Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 35.661
Filtrar
1.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32730915

RESUMEN

In December 2019, the first case of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2, COVID-19) infection was reported. In only few weeks it has caused a global pandemic, with mortality reaching 3.4%, mostly due to a severe pneumonia. However, the impact of SARS-CoV-2 virus on the central nervous system (CNS) and mental health outcomes remains unclear. Previous studies have demonstrated the presence of other types of coronaviruses in the brain, especially in the brainstem. There is evidence that the novel coronavirus can penetrate CNS through the olfactory or circulatory route as well as it can have an indirect impact on the brain by causing cytokine storm. There are also first reports of neurological signs in patients infected by the SARS-Cov-2. They show that COVID-19 patients have neurologic manifestations like acute cerebrovascular disease, conscious disturbance, taste and olfactory disturbances. In addition, there are studies showing that certain psychopathological symptoms might appear in infected patients, including those related to mood and psychotic disorders as well as post-traumatic stress disorder. Accumulating evidence also indicates that the pandemic might have a great impact on mental health from the global perspective, with medical workers being particularly vulnerable. In this article, we provide a review of studies investigating the impact of the SARS-CoV-2 on the CNS and mental health outcomes. We describe neurobiology of the virus, highlighting the relevance to mental disorders. Furthermore, this article summarizes the impact of the SARS-CoV-2 from the public health perspective. Finally, we present a critical appraisal of evidence and indicate future directions for studies in this field.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/psicología , Trastornos Mentales/psicología , Salud Mental , Neumonía Viral/psicología , Betacoronavirus , Encéfalo/virología , Infecciones por Coronavirus/complicaciones , Humanos , Trastornos Mentales/complicaciones , Trastornos Mentales/etiología , Enfermedades del Sistema Nervioso/etiología , Pandemias , Neumonía Viral/complicaciones , Resultado del Tratamiento
2.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32771337

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Psychological suffering by health professionals may be associated with the uncertainty of a safe workplace. Front-line professionals exposed and involved in the diagnosis and treatment of COVID-19 patients are more susceptible. METHOD: This review was conducted based on papers that were published at MEDLINE, BMJ, PsycINFO, and LILACS, the according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyzes (PRISMA). RESULTS: Health professionals had a higher level of anxiety (13.0 vs. 8.5%, p < 0.01, OR = 1.6152; 95%CI 1.3283 to 1.9641; p < 0.0001) and depression 12.2 vs. 9.5%; p = 0.04; OR = 1.3246; 95%CI 1.0930 to 1.6053; p = 0.0042), besides somatizations and insomnia compared to professionals from other areas. CONCLUSION: Health professionals, regardless of their age, showed significant levels of mental disorders. We observed a prevalence of anxiety and depression. Insomnia was a risk factor for both.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus , Personal de Salud/psicología , Trastornos Mentales/etiología , Trastornos Mentales/psicología , Enfermedades Profesionales/etiología , Enfermedades Profesionales/psicología , Pandemias , Neumonía Viral , Humanos , Trastornos Mentales/epidemiología , Enfermedades Profesionales/epidemiología , Prevalencia , Estrés Psicológico
3.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32777327

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Health professionals are key personnel to containing infectious diseases like COVID-19. In the face of long work shifts (that reach 16 h per day on average), the risk of getting infected by a high-infectious disease and the lack of enough biological protection measures, mental suffering among health professionals suddenly became evident. METHOD: We carried out an updated meta-analysis to investigate the psychiatric impacts on health professionals in the face of the physical and psychological conditions to which they are subjected due to the high demands of the COVID-19 pandemic. Papers were researched in four databases from December 2019 to April 2020. In total, eight papers were included in the study. RESULTS: Health professionals working to fight COVID-19 are being more severely affected by psychiatric disorders associated with depression, anxiety, distress and insomnia, stress, and indirect traumatization than other occupational groups. No significant differences were observed in the publication bias. CONCLUSION: There is a strong association between health professionals and COVID-19 in terms of psychiatric repercussions. Our meta-analysis showed that health professionals have a higher level of indirect traumatization, in which the level of damage exceeds psychological and emotional tolerance and indirectly results in psychological abnormalities. The incidence of obsessive-compulsive traces and somatizations was higher in situations involving front-line professionals.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus , Trastornos Mentales/etiología , Trastornos Mentales/psicología , Enfermedades Profesionales/etiología , Enfermedades Profesionales/psicología , Pandemias , Neumonía Viral , Ansiedad/etiología , Ansiedad/psicología , Depresión/etiología , Depresión/psicología , Personal de Salud , Humanos , Distrés Psicológico , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/etiología , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/psicología , Estrés Psicológico/epidemiología
4.
Soins Psychiatr ; 41(329): 12-17, 2020.
Artículo en Francés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33129399

RESUMEN

Patients suffering from severemental illness often turn to spirituality to help cope with their difficulties, in particular to (re)discover meaning in life.Some thereby try to explain their symptoms through religious causes.Generally, turning to spirituality in this way can be adaptive or on the contrary, detrimental. This question and its therapeutic consequences arediscussed and illustrated through clinical examples.


Asunto(s)
Trastornos Mentales , Religión y Psicología , Adaptación Psicológica , Humanos , Trastornos Mentales/psicología , Espiritualidad
5.
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv ; 58(11): 9-12, 2020 Nov 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33119116

RESUMEN

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed psychopharmacological prescribing and management of patients around the world. Social distancing requirements led to a transition from face-to-face patient visits to telepsychiatry. Relaxed federal reimbursement policies during the COVID-19 pandemic expanded patient awareness and access to virtual care. For many psychiatric advanced practice RNs (APRNs), the transition to telepsychiatry was intended as a temporary solution until it is possible to return to in-person patient care. Instead, virtual care has become an expectation of patients and agencies. The current article presents a case study example of an adolescent psychiatric patient, exploring the challenges of therapeutic alliance, patient engagement, psychiatric evaluation, laboratory orders, deprescribing, and psychopharmacological adherence. The case study discusses considerations for APRNs who use telemental health in child and adolescent psychiatry and resources for clinical practice. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 58(11), 9-12.].


Asunto(s)
Trastornos Mentales/terapia , Participación del Paciente/métodos , Participación del Paciente/psicología , Enfermería Psiquiátrica/métodos , Psiquiatría/métodos , Telemedicina/métodos , Adolescente , Humanos , Masculino , Trastornos Mentales/psicología
8.
Transl Psychiatry ; 10(1): 348, 2020 10 13.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33051440

RESUMEN

To study the acute psychological effects of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak among healthcare workers (HCWs) in China, a cross-sectional survey was conducted among HCWs during the early period of COVID-19 outbreak. The acute psychological effects including symptoms of depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), the Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7) questionnaire, and the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R). The prevalence of depression, anxiety, and PTSD was estimated at 15.0%, 27.1%, and 9.8%, respectively. Having an intermediate technical title, working at the frontline, receiving insufficient training for protection, and lacking confidence in protection measures were significantly associated with increased risk for depression and anxiety. Being a nurse, having an intermediate technical title, working at the frontline, and lacking confidence in protection measures were risk factors for PTSD. Meanwhile, not worrying about infection was a protective factor for developing depression, anxiety, and PTSD. Psychological interventions should be implemented among HCWs during the COVID-19 outbreak to reduce acute psychological effects and prevent long-term psychological comorbidities. Meanwhile, HCWs should be well trained and well protected before their frontline exposure.


Asunto(s)
Betacoronavirus , Infecciones por Coronavirus/psicología , Personal de Salud/psicología , Personal de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Trastornos Mentales/epidemiología , Trastornos Mentales/psicología , Neumonía Viral/psicología , Enfermedad Aguda , Adulto , China/epidemiología , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Encuestas Epidemiológicas/métodos , Encuestas Epidemiológicas/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Masculino , Pandemias
9.
J Pediatr Psychol ; 45(10): 1106-1113, 2020 11 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33068424

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has ignited wider clinical adoption of digital health tools, including mobile health apps (mHealth apps), to address mental and behavioral health concerns at a distance. While mHealth apps offer many compelling benefits, identifying effective apps in the crowded and largely unregulated marketplace is laborious. Consumer demand and industry productivity are increasing, although research is slower, making it challenging for providers to determine the most credible and safe apps for patients in need. OBJECTIVES/METHODS: This commentary offers a practical, empirically guided framework and associated resources for selecting appropriate mHealth apps for pediatric populations during the pandemic and beyond. RESULTS: In the first stage, Narrow the target problem, end user, and contender apps. Beginning the search with continuously updated websites that contain expert app ratings can help expedite this process (e.g., Psyberguide). Second, Explore each contender app's: (a) scientific and theoretical support (e.g., are app components consistent with health behavior change theories?), (b) privacy policies, and (c) user experience (e.g., through crowdsourcing feedback about app usability and appeal via social media). Third, use clinical expertise and stakeholder feedback to Contextualize whether the selected app is a good fit for a particular patient and/or caregiver (e.g., by considering age, race/ethnicity, ability, gender, sexual orientation, technology access), including conducting a brief self-pilot of the app. CONCLUSION: Youth are increasingly turning to technology for support, especially during the pandemic, and pediatric psychologists must be primed to recommend the most credible tools. We offer additional recommendations for rapidly disseminating evidence-based apps to the public.


Asunto(s)
Betacoronavirus , Infecciones por Coronavirus/prevención & control , Trastornos Mentales/terapia , Aplicaciones Móviles/normas , Pandemias/prevención & control , Neumonía Viral/prevención & control , Cuarentena/psicología , Telemedicina/métodos , Adolescente , Niño , Infecciones por Coronavirus/complicaciones , Infecciones por Coronavirus/psicología , Humanos , Estudios Longitudinales , Masculino , Trastornos Mentales/complicaciones , Trastornos Mentales/psicología , Neumonía Viral/complicaciones , Neumonía Viral/psicología
10.
J Pediatr Psychol ; 45(10): 1124-1143, 2020 11 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33083817

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: A systematic review of mental health outcomes and needs of children and families during past pandemics was conducted based on the PRISMA protocol. The objectives were to evaluate the quality of existing studies on this topic, determine what is known about mental health outcomes and needs of children and families, and provide recommendations for how COVID-19 policies can best support children and families. METHODS: Seventeen studies were identified through a search of PsycINFO, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and Google Scholar. RESULTS: Studies examining child outcomes indicate that social isolation and quarantining practices exert a substantial negative impact on child anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, and fear symptoms. Potential risk factors such as living in rural areas, being female, and increasing grade level may exacerbate negative mental health outcomes for children. Studies examining parental and family outcomes indicate that parents experience high stress, anxiety, and financial burden during pandemics. The age of the parent and family socioeconomic status (SES) appeared to mitigate negative outcomes, where older parents and higher SES families had lower rates of mental health problems. Parents' fear over the physical and mental health of their children, concerns over potential job loss and arranging childcare contributes to elevated stress and poorer well-being. CONCLUSIONS: Findings from this review suggest current gaps in COVID-19 policies and provide recommendations such implementing "family-friendly" policies that are inclusive and have flexible eligibility criteria. Examples include universal paid sick leave for parents and financial supports for parents who are also frontline workers and are at an elevated risk for contracting the disease.


Asunto(s)
Betacoronavirus , Infecciones por Coronavirus/psicología , Familia/psicología , Trastornos Mentales/psicología , Pandemias , Neumonía Viral/psicología , Cuarentena/psicología , Adulto , Niño , Infecciones por Coronavirus/complicaciones , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Trastornos Mentales/complicaciones , Neumonía Viral/complicaciones
11.
Lancet Public Health ; 5(11): e583-e591, 2020 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33120044

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Children of parents with mental illness are a vulnerable group, but their numbers and their exposure to adversity have rarely been examined. We examined the prevalence of children with parents with mental illness in Sweden, trends in prevalence from 2006 to 2016, and these children's exposure to socioeconomic adversity. METHODS: We did a population-based cohort study among all children (aged <18 years) born in Sweden between Jan 1, 1991, and Dec 31, 2011, and their parents, followed up between Jan 1, 2006, and Dec 31, 2016. We included children who were identified in the Total Population Register and linked to their birth parents, excluding adopted children and those with missing information on both birth parents. We used a comprehensive register linkage, Psychiatry Sweden, to follow up for indicators of parental mental illness and socioeconomic adversity. Marginal predictions from a standard logistic regression model were used to estimate age-specific, 3-year period prevalence of parental mental illness and trends in prevalence for 2006-16. Using cross-sectional data on each child, indicators of socioeconomic adversity were compared between children with and without concurrent parental mental illness using logistic regression. FINDINGS: Of 2 198 289 children born in Sweden between Jan 1, 1991, and Dec 31, 2011, we analysed 2 110 988 children (96·03% of the total population). The overall prevalence of children with diagnosed parental mental illness between 2006 and 2016 was 9·53% (95% CI 9·50-9·57). This prevalence increased with age of the child, from 6·72% (6·65-6·78) of the youngest children (0 to <3 years) to 10·80% (10·73-10·89) in the oldest (15 to <18 years). The prevalence of diagnosed parental mental illness increased from 8·62% (8·54-8·69) in 2006-09 up to 10·95% (10·86-11·03) in 2013-16. Children with any type of parental mental illness had markedly higher risk of socioeconomic adversity, such as living in poorer households or living separately from their parents. INTERPRETATION: Currently, 11% of all Swedish children have a parent with a mental illness treated within secondary care. These children have markedly higher risk of broad socioeconomic adversity than do other children. There is a need to understand how socioeconomic adversity and parental mental illness influence vulnerability to poor life outcomes in these children. FUNDING: European Research Council, National Institute for Health Research, Region Stockholm, and the Swedish Research Council.


Asunto(s)
Hijo de Padres Discapacitados/estadística & datos numéricos , Trastornos Mentales/epidemiología , Padres/psicología , Factores Socioeconómicos , Adolescente , Adulto , Distribución por Edad , Niño , Hijo de Padres Discapacitados/psicología , Preescolar , Estudios de Cohortes , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Lactante , Masculino , Trastornos Mentales/psicología , Prevalencia , Suecia/epidemiología
12.
Transl Psychiatry ; 10(1): 337, 2020 10 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33009366

RESUMEN

Data are scarce regarding the comorbid mental disorders and their management among COVID-19 patients. This study described the clinical characteristics and management of COVID-19 patients treated in psychiatric inpatient settings due to comorbid first-onset mental disorders in Wuhan, China. This electronic medical records-based study included 25 COVID-19 patients with first-onset mental disorders and 55 patients with first-onset mental disorders without COVID-19 (control group). Data collected included ICD-10 diagnoses of mental disorders, psychiatric and respiratory symptoms, treatments, and outcomes. Adjustment disorder (n = 11, 44.0%) and acute and transient psychotic disorders, with associated acute stress (n = 6, 24.0%) were main clinical diagnoses in the COVID-19 group while serious mental illnesses (i.e., schizophrenia, 24.5%) and alcohol use disorders (10.9%) were overrepresented in the control group. On admission, the most common psychiatric symptom in COVID-19 patients was insomnia symptoms (n = 18, 72.0%), followed by aggressive behaviors (n = 16, 64.0%), delusion (n = 10, 40.0%), and severe anxiety (n = 9, 36.0%). In addition to respiratory treatments, 76.0% COVID-19 patients received antipsychotics, 40.0% sedative-hypnotics, and 24.0% mood stabilizers. At the end of inpatient treatment, 4 (16.0%) COVID-19 patients were transferred to other hospitals to continue respiratory treatment after their psychiatric symptoms were controlled while the remaining 21 (84.0%) all recovered. Compared to the control group, COVID-19 group had significantly shorter length of hospital stay (21.2 vs. 37.4 days, P < 0.001). Adjustment disorder and acute and transient psychotic disorders are the main clinical diagnoses of COVID-19 patients managed in psychiatric inpatient settings. The short-term prognosis of these patients is good after conventional psychotropic treatment.


Asunto(s)
Betacoronavirus/aislamiento & purificación , Infecciones por Coronavirus , Hospitalización/estadística & datos numéricos , Trastornos Mentales , Pandemias , Neumonía Viral , Psicotrópicos , China/epidemiología , Comorbilidad , Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Infecciones por Coronavirus/psicología , Infecciones por Coronavirus/terapia , Registros Electrónicos de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Trastornos Mentales/epidemiología , Trastornos Mentales/fisiopatología , Trastornos Mentales/psicología , Trastornos Mentales/terapia , Persona de Mediana Edad , Manejo de Atención al Paciente/métodos , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Neumonía Viral/psicología , Neumonía Viral/terapia , Pronóstico , Escalas de Valoración Psiquiátrica , Psicotrópicos/clasificación , Psicotrópicos/uso terapéutico , Evaluación de Síntomas/métodos , Evaluación de Síntomas/estadística & datos numéricos
13.
Pril (Makedon Akad Nauk Umet Odd Med Nauki) ; 41(2): 95-101, 2020 Sep 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33011701

RESUMEN

COVID-19 pandemic has provoked a huge change in daily functioning in millions of people worldwide. The epidemiological measures in prevention of possible infection have increased the possible risks on the mental and physical health. We have conducted a survey in order to investigate the needs and challenges of families with children with chronic respiratory diseases. In this order, we have created a questionnaire with general information about the family, general information about the child with chronic respiratory disease, overall physical and mental health before and during the pandemic, needs and mental health condition of the parents/caregivers. This survey showed that this group of families of children with respiratory disorders have suffered financially in significant way and has changed the way they perform professional and educational patterns due to the pandemic. Most of the children were stable in their physical health, but their mental health has deteriorated. This is probably due to the regular contact with the medical staff, but not with the mental health professionals. This group of children has a significant reduction in their physical activity and increase the hours in front of TV screens. The further effect on the physical and mental health is to be investigated.


Asunto(s)
Enfermedad Crónica/psicología , Infecciones por Coronavirus/psicología , Trastornos Mentales/epidemiología , Neumonía Viral/psicología , Cuarentena/psicología , Enfermedades Respiratorias/psicología , Betacoronavirus , Niño , Infecciones por Coronavirus/prevención & control , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Trastornos Mentales/psicología , Pandemias/prevención & control , Padres , Neumonía Viral/prevención & control , República de Macedonia del Norte/epidemiología , Enfermedades Respiratorias/virología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
14.
J Clin Psychiatry ; 81(6)2020 10 20.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33084255

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: In light of the current evolving coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, and the need to learn from past infectious disease outbreaks to provide better psychological support for our frontline health care workers (HCW), we conducted a rapid review of extant studies that have reported on both psychological and coping responses in HCW during recent outbreaks. DATA SOURCES: We performed a systematic search of the available literature using PubMed, MEDLINE (Ovid), and Web of Science, combining key terms regarding recent infectious disease outbreaks and psychological and coping responses. Papers published from database inception to April 20, 2020, were considered for inclusion. Only studies in the English language and papers from peer-reviewed journals were included. STUDY SELECTION: We identified 95 (PubMed) and 49 papers (Web of Science) from the database search, of which 23 papers were eventually included in the review. DATA EXTRACTION: The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines were used for data extraction. The McMaster University critical appraisal tool was used to appraise quantitative studies. Guidelines by Higginbotham and colleagues were used to appraise qualitative studies. Only studies exploring the combined psychological and coping responses of HCW amid infectious diseases were included. RESULTS: Salient psychological responses that can persist beyond the outbreaks included anxiety/fears, stigmatization, depression, posttraumatic stress, anger/frustration, grief, and burnout, but also positive growth and transformation. Personal coping methods (such as problem solving, seeking social support, and positive thinking) alongside workplace measures (including infection control and safety, staff support and recognition, and clear communication) were reported to be helpful. CONCLUSIONS: Psychological support for HCW in the current COVID-19 pandemic and future outbreaks should focus on both individual (eg, psychoeducation on possible psychological responses, self-care) and institutional (eg, clear communication, providing access to resources for help, recognition of efforts of HCW) measures.


Asunto(s)
Adaptación Psicológica , Betacoronavirus , Infecciones por Coronavirus/psicología , Personal de Salud/psicología , Trastornos Mentales/etiología , Enfermedades Profesionales/etiología , Neumonía Viral/psicología , Resiliencia Psicológica , Infecciones por Coronavirus/prevención & control , Salud Global , Humanos , Control de Infecciones , Trastornos Mentales/prevención & control , Trastornos Mentales/psicología , Enfermedades Profesionales/prevención & control , Enfermedades Profesionales/psicología , Pandemias/prevención & control , Neumonía Viral/prevención & control , Apoyo Social
15.
Epidemiol Psychiatr Sci ; 29: e172, 2020 Oct 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33028455

RESUMEN

AIMS: To test the impact of using different idioms in epidemiological interviews on the prevalence and correlates of poor mental health and mental health service use. METHODS: We conducted a randomised methodological experiment in a nationally representative sample of the US adult population, comparing a lay idiom, which asked about 'problems with your emotions or nerves' with a more medical idiom, which asked about 'problems with your mental health'. Differences across study arms in the associations of endorsement of problems with the Kessler-6 (a validated assessment of psychological distress), demographic characteristics, self-rated health and mental health service use were examined. RESULTS: Respondents were about half as likely to endorse a problem when asked with the more medical idiom (18.1%) than when asked with the lay idiom (35.1%). The medical idiom had a significantly larger area under the ROC curve when compared against a validated measure of psychological distress than the lay idiom (0.91 v. 0.87, p = 0.012). The proportion of the population who endorsed a problem but did not receive treatment in the past year was less than half as large for the medical idiom (7.90%) than for the lay idiom (20.94%). Endorsement of problems differed in its associations with age, sex, race/ethnicity and self-rated health depending on the question idiom. For instance, the odds of endorsing problems were threefold higher in the youngest than the oldest age group when the medical idiom was used (OR = 3.07; 95% CI 1.47-6.41) but did not differ across age groups when the lay idiom was used (OR = 0.76; 95% CI 0.43-1.36). CONCLUSION: Choice of idiom in epidemiological questionnaires can affect the apparent correlates of poor mental health and service use. Cultural change within populations over time may require changes in instrument wording to maintain consistency in epidemiological measurement of psychiatric conditions.


Asunto(s)
Trastornos Mentales/epidemiología , Servicios de Salud Mental/provisión & distribución , Salud Mental/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto , Anciano , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Trastornos Mentales/psicología , Persona de Mediana Edad , Evaluación de Procesos y Resultados en Atención de Salud , Percepción , Estados Unidos/epidemiología , Adulto Joven
17.
Epidemiol Psychiatr Sci ; 29: e174, 2020 Oct 19.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33070789

RESUMEN

AIMS: Observational studies have shown a relationship between maternal mental health (MMH) and child development, but few studies have evaluated whether MMH interventions improve child-related outcomes, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. The objective of this review is to synthesise findings on the effectiveness of MMH interventions to improve child-related outcomes in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). METHODS: We searched for randomised controlled trials conducted in LMICs evaluating interventions with a MMH component and reporting children's outcomes. Meta-analysis was performed on outcomes included in at least two trials. RESULTS: We identified 21 trials with 28 284 mother-child dyads. Most trials were conducted in middle-income countries, evaluating home visiting interventions delivered by general health workers, starting in the third trimester of pregnancy. Only ten trials described acceptable methods for blinding outcome assessors. Four trials showed high risk of bias in at least two of the seven domains assessed in this review. Narrative synthesis showed promising but inconclusive findings for child-related outcomes. Meta-analysis identified a sizeable impact of interventions on exclusive breastfeeding (risk ratio = 1.39, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.13-1.71, ten trials, N = 4749 mother-child dyads, I2 = 61%) and a small effect on child height-for-age at 6-months (std. mean difference = 0.13, 95% CI: 0.02-0.24, three trials, N = 1388, I2 = 0%). Meta-analyses did not identify intervention benefits for child cognitive and other growth outcomes; however, few trials measured these outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: These findings support the importance of MMH to improve child-related outcomes in LMICs, particularly exclusive breastfeeding. Given, the small number of trials and methodological limitations, more rigorous trials should be conducted.


Asunto(s)
Lactancia Materna/psicología , Trastornos Mentales/psicología , Salud Mental/estadística & datos numéricos , Relaciones Madre-Hijo/psicología , Niño , Hijo de Padres Discapacitados , Países en Desarrollo , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Salud Materna , Apego a Objetos , Pobreza
18.
PLoS One ; 15(9): e0238766, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32886729

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Women with mental illness have a special need for family planning as they carry a high risk of unplanned pregnancy, sexual violence and, the poor obstetric outcomes due to their mental illness, as well as teratogenicity from exposure to psychotropic medications lower antenatal care utilization. OBJECTIVE: To assess knowledge, and utilization of family planning and associated factors among women attending psychiatric outpatient clinics in Addis Ababa. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 423 women attending the outpatient psychiatric clinics of three general and one specialized mental hospital in Addis Ababa, the capital city of Ethiopia. A structured and pretested questionnaire were administered by psychiatric nurses. Multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted to identify factors associated with utilization of family planning methods. RESULT: Four hundred twenty-two participants who had follow up at the psychiatric outpatient departments participated in the study. Almost 88% of participants had an unintended pregnancy. Only 68% of study participant had ever heard about Family planning. Just over one third (38.6%) reported current use of at least one method of Family planning. Of those not using family planning 73.3% had no intention to have children. And 38.8% did not have any intention to use Family Planning in the future. Fear of drug-interaction with psychiatric medication was the most common reason not to use contraceptives. Having one or two children was associated with higher utilization of family planning [adjusted odds ratio (95%, confidence interval) 2.05 (1.06, 3.99)]. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, the majority of women with mental illness were not using family planning methods. The Awareness of the Family planning methods is lower than the national average. Education and counselling about family planning for women attending psychiatric outpatient departments should be strengthened.


Asunto(s)
Servicios de Planificación Familiar/estadística & datos numéricos , Trastornos Mentales/psicología , Pacientes Ambulatorios/psicología , Aceptación de la Atención de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Reproducción , Adolescente , Adulto , Estudios Transversales , Etiopía , Femenino , Humanos , Adulto Joven
20.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(33): e21484, 2020 Aug 14.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32871994

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of humanistic care and psychological counseling (HCPC) on psychological disorders (PD) in medical students after coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak. METHODS: We will search randomized controlled trials or case-controlled studies of HCPC on PD in medical students after COVID-19 outbreak in the following electronic databases: PUBMED/MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, AMED, WANGFANG, and CNKI. The time is restricted from the construction of each database to the present. All process of study selection, data collection, and study quality evaluation will be carried out by two independent authors. Any different opinions will be solved by a third author through discussion. We will employ RevMan 5.3 software to conduct statistical analysis. RESULTS: This study will provide a better understanding of HCPC on PD in medical students after COVID-19 outbreak. CONCLUSIONS: This study may offer strong evidence for clinical practice to treat PD in medical students after COVID-19 outbreak. STUDY REGISTRATION: CRD42020193199.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/psicología , Consejo/métodos , Trastornos Mentales/terapia , Neumonía Viral/psicología , Psicoterapia/métodos , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Adulto , Betacoronavirus , Estudios de Casos y Controles , Femenino , Humanismo , Humanos , Masculino , Trastornos Mentales/psicología , Pandemias , Ensayos Clínicos Controlados Aleatorios como Asunto , Proyectos de Investigación , Revisiones Sistemáticas como Asunto , Adulto Joven
SELECCIÓN DE REFERENCIAS
DETALLE DE LA BÚSQUEDA