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1.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31398907

RESUMEN

Changes in levels and patterns of physical activity might be a mechanism to assess and inform disaster recovery through the lens of wellbeing. However, few studies have examined disaster impacts on physical activity or the potential for physical activity to serve as an indicator of disaster recovery. In this exploratory study, we examined daily bicycle and pedestrian counts from four public bicycle/pedestrian trails in Houston, before and after Hurricane Harvey landfall, to assess if physical activity returned to pre-Harvey levels. An interrupted time series analysis was conducted to examine the immediate impact of Harvey landfall on physical activity; t-tests were performed to assess if trail usage returned to pre-Harvey levels. Hurricane Harvey was found to have a significant negative impact on daily pedestrian and bicycle counts for three of the four trails. Daily pedestrian and bicycle counts were found to return to pre-Harvey or higher levels at 6 weeks post-landfall at all locations studied. We discuss the potential for further research to examine the trends, feasibility, validity, and limitations of using bicycle and pedestrian use levels as a proxy for disaster recovery and wellbeing among affected populations.


Asunto(s)
Ciclismo/estadística & datos numéricos , Tormentas Ciclónicas/estadística & datos numéricos , Víctimas de Desastres/estadística & datos numéricos , Desastres/estadística & datos numéricos , Ejercicio , Peatones/estadística & datos numéricos , Recuperación de la Función , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Texas
2.
Washington, D.C.; PAHO; 2019-08-21.
en Inglés | PAHO-IRIS | ID: phr-51484

RESUMEN

[Description of the Course]. The Mass Casualty Management course is a didactic, multi-sectoral training course consisting of five days of lectures, field exercises and role-playing. It is designed to sharpen the response skills of mass casualty responders, helping them to more effectively manage events in human and/or other resources-challenged areas. On day six, it culminates in a series of practical field exercises, held at night, to underscore nocturnal challenges. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be eligible for a certificate in Mass Casualty Management, issued through the Ministry of Health or the National Disaster Office, in collaboration with the Pan American Health Organization. The course will be of value to all persons likely to be involved in a community’s response to a mass casualty event: police officers; fire officers; medical staff; first responders; ambulance service personnel; Coast Guard and the military; airport/airline employees; disaster managers; paramilitary and non-governmental organizations (NGOs), such as Red Cross volunteers; and security staff.


Asunto(s)
Incidentes con Víctimas en Masa , Recursos Humanos en Desastres , Cursos de Capacitación , Evaluación y Mitigación de Riesgos , Víctimas de Desastres , Américas
3.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31212766

RESUMEN

This study investigates the attitudes and behavioural intentions of community crisis response and tourism community participation in tourist destinations after the occurrence of a disaster. Further, we built a conceptual model of perceived community participation benefit, community attachment, community resilience, and crisis response and community participation intention and measured it using 556 samples surveyed after the Wenchuan earthquake, China. The results indicated that benefit perception, community attachment, and community resilience have a positive effect on crisis response and community participation. The study further reveals that the local tourism community gradually transforms the negative aspects of terrible disasters into development opportunities. Our case study particularly focuses on the initiative shown by and positive participation of the tourist community in the aforementioned transformation. The study proposes the Attachment, Benefit, and Capability framework of tourist community participation based on the crisis response perspective and expands the boundaries of tourist community participation research. The study has theoretical and practical significance, puts forward relevant countermeasures, and has significant implications.


Asunto(s)
Participación de la Comunidad/psicología , Participación de la Comunidad/estadística & datos numéricos , Víctimas de Desastres/psicología , Desastres , Terremotos , Viaje/psicología , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , China , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad
4.
Disasters ; 43(3): 555-574, 2019 Jul.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31206228

RESUMEN

This paper reviews the role of news with respect to the mental health of a population exposed to a disaster. It is based on the five essential elements of psychosocial care presented by Stevan E. Hobfoll et al. (2007) that can be introduced after a potentially traumatic event: promoting a sense of safety, calming, self and collective efficacy, connectedness, and hope. This study developed a method to relate these elements to television coverage and applied it to the stories (n=1,169) aired by the main networks in Chile in the 72 hours after an 8.8 magnitude earthquake struck on 27 February 2010. Of the five elements, promoting a sense of safety occurred most often (82.72 per cent), whereas the others were barely present (less than 10 per cent). The study argues that these elements can increase the possibility of framing the news, given that the audience watching can also be affected by a disaster.


Asunto(s)
Víctimas de Desastres/psicología , Desastres , Terremotos , Medios de Comunicación de Masas , Salud Mental , Chile , Humanos
5.
Yakugaku Zasshi ; 139(5): 817-826, 2019.
Artículo en Japonés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31061350

RESUMEN

The use of medical supply vehicles (mobile pharmacies) as a disaster measure developed after the Great East Japan Earthquake in 2011 when a massive tsunami destroyed the medicine supply system. In the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake, mobile pharmacies were dispatched from Oita, Wakayama, and Hiroshima and contributed to medical treatment in the disaster area. In this study, we conducted an interview to structure the mental conflicts of the pharmacists supporting the disaster victims by means of the mobile pharmacies, a novel medical support tool. We conducted a semi-structured interview of 21 pharmacists. The modified grounded theory approach was used for data collection and analysis. As a result, 36 concepts and 13 categories were generated. The support pharmacists maintained mobile pharmacies as a method for cooperation among multiple occupations, and talked about further collaboration in the operation of mobile pharmacies.


Asunto(s)
Medicina de Desastres , Planificación en Desastres , Terremotos , Salud Mental , Unidades Móviles de Salud , Farmacias , Farmacéuticos/psicología , Víctimas de Desastres , Humanos , Cooperación Internacional , Entrevistas como Asunto , Japón
7.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; 13(1): 38-43, 2019 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30841950

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: Two Category 5 storms, Hurricane Irma and Hurricane Maria, hit the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) within 13 days of each other in September 2017. These storms caused catastrophic damage across the territory, including widespread loss of power, destruction of homes, and devastation of critical infrastructure. During large scale disasters such as Hurricanes Irma and Maria, public health surveillance is an important tool to track emerging illnesses and injuries, identify at-risk populations, and assess the effectiveness of response efforts. The USVI Department of Health (DoH) partnered with shelter staff volunteers to monitor the health of the sheltered population and help guide response efforts. METHODS: Shelter volunteers collect data on the American Red Cross Aggregate Morbidity Report form that tallies the number of client visits at a shelter's health services every 24 hours. Morbidity data were collected at all 5 shelters on St. Thomas and St. Croix between September and October 2017. This article describes the health surveillance data collected in response to Hurricanes Irma and Maria. RESULTS: Following Hurricanes Irma and Maria, 1130 health-related client visits were reported, accounting for 1655 reasons for the visits (each client may have more than 1 reason for a single visit). Only 1 shelter reported data daily. Over half of visits (51.2%) were for health care management; 17.7% for acute illnesses, which include respiratory conditions, gastrointestinal symptoms, and pain; 14.6% for exacerbation of chronic disease; 9.8% for mental health; and 6.7% for injury. Shelter volunteers treated many clients within the shelters; however, reporting of the disposition (eg, referred to physician, pharmacist) was often missed (78.1%). CONCLUSION: Shelter surveillance is an efficient means of quickly identifying and characterizing health issues and concerns in sheltered populations following disasters, allowing for the development of evidence-based strategies to address identified needs. When incorporated into broader surveillance strategies using multiple data sources, shelter data can enable disaster epidemiologists to paint a more comprehensive picture of community health, thereby planning and responding to health issues both within and outside of shelters. The findings from this report illustrated that managing chronic conditions presented a more notable resource demand than acute injuries and illnesses. Although there remains room for improvement because reporting was inconsistent throughout the response, the capacity of shelter staff to address the health needs of shelter residents and the ability to monitor the health needs in the sheltered population were critical resources for the USVI DoH overwhelmed by the disaster. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2019;13:38-43).


Asunto(s)
Tormentas Ciclónicas/estadística & datos numéricos , Refugio de Emergencia/estadística & datos numéricos , Tiempo de Internación/estadística & datos numéricos , Vigilancia de la Población/métodos , Adolescente , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Niño , Preescolar , Víctimas de Desastres/estadística & datos numéricos , Refugio de Emergencia/organización & administración , Femenino , Humanos , Lactante , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Cruz Roja/organización & administración , Islas Virgenes de los Estados Unidos/epidemiología
8.
Chin J Traumatol ; 22(1): 41-46, 2019 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30850325

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: Using a quantitative approach, this study aims to assess Indonesian nurses' perception of their knowledge, skills, and preparedness regarding disaster management. METHODS: This study was a descriptive comparison in design. The research samples are Indonesian nurses working in medical services and educational institutions. The variables of nurses' preparedness to cope with disaster victims were measured using the Disaster Preparedness Evaluation Tool (DPET), which was electronically distributed to all nurses in Indonesia. Data were analyzed using a statistical descriptive one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and t-test with a significance level of 95%. RESULTS: In total, 1341 Indonesian nurses completed this survey. The average scores of preparedness to cope with disasters, the ability to recover from disaster, and evaluation of disaster victims were 3.13, 2.53, and 2.46, respectively. In general, nurses surveyed in this study are less prepared for disaster management, and do not understand their roles both during the phase of disaster preparedness, and when coping with a post-disaster situation. CONCLUSION: Nurses' preparedness and understanding of their roles in coping with disasters are still low in Indonesia. Therefore, their capacity in preparedness, responses, recovery, and evaluation of disasters needs improvement through continuing education. The efforts needed are significant due to potential disasters in Indonesia and adequate nurses resources.


Asunto(s)
Defensa Civil , Planificación en Desastres , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Enfermeras y Enfermeros/psicología , Percepción , Adaptación Psicológica , Adulto , Estudios Transversales , Víctimas de Desastres , Educación Continua en Enfermería , Femenino , Humanos , Indonesia , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Rol Profesional , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Adulto Joven
10.
Sangyo Eiseigaku Zasshi ; 61(3): 95-107, 2019 May 25.
Artículo en Japonés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30787209

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Chiyoda City in Tokyo plays a central role in Japanese politics and the economy, with a daytime population of 820,000 and a nighttime population of 50,000. Consequently, companies are required to take measures to ensure the safety of evacuees and employees and to have a minimum knowledge of health care. These requirements necessitate an examination of the contents of intervention and support from the perspective of nursing, as a form of disaster preparedness cooperation among industry, government, and local communities. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to clarify the actual conditions of disaster preparedness and challenges regarding disaster countermeasures faced by companies in Chiyoda City and to examine the types of support required for facilitating disaster preparedness from the perspective of nursing. METHODS: Data were collected through semi-structured face-to-face interviews with the six persons in charge of disaster management at companies in Chiyoda City. Qualitative descriptive analysis was used for clarifying the companies' actual disaster preparedness practices and challenges. RESULTS: The participants acknowledged that specific disaster preparedness efforts at each company were carried out based on past experience with accidents and disasters and that their interests and efforts were promoted by associated organizations and not by the company itself. There was a difference in the level of awareness between participants and other employees, which placed a burden on the participants. In addition, numerous problems existed regarding regional cooperation. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that nurses could play a vital role in education regarding disaster preparedness and in improving awareness of care strategies for disaster victims. This study also indicated the importance of providing psychological support to persons in charge of disaster countermeasures, of confirming the safety of employees' families, and cooperating with regional organizations.


Asunto(s)
Defensa Civil , Planificación en Desastres , Terremotos , Enfermeras y Enfermeros , Salud Laboral , Rol Profesional , Defensa Civil/educación , Víctimas de Desastres , Femenino , Educación en Salud , Humanos , Masculino , Apoyo Social , Tokio
11.
J Korean Med Sci ; 34(4): e29, 2019 Jan 28.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30686951

RESUMEN

To substantiate psychological symptoms following humidifier disinfectant (HD) disasters, counseling records of 26 victims and 92 family members of victims (45 were bereaved) were analyzed retrospectively. Among the victims, 34.6% had Clinical Global Impression-Severity scores of over 4, which meant they were moderately ill. While anxiety/fear and depression with respiratory symptoms were frequently observed in victims and family members, chronic psychological distress such as alcohol/smoking abuse and insomnia was relatively high in bereaved family members. In conclusion, it is important to provide mental health support for victims and their families, focusing on the characteristic symptoms of each group as well as monetary compensation.


Asunto(s)
Víctimas de Desastres/psicología , Desinfectantes/efectos adversos , Familia/psicología , Lesión Pulmonar/etiología , Estrés Psicológico , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Humidificadores , Lesión Pulmonar/psicología , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Estudios Retrospectivos
12.
J Inj Violence Res ; 11(1): 35-44, 2019 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30635998

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Internationally, inclusion of physical rehabilitation services during early disaster response is relatively new. The aim of the study was to gain an understanding of disaster relief physical rehabilitation in Iran. METHODS: A qualitative study design was employed and sixteen semi-structured interviews were conducted for data collection. Content analysis was used for data analysis. The participants in this study were purposively selected among people who experienced the Bam (2003) and Varzaghan (2012) earthquakes. RESULTS: Three main themes were explored including: indispensable intervention, barriers to continuous intervention and opportunities for intervention. Almost all participants reiterated the importance of effective physical rehabilitation services during disasters. Some participants mentioned significant barriers for delivering such services in the context of Iran. The lack of an effective responsible body, weak disaster-related competencies and under-prioritization by government were among other barriers. On a more positive note, some interviewees talked about national programs that could facilitate service delivery. CONCLUSIONS: Providing disaster relief physical rehabilitation has faced many barriers in Iran. However, there are some facilitators in the country that could help provide these services. Finally, the feasibility of post-disaster physical rehabilitation services delivery completely depends on the current national rehabilitation system.


Asunto(s)
Víctimas de Desastres/educación , Víctimas de Desastres/rehabilitación , Desastres , Terremotos , Socorristas/educación , Rehabilitación/economía , Rehabilitación/educación , Adulto , Recolección de Datos , Países en Desarrollo , Personas con Discapacidad/educación , Personas con Discapacidad/rehabilitación , Planificación en Desastres , Femenino , Humanos , Irán , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Investigación Cualitativa
14.
Nurs Forum ; 54(2): 157-164, 2019 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30536416

RESUMEN

Natural disasters impact people of every age in the communities where they occur, with older adults being a vulnerable subset of the population. Most disaster shelter volunteer nurses are experienced in addressing common health needs of older adult clients such as diabetes, hypertension, and pulmonary disease. These nurses also have the requisite training to respond to more acute medical events, including the symptoms of a heart attack or stroke. They provide care and comfort to those suffering from the distress, anxiety, and fear caused by disasters. However, they may be less adept at triaging and caring for older adults with mental health conditions such as delirium, depression, or dementia. The trauma associated with a disaster and relocation will challenge cognitive abilities in those with dementia, may exacerbate existing depression, or lead to the onset of delirium, which is a medical emergency. Older adults experiencing these conditions are at risk for harm and deterioration with serious short and long-term consequences. Since disaster shelter volunteer health care staff may not be well-versed in distinguishing between dementia, depression, or delirium, behavior observation, and safety considerations are critical determinants of whether it is possible to support the older adult in the shelter environment or it is necessary to transition to a higher level of care.


Asunto(s)
Delirio , Demencia , Depresión , Víctimas de Desastres/psicología , Refugio de Emergencia/organización & administración , Sistemas de Socorro/normas , Anciano , Delirio/diagnóstico , Delirio/enfermería , Delirio/psicología , Demencia/diagnóstico , Demencia/enfermería , Demencia/psicología , Depresión/diagnóstico , Depresión/enfermería , Depresión/psicología , Planificación en Desastres/organización & administración , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Desastres Naturales , Sistemas de Socorro/organización & administración , Factores de Riesgo , Poblaciones Vulnerables/psicología
15.
J Forensic Sci ; 64(3): 852-856, 2019 May.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30231298

RESUMEN

DNA analysis is a key method for the identification of human remains in mass disasters. Reference samples from relatives may be used to identify missing persons by kinship analysis. Different methods of applying the CODIS in disaster victim identification (DVI) were investigated. Two searches were evaluated: (i) relating family relatives to a pedigree tree (FPT) and (ii) relating unidentified human remains to a pedigree tree (UPT). A joint pedigree likelihood ratio (JPLR) and rank were calculated for each search. Both searches were similar in average JPLR and rank. In exceptional cases, namely the existence of a mutation different from the CODIS model, a nonbiological father, a mistake in STR, or incorrect profile association, the UPT search returned one true rank, whereas the FPT search returned no results. This paper suggests a novel strategy to overcome these limitations and increase efficiency in conducting identification of mass disaster victims.


Asunto(s)
Dermatoglifia del ADN , Bases de Datos de Ácidos Nucleicos , Víctimas de Desastres , Linaje , Ciencias Forenses , Humanos , Funciones de Verosimilitud , Repeticiones de Microsatélite , Mutación
16.
Forensic Sci Med Pathol ; 15(1): 125-130, 2019 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30306346

RESUMEN

The management of mass fatalities following disasters is a complex process which requires the involvement of multiple stakeholders and resources. A garbage dump at Meethotamulla in Sri Lanka suddenly collapsed, resulting in the death of 32 individuals. Efforts to implement best practice guidelines in Disaster Victim Identification (DVI) during this disaster revealed several important aspects that need to be considered by the forensic community. Delays in initiating the legal processes to investigate and manage the incident resulted in public dissatisfaction towards the post-disaster management process. Body recovery by Police and military personnel without the involvement of medical teams had numerous shortcomings including the lack of proper tagging and photography, commingling of body parts, and non-preservation of personal items. Public expectation and demand for early release of the bodies conflicted with the necessity to undergo a stringent DVI process according to best practice guidelines. Many adaptations and alternate strategies were necessary to ensure that DVI could be done scientifically. The use of primary identification markers including odontology and DNA had many limitations including non-availability of antemortem data, resource availability and cost. Identification was established using a combination of secondary identification markers including clothing, jewelry, scars, tattoos, morphological descriptions and circumstantial evidence. In two cases, odontological features further supported positive identification. Samples for DNA were obtained and preserved but were not utilized in establishing the identities. This paper highlights the need for better public awareness and multidisciplinary commitment in managing mass fatalities and also reflects on the challenges of implementing best practice DVI guidelines in low-resource settings with different legal and socio-cultural expectations.


Asunto(s)
Restos Mortales , Víctimas de Desastres , Ciencias Forenses/organización & administración , Incidentes con Víctimas en Masa , Identificación Biométrica , Dermatoglifia del ADN , Humanos , Guías de Práctica Clínica como Asunto , Sri Lanka
17.
J Forensic Sci ; 64(3): 824-827, 2019 May.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30278107

RESUMEN

The nature of air disasters includes factors that exacerbate challenges in the identification process. Of the 49 deceased in the US Bangla air crash in Kathmandu, Nepal, four were intact, 11 presented with burn injuries, another 11 presented with partial charring, and 23 were completely charred. Personal belongings were useful in the identification phases for all types of victims. Fingerprints were obtainable and useful in intact victims and victims with less severe burn injuries; medical and surgical information was useful in bodies with burn injuries; finally, dental findings were useful in cases of extensive charring. Other useful methods in the process included marks of identification, physical features, and exclusion. In certain resource-limited settings, especially in closed population disasters, where scientific identification (DNA, dental records, etc.) is not currently available, personal belongings, clothing, and physical findings analyzed by an identification team using a structured organization may be cautiously used as the primary means of identification.


Asunto(s)
Accidentes de Aviación , Víctimas de Desastres , Ciencias Forenses/métodos , Quemaduras , Vestuario , Registros Odontológicos , Dermatoglifia , Humanos , Nepal
18.
Br Med Bull ; 129(1): 25-34, 2019 03 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30544131

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Many people who experience a disaster will do so as part of an occupational group, either by chance or due to the nature of their role. SOURCES OF DATA: This review is based on literature published in scientific journals. AREAS OF AGREEMENT: There are many social and occupational factors, which affect post-disaster mental health. In particular, effective social support-both during and post-disaster-appears to enhance psychological resilience. AREAS OF CONTROVERSY: There is conflicting evidence regarding the best way to support trauma-exposed employees. Many organisations carry out post-incident debriefing despite evidence that this is unhelpful. GROWING POINTS: Employees who are well supported tend to have better psychological outcomes and as a result may be more likely to perform well at work. AREAS TIMELY FOR DEVELOPING RESEARCH: The development and evaluation of workplace interventions designed to help managers facilitate psychological resilience in their workforce is a priority. Successful interventions could substantially increase resilience and reduce the risk of long-term mental health problems in trauma-exposed employees.


Asunto(s)
Desastres , Enfermedades Profesionales/terapia , Servicios de Salud del Trabajador/métodos , Trastornos por Estrés Postraumático/terapia , Adaptación Psicológica , Víctimas de Desastres/psicología , Humanos , Salud Mental , Resiliencia Psicológica , Apoyo Social , Heridas y Traumatismos/psicología
19.
Int J Legal Med ; 133(1): 277-287, 2019 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29666997

RESUMEN

The terrorist attack of July 14, 2016 in Nice (France) was a devastating event. A man voluntarily drove a truck into a crowd gathered for the fireworks display on the seaside "Promenade des Anglais," plowing pedestrians down over more than 2 km before being shot dead. At the time of this report, a total of 86 casualties and more than 1200 formal complaints for physical and psychological injuries have been recorded. The aim of this work is to describe the forensic management of this event and its immediate aftermath. This paper reaffirms the basic tenets of disaster management: a single place of work, teamwork in times of crisis, a single communication channel with families and the media, and the validation of the identifications by a multidisciplinary commission. This paper highlights other essential aspects of the organization of the forensic effort put in place after the Nice attack: the contribution of the police at the crime scene, the cooperation between the disaster victim identification (DVI) team, and the forensic pathologists at the morgue, applying the identification (ID) process to unconscious victims in the intensive care unit, the input of volunteers, and the logistics associated with the management of the aftermath of the event. All of the victims were positively identified within 4 and a half days. For the first time in such a paper, the central role of medical students in the immediate aftermath of the disaster is outlined. The need to address the possible psychological trauma of the non-medical and even the medical staff taking part in the forensic effort is also reaffirmed.


Asunto(s)
Víctimas de Desastres , Desastres , Ciencias Forenses/organización & administración , Terrorismo , Autopsia , Restos Mortales , Conducta Cooperativa , Francia , Humanos , Relaciones Interprofesionales , Morgue , Policia , Tomografía Computarizada por Rayos X
20.
Leg Med (Tokyo) ; 37: 15-17, 2019 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30583197

RESUMEN

A disaster is an unexpected event causing death or injury to many people. In such events, a large number of casualties may take place, exposing corpses to a harsh environment for days or months. DNA profiling is recognized as one of the primary methods for identifying mass disaster victims, especially when it involves decomposed or fragmented bodies. The objective of this study was to standardize the use of urinary bladder swabs as a source of DNA for the identification of decomposing and carbonized human bodies by Forensic Genetic techniques. Samples' DNA was extracted using both organic and Chelex® resin methods; quantified by qPCR and amplified with PowerPlex® Fusion System (Promega Corporation). The results of this study show that between the two methodologies used for DNA extraction, the organic method presented higher DNA yields in relation to the minimum acceptable for the amplification, while Chelex®, although not having a high yield, still allowed obtaining significant amounts of DNA for amplification. The use of bladder swabs has proven to be a viable source of DNA for human identification, since besides reproducible and reliable results, this type of sample allows a significant reduction in the time and cost required for analysis.


Asunto(s)
Cadáver , Dermatoglifia del ADN/métodos , ADN/aislamiento & purificación , Víctimas de Desastres , Genética Forense/métodos , Medicina Legal/métodos , Vejiga Urinaria , Dermatoglifia del ADN/normas , Humanos , Reacción en Cadena de la Polimerasa/métodos
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