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1.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33800027

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Japanese people are known to have the shortest sleep duration in the world. To date, no study has assessed a large Japanese population for insomnia and sleep duration. METHODS: We performed an Ιnternet-based survey in association with a national television (TV) program. Questionnaire data were collected not only through personal computers, tablets, and smartphones, but also through the Hybridcast system, which combines broadcasts over airwaves with broadband data provided via the Internet using the TV remote controller. The Athens Insomnia Scale (AIS) was used to assess insomnia. RESULTS: A total of 301,241 subjects participated in the survey. Participants slept for an average of 5.96 ± 1.13 h; the average AIS score was 6.82 ± 3.69. A total of 26.1% of male and 27.1% of female participants had both insomnia (AIS ≥ 6) and short sleep duration (<6 h). Responses were recorded through the Hybridcast system for 76.4% of the elderly (age ≥ 65 years) subjects and through personal computers, tablets, or smartphones for 59.9-82.7% of the younger subjects (age ≤ 65 years). CONCLUSIONS: Almost a quarter of the Japanese participants presented short sleep duration and insomnia. Furthermore, the Hybridcast system may be useful for performing large internet-based surveys, especially for elderly individuals.


Asunto(s)
Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño , Anciano , Femenino , Humanos , Japón/epidemiología , Masculino , Sueño , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/epidemiología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
2.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33808865

RESUMEN

Chronic tinnitus causes a decrease in well-being and can negatively affect sleep quality. It has further been indicated that there are clinically relevant gender differences, which may also have an impact on sleep quality. By conducting a retrospective and explorative data analysis for differences in patients with tinnitus and patients diagnosed with tinnitus and insomnia, hypothesized differences were explored in the summed test scores and on item-level of the validated psychometric instruments. A cross-sectional study was conducted collecting data from a sample of tinnitus patients (n = 76). Insomnia was diagnosed in 49 patients. Gender differences were found on aggregated test scores of the MADRS and BDI with men scoring higher than women, indicating higher depressive symptoms in men. Women stated to suffer more from headaches (p < 0.003), neck pain (p < 0.006) and nervousness as well as restlessness (p < 0.02). Women also reported an increase in tinnitus loudness in response to stress compared to men (p < 0.03). Male individuals with tinnitus and insomnia have higher depression scores and more clinically relevant depressive symptoms than women, who suffer more from psychosomatic symptoms. The results indicate a need for a targeted therapy of depressive symptoms in male patients and targeted treatment of psychosomatic symptoms, stress-related worsening of insomnia and tinnitus in women.


Asunto(s)
Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño , Acúfeno , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Estudios Retrospectivos , Caracteres Sexuales , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/epidemiología , Acúfeno/epidemiología
3.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33802730

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Specific academic environment and time spent on learning may lead to sleep deprivation and a sedentary lifestyle. Insomnia is the most common sleep complaint. The purposes of this study were to describe the prevalence of insomnia in medical students, and to examine physical activity levels and other behavioral factors associated with insomnia in this population group. METHODS: We included 308 medical students from Poland. The International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) was used to assess physical activity levels and the Athens Insomnia Scale (AIS) was used to assess insomnia among students. A multifactor model of analysis was used to analyze variables related to insomnia. RESULTS: A share of 19.2% of medical students were inactive. Insomnia was reported by 36.8% of students. In the multifactorial model, variables such as smoking cigarettes (ß = 0.21, p < 0.001), consuming energy drinks several times a month (ß = 0.21, p = 0.024), or daily stress (ß = 0.44, p < 0.001) had a negative impact on the quality of sleep of medical students. CONCLUSIONS: Most medical students are physically active, however, approximately one-third of the medical students experience insomnia. This sleep problem is reported more often in students who experience daily stress or smoke cigarettes.


Asunto(s)
Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño , Estudiantes de Medicina , Ejercicio Físico , Humanos , Polonia/epidemiología , Sueño , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/epidemiología
4.
Artículo en Ruso | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33899447

RESUMEN

Dissatisfaction with night sleep occurs in 45% of the population. Chronic insomnia is one of the most common sleep disorders. The incidence of insomnia is estimated at 9-15%. The clinical importance of insomnia is determined by the negative impact it has on social aspects, economic performance and human health. Taking into account the prevalence of insomnia in the population and its social importance the correct diagnosis and effective treatment of insomnia is clear. OBJECTIVE: To assess the sleep quality dynamics in patients with chronic insomnia getting the complex spa treatment with the inclusion of transcranial magnetic therapy (TCMT). MATERIAL AND METHODS: It was examined 122 patients (mean age 54.0±0.92 years) with a verified diagnosis of chronic insomnia; 68.9% were women and 31.1% were men. The patients were randomized into 2 groups: the main group included 62 patients who received a spa complex and TCMT; the comparison group included 60 patients who received an identical treatment complex without TCMT. All patients were evaluated by polysomnography (PSG) data, insomnia severity index (ISI) and subjective symptoms of daytime functioning. RESULTS: As a result of treatment program implementation the patients of both groups showed a decrease in ISI and a subjective improvement in daytime well-being. In the main group the treatment led to an increase in the number of patients with mild disorders by 51.7%, a decrease in patients with moderate disorders by 16.2%, severe disorders by 45.2%, and the formation of a group of 6 people (9.7%) without sleep disorders. In the comparison group after treatment the proportion of patients with mild disorders increased by 33.3%, with moderate disorders by 3.3%, the number of patients with severe disorders decreased by 41.6%, and 3 (5%) patients had no symptoms. The mean value of ISI in the main group decreased by 35.9% (p<0.001), in the comparison group - by 23.1% (p<0.001), the difference was 12.8% (p<0.001). From clinical perspective, patients noted an improvement in the process of falling asleep, a decrease in the number of nighttime awakenings, an increase in the duration of sleep, and an improvement in functioning while awake. After the use of therapeutic complexes in patients of both groups there was a favorable reliable dynamics in the change in PSG indicators that was more pronounced in the main group. The difference between the groups in terms of PSG was: for the wakefulness time during sleep 16.3% (p<0.005), for the number of awakenings during sleep 12.8% (p<0.001), for the latency of falling asleep 13.9% (p<0.05), for micro-activation index 14.6% (p<0.05), for sleep efficiency 4.9% (p<0.05). CONCLUSION: The inclusion of TCMT in complex spa treatment can significantly reduce ISI, the symptoms' severity of impaired daytime functioning and improve sleep quality indicators according to PSG data in patients with chronic insomnia.


Asunto(s)
Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño , Femenino , Humanos , Fenómenos Magnéticos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Polisomnografía , Sueño , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/epidemiología , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/terapia , Resultado del Tratamiento
5.
BMC Psychiatry ; 21(1): 193, 2021 04 14.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33853571

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Although long-term use of benzodiazepines and benzodiazepine receptor agonists (BZDs) has been associated with an increased risk of dependence, the incidence, details of clinical manifestations, and triggering factors of withdrawal symptoms associated with long-term BZD use at common clinical doses remain unclear. METHODS: In a multicenter, open-label study of 123 Japanese patients with insomnia, patients were given a common clinical dose of eszopiclone (2 mg) for 24 weeks, and then treatment was abruptly discontinued. Withdrawal symptoms were evaluated using the Benzodiazepine Hypnotics Withdrawal Symptom Scale (BHWSS). The Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) was used to rate insomnia severity during treatment and 2 weeks after discontinuation. Dependence and poor compliance during treatment without strict medication controls were evaluated with the Benzodiazepine Dependence Self Report Questionnaire short version (Bendep-SRQ SV) subscale sum scores for problematic use, preoccupation, and lack of compliance. Associations between the presence of clinically relevant withdrawal symptoms (BHWSS≥7) and demographic measures, ISI scores at Week 24, and Bendep-SRQ SV subscale sum scores were evaluated by multivariable stepwise logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: Seventy-six patients completed treatment and 2 weeks of withdrawal; eight (10.5%) had clinically relevant withdrawal symptoms. On multiple logistic regression analysis, Bendep-SRQ SV subscale sum scores were correlated with withdrawal symptoms (odds ratio, 1.650; 95% confidence interval, 1.105-2.464; p = 0.014). Exacerbation of post-discontinuation insomnia was not significantly different between patients who showed clinically relevant withdrawal symptoms and those who did not (p = 0.245). CONCLUSIONS: Dependence and poor compliance may contribute to withdrawal symptoms with long-term BZD use. Providing guidance to ensure proper compliance is thought to be the best way to mitigate withdrawal symptoms. TRIAL REGISTRATION: UMIN000024462 (18/10/2016).


Asunto(s)
Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño , Síndrome de Abstinencia a Sustancias , Benzodiazepinas , Eszopiclona , Humanos , Hipnóticos y Sedantes/efectos adversos , Prevalencia , Estudios Prospectivos , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/inducido químicamente , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/tratamiento farmacológico , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/epidemiología , Síndrome de Abstinencia a Sustancias/epidemiología
6.
Curr Psychiatry Rep ; 23(5): 28, 2021 04 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33797626

RESUMEN

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: For the most part of human existence, individuals have been living a rural lifestyle in a rural setting. However, such sleep-conducive conditions have largely been transformed dramatically by urbanization within a relatively short span of time in recent history, and the resulting evolved mechanisms-environment mismatch is theorized to bring about an increased risk for insomnia symptoms. This brief review of the recent literature is designed to evaluate the veracity of this proposition. RECENT FINDINGS: The majority of recent findings have suggested that most proposed evolutionarily mismatched urban factors are indeed related to the presence of insomnia symptoms. However, there is a general paucity of longitudinal evidence (and for some other factors, a lack of enough evidence of any kind). Although there is a preponderance of recent findings indicating a link between evolutionarily mismatched urban phenomena and insomnia symptoms, more longitudinal data are needed before any causative conclusion can be drawn.


Asunto(s)
Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia , Humanos , Estilo de Vida , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/epidemiología , Urbanización
7.
Saudi Med J ; 42(4): 384-390, 2021 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33795493

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: To measure the Saudi population's sleep quality during the lockdown of COVID-19. METHODS: An internet-based questionnaire that was performed during the lockdown of the COVID-19 pandemic among the Saudi population over 2 weeks from April 1 to April 15, 2020. We used the instant messaging application WhatsApp and Twitter to reach the targeted population. Saudi citizens and non-Saudi residents who can read and understand the questionnaire were recruited. Data were analyzed using Stata and SPSS. RESULTS: A total of 790 responses were included. The majority of participants were the Saudi population 735 (92.9%). The prevalence of insomnia and poor sleep quality were 54.4% and 55.5%, respectively. Saudi citizenship was associated with longer sleep duration (p=0.031). Female gender and being married were associated with worse global PSQI, sleep quality, sleep distribution, sleep latency, and daytime dysfunction. CONCLUSION: Our findings showed that during the COVID-19 pandemic, the Saudi population had a high prevalence of insomnia and poor sleep quality. Routine monitoring of the psychological impact of life-threatening outbreaks and the adoption of effective early mental health actions should be considered.


Asunto(s)
Trastornos de Somnolencia Excesiva/epidemiología , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/epidemiología , Sueño , Adulto , Control de Enfermedades Transmisibles , Estudios Transversales , Escolaridad , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Estado Civil/estadística & datos numéricos , Persona de Mediana Edad , Prevalencia , Política Pública , Factores de Riesgo , Arabia Saudita/epidemiología , Factores Sexuales , Latencia del Sueño , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Desempleo/estadística & datos numéricos
8.
Neurology ; 96(13): e1792-e1799, 2021 03 30.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33658328

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that veterans with traumatic brain injury (TBI) have an increased subsequent risk of sleep disorders, we studied the longitudinal association between TBI and incident sleep disorders in nearly 200,000 veterans. METHODS: We performed a cohort study of all patients diagnosed with a TBI in the Veterans Health Administration system from October 1, 2001, to September 30, 2015, who were age-matched 1:1 to veterans without TBI. Veterans with prevalent sleep disorders at baseline were excluded. Development of sleep disorders was defined as any inpatient or outpatient diagnosis of sleep apnea, hypersomnia, insomnia, or sleep-related movement disorders based on ICD-9 codes after the first TBI diagnosis or the random selection date for those without TBI. We restricted the analysis to those with at least 1 year of follow-up. We used Cox proportional hazards models to examine the association between TBI and subsequent risk of sleep disorders. RESULTS: The study included 98,709 veterans with TBI and 98,709 age-matched veterans without TBI (age 49 ± 20 years). After an average follow-up of 5 (1-14) years, 23,127 (19.6%) veterans developed sleep disorders. After adjustment for demographics, education, income, and medical and psychiatric conditions, those who had TBI compared to those without TBI were 41% more likely to develop any sleep disorders (hazard ratio 1.41 [95% confidence interval 1.37-1.44]), including sleep apnea (1.28 [1.24-1.32]), insomnia (1.50 [1.45-1.55]), hypersomnia (1.50 [1.39-1.61]), and sleep-related movement disorders (1.33 [1.16-1.52]). The association was stronger for mild TBIs, did not differ appreciably by presence of posttraumatic stress disorder, and remained after a 2-year time lag. CONCLUSION: In 197,418 veterans without sleep disorders, those with diagnosed TBI had an increased risk of incident sleep disorders over 14 years. Improved prevention and long-term management strategies for sleep are needed for veterans with TBI.


Asunto(s)
Lesiones Traumáticas del Encéfalo/epidemiología , Trastornos de Somnolencia Excesiva/epidemiología , Parasomnias/epidemiología , Síndromes de la Apnea del Sueño/epidemiología , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/epidemiología , Veteranos/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto , Anciano , Conmoción Encefálica/epidemiología , Estudios de Cohortes , Femenino , Humanos , Incidencia , Estudios Longitudinales , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Modelos de Riesgos Proporcionales , Factores de Riesgo , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/epidemiología , Índices de Gravedad del Trauma , Estados Unidos/epidemiología , United States Department of Veterans Affairs
9.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33668985

RESUMEN

This study aimed to explore factors associated with poor quality of sleep in construction workers. This study was cross-sectional, correlational in design and used secondary data from fatigue instrument development study. We analyzed the data from 206 participants aged over 19 years who worked at construction sites for more than 6 months. We used multivariate binary logistic regression to identify the factors associated with poor quality of sleep. We classified the two sleep quality groups based on the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) score, and almost 63% of them were classified as the poor quality of sleep group. Based on multivariate binary logistic regression (Cox and Snell R2 = 0.317, Nagelkerke R2 = 0.429), the poor quality of sleep group tended to sleep for a shorter duration before the working day, and not only showed lower sleep latency and higher levels of daytime dysfunction and discomfort in daily life, but also had more chronic disease, depressive symptoms, and higher physical fatigue. Our study findings support that there are many modifiable factors associated with poor sleep and a high rate of poor quality of sleep occurred in construction workers. Thus, clinicians should consider providing diverse options for applying interventions to ensure better sleep, fatigue management, and depression prevention in construction workers after considering their unique characteristics.


Asunto(s)
Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia , Anciano , Estudios Transversales , Análisis de Datos , Fatiga/epidemiología , Humanos , Sueño , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/epidemiología , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/epidemiología
10.
Arq Neuropsiquiatr ; 79(2): 149-155, 2021 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33759982

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Coronavirus pandemic began in China in 2019 (COVID-19), causing not only public health problems but also great psychological distress, especially for physicians involved in coping with the virus or those of the risk group in social isolation, and this represents a challenge for the psychological resilience in the world population. Studies showed that health professionals had psychological symptoms such as depression, anxiety, insomnia, stress, among others. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the quality of sleep and the prevalence rate of sleeping disorders among physicians during COVID-19 pandemic, and identify the psychological and social factors associated with the condition. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of an online questionnaire was applied for physicians in Brazil. Among the 332 participants included, 227 were women. Sociodemographic assessment was used in the questionnaire, as well as the scale of impact on the events of modifications caused by COVID-19, assessment on sleep quality (PSQI), presence and severity of insomnia (ISI), depressive symptoms (PHQ-9), and anxiety (GAD-7). RESULTS: Most physicians (65.6%) had changes in sleep. Poor sleep quality was reported by 73.1%, depressive symptoms were present in 75.8%, and anxiety in 73.4%. CONCLUSION: Our study found that more than 70% of the physicians assessed had impaired sleep quality, characterizing insomnia symptoms during COVID-19 outbreak. Related factors included an environment of isolation, concerns about COVID-19 outbreak and symptoms of anxiety and depression. Special interventions are needed to promote health professionals' mental well-being and implement changes in this scenario.


Asunto(s)
Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño , Ansiedad/epidemiología , Brasil/epidemiología , China/epidemiología , Estudios Transversales , Depresión/epidemiología , Femenino , Humanos , Pandemias , Sueño , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/epidemiología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
11.
Zhonghua Nei Ke Za Zhi ; 60(4): 331-337, 2021 Apr 01.
Artículo en Chino | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33765702

RESUMEN

Objective: To investigate the current situation of insomnia in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS), and analyze the influencing factors of insomnia in the ACS patients, so as to provide information on the development of new strategies for the treatment of insomnia in ACS patients. Methods: This is a multicenter and prospective observational study. A total of 771 ACS patients who met the criteria were selected from March 2013 to June 2015. The baseline social demographic information, sleep quality questionnaire, general anxiety disorder scale-7(GAD-7),patient health questionnaire-9(PHQ-9), short-form 12 health survey questionnaire(SF-12), and enhancing recovery in coronary heart disease patients social inventory(ESSI) were completed within 7 days after admission. Logistic regression analyses were used to analyze the influencing factors of insomnia in ACS patients. Results: A total of 741 subjects with valid questionnaires were collected, including 510 males (68.8%) and 231 females (31.2%). Among them, 487 (65.7%) subjects had at least one insomnia symptom: 308 (41.6%) subjects had difficulty in falling asleep, 369 (49.8%) subjects were easy to wake at night, 116 (15.7%) subjects woke up earlier than they expected, 74 (10.0%) subjects experienced both woke up earlier and difficulty in falling asleep, and 53 (7.2%) subjects woke up earlier, woke up at night and had difficulty in falling asleep at the same time. Logistic regression analyses showed that before admission physical activity (OR =0.636, 95%CI 0.411-0.984), depression (OR=1.908, 95%CI 1.101-3.305) and low social support (OR=0.278, 95%CI 1.198-3.301) were independent factors of insomnia in ACS patients. Conclusions: Nearly 2/3 ACS patients have symptoms of insomnia. Difficulty in falling asleep and easy to wake up at night are the most common manifestations. Physical activity, depression and social support independently are associated with insomnia.


Asunto(s)
Síndrome Coronario Agudo , Enfermedad Coronaria , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño , Síndrome Coronario Agudo/complicaciones , Síndrome Coronario Agudo/epidemiología , Femenino , Encuestas Epidemiológicas , Humanos , Masculino , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/complicaciones , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/epidemiología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
12.
Epidemiol Psychiatr Sci ; 30: e20, 2021 Feb 15.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33583474

RESUMEN

AIMS: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic represents an unprecedented threat to mental health. Herein, we assessed the impact of COVID-19 on subthreshold depressive symptoms and identified potential mitigating factors. METHODS: Participants were from Depression Cohort in China (ChiCTR registry number 1900022145). Adults (n = 1722) with subthreshold depressive symptoms were enrolled between March and October 2019 in a 6-month, community-based interventional study that aimed to prevent clinical depression using psychoeducation. A total of 1506 participants completed the study in Shenzhen, China: 726 participants, who completed the study between March 2019 and January 2020 (i.e. before COVID-19), comprised the 'wave 1' group; 780 participants, who were enrolled before COVID-19 and completed the 6-month endpoint assessment during COVID-19, comprised 'wave 2'. Symptoms of depression, anxiety and insomnia were assessed at baseline and endpoint (i.e. 6-month follow-up) using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), Generalised Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7) and Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), respectively. Measures of resilience and regular exercise were assessed at baseline. We compared the mental health outcomes between wave 1 and wave 2 groups. We additionally investigated how mental health outcomes changed across disparate stages of the COVID-19 pandemic in China, i.e. peak (7-13 February), post-peak (14-27 February), remission plateau (28 February-present). RESULTS: COVID-19 increased the risk for three mental outcomes: (1) depression (odds ratio [OR] = 1.30, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.04-1.62); (2) anxiety (OR = 1.47, 95% CI: 1.16-1.88) and (3) insomnia (OR = 1.37, 95% CI: 1.07-1.77). The highest proportion of probable depression and anxiety was observed post-peak, with 52.9% and 41.4%, respectively. Greater baseline resilience scores had a protective effect on the three main outcomes (depression: OR = 0.26, 95% CI: 0.19-0.37; anxiety: OR = 1.22, 95% CI: 0.14-0.33 and insomnia: OR = 0.18, 95% CI: 0.11-0.28). Furthermore, regular physical activity mitigated the risk for depression (OR = 0.79, 95% CI: 0.79-0.99). CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic exerted a highly significant and negative impact on symptoms of depression, anxiety and insomnia. Mental health outcomes fluctuated as a function of the duration of the pandemic and were alleviated to some extent with the observed decline in community-based transmission. Augmenting resiliency and regular exercise provide an opportunity to mitigate the risk for mental health symptoms during this severe public health crisis.


Asunto(s)
/psicología , Depresión/epidemiología , Salud Mental/estadística & datos numéricos , Pandemias , Adulto , Ansiedad/epidemiología , Ansiedad/psicología , China/epidemiología , Estudios Transversales , Depresión/psicología , Femenino , Humanos , Estudios Longitudinales , Masculino , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/epidemiología , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/psicología
13.
BMC Psychiatry ; 21(1): 84, 2021 02 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33557765

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies of insomnia in the Middle East remain scarce. The present study aimed to estimate the prevalence of insomnia and explore its associations in the general population of Qatar. With almost 100 nationalities, Qatar is one of the most culturally diverse, richest, and fastest developing countries in the Arabian Peninsula. METHODS: A probability sample of community-dwelling adults were surveyed in February of 2019. A total of 1611 respondents completed face-to-face interviews in Arabic or English. Logistic regression modeled associations with insomnia, our dependent variable, as defined by a score of ≤16 on the eight-item Sleep Condition Indicator or according to criteria for insomnia in the Diagnostic & Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition or DSM-5. RESULTS: Approximately, 5.5% of the sample screened positive for insomnia and the 30-day prevalence of those who met all the DSM-5 criteria for insomnia disorder was 3.0%. In addition, 2.0% of the sample screened positive for depression and 3.4% for anxiety in the past 2 weeks. Multivariable analysis showed the following were significantly associated with insomnia: Arab ethnicity, young age, unemployment, being married, having less than high school education, fair or poor health, anxiety, and depression. CONCLUSIONS: Insomnia prevalence was in the lower range of previously reported DSM-defined estimates from developed Western countries. Our findings highlight the need for raising awareness and improving sleep hygiene in potential risk groups such as younger adults and those of Arab ethnicity, in addition to incorporating insomnia screening in the provision of mental health services.


Asunto(s)
Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño , Adulto , Manual Diagnóstico y Estadístico de los Trastornos Mentales , Humanos , Medio Oriente , Prevalencia , Qatar/epidemiología , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/diagnóstico , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/epidemiología
14.
J Affect Disord ; 282: 726-731, 2021 03 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33601713

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Insomnia and affective temperaments influence depressive symptoms in the general population. However, the ways in which the interaction between insomnia and affective temperaments affects depressive symptoms remains unknown. We studied the moderating effects of affective temperaments on the relationship between insomnia and depressive symptoms in adult community volunteers. METHODS: The participants were recruited from a community in Japan (n = 525). The Athens Insomnia Scale; Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris, and San Diego Auto-questionnaire version; and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 were used to evaluate insomnia, affective temperaments, and depressive symptoms, respectively. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis were conducted to evaluate the interactions. RESULTS: Insomnia significantly and positively interacted with cyclothymic, depressive, and anxious temperaments with regard to depressive symptoms, while insomnia significantly and negatively interacted with hyperthymic temperament on depressive symptoms. No significant interaction between insomnia and irritable temperament with regard to depressive symptoms were observed. LIMITATIONS: Since the participants were adult community volunteers in Japan, the results may not be generalizable to other communities. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that the influence of insomnia on depressive symptoms is moderated positively by cyclothymic, depressive, and anxious temperament and negatively by hyperthymic temperament. In adult community volunteers, affective temperaments may moderate the influence that insomnia has on depressive symptoms. Therefore, it may be useful to consider affective temperaments while dealing with depressive symptoms associated with insomnia.


Asunto(s)
Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño , Temperamento , Adulto , Depresión/epidemiología , Humanos , Japón/epidemiología , Inventario de Personalidad , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/epidemiología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Voluntarios
15.
High Blood Press Cardiovasc Prev ; 28(2): 85-102, 2021 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33630269

RESUMEN

Hypertension is a major contributor to fatal/nonfatal cardiovascular diseases, and timely identification and appropriate management of factors affecting hypertension and its control are mandatory public health issues. By inducing neurohormonal alterations and metabolic impairment, sleep disorders have an impact on a variety of cardiovascular risk factors, including hypertension, and ultimately increase the risk of cardiovascular events. There is evidence that qualitative and quantitative sleep disorders are associated with resistant hypertension and with impaired circadian blood pressure variations. However, sleep disturbances are often unrecognized, or heterogeneity exists in their management by non-specialists in the field. This document by the Italian Society of Hypertension summarizes the updated evidence linking sleep disorders to hypertension and cardiovascular diseases, the major underlying mechanisms, and the possible management strategies. A simplified, evidence-based diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm for comorbid hypertension and common sleep disorders, namely obstructive sleep apnoea and insomnia, is proposed.


Asunto(s)
Antihipertensivos/uso terapéutico , Presión Sanguínea/efectos de los fármacos , Enfermedades Cardiovasculares/prevención & control , Presión de las Vías Aéreas Positiva Contínua , Hipertensión/tratamiento farmacológico , Apnea Obstructiva del Sueño/terapia , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/terapia , Sueño , Enfermedades Cardiovasculares/diagnóstico , Enfermedades Cardiovasculares/epidemiología , Enfermedades Cardiovasculares/fisiopatología , Ritmo Circadiano , Comorbilidad , Consenso , Estilo de Vida Saludable , Humanos , Hipertensión/diagnóstico , Hipertensión/epidemiología , Hipertensión/fisiopatología , Pronóstico , Medición de Riesgo , Conducta de Reducción del Riesgo , Apnea Obstructiva del Sueño/diagnóstico , Apnea Obstructiva del Sueño/epidemiología , Apnea Obstructiva del Sueño/fisiopatología , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/diagnóstico , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/epidemiología , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/fisiopatología
16.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(2): e25363, 2021 02 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33523828

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a negative impact on both the physical and mental health of individuals worldwide. Evidence regarding the association between mental health problems and information exposure among Thai citizens during the COVID-19 outbreak is limited. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to explore the relationship between information exposure and mental health problems during the COVID-19 pandemic in Thailand. METHODS: Between April 21 and May 4, 2020, we conducted a cross-sectional, nationwide online survey of the general population in Thailand. We categorized the duration of exposure to COVID-19-related information as follows: <1 h/day (reference group), 1-2 h/day, and ≥3 h/day. Mental health outcomes were assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 scale, the Perceived Stress Scale-10, and the Insomnia Severity Index for symptoms of depression, anxiety, perceived stress, and insomnia, respectively. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to evaluate the relationship between information exposure and the risk of developing the aforementioned symptoms. An ancillary analysis using multivariable multinomial logistic regression models was also conducted to assess the possible dose-response relationship across the severity strata of mental health problems. RESULTS: Of the 4322 eligible participants, 4004 (92.6%) completed the online survey. Of them, 1481 (37.0%), 1644 (41.1%), and 879 (22.0%) participants were exposed to COVID-19-related information for less than 1 hour per day, 1 to 2 hours per day, or 3 or more hours per day, respectively. The major source of information related to the COVID-19 pandemic was social media (95.3%), followed by traditional media (68.7%) and family members (34.9%). Those exposed to information for 3 or more hours per day had a higher risk of developing symptoms of depression (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.35, 95% CI 1.03-1.76; P=.03), anxiety (adjusted OR 1.88, 95% CI 1.43-2.46; P<.001), and insomnia (adjusted OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.17-1.97; P=.001) than people exposed to information for less than 1 hour per day. Meanwhile, people exposed to information for 1 to 2 hours per day were only at risk of developing symptoms of anxiety (adjusted OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.08-1.69; P=.008). However, no association was found between information exposure and the risk of perceived stress. In the ancillary analysis, a dose-response relationship was observed between information exposure of 3 or more hours per day and the severity of mental health problems. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that social media is the main source of COVID-19-related information. Moreover, people who are exposed to information for 3 or more hours per day are more likely to develop psychological problems, including depression, anxiety, and insomnia. Longitudinal studies investigating the long-term effects of COVID-19-related information exposure on mental health are warranted.


Asunto(s)
Ansiedad/epidemiología , Depresión/epidemiología , Educación en Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Salud Mental/estadística & datos numéricos , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/epidemiología , Estrés Psicológico/epidemiología , Adulto , Estudios Transversales , Brotes de Enfermedades , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Pandemias , Medios de Comunicación Sociales/provisión & distribución , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Tailandia/epidemiología
17.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33572328

RESUMEN

The study aimed to explore the influence of the COVID-19 lockdown on the mental status and dietary intake of residents in Saudi Arabia. In this cross-sectional study, an online survey was conducted from 11 May to 6 June 2020 corresponding to almost two weeks during and after Ramadan (23 April-23 May 2020). The Patient Health Questionnaire was used to assess anxiety, depression, and insomnia. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify predictors of anxiety, depression, and insomnia. The prevalence of anxiety, depression, and insomnia among the participants was 25.4%, 27.7%, and 19.6%, respectively. Participants aged ≥50 years with high income (≥8000 SAR) were at a lower risk of developing depression, whereas participants of the same age group with income 5000-7000 SAR were at high risk of developing anxiety. Students and master-educated participants suffer from median elevated depression and are required to take more multivitamins and vitamin D than others. Anxiety and depression were more common among married participants with low income. There is a wide range of Saudi residents who are at a higher risk of mental illness during the COVID-19 pandemic. Policymakers and mental healthcare providers are advised to provide continuous monitoring of the psychological consequences during this pandemic and provide mental support.


Asunto(s)
/psicología , Dieta , Salud Mental , Pandemias , Adulto , Ansiedad/epidemiología , Control de Enfermedades Transmisibles , Estudios Transversales , Depresión/epidemiología , Ingestión de Alimentos , Femenino , Humanos , Renta , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Arabia Saudita/epidemiología , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/epidemiología , Adulto Joven
18.
Head Face Med ; 17(1): 6, 2021 Feb 23.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33622360

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Psychological factors such as depression, anxiety, stress and insomnia and problematic social media use are able to alter our memories and might have an impact on memory function and retrieval. More studies are needed to better understand the relationship between memory performance and mental health disorders, especially the ones that could be related to problematic social media use. The objective of this study was to evaluate any association between problematic social media use, depression, anxiety, stress, and insomnia vs memory performance among a representative sample of Lebanese people. METHODS: This cross-sectional study, conducted between January and May 2019, enrolled 466 community dwelling participants using a proportionate random sample from all Lebanese governorates. The questionnaire consisted of the following measures: the Memory Awareness Rating Scale (MARS) to assesses views of memory performance, the problematic social media use scale to measure the degree of addiction to social media, the Hamilton depression rating scale and Hamilton anxiety scale to assess depression and anxiety respectively, the Beirut Distress Scale to assess stress and the Lebanese Insomnia sale to assess insomnia. The data analysis was performed using the SPSS software version 25. A linear regression was conducted, taking the memory performance scale as the dependent variable. A mediation analysis was performed to test the effect of problematic social media use on memory performance mediated by depression, anxiety, stress and insomnia. RESULTS: Higher problematic social media use (Beta = - 0.21) and higher anxiety (Beta = - 0.25) were significantly associated with lower memory performance. The association between problematic social media use and memory performance was partially mediated by anxiety (21.19%) but not depression, stress or insomnia. CONCLUSION: Concerning problematic social media use, a clear correlation was demonstrated in this study linking it to lower memory performances. Future studies should evaluate the possible mechanisms and methods for effective awareness especially towards the younger generation.


Asunto(s)
Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño , Medios de Comunicación Sociales , Adulto , Ansiedad/epidemiología , Estudios Transversales , Depresión/epidemiología , Humanos , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/epidemiología
19.
BMC Psychiatry ; 21(1): 99, 2021 02 16.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33593317

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic have caused mental and psychological problems on the general population, patients, and related workers. Our study is to determine the impact of mental and psychological symptoms among population in quarantine for 2 weeks during COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A case-controlled study design have conducted at department of psychiatry of Shenzhen Longgang Center for Chronic Disease Control in Shenzhen, China mainland from 7th April to 15th June 2020.1674 participants (aged 18 to 65 years) in quarantine for 2 weeks and 1743 age-sex matched controls living in Shenzhen were recruited between 7th April 2020 and 15th June 2020. The assessment of depressive, anxiety, and insomnia symptoms were determined by self-reported questionnaires PHQ-9, GAD-7, and ISI, respectively. RESULTS: A total of 1674 participants in quarantine for 2 weeks and 1743 age-sex matched controls (32.6 ± 9.3 years vs. 32.7 ± 10.7 years, 49.8% vs. 47.8% females) were recruited. Population in quarantine had higher score on PHQ-9 (6.1 ± 5.5 vs. 3.0 ± 3.7, p < 0.001), GAD-7 (4.2 ± 4.7 vs. 1.9 ± 3.7, p < 0·001), and ISI (5.5 ± 5.8 vs. 3.1 ± 5.0%, p < 0.001) compared to general population. Population in quarantine showed significantly higher risks of depression (OR: 4.55, 95% CI: 3.82-5.41), anxiety (OR: 2.92, 95% CI: 2.43-3.51), and insomnia (OR: 2.40, 95% CI: 2.02-2.89), when compared to the general population. Younger, more education, non-married and lower household income showed higher risks of mental health problems. CONCLUSIONS: Population in quarantine had a higher level of depressive, anxiety, and insomnia symptoms than controls. Specifically, they were at a higher risk prevalence of depression, anxiety, and insomnia, especially the severity of depression, when compared to controls. Younger, more education, non-married, and lower income population in quarantine were at higher risks of mental health problems. Mental health professionals should pay attention to the mental and psychological symptoms for population in quarantine.


Asunto(s)
Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño , Adolescente , Adulto , Anciano , Ansiedad/epidemiología , Estudios Transversales , Depresión/epidemiología , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Salud Mental , Persona de Mediana Edad , Pandemias , Cuarentena , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/epidemiología , Adulto Joven
20.
PLoS One ; 16(2): e0246515, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33544772

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: During health disaster events such as the current devastating havoc being inflicted on countries globally by the SARS-CoV-19 pandemic, mental health problems among survivors and frontline workers are likely concerns. However, during such health disaster events, stakeholders tend to give more precedence to the socio-economic and biomedical health consequences at the expense of mental health. Meanwhile, studies show that regardless of the kind of disaster/antecedent, all traumatic events trigger similar post-traumatic stress symptoms among survivors, families, and frontline workers. Thus, our study investigated the prevalence of anxiety, depression and insomnia symptoms among survivors of the 2014-2016 Ebola virus disease that plagued the West African sub-region. METHODS: We systematically retrieved peer-reviewed articles published between 1970 and 2019 from seven electronic databases, including Google Scholar, MEDLINE, PsychInfo, PubMed, Scopus, Springer Link, Web of Science on Ebola and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms. A comprehensive hand search complemented this literature search. Of the 87 articles retrieved, only 13 met the inclusion criteria for this meta-analysis. RESULTS: After heterogeneity, influence, and publication bias analysis, our meta-analysis pooled proportion effects estimates showed a moderate to a high prevalence of anxiety (14%; 99% CI: 0.05-0.30), depression (15%; 99% CI: 0.11-0.21), and insomnia (22%; 99% CI: 0.13-0.36). Effect estimates ranging from (0.13; 99% CI: 0.05, 0.28) through to (0.11; 99% CI: 0.05-0.22), (0.15; 99% CI: 0.09-0.25) through to (0.13; 99% CI: 0.08-0.21) and (0.23; 99% CI: 0.11-0.41) to (0.23; 99% CI: 0.11-0.41) were respectively reported for anxiety, depression and insomnia symptoms. These findings suggest a significant amount of EVD survivors are struggling with anxiety, depression and insomnia symptoms. CONCLUSION: Our study provided the first-ever meta-analysis evidence of anxiety, depression, and insomnia symptoms among EVD survivors, and suggest that the predominant biomedical health response to regional and global health disasters should be complemented with trauma-related mental health services.


Asunto(s)
Ansiedad/complicaciones , Depresión/complicaciones , Fiebre Hemorrágica Ebola/complicaciones , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/complicaciones , África Occidental/epidemiología , Ansiedad/epidemiología , Trastornos de Ansiedad/complicaciones , Trastornos de Ansiedad/epidemiología , Depresión/epidemiología , Trastorno Depresivo/complicaciones , Trastorno Depresivo/epidemiología , Ebolavirus/aislamiento & purificación , Fiebre Hemorrágica Ebola/epidemiología , Humanos , Prevalencia , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/epidemiología , Sobrevivientes
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