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1.
Braz Oral Res ; 34: e019, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32187305

RESUMEN

The aim of this study was to verify the oral habits, symptoms, and characteristics of some children aged 8 to 10 years that could be associated with possible sleep bruxism. A cross-sectional study was performed. Questionnaires were sent to parents to obtain information on sex, age, school shift, sleep quality, parents' perception of children's behavior, and children's oral habits (nail biting, object biting, and lip biting), and symptoms such as headache or earache. In addition, parents reported the frequency of sleep bruxism (no day to 7 days a week). Descriptive analysis and multinomial logistic regression were performed and the level of significance was set at 5%. A total of 1,554 parents of children aged 8 to 10 years participated in this study. Possible sleep bruxism was reported as mild for 65.7%, moderate for 25.3%, and severe for 9% of the children. In the adjusted multinomial logistic regression, boys were 79% more likely to have sleep bruxism (OR: 1.79; 95%CI 1.23-2.60) and were 2.06 more times at risk of being in the habit of lip biting (OR: 2.06; 95%CI 1.26-3.37). Children with possible severe sleep bruxism were 61% more likely to develop object biting (OR: 1.61; 95%CI 1.09-2.39), 52% more likely to have headaches (OR: 1.52; 95%CI 1.01-2.28), and 3.29 more times at risk of poor sleep quality (OR: 3.29; 95%CI 2.25-4.82). Based on the report, boys with lip and object biting habits, headaches, and poor sleep quality presented a higher chance of possible severe sleep bruxism.


Asunto(s)
Hábitos , Bruxismo del Sueño/epidemiología , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/epidemiología , Brasil/epidemiología , Niño , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Cefalea/complicaciones , Cefalea/epidemiología , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Factores de Riesgo , Índice de Severidad de la Enfermedad , Factores Sexuales , Bruxismo del Sueño/etiología , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/complicaciones , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
2.
Clin Nephrol ; 93(1): 17-23, 2020 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31599227

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Sleep disorders are common in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) or end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). Polysomnography (PSG) is the gold standard diagnostic tool but is not easily available in all jurisdictions. We aimed to evaluate various questionnaires and wrist actigraphy as screening tools for sleep disorders in the context of ESKD, by comparing results to unattended home PSG results. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Consecutive patients with advanced CKD or ESKD were recruited and assessed using a combination of self-reported instruments (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, International Restless Legs Questionnaire, Short Form 36), wrist actigraphy, and unattended home PSG. The utility of the questionnaires was summarized. Agreement between acti-graphy and PSG scores was assessed. RESULTS: There was a high prevalence of self-reported sleep disturbance among the 54 participants. The questionnaires had low positive and negative predictive values for their corresponding PSG-measured variables. There were no significant differences between paired PSG and actigraphy summary results for sleep efficiency and time spent awake after sleep onset (n = 27 paired comparisons). CONCLUSION: Commonly used screening questionnaires do not accurately predict sleep disorders in the context of advanced CKD or ESKD. Wrist actigraphy accurately identifies those with low sleep efficiency and long time spent awake after sleep onset, who are likely to have the highest diagnostic yield with PSG. Neither approach obviates the need for PSG for accurate diagnosis of sleep disorders in this population.


Asunto(s)
Actigrafía , Fallo Renal Crónico/complicaciones , Polisomnografía , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/complicaciones , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/diagnóstico , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Adulto , Anciano , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Tamizaje Masivo/métodos , Persona de Mediana Edad , Polisomnografía/métodos , Valor Predictivo de las Pruebas , Sueño
3.
Z Gerontol Geriatr ; 53(2): 100-104, 2020 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31863167

RESUMEN

Sufficient and refreshing sleep is important for good health, physical and cognitive functioning as well as quality of life. An assessment of sleep quality and sleep disorders is therefore mandatory in geriatric patients. Despite a variety of clinical assessment tools for screening and diagnosing sleep disorders, only some of them have been validated in older subjects and nearly none in geriatric patients or in individuals with dementia. Therefore, the aim of this review is to present a concise overview of assessment tools for sleep disorders that are widely used in sleep medicine and to briefly discuss the suitability and limitations in geriatric patients and subjects with dementia.


Asunto(s)
Disfunción Cognitiva/complicaciones , Evaluación Geriátrica/métodos , Calidad de Vida , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/complicaciones , Sueño/fisiología , Anciano , Demencia/complicaciones , Humanos , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/psicología
4.
Clin Child Psychol Psychiatry ; 25(1): 200-212, 2020 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30957529

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Both fatigue and sleep difficulties are common symptoms of mental health presentations such as depression and anxiety. Despite this, little is known about how psychologists in Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) assess and treat these common symptoms. METHOD: Qualitative interviews with nine psychologists working in CAMHS analysed using thematic analysis. RESULTS: Fatigue and sleep problems do not tend to be the focus of assessment because they are seen to be part of other presentations and not accorded priority. Psychologists struggled to differentiate fatigue from sleep problems, with greater clarity about sleep problems, which appear to be more routinely assessed. A number of barriers to addressing fatigue and sleep problems were identified, including lack of motivation from young people to make behavioural changes to address fatigue and/or sleep difficulties. Psychologists wished for more training, access to information for young people and families and more service integration with paediatric physical health settings. CONCLUSION: Sleep problems and fatigue may not be thoroughly assessed and addressed in CAMHS and are often conflated, with the focus on enquiring about sleep, not fatigue. Further research is required to elucidate whether the themes identified are more pervasive. Potential interventions include training and information provision.


Asunto(s)
Fatiga/terapia , Trastornos Mentales/complicaciones , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/terapia , Adolescente , Servicios de Salud del Adolescente , Niño , Servicios de Salud del Niño , Fatiga/complicaciones , Humanos , Servicios de Salud Mental , Investigación Cualitativa , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/complicaciones , Resultado del Tratamiento
5.
Nihon Yakurigaku Zasshi ; 154(6): 306-309, 2019.
Artículo en Japonés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31787681

RESUMEN

Sleep abnormality such as frequent nocturnal arousal and decreased deep non-REM (rapid-eye-movement) sleep is a prevalent but under-recognized symptom that affects patients with various neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). In contrast to the conventional understanding that the sleep abnormality in these patients is caused by AD or PD pathology in the brain regions regulating sleep-wake or circadian rhythm, various epidemiological studies have demonstrated the association of sleep abnormality with an increased risk of these diseases. Through various recent studies using relevant animal models to test the causal relationship between sleep abnormality and neurodegenerative diseases, the recent concept of a bidirectional relationship between sleep abnormality and neurodegenerative diseases was established. However, whether therapeutic interventions against sleep abnormality would modify the disease course of neurodegenerative diseases remains unknown. In this review, we will first provide an overview of previous studies that link neurodegenerative diseases and sleep abnormality, mainly focusing on the sleep abnormality in patients with AD. We will then introduce the studies that examined the causal relationship between sleep abnormality and neurodegenerative diseases. Finally, we will discuss possible mechanisms underlying the bidirectional relationship between sleep abnormality and neurodegenerative diseases. A better understanding of these mechanisms would lead to the development of novel pharmacological and/or non-pharmacological treatments that would modify the disease course of neurodegenerative diseases through targeting the processes related to sleep abnormality in the patients of neurodegenerative diseases.


Asunto(s)
Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas/complicaciones , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/complicaciones , Enfermedad de Alzheimer/complicaciones , Animales , Humanos , Sueño
6.
Bratisl Lek Listy ; 120(11): 849-855, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31747766

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental condition associated with sleep disturbances that may result from abnormalities in melatonin production. The correlations of melatonin levels with the severity of sleep disorder and/or severity of ASD were reported. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate urinary levels of the melatonin metabolite, 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (aMT6s), in children with ASD, and their associations with sleep abnormalities and behavioural impairments. METHODS: Study involved 77 children with ASD and 84 controls aged 2.5‒15.5 years. Sleep disorders were assessed by Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire. Morning and afternoon levels of aMT6s were determined by radioimmunoassay method. Urinary creatinine levels were assessed by an enzymatic method. RESULTS: The urinary aMT6s/creatinine values indicate that the night-time melatonin levels are significantly lower in ASD than in controls, but there are no significant differences in the daytime levels. In the ASD group, on average, a 6.8-fold difference between night-time and daytime values of urinary aMT6s/creatinine was found, whereas for the controls a 12.5-fold difference was observed, indicating a lower night-time increase in melatonin levels. In ASD group, the difference in night-time-daytime aMT6s/creatinine value correlated with some types of sleep problems, but not with the severity of ASD. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that in ASD there are differences in the patterns of melatonin secretion that may be associated with sleep impairment (Tab. 4, Fig. 2, Ref. 28).


Asunto(s)
Trastorno del Espectro Autista/complicaciones , Melatonina/análogos & derivados , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/orina , Adolescente , Estudios de Casos y Controles , Niño , Preescolar , Humanos , Melatonina/orina , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/complicaciones
7.
Orv Hetil ; 160(47): 1872-1880, 2019 Nov.
Artículo en Húngaro | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31736343

RESUMEN

Introduction: The problem of diabetes worldwide raises increasingly serious public health issues in Hungary. In recent years, the emphasis on obesity as a primary cause of diabetes has been driven by a complex understanding of the causes of civilization: the role of sleep problems and stress in the development of the disease and the aggravation of the condition has been proven and supported. Aim: The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between stress, sleep problems and diabetes in the representative Hungarostudy 2013 survey. Method: In the cross-sectional questionnaire study, 2000 adults participated. Mean of age was 46.9 (SD = 18.24) years. The average BMI was 26.0 (SD = 4.97) kg/m2. Measures: socio-demographic data, question about the presence of treated diabetes, symptomatic list, Perceived Stress Scale. Results: The frequency of diabetes treated one year before the date of the survey was 8.2%. The levels of stress experienced by diabetic patients were significantly higher than those experienced by participants not treated with diabetes (t(1944) = -2.586, p = 0.010). After adjusting potential background variables, perceived stress shows a marginally significant relationship with diabetes (OR = 1.03, p = 0.052). 26.0% of the respondents reported sleep problems last month, while 40.2% of them reported fatigue and energy shortages. The presence of sleep problems (χ2(2) = 61.108, p<0.001) and feeling of fatigue or lack of energy (χ2(2) = 51.061, p<0.001) are significantly more frequent among people with diabetes. Treated diabetes also predicts the presence of sleep problems (OR = 1.77, p = 0.003) as well as fatigue and lack of energy (OR = 1.88, p = 0.004) under the control of potential background variables. Conclusion: Our results show that, according to trends in other parts of the world, both sleep problems and stress play a significant role in the development of diabetes in Hungary. This draws attention to the need for effective screening and treatment of these factors in the prevention and treatment of diabetes in accordance with international protocols. Orv Hetil. 2019; 160(47): 1872-1880.


Asunto(s)
Diabetes Mellitus/psicología , Fatiga/complicaciones , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/complicaciones , Estrés Psicológico/etiología , Adulto , Estudios Transversales , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiología , Fatiga/epidemiología , Femenino , Humanos , Hungría/epidemiología , Masculino , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/epidemiología , Estrés Psicológico/epidemiología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
8.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 98(46): e17642, 2019 Nov.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31725607

RESUMEN

The sleep allows many psychological processes, such as immune system activity, body metabolism and hormonal balance, emotional and mental health, learning, mnemonic processes. The lack of sleep could undermine mental and physical purposes, causing an alteration in cognitive functions or metabolic disorders. In our study, we have examined the irregular sleep effects with the overweight and obesity risk in children and adults.The sample was composed of 199 subjects, of which 71 adults, (29 males and 42 females), and 128 children (73 males and 55 females). We have measured the weight and height with standard techniques; we also have measured the body mass index dividing the weight in kg with the height square expressed in meters (kg/m). Subjects were divided into underweight, normal weight, overweight, and obese. Were administered some questionnaires to measure the quantity and quality of sleep, and eating habits and individual consumption of food.Analysis of demographic variables not showed significant differences between male and female groups but highlighted a significant trend differences in normal-weight score. The clinical condition has a substantial impact on body mass index score and sleep hours were significant predictor on this.Quantity and quality sleep can also represent a risk factor of overweight and obesity, so sufficient sleep is a factor that influence a normal weight. Adults and children that sleep less, have an increase in obesity and overweight risk with dysfunctional eating behaviors, decreased physical activity, and metabolic changes.


Asunto(s)
Obesidad/fisiopatología , Sobrepeso/fisiopatología , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/fisiopatología , Sueño/fisiología , Delgadez/fisiopatología , Adulto , Índice de Masa Corporal , Niño , Conducta Alimentaria , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Obesidad/complicaciones , Sobrepeso/complicaciones , Factores de Riesgo , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/complicaciones , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Delgadez/complicaciones
9.
Int Rev Neurobiol ; 147: 121-153, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31607352

RESUMEN

Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is often overlooked, has unclear etiology and no effective cure except some symptomatic treatments. Additionally, most people with CFS do not seek medical attention. Qigong exercise, an ancient Eastern body-mind-spirit practice, has been long practiced in Chinese communities and may powerfully trigger the self-healing process. Using full baseline data (n=1409), the average Hong Kong CFS respondent was found to be female, married, 42.5yo, highly educated and employed full-time, experiencing sleep disturbance (~95%), anxiety (>80%), and depressive symptoms (68%). Here, we summarized our previous studies to evaluate the potential of Qigong as a complementary and alternative therapy for CFS. Two randomized controlled trials were conducted (RCT1 n1=137, RCT2 n2=150). In both trials, extensive online questionnaires allowed individuals with CFS-like illness (i.e., symptoms match CFS, yet without clinical confirmation) to be identified. RCT1 included a 5-week intervention. The intervention in RCT2 was 8weeks. In RCT1 Qigong group had reduced fatigue (P<0.001) and depressive symptoms (P=0.002), and improved telomerase activity (P=0.029). An effective practice regimen was identified (≥3 days/week, at ≥30min/session). Methods were slightly adjusted for RCT2, which replicated RCT1 findings, and further documented improved subjective sleep quality (P=0.008) and adiponectin levels (P<0.05). A significant dose-response relationship was founded. Thus, Qigong exercise should be recognized as a possible standalone therapy and self-management skill in CFS. Strategies are needed to increase motivation for regular practice and to explore its possibility of self-management skill in brain health. Further clarity would come from studies comparing Qigong with other physical exercises.


Asunto(s)
Síndrome de Fatiga Crónica/terapia , Qigong , Adiponectina/sangre , Adulto , Depresión/complicaciones , Depresión/terapia , Terapia por Ejercicio , Síndrome de Fatiga Crónica/sangre , Síndrome de Fatiga Crónica/complicaciones , Síndrome de Fatiga Crónica/metabolismo , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Proyectos Piloto , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/complicaciones , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/terapia , Telomerasa/metabolismo , Adulto Joven
10.
Medicina (B Aires) ; 79 Suppl 3: 33-36, 2019.
Artículo en Español | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31603841

RESUMEN

The development and establishment of the normal sleep patterns are very important processes in the final anatomical and physiological architecture of the central nervous system. The relationship between sleep disturbances during childhood with neurodevelopmental disorders is complex and potentially synergistic. Sleep patterns are present since the fetal period but their structure and physiology is modified according with the maturation of the central nervous system. Sleep disorders and their relationship with attention deficit hyperactivity disorders(ADHD), autism spectrum disorders(ASD) and other neurodevelopmental disorders (TDN) are not well understood yet, but significant progresses have been made in understanding associations and potential etiological correlations. We reviewed sleep disturbances in NDT, in ADHD and in ASD. A greater understanding of the pleiotropic functions of the genes involved in sleepwake cycle disorders and deviations from neurological developme nt could lead to new diagnostic and therapeut ic strategies in an early stage in order to improve the quality of life of the patient, relatives and caregivers.


Asunto(s)
Trastorno por Déficit de Atención con Hiperactividad/complicaciones , Trastorno del Espectro Autista/complicaciones , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/complicaciones , Trastorno por Déficit de Atención con Hiperactividad/genética , Trastorno del Espectro Autista/genética , Preescolar , Ritmo Circadiano , Humanos , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/diagnóstico , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/genética
11.
Zhongguo Dang Dai Er Ke Za Zhi ; 21(10): 987-991, 2019 Oct.
Artículo en Chino | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31642432

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence of obesity and sleep disorders and the association between them among children in Lanzhou, China. METHODS: The stratified cluster random sampling method was used to select 3 283 primary school students in four districts of Lanzhou of Gansu province. Physical examination and sleep questionnaire were conducted to screen out the children who met the criteria for sleep disorders or obesity as subjects. Among the 3 283 children, 200 healthy children without sleep disorders or obesity were enrolled as the control group. RESULTS: The prevalence rate of obesity among the 3 283 children was 5.76% (189/3 283). Among these 189 obese children, 80 (42.3%) had sleep disorders. The prevalence rate of sleep disorders was 16.24% (533/3 283), and the prevalence rate of obesity among the children with sleep disorders was 24.6% (131/533). Snoring was the most common sleep disorder in obese children. The prevalence rate of obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome was 45% (36/80) among obese children with sleep disorders. The obese children had a significantly higher prevalence rate of sleep disorders than the children with normal body weight [42.3% (80/189) vs 20% (40/200), P<0.01]. CONCLUSIONS: There is a close relationship between obesity and sleep disorders in children in Lanzhou, China.


Asunto(s)
Obesidad , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia , Índice de Masa Corporal , Niño , China , Humanos , Obesidad/complicaciones , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/complicaciones , Ronquido
12.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 28(11): 104349, 2019 Nov.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31492629

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Sleep disorders are more prevalent in patients with previous stroke compared to healthy individuals. The main objective of the present study was to investigate the impact of sleep quality on the functional status of patients with a history of stroke, upon admission to inpatient rehabilitation. METHODS: Fifty patients (mean age: 69 ± 11 years) with previous stroke were consecutively included in this single center cross-sectional observational study upon admission to inpatient rehabilitation. Pittsburgh Sleep Questionnaire Index (PSQI) was calculated for all patients and patients were divided into 2 groups according to PSQI scores (PSQI ≤ 5 as good sleepers and PSQI > 5 as poor sleepers). A specialist evaluated the level of muscle spasticity and disability, walking capability, and overall performance of daily activity of all enrolled patients using the functional ambulation scale (FAS) score, modified Brunnstrom Classification, Modified Ashworth scale, and Beck Depression Inventory. RESULTS: The FAS score (3.4 ± 1.3 versus 1.8 ± 1.7, P = .004) and Brunnstrom scores of upper limb (3.8 ± 1.1 versus 2.5 ± 1.6, P = .005), lower limb (4.3 ± 1.4 versus 3.1 ± 1.7, P = .013) and hand (3.6 ± 1.5 versus 2.3 ± 1.6, P = .006) were significantly higher in good sleepers than poor sleepers. Linear regression analysis revealed that PSQI score (coefficient ß = -.360, 95% CI: -.212-.032, P = .009) and age (coefficient ß = -.291, 95% CI: .100-.245, P = .032) were independently associated with FAS score. CONCLUSION: Results of the present study indicate that presence of poor sleep quality is associated with poor functional status which might further impair the outcomes of the rehabilitation and accordingly the health-related quality of life in patients admitted for stroke rehabilitation.


Asunto(s)
Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/complicaciones , Sueño , Rehabilitación de Accidente Cerebrovascular , Accidente Cerebrovascular/terapia , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Estudios Transversales , Evaluación de la Discapacidad , Femenino , Estado de Salud , Humanos , Pacientes Internos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Admisión del Paciente , Recuperación de la Función , Factores de Riesgo , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/diagnóstico , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/fisiopatología , Accidente Cerebrovascular/complicaciones , Accidente Cerebrovascular/diagnóstico , Accidente Cerebrovascular/fisiopatología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Factores de Tiempo , Resultado del Tratamiento , Adulto Joven
13.
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol ; 127: 109665, 2019 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31526938

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: acoustic rhinometry (AR) is a non-invasive method measuring the nasal volume (NV) and the nasal minimal cross-sectional area (MCA), reflecting nasal obstruction. The first objective of this study was to measure and compare NV and MCA between 3 groups of children: "achondroplasia", "Down syndrome" and "control". The control group corresponded to children with suspicion of sleep disorder disease and without cranio-facial malformation. The second objective was to correlate AR measurements with the obstructive apnea-hypopnea index (OAHI). METHODS: prospective study between February and July 2017, in a tertiary care center. The following data were collected: demographic characteristics, medical and surgical history, NV, MCA, and OAHI. RESULTS: 83 children were included. The mean NV was lower in achondroplasia group compared to control group: 2.75 cm3 vs 3.60 cm3 (p = 0.02, 95% CI [0.0694, 0.7456]). Negative correlation was found between the NV and the OAHI for children with achondroplasia (T = -0.37; p = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: AR is an effective tool for assessing nasal obstruction in children. Nasal obstruction was correlated to OAHI in achondroplasia. AR could become a routine tool in the management of nasal obstruction of children with cranio-facial malformations.


Asunto(s)
Acondroplasia/complicaciones , Síndrome de Down/complicaciones , Cavidad Nasal/patología , Obstrucción Nasal/patología , Rinometría Acústica , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/complicaciones , Adolescente , Niño , Preescolar , Femenino , Humanos , Lactante , Masculino , Obstrucción Nasal/complicaciones , Tamaño de los Órganos , Estudios Prospectivos , Índice de Severidad de la Enfermedad
14.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31413895

RESUMEN

Background: Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common sleep disorder,. although controversial, growing evidence relates the presence of RLS to an increased risk of mortality, mainly due to cardiovascular events. The aim of this article was to review the role of RLS as a risk factor of mortality according to independent cohort studies. Methods: We performed a literature review via PubMed database for articles relating RLS and mortality. We used the random-effects model to calculate the pooled effect estimates on mortality. Heterogeneity between studies was assessed using quantitative and qualitative analysis. Results: Out of 100 articles identified, 13 were finally included. Although studies were heterogeneous (p = 0.001), no significant publication bias was found. When all cohort studies were considered, the random-effects model yielded a significantly increased risk of mortality in RLS versus non-RLS patients (13 studies, hazard ratio [HR] = 1.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.28-1.80). However, this association was not statistically significant when only cohort studies using the international RLS diagnostic criteria were considered (5 studies, HR = 1.63, 95% CI 0.94-2.81). Discussion: The results of this meta-analysis suggest that RLS seems to be a risk factor of mortality, although this association is conditioned by the diagnostic criteria used in the studies. Future long-term follow-up standardized mortality studies are needed to address this important question that carries potential impact on population global health.


Asunto(s)
Síndrome de las Piernas Inquietas/complicaciones , Síndrome de las Piernas Inquietas/mortalidad , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/mortalidad , Estudios de Cohortes , Estudios de Seguimiento , Humanos , Modelos de Riesgos Proporcionales , Síndrome de las Piernas Inquietas/fisiopatología , Factores de Riesgo , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/complicaciones
15.
Sleep Med Clin ; 14(3): 399-406, 2019 Sep.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31375208

RESUMEN

Sleep loss is a widespread phenomenon and a public health threat. Sleep disorders, medical conditions, lifestyles, and occupational factors all contribute to insufficient sleep. Regardless of the underlying cause, insufficient sleep has well-defined consequences and the severity of said consequences partially influenced by individual characteristics. It is here where precision medicine needs to understand and define sleep insufficiency in hopes for personalizing medical approach to improve patient outcomes. Following a discussion on causes and consequences of sleep loss, this article discusses tools for assessing sleep sufficiency, mitigating strategies to sleep loss, and sleep loss in the context of fatigue management.


Asunto(s)
Fatiga/terapia , Medicina de Precisión , Privación de Sueño/terapia , Fatiga/etiología , Humanos , Estilo de Vida , Sueño , Privación de Sueño/etiología , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/complicaciones , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/terapia
16.
Orv Hetil ; 160(32): 1279-1283, 2019 Aug.
Artículo en Húngaro | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31387375

RESUMEN

Introduction: Short sleep duration and poor sleep quality may be associated with weight gain; this association has not yet been studied in Roma (Gipsy) population. Aim: Our aim was to study sleep patterns in two adult Roma subgroups (the wealthy Gabor and the poor Lovari Roma), compared to the majority of Hungarian population, in relation to obesity, knowing that Roma population has specific socio-cultural characteristics, with a rapidly changing lifestyle. Method: A population-based cross-sectional survey was conducted in a rural region in Transylvania, where the above groups are cohabiting. The groups were age- and gender-matched. Results: Sleep duration was 7.18 ± 1.6 hours in the Gabor Roma, 7.67 ± 1.5 hours in the Lovari Roma and 7.37 ± 1.5 hours in the non-Roma group. In average, 70% of them had enough sleep (≥7 hours). 38.6% of Gabor Roma, 27.1% of Lovari Roma and 23.5% of non-Roma had poor-quality sleep (p = 0.05). Gabor Roma had significantly higher body mass index (31.1 ± 4.6 versus 27.4 ± 5.2 and 28.66 ± 5.7 kg/m2, p = 0.004), and this correlated inversely with sleep duration (F = 14.85, p<0.000). Conclusion: Gabor Roma had significantly higher percentage of poor-quality sleep. Sleep duration and sleep quality were linked with obesity, mainly in the Roma population. Orv Hetil. 2019; 160(32): 1279-1283.


Asunto(s)
Obesidad/etiología , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/complicaciones , Sueño/fisiología , Adulto , Estudios Transversales , Humanos , Hungría/epidemiología , Obesidad/epidemiología , Obesidad/etnología , Roma , Población Rural
17.
J Korean Med Sci ; 34(33): e226, 2019 Aug 26.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31436054

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between sleep duration and dizziness in a representative Korean population. METHODS: We analyzed data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (2010-2012). A total of 12,499 adults who completed otolaryngologic examinations were evaluated. RESULTS: Both men and women with severely short sleep duration (≤ 5 hours) and severely long sleep duration (≥ 9 hours) tended to have higher dizziness prevalence. However, the adjusted odds ratio (OR) for sleep duration was only significant in women with dizziness after adjusting for confounders. Compared to that in an optimal sleep group (6-8 hr/day), the OR (95% confidence interval) for dizziness prevalence after adjusting for age and health behaviors (body mass index, smoking habit, alcohol consumption, level of exercise, metabolic syndrome, and tinnitus) was 1.473 (1.194-1.818) for the severely short sleep group (≤ 5 hr/day) and 1.472 (1.078-2.009) for the severely long sleep group (≥ 9 hr/day) only in women. CONCLUSION: In the Korean population, dizziness was associated with shorter or longer sleep durations only among women. Further epidemiologic and experimental studies are necessary to clarify the impact of dizziness on sleep disorders.


Asunto(s)
Mareo/diagnóstico , Encuestas Epidemiológicas , Encuestas Nutricionales , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/diagnóstico , Mareo/complicaciones , Mareo/epidemiología , Femenino , Humanos , Estilo de Vida , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Oportunidad Relativa , Prevalencia , República de Corea/epidemiología , Índice de Severidad de la Enfermedad , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/complicaciones , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/epidemiología
18.
Behav Ther ; 50(5): 910-923, 2019 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31422847

RESUMEN

While evidence-based interventions can help the substantial number of veterans diagnosed with comorbid PTSD and depression, an emerging literature has identified sleep disturbances as predictors of treatment nonresponse. More specifically, predicting effects of residual insomnia and nightmares on postintervention PTSD and depressive symptoms among veterans with comorbid PTSD and depression has remained unclear. The present study used data from a clinical trial of Behavioral Activation and Therapeutic Exposure (BA-TE), a combined approach to address comorbid PTSD and depression, administered to veterans (N = 232) to evaluate whether residual insomnia and nightmare symptoms remained after treatment completion and, if so, whether these residual insomnia and nightmare symptoms were associated with higher levels of comorbid PTSD and depression at the end of treatment. Participants (ages 21 to 77 years old; 47.0% Black; 61.6% married) completed demographic questions, symptom assessments, and engagement-related surveys. Hierarchical multiple linear regression models demonstrated that residual insomnia was a significant predictor of PTSD and depression symptom reduction above and beyond the influence of demographic and engagement factors (e.g., therapy satisfaction). Consistent with previous research, greater residual insomnia symptoms were predictive of smaller treatment gains. Findings illustrate the potential significance of insomnia during the course of transdiagnostic treatment (e.g., PTSD and depression), leading to several important clinical assessment and treatment implications.


Asunto(s)
Depresión/complicaciones , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/complicaciones , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/complicaciones , Trastornos por Estrés Postraumático/complicaciones , Veteranos/psicología , Adulto , Anciano , Depresión/terapia , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Índice de Severidad de la Enfermedad , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/psicología , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/psicología , Trastornos por Estrés Postraumático/terapia , Veteranos/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto Joven
19.
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova ; 119(4. Vyp. 2): 73-80, 2019.
Artículo en Ruso | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31317919

RESUMEN

AIM: To assess the association between stroke and self-reported sleep disorders in the epidemiological studies of cardiovascular diseases in various regions of Russia (ESSE-RF). MATERIAL AND METHODS: A questionnaire survey included unorganized male and female population, aged 25 to 64 years, from 13 regions of the Russian Federation. In the analysis, answers to the question related to history of stroke: 'Did the doctor ever tell you that you had / had the following diseases?' (the 'Diseases' module) were included. The authors also evaluated answers about sleep duration, insomnia complaints, and sleepiness (the 'Sleep assessment' module). RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Of 20 357 respondents, 422 (2%) confirmed the history of stroke. Both short and long sleep duration were not associated with stroke. Complaints of sleep disorders (snoring, sleep apnea, difficulty falling and maintaining sleep, as well as their combinations) were more frequently correlated with stroke. After adjustment for gender, age, body mass index, office blood pressure, the regression analysis showed that odds ratio was not significant for all complaints, except the combination of sleep apnea with frequent daytime sleepiness (1.7 (95% CI 1.04-2.8) (p=0.034). Therefore, symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing and insomnia are more common in respondents with the history of stroke. The combination of sleep apnea and frequent sleepiness complaints may indicate more severe sleep disorders in post-stroke patients.


Asunto(s)
Síndromes de la Apnea del Sueño , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia , Accidente Cerebrovascular , Adulto , Anciano , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Federación de Rusia/epidemiología , Síndromes de la Apnea del Sueño/complicaciones , Síndromes de la Apnea del Sueño/epidemiología , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/complicaciones , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/epidemiología , Ronquido , Accidente Cerebrovascular/complicaciones , Accidente Cerebrovascular/epidemiología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
20.
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova ; 119(4. Vyp. 2): 89-98, 2019.
Artículo en Ruso | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31317921

RESUMEN

Sleep and wakefulness disorders are commonly seen in patients with Parkinson's disease, Lewy body dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Sleep provides a lot of functions which sustain normal condition of the brain and sleep disturbances can be one of the factors contributing to the development of neurodegenerative diseases. Sleep and wakefulness disorders can worsen the course of the neurodegenerative process and lead to an increase of symptoms, including cognitive dysfunction. In this review, the relationship between sleep and wakefulness disorders and cognitive impairment as well as clinical forms of sleep and wakefulness disorders and treatment methods in such patients are discussed.


Asunto(s)
Disfunción Cognitiva , Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia , Disfunción Cognitiva/complicaciones , Humanos , Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas/complicaciones , Sueño , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/complicaciones , Vigilia
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