaths from lethal ingestion (76.0%). Of the 2558 patients, most were male (1311 [51.3%]), older than 65 years (1851 [72.4%]), and non-Hispanic white (2426 [94.8%]). The most common underlying illnesses were cancer (1955 [76.4%]), neurologic illness (261 [10.2%]), lung disease (144 [5.6%]), and heart disease (117 [4.6%]). Loss of autonomy (2235 [87.4%]), impaired quality of life (2203 [86.1%]), and loss of dignity (1755 [68.6%]) were the most common reasons for pursuing MAID. Time between drug intake to coma ranged from 1 to 660 minutes and time from drug intake to death ranged from 1 to 6240 minutes. In the 1557 patients for whom rates of complications were reported, 1494 (96.0%) did not experience a complication (592 of 626 [94.6%] in OR and 902 of 931 [96.8%] in WA). Eight patients (<0.5%) regained consciousness after drug ingestion in OR. Annual rates per year for percentage of patients who received a prescription ingesting the prescribed medication ranged from 48% to 87%, with no significant time trend in OR (adjusted odds ratio per year, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.99-1.02; P = .59) but with an increase over time in WA (adjusted odds ratio per year, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.08-1.19; P < .001). In both OR and WA there were increases in the number of patient deaths due to MAID per 1000 deaths over time. Conclusions and Relevance: In this study, MAID results in Oregon and Washington were similar, although MAID use measured as a percentage of patients prescribed lethal medications and then self-administering them increased only in WA. Most patients who acquired lethal prescriptions had cancer or terminal illnesses that are difficult to palliate and lead to loss of autonomy, dignity, and quality of life.


Asunto(s)
Prescripciones de Medicamentos/estadística & datos numéricos , Medicamentos bajo Prescripción/administración & dosificación , Autoadministración/estadística & datos numéricos , Suicidio Asistido/estadística & datos numéricos , Suicidio Asistido/tendencias , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Femenino , Predicción , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Oregon , Washingtón
7.
Palliat Support Care ; 17(6): 621-627, 2019 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31131780

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: Switzerland is among the few countries worldwide where a request for assisted suicide (AS) can be granted on the basis of a primary psychiatric diagnosis. Psychiatrists play an increasingly important role in this regard, especially when the request for AS arises in the context of suffering caused by severe and persistent mental illness (SPMI). The objective of the survey was to assess general attitudes among psychiatrists in Switzerland regarding AS requests from patients with SPMI. METHOD: In a cross-sectional survey of 1,311 German-speaking psychiatrists in Switzerland, participants were asked about their attitude to AS for patients with SPMI, based on three case vignettes of patients diagnosed with anorexia nervosa, treatment-refractory depression, or severe persistent schizophrenia. RESULT: From a final sample of 457 psychiatrists (a response rate of 34.9%) whose mean age was 57.8 years, 48.6% of respondents did not support access to AS for persons diagnosed with SPMI, 21.2% were neutral, and 29.3% indicated some degree of support for access. In relation to the case vignettes, a slightly higher percentage of respondents supported the patient's wish to seek AS: 35.4% for those diagnosed with anorexia nervosa, 32.1% for those diagnosed with depression, and 31.4% for those diagnosed with schizophrenia. SIGNIFICANCE OF RESULTS: Although a majority of the responding psychiatrists did not support AS for SPMI patients, about one-third would have supported the wishes of patients in the case vignettes. In light of the increasing number of psychiatric patients seeking AS and the continuing liberalization of AS practices, it is important to understand and take account of psychiatrists' perspectives.


Asunto(s)
Trastornos Mentales/complicaciones , Suicidio Asistido/psicología , Adulto , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Trastornos Mentales/psicología , Persona de Mediana Edad , Psiquiatría/métodos , Suicidio Asistido/tendencias , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Suiza
9.
J Hosp Palliat Nurs ; 21(1): 46-53, 2019 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30608357

RESUMEN

In June 2016, Bill C-14 or Medical Assistance in Dying legislation became law in Canada. With this law came changes to nurses' (ie, nurse practitioner, registered nurse, registered practical nurse) scopes of practice, roles, and responsibilities. While federal law, regulatory, and organizational policies are developed to inform nurses about the practice of medical assistance in dying, there is little evidence examining how nurses' roles and responsibilities are enacted in practice. Therefore, a scoping review was conducted to synthesize the evidence on nurses' roles and responsibilities in relation to medical assistance in dying and to identify gaps in the literature. A secondary aim was to identify organizational supports for nurses to effectively and ethically engage in medical assistance in dying. Using a recognized and rigorous scoping review methodology, the findings from 24 research studies were synthesized in this article. The analysis highlights the importance of effective health care professional engagement with the individual in the decision-making process and of the need to educate, support, and include nurses in providing medical assistance in dying. Overall, the current research on medical assistance in dying is limited in Canada, and more attention is needed on the role of the nurse.


Asunto(s)
Asistencia Médica , Proceso de Enfermería/tendencias , Suicidio Asistido/tendencias , Humanos , Suicidio Asistido/psicología
10.
Nurs Ethics ; 26(1): 124-133, 2019 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28532236

RESUMEN

This discussion paper critically assesses the American Nurses Association's stated arguments against nurse participation in assisted suicide, as found in its current (2013) position statement. Seven distinct arguments can be gleaned from the American Nurses Association's statement, based on (1) the American Nurses Association's Code of Ethics with Interpretive Statements and its injunction against nurses acting with the sole intent to end life, (2) the risks of abuse and misuse of assisted suicide, (3) nursing's social contract or covenant with society, (4) the contention that nurses must not harm their patients, (5) the sanctity of life, (6) the traditions of nursing, and (7) the fundamental goals of nursing. Each of these arguments is evaluated, and none are found to be convincing. This is crucial because the American Nurses Association's official stance on nurse participation in assisted suicide can have significant consequences for the well-being of nurses who care for patients in jurisdictions in which assisted suicide is legally available. The American Nurses Association should therefore have a strong and convincing justification for opposing the practice, if it is to take such a position. That it fails to evince such a justification in its official statement on the matter places a burden on the American Nurses Association to more strongly justify its position, or else abandon its stance against nurse participation in assisted suicide.


Asunto(s)
Rol de la Enfermera/psicología , Suicidio Asistido/ética , American Nurses' Association/organización & administración , Humanos , Suicidio Asistido/tendencias , Cuidado Terminal/ética , Cuidado Terminal/métodos , Estados Unidos
11.
Aust Health Rev ; 42(6): 616-620, 2018 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30465706

RESUMEN

The Voluntary Assisted Dying Act 2017 (Vic) will come into force in June 2019, becoming the first law in Australia in 20 years to permit voluntary assisted dying (VAD). This paper considers how other Australian states and territories are likely to respond to this development. It analyses three key factors that suggest that law reform is likely to occur in other parts of Australia: (1) the growing international trend to permit VAD; (2) social science evidence about how VAD regimes operate; and (3) changes to the local political environment. The paper argues that these three factors, coupled with the effect of Victoria changing its law, suggest that other VAD law reform is likely to occur in Australia. It also considers the different types of laws that may be adopted, including whether other states and territories will follow the very conservative Victorian approach or adopt more liberal models.


Asunto(s)
Suicidio Asistido , Australia , Predicción , Reforma de la Atención de Salud/legislación & jurisprudencia , Reforma de la Atención de Salud/tendencias , Humanos , Política , Suicidio Asistido/legislación & jurisprudencia , Suicidio Asistido/tendencias , Victoria
12.
J Hosp Palliat Nurs ; 20(6): 512-518, 2018 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30379794

RESUMEN

Nurses caring for patients at end of life are faced with many ethical dilemmas. A patient's desire to commit suicide affects not only the person who commits suicide but also the patient's family, friends, and health care professionals. This fictional case study demonstrates an ethical dilemma when Beth, a novice hospice clinical nurse leader, is at a home care visit for Joan, a patient with end-stage ovarian cancer, and Joan expresses her wish to commit suicide. The case raises issues about patient autonomy, patient confidentiality, nursing professional code of ethics, beneficence, and whether the nurse's actions were enough to prevent the death.


Asunto(s)
Enfermeras Administradoras/normas , Atención de Enfermería/métodos , Ideación Suicida , Suicidio Asistido/tendencias , Beneficencia , Ética en Enfermería , Humanos , Enfermeras Administradoras/tendencias , Atención de Enfermería/normas , Autonomía Personal
13.
Riv Psichiatr ; 53(4): 173-176, 2018.
Artículo en Italiano | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30087487

RESUMEN

The debate on different forms of request of death has taken on a broad dimension in public opinion over last years, often referring on profoundly differentiated and often opposing positions of principle. Beyond cultural, political or ideal positions, a further critical issue, often underestimated or quite not considered, concerns a person's ability to express a valid consent to the request of death, according to the same criteria of validity of the informed consent to any medical act. This assumes particular importance in the case of assisted suicide. Assisted suicide represents a phenomenon in sharp growth in Western world. It is legal in many nations, and in Switzerland it is also allowed for foreign citizens, thus increasing the phenomenon of the so-called "tourism of suicide". In addition to neoplastic and neurological diseases, depression has also been accepted as a disease that makes assisted suicide possible. This imposes profound clinical and ethical considerations, since depression is unanimously recognized as a treatable disease and since in its most serious forms, such as those in which suicidal ideation dominates, it can compromise the patient's ability to express a valid consent to any medical act, including the assisted suicide. Furthermore, it is often overlooked that any serious and disabling somatic disease, source of intense and chronic suffering, carries the very high risk of the onset of unrecognized depressive conditions, able in turn to negatively influence the ability to express valid consent. Faced with this situation, which has involved a large number of Italian citizens in recent years, the personal and official voice of psychiatry is absolutely lacking, contrasting its silence with the opinions of those who do not want to take into account its potentially fundamental considerations.


Asunto(s)
Turismo Médico , Psiquiatría , Suicidio Asistido , Actitud Frente a la Muerte , Humanos , Consentimiento Informado/ética , Consentimiento Informado/psicología , Italia , Rol del Médico , Suicidio Asistido/ética , Suicidio Asistido/legislación & jurisprudencia , Suicidio Asistido/psicología , Suicidio Asistido/tendencias , Suiza
14.
Gac. sanit. (Barc., Ed. impr.) ; 32(4): 333-338, jul.-ago. 2018. tab
Artículo en Español | IBECS | ID: ibc-174156

RESUMEN

Objetivo: Examinar los conocimientos y actitudes, en la etapa final de la vida, sobre los cuidados paliativos, el documento de instrucciones previas, los cuidados psicofísicos, el suicidio médicamente asistido y el acompañamiento espiritual. Método: Estudio transversal efectuado en la población usuaria de un centro de salud de atención primaria de la Comunidad Autónoma de Madrid. Participaron 425 personas seleccionadas mediante un muestreo sistemático aplicado a las hojas de consulta de los/las profesionales sanitarios/as. Se analizaron 42 variables del cuestionario autoadministrado. Resultados: La población madrileña encuestada presentó las siguientes características: estudios superiores 58%, 51-70 años 47%, casados/as 60%, y mujeres 61%. Al 91% les gustaría decidir sobre sus cuidados al final de la vida. El 58% de los/las encuestadas conoce los cuidados paliativos y el 53% solicitaría acompañamiento espiritual. Conocen las instrucciones previas (50%), pero no tienen efectuado el documento. El 54% están a favor de legalizar la eutanasia y el 42% el suicidio asistido. Conclusiones: La población madrileña estudiada decidirá los cuidados al final de la vida y solicitará acompañamiento espiritual. Sobresalen los partidarios de la eutanasia frente al suicidio asistido. Desearían recibir cuidados paliativos y efectuarían las instrucciones previas. Para contrastar la opinión de la población y dar a conocer los recursos sociosanitarios de la Comunidad Autónoma de Madrid deberían realizarse encuestas en diferentes áreas sanitarias de atención primaria


Objective: To assess the attitudes and knowledge in the life's end about palliative care, advance directives, psychological-physical care, medically assisted suicide and spiritual accompaniment. Method: A cross-sectional study performed in the population at primary health care center of the Autonomous Region of Madrid (Spain). It participated 425 selected people that a simple random was applied in the consultation sheets of health professionals. They analyzed 42 variables of self-administered questionnaire. Results: The surveyed population of Madrid displayed the following characteristics: university studies 58%, 51-70 years 47%, married 60%, and women 61%. 91% would like to decide about their care at life's end. 58% of respondents are aware of palliative care and 53% would request spiritual accompaniment. They know advance directives (50%) but have not made the document. 54% are in favor of legalizing the euthanasia and 42% the assisted suicide. Conclusion: Madrid's people state they would like to decide what care they will receive at life's end and request spiritual accompaniment. Outstanding advocates of euthanasia against assisted suicide. They would like to receive palliative care and complete advance directives documents. To draw comparisons within the population, thereby increasing awareness about social health care resources in Autonomous Region of Madrid, surveys should be conducted in different primary health care centers areas of Madrid


Asunto(s)
Humanos , Cuidados Paliativos al Final de la Vida/tendencias , Directivas Anticipadas/tendencias , Derecho a Morir , Cuidados para Prolongación de la Vida/tendencias , Adhesión a las Directivas Anticipadas/tendencias , Toma de Decisiones Clínicas/ética , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Suicidio Asistido/tendencias , Eutanasia Activa Voluntaria/tendencias , Terapias Espirituales/tendencias , Estudios Transversales , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
15.
J Pain Symptom Manage ; 56(4): 551-559, 2018 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30009965

RESUMEN

CONTEXT: According to guideline recommendations, barbiturates and neuromuscular relaxants are the recommended drugs for euthanasia. OBJECTIVES: To describe changes over time in drugs used to perform euthanasia and differences in case characteristics according to the drugs used. METHODS: Repeated population-based mortality follow-back study among physicians attending a large representative sample of deaths in 1998, 2007, and 2013 in Flanders, Belgium. RESULTS: In 1998, we identified 25 euthanasia cases (1.2% of all deaths), 142 cases in 2007 (2.0% of all deaths), and 349 cases in 2013 (4.6% of all deaths). Use of recommended drugs to perform euthanasia increased from 11.9% of euthanasia cases in 1998 to 55.3% in 2007 and 66.8% in 2013 (P < 0.001). In 2013, cases with recommended drugs compared with nonrecommended drugs more often involved requests expressed both orally and in writing (86.8%/14.1%; P < 0.001), consultation with colleague physicians (93.8%/69.1%; P < 0.001), and administration in the presence of another physician (98.3%/54.3%; P < 0.001), and were more often self-labeled by physicians as euthanasia (95.5%/0.9%; P < 0.001) and reported to the euthanasia review committee (92.3%/3.8%; P < 0.001). Between 2007 and 2013, physicians consistently labeled cases in which nonrecommended drugs were used as palliative sedation (72.8%/78.4%; P = 0.791) or alleviation of pain and symptoms (13.2%/15.0%; P > 0.999). CONCLUSION: Physicians in Flanders are increasingly using the recommended drugs for euthanasia. This suggests that guidelines and training regarding the conduct and pharmacological aspects of euthanasia may have had important effects on the practice of euthanasia. However, the declining but persisting use of nonrecommended drugs requires further attention.


Asunto(s)
Pautas de la Práctica en Medicina/tendencias , Suicidio Asistido/tendencias , Adolescente , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Barbitúricos/uso terapéutico , Bélgica/epidemiología , Toma de Decisiones Clínicas , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Fármacos Neuromusculares/uso terapéutico , Guías de Práctica Clínica como Asunto , Adulto Joven
17.
Br Med Bull ; 125(1): 145-155, 2018 03 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29444208

RESUMEN

Background: Physician-administered euthanasia (PAE) was legalized, along with physician-assisted suicide (PAS), in The Netherlands in 2001. Sources of data: Annual reports of the Dutch Regional Euthanasia Review Committees, the committees' 2015 published Code of Practice and research studies. Areas of agreement: There is a general openness about the practice of PAE/PAS in The Netherlands and an avoidance of misleading euphemisms. The 2001 law also includes arrangements for post-event review of PAE/PAS decisions. Areas of controversy: Rising numbers of annually reported deaths from PAE and uncertainty over actual numbers. Movement away from the principle that euthanasia must take place within an established doctor-patient relationship. Increasing extension of the 2001 law to people with mental health conditions, dementia and multiple co-morbidities. Nature of the post-event scrutiny applied to reported cases. Growing points: The predominance of PAE over PAS where both are legalized raises questions over how these two acts are perceived and whether there are implications for such laws. Areas for timely research: Are the criteria for PAE/PAS in the 2001 law appropriate for a law of this nature? What should be the respective roles of the second-opinion doctors and the review committees?


Asunto(s)
Eutanasia , Suicidio Asistido , Informes Anuales como Asunto , Toma de Decisiones/ética , Eutanasia/ética , Eutanasia/legislación & jurisprudencia , Eutanasia/psicología , Eutanasia/tendencias , Humanos , Países Bajos , Suicidio Asistido/ética , Suicidio Asistido/legislación & jurisprudencia , Suicidio Asistido/psicología , Suicidio Asistido/tendencias
18.
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont) ; 31(4): 74-81, 2018 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30860972

RESUMEN

The provision of MAiD will be in flux for a few years, as legislative challenges are underway. This article addresses what leaders need to know and do to support nurses today and in the future regarding care of patients choosing MAiD. Drawing on complexity leadership theory and research into nurses' experiences in caring for persons choosing MAiD, we share 10 simple yet foundational things a leader must know. Underpinning our key messages are current evidence and familiar nursing concepts such as end-of-life care, death trajectories, conscientious objection, scope of practice, ethics, sense-making and care cultures. These key messages are embedded in a framework of leadership practices where attention to inter-relationships, emergence and innovation are highlighted. They provide nurse leaders with concrete actions to inspire a team dynamic for creating inclusive cultures of quality care. Leadership is needed across healthcare settings where MAiD is being enacted.


Asunto(s)
Asistencia Médica/legislación & jurisprudencia , Suicidio Asistido/tendencias , Humanos , Rol de la Enfermera , Cuidados Paliativos/métodos , Desarrollo de Programa/métodos , Suicidio Asistido/legislación & jurisprudencia
19.
Br Med Bull ; 123(1): 69-77, 2017 09 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28910992

RESUMEN

Background: Physician-assisted suicide (PAS) laws have been enacted in five US States and, along with physician-administered euthanasia, in Canada and the Netherlands. Sources of data: Annual reports of the Oregon Health Authority and published research papers. Areas of agreement: Not all recipients of lethal drugs use them to end their lives. Improvements in palliative care provision. Areas of controversy: Rising numbers of deaths from PAS. Emergence of 'doctor shopping' and multiple-prescribing. Absence of qualitative scrutiny of assessment process. No re-assessment or oversight when prescribed drugs are ingested. Recent pressures to extend Oregon's PAS law. Growing points: Reasons given for seeking PAS indicate this is a societal rather than a clinical issue and raise the question whether adjudicating on requests for legalized PAS is an appropriate role for doctors. Areas for timely research: Research into quality of decision-making in requests for PAS and into potential role of doctors as expert witnesses rather than judges in requests for PAS.


Asunto(s)
Toma de Decisiones , Suicidio Asistido , Canadá , Humanos , Países Bajos , Oregon , Suicidio Asistido/legislación & jurisprudencia , Suicidio Asistido/tendencias
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