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1.
Open Forum Infect Dis ; 9(8): ofac336, 2022 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35937648

RESUMO

Background: In 2012, the US Department of Health and Human Services updated their HIV treatment guidelines to recommend antiretroviral therapy (ART) for all people with HIV (PWH) regardless of CD4 count. We investigated recent trends and disparities in early receipt of ART prescription and subsequent viral suppression (VS). Methods: We examined data from ART-naïve PWH newly presenting to HIV care at 13 North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design clinical cohorts in the United States during 2012-2018. We calculated the cumulative incidence of early ART (within 30 days of entry into care) and early VS (within 6 months of ART initiation) using the Kaplan-Meier survival function. Discrete time-to-event models were fit to estimate unadjusted and adjusted associations of early ART and VS with sociodemographic and clinical factors. Results: Among 11 853 eligible ART-naïve PWH, the cumulative incidence of early ART increased from 42% in 2012 to 82% in 2018. The cumulative incidence of early VS among the 8613 PWH who initiated ART increased from 83% in 2012 to 93% in 2018. In multivariable models, factors independently associated with delayed ART and VS included non-Hispanic/Latino Black race, residence in the South census region, being a male with injection drug use acquisition risk, and history of substance use disorder (SUD; all P ≤ .05). Conclusions: Early ART initiation and VS have substantially improved in the United States since the release of universal treatment guidelines. Disparities by factors related to social determinants of health and SUD demand focused attention on and services for some subpopulations.

2.
AIDS Behav ; 2022 Aug 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35916949

RESUMO

Annual screening for bacterial sexually transmitted infections (STI), including gonorrhea/chlamydia (GC/CT) and syphilis, is recommended for persons with HIV (PWH). We used the prevention index to quantify the extent to which STI screening was completed at guideline-recommended frequency in African American and Latinx persons, women, persons with alcohol (AUD) and substance (SUD) use disorders. Data from PWH at Kaiser Permanente Northern California were collected from electronic health records. We defined receipt of GC/CT and syphilis screening consistent with recommendations as a prevention index score ≥ 75%. Among 9655 PWH (17.7% Latinx; 16.2% African American; 9.6% female; 12.4% AUD; 22.1% SUD), prevention index scores for GC/CT and syphilis increased from 2015 to 2019. African American PWH had lower odds of receiving an annual syphilis screen (aOR 0.87 [95% CI 0.79-0.97]). Female sex was associated with lower odds of GC/CT (aOR 0.30 [95% CI 0.27-0.34]) and syphilis (aOR 0.27 [95% CI 0.24-0.310) screening. AUD and SUD were not associated with differences in annual GC/CT or syphilis screening. Key PWH subgroups experience ongoing challenges to annual STI screening despite comparable healthcare access.

3.
Epidemics ; 40: 100608, 2022 Jul 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35843152

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Transmission models provide complementary evidence to clinical trials about the potential population-level incidence reduction attributable to ART (ART prevention impact). Different modelling assumptions about risk heterogeneity may influence projected ART prevention impacts. We sought to review representations of risk heterogeneity in compartmental HIV transmission models applied to project ART prevention impacts in Sub-Saharan Africa. METHODS: We systematically reviewed studies published before January 2020 that used non-linear compartmental models of sexual HIV transmission to simulate ART prevention impacts in Sub-Saharan Africa. We summarized data on model structure/assumptions (factors) related to risk and intervention heterogeneity, and explored multivariate ecological associations of ART prevention impacts with modelled factors. RESULTS: Of 1384 search hits, 94 studies were included. 64 studies considered sexual activity stratification and 39 modelled at least one key population. 21 studies modelled faster/slower ART cascade transitions (HIV diagnosis, ART initiation, or cessation) by risk group, including 8 with faster and 4 with slower cascade transitions among key populations versus the wider population. In ecological analysis of 125 scenarios from 40 studies (subset without combination intervention), scenarios with risk heterogeneity that included turnover of higher risk groups were associated with smaller ART prevention benefits. Modelled differences in ART cascade across risk groups also influenced the projected ART benefits, including: ART prioritized to key populations was associated with larger ART prevention benefits. Of note, zero of these 125 scenarios considered lower ART coverage among key populations. CONCLUSION: Among compartmental transmission models applied to project ART prevention impacts in Sub-Saharan Africa, representations of risk heterogeneity and projected impacts varied considerably. Inclusion/exclusion of risk heterogeneity with turnover, and intervention heterogeneity across risk groups could influence the projected impacts of ART scale-up. These findings highlight a need to capture risk heterogeneity with turnover and cascade heterogeneity when projecting ART prevention impacts.

4.
Soc Sci Med ; 307: 115121, 2022 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35843180

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Stigmatization contributes to health inequalities, impacting the wellbeing of children and adolescents negatively. Addressing stigmatization requires adequate measurement. Our systematic review synthesizes the content of scales used with children and adolescents in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) across stigmas, and examines their comparability and level of cultural adaptation. METHODS: Ten databases were systematically searched combining three sets of search terms: (i) stigma, (ii) scales, and (iii) LMICs. Studies conducted in LMICs, with a sample with mean age below 18 and reporting a minimum of one stigma scale, were eligible. We allocated scale items to four frameworks: (i) dimensions, or drivers of stigmatization; (ii) target variants, or types of stigmatization; (iii) socio-ecological levels, and (iv) cross-cultural equivalence, or scale adaptation to context/population. Based on percentages, we compared scale content per age cohort, stigma status, region, and stigma category. RESULTS: Out of 14,348 records, we included 93 articles (112 scales). Most studies focused on adolescents (12-18 years). Twelve scales were used more than once, seven were used across regions, and four were employed for multiple stigmas. Physical health stigma, and HIV/AIDS-related stigma in particular, was measured most; mental health and multiple/generic stigmas least. Physical and mental health scales were generally more comprehensive, i.e., measuring more stigma facets. In general, scales consistently measured two of the 21 included stigma facets, namely the disruptiveness dimension and the community level. Cross-cultural equivalence was moderate; conceptual and measurement equivalence were high. DISCUSSION: Although scales were largely comparable in how they measure stigma, they failed to reflect the complexity of the stigmatization process and fell short of existing stigma frameworks and qualitative research. Stigma research with children should work towards cross-culturally validated stigma scale sets which incorporate more facets of existing stigma frameworks, thus facilitating comparability across cultural contexts and informing intervention development and evaluation.


Assuntos
Síndrome de Imunodeficiência Adquirida , Países em Desenvolvimento , Adolescente , Criança , Humanos , Pobreza , Estigma Social , Estereotipagem
5.
PLoS One ; 17(7): e0270649, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35839245

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Peer-led interventions are central to the global HIV response for gay and bisexual men who have sex with men [GBMSM]. Since the year 2000, technological advancements in HIV and an increased response to the health disparities faced by GBMSM outside of HIV, have contributed to the expanding scope of their content and delivery. This review sets out to characterise the evidence base for individual level peer interventions for GBMSM, overview approaches to implementing and evaluating them and identify future priorities for their delivery and evaluation. METHODS: A scoping review methodology was applied and evaluations of peer programs for GBMSM published in peer reviewed journals were identified via subject heading and keyword searches across five electronic databases. Titles and abstracts were reviewed, and full texts were assessed against eligibility criteria. A coding framework was used to extract data from included studies against intervention implementation and evaluation components. RESULTS: A total of 38 studies evaluating peer led interventions against effectiveness outcomes were deemed eligible for inclusion and coded into four intervention modalities; peer counselling [n = 6], groupwork programs [n = 15], peer navigation [n = 7] and peer education [n = 10]. Most addressed HIV [n = 32] and across intervention modalities, evaluations demonstrated compelling evidence of significant effect. Intervention effects on broader indicators of psychosocial wellbeing were not extensively evaluated. Expertise regarding the implementation and evaluation of peer interventions addressing HIV among GBMSM ought to be leveraged to expand the scope of peer intervention to meet the diverse health and wellbeing needs of GBMSM.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Bissexualidade/psicologia , Homossexualidade Masculina/psicologia , Humanos , Masculino , Comportamento Sexual
6.
Cogn Behav Pract ; 29(2): 267-279, 2022 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35812005

RESUMO

Among sexual minority men (i.e., gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men) living with HIV, those who use methamphetamine experience profound health disparities. Affect Regulation Treatment to Enhance Methamphetamine Intervention Success (ARTEMIS) is an evidence-based, 5-session, individually delivered positive affect intervention adapted for sexual minority men living with HIV who use methamphetamine. ARTEMIS was designed to amplify the benefits of evidence-based substance use interventions such as contingency management (CM) with this high-priority population. Delivering ARTEMIS during CM has been shown to assist participants in reducing stimulant use, increasing positive affect, and achieving durable reductions in HIV viral load. We describe the theoretical underpinnings of the ARTEMIS intervention, provide details of the training and session protocols with a case example, and discuss implications for future applications in research and clinical settings.

7.
AIDS ; 2022 Jul 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35848589

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To better understand the different pathways linking socioeconomic position and HIV testing uptake in 18 sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries. DESIGN: We used cross-sectional population-based surveys between 2010 and 2018. METHODS: Using a potential outcomes framework and the product method, we decomposed the total effect linking wealth and recent (<12 months) HIV testing into direct effects, and indirect effects, via internal (related to individual's ability to perceive need for and to seek care) or external (ability to reach, pay for and engage in healthcare) mediators to calculate the proportion mediated (PM) by each mediator. RESULTS: High levels of inequalities were observed in nine and 15 countries among women and men, respectively. The mediator indirect effect varied greatly across countries. The PM tended to be higher for internal than for external mediators. For instance, among women, HIV-related knowledge was estimated to mediate up to 12.1% of inequalities in Côte d'Ivoire; and up to 31.5% for positive attitudes towards people with HIV (PWH) in Senegal. For the four external mediators, the PM was systematically below 7%. Similar findings were found when repeating analyses on men for the internal mediators, with higher PM by attitudes towards PWH (up to 39.9% in Senegal). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that wealth-related inequalities in HIV testing may be mediated by internal more than external characteristics, with important variability across countries. Overall, the important heterogeneities in the pathways of wealth-related inequalities in HIV testing illustrate that addressing inequalities requires tailored efforts and upstream interventions.

8.
PLoS One ; 17(7): e0270404, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35895722

RESUMO

Accomplishing the goals outlined in "Ending the HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) Epidemic: A Plan for America Initiative" will require properly estimating and increasing access to HIV testing, treatment, and prevention services. In this research, a computational spatial method for estimating access was applied to measure distance to services from all points of a city or state while considering the size of the population in need for services as well as both driving and public transportation. Specifically, this study employed the enhanced two-step floating catchment area (E2SFCA) method to measure spatial accessibility to HIV testing, treatment (i.e., Ryan White HIV/AIDS program), and prevention (i.e., Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis [PrEP]) services. The method considered the spatial location of MSM (Men Who have Sex with Men), PLWH (People Living with HIV), and the general adult population 15-64 depending on what HIV services the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommends for each group. The study delineated service- and population-specific accessibility maps, demonstrating the method's utility by analyzing data corresponding to the city of Chicago and the state of Illinois. Findings indicated health disparities in the south and the northwest of Chicago and particular areas in Illinois, as well as unique health disparities for public transportation compared to driving. The methodology details and computer code are shared for use in research and public policy.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV , Profilaxia Pré-Exposição , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Adulto , Chicago/epidemiologia , Infecções por HIV/diagnóstico , Infecções por HIV/tratamento farmacológico , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Teste de HIV , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde , Homossexualidade Masculina , Humanos , Illinois , Masculino , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
9.
J Law Med Ethics ; 50(S1): 55-59, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35902091

RESUMO

Transgender and gender diverse (TGD), Black, and Latinx communities have long borne a disproportionate share of the U.S. HIV epidemic, yet these same key demographics are continually underrepresented in national PrEP prescriptions. Black, Latinx, and TGD individuals are also more likely to be uninsured, meaning that a proposed federal program to cover PrEP for people without insurance could provide significant benefit to potential PrEP users from these populations. However, coverage of PrEP costs alone will not end disparities in uptake. This commentary provides additional context and recommendations to maximize effectiveness of a national PrEP program for TGD, Black, and Latinx populations in the US.


Assuntos
Fármacos Anti-HIV , Infecções por HIV , Profilaxia Pré-Exposição , Pessoas Transgênero , Fármacos Anti-HIV/uso terapêutico , Equidade de Gênero , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Infecções por HIV/prevenção & controle , Humanos
10.
J Pers Med ; 12(7)2022 Jun 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35887575

RESUMO

Engagement along the HIV care cascade in Canada is lower among women compared to men. We used Fuzzy Cognitive Mapping (FCM), a participatory research method, to identify factors influencing satisfaction with HIV care, their causal pathways, and relative importance from the perspective of women living with HIV. Building from a map of factors derived from a mixed-studies review of the literature, 23 women living with HIV in Canada elaborated ten categories influencing their satisfaction with HIV care. The most central and influential category was "feeling safe and supported by clinics and healthcare providers", followed by "accessible and coordinated services" and "healthcare provider expertise". Participants identified factors that captured gendered social and health considerations not previously specified in the literature. These categories included "healthcare that considers women's unique care needs and social contexts", "gynecologic and pregnancy care", and "family and partners included in care." The findings contribute to our understanding of how gender shapes care needs and priorities among women living with HIV.

12.
Curr HIV/AIDS Rep ; 19(4): 265-280, 2022 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35794447

RESUMO

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Status-neutral care, a person-centered approach to healthcare not predicated on HIV serostatus, may improve health equity among Black sexual minority men (BSMM). We reviewed current status-neutral, HIV, and Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) interventions, and coded each for social-ecological focus and use of six approaches: (1) person-centered, (2) anti-stigma, (3) social support, (4) the social determinants of health (SDOH), (5) community engagement, and (6) multi-sectoral partnerships. RECENT FINDINGS: We reviewed 25 studies, of which 3 were status-neutral. Nineteen studies utilized person-centered approaches, with several employing BSMM peers. For SDOH, financial incentives and reducing clinic-level barriers to care improved cascade outcomes. Direct text messaging, anti-stigma, social support, community-engagement, and multi-sectoral partnerships also improved outcomes in some studies. Few status-neutral programs exist and additional research is needed to identify key intervention components and mechanisms of influence. Programs targeting SDOH and multiple social-ecological levels offer promise for providing holistic care to BSMM, while addressing HIV prevention and treatment and health equity.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV , Equidade em Saúde , Profilaxia Pré-Exposição , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Afro-Americanos , Infecções por HIV/tratamento farmacológico , Homossexualidade Masculina , Humanos , Masculino
13.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(7): e33990, 2022 07 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35849442

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The HIV epidemic has revealed considerable disparities in health among sexual and gender minorities of color within the Unites States, disproportionately affecting cisgender men who have sex with men (MSM) and trans women. Social inequities further disadvantage those with intersectional identities through homophobia, antitrans discrimination, and racism, shaping not only those at risk for HIV infection but also HIV prevention and care outcomes. Digital interventions have great potential to address barriers and improve HIV care among cisgender MSM and trans women; however, efficacy of digital HIV care interventions vary and need further examination. OBJECTIVE: This study assessed the 12-month efficacy of a 6-month digital HIV care navigation intervention among young people living with HIV in San Francisco, California. We examined dose-response relationships among intervention exposure (eg, text messaging), viral suppression, and mental health. Health electronic navigation (eNav) is a 6-month, text message-based, digital HIV care navigation intervention, in which young people living with HIV are connected to their own HIV care navigator through text messaging to improve engagement in HIV primary care. METHODS: This study had a single-arm, prospective, pre-post design. Eligibility criteria for the study included the following: identifying as cisgender MSM or trans women, being between the ages of 18 and 34 years, being newly diagnosed with HIV, or not being engaged or retained in HIV care or having a detectable viral load. We assessed and analyzed sociodemographics, intervention exposure, and HIV care and mental health outcome data for participants who completed the 6-month Health eNav intervention. We assessed all outcomes using generalized estimating equations to account for within-subjects correlation, and marginal effects of texting engagement on all outcomes were calculated over the entire 12-month study period. Finally, we specified an interaction between texting engagement and time to evaluate the effects of texting engagement on outcomes. RESULTS: Over the entire 12-month period, this study shows that every one-text increase in engagement was associated with an increased odds of undetectable viral load (adjusted odds ratio 1.01, 95% CI 1.00-1.02; P=.03). Mean negative mental health experiences decreased significantly at 12 months compared to baseline for every one-text increase in engagement (coefficient on interaction term 0.97, 95% CI 0.96-0.99; P<.01). CONCLUSIONS: Digital care navigation interventions including Health eNav may be a critical component in the health delivery service system as the digital safety net for those whose social vulnerability is exacerbated in times of crisis, disasters, or global pandemics owing to multiple social inequities. We found that increased engagement in a digital HIV care navigation intervention helped improve viral suppression and mental health-intersecting comorbid conditions-6 months after the intervention concluded. Digital care navigation may be a promising, effective, sustainable, and scalable intervention. INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): RR2-10.2196/16406.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Adolescente , Adulto , Feminino , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Homossexualidade Masculina/psicologia , Humanos , Masculino , Saúde Mental , Estudos Prospectivos , Adulto Jovem
14.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 1421, 2022 07 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35883158

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Persons who experience homelessness remain at increased risk for three viral blood-borne infections: human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV). We assessed the yield of testing and linkage to care programs targeting this population for these infections in the United States (US). METHODS: We searched PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane Central for peer-reviewed articles through August 27, 2020. Additionally, we searched the grey literature. Two individuals independently reviewed all relevant studies to check for eligibility and extracted data for each step in the care cascade. We used random-effects model to generate weighted pooled proportions to assess yield at each step. Cumulative proportions were calculated as products of adjacent-step pooled proportions. We quantitatively synthesized data from the studies that focused on non-drug injecting individuals. RESULTS: We identified 24 studies published between 1996-2019 conducted in 19 US states. Seventeen studies screened for HIV, 12 for HCV, and two screened for HBV. For HIV, 72% of approached were recruited, 64% had valid results, 4% tested positive, 2% were given results, and 1% were referred and attended follow-up. Of positives, 25% were referred to treatment and started care. For HCV, 69% of approached were recruited, 63% had valid results, 16% tested positive, 14% were given results, and 3% attended follow-up. Of positives, 30% were referred for treatment and 19% started care. The yield at each care cascade step differs widely by recruitment strategy (for example, for HIV: 71.6% recruited of reached under service-based with zero yield under healthcare facility-based and outreach). CONCLUSIONS: A very large proportion of this population reached for HIV and HCV care were lost in the follow-up steps and never received treatment. Future programs should examine drop-out reasons and intervene to reduce health disparities in this population.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV , Hepatite B , Hepatite C , Pessoas em Situação de Rua , Infecções Transmitidas por Sangue , Infecções por HIV/diagnóstico , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Hepacivirus , Hepatite B/diagnóstico , Hepatite B/epidemiologia , Vírus da Hepatite B , Hepatite C/diagnóstico , Hepatite C/epidemiologia , Hepatite C/terapia , Humanos , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
15.
Afr J AIDS Res ; 21(2): 152-161, 2022 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35901303

RESUMO

In 2020, COVID-19 started spreading from Wuhan in China to the USA, the UK and Europe and then to the rest of the world. In Africa, the first case of COVID-19 was reported in Egypt on 14 February, while South Africa's first case was identified on 5 March. On 11 March, the World Health Organization declared a pandemic. At the time, it was said that COVID-19 would become the great equaliser because the virus made no distinction between first and third world countries, between the rich and the poor, and nor was it influenced by gender, sexual orientation or race. When someone contracted SARS-CoV-2, no guarantee could be given that the patient would survive, regardless of who they were or their status in the community.This stood in contrast to the early experience of AIDS before antiretrovirals existed and when HIV was spreading like wildfire in sub-Saharan Africa and other countries with low or lower-middle-income status. It seemed as if these countries were doubly cursed - by poverty and the AIDS pandemic that was causing as many as 6 000 mortalities per day in sub-Saharan Africa. This led to the South African president at the time, Thabo Mbeki, to assert that poverty was an even greater problem than HIV and AIDS.It did not take long to see that COVID-19 was not the anticipated equaliser. As lockdowns were enforced within most countries across the globe and resulting in economic slumps, differences between rich and poorer countries and their respective citizens were thrown into sharp relief once again. This article reports how both AIDS and COVID-19 adversely affected women, the impoverished and those without access to sustainable souces of food and medicine.


Assuntos
Síndrome de Imunodeficiência Adquirida , COVID-19 , Infecções por HIV , Síndrome de Imunodeficiência Adquirida/epidemiologia , África ao Sul do Saara , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Controle de Doenças Transmissíveis , Feminino , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Humanos , Masculino , Pandemias , SARS-CoV-2
16.
AIDS Behav ; 2022 Jul 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35776251

RESUMO

We investigated the impact of State-level Earned Income Tax Credit (SEITC) generosity on HIV risk behavior among single mothers with low education. We merged individual-level data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (2002-2018) with state-level data from the University of Kentucky Center for Poverty Research and conducted a multi-state, multi-year difference-in-differences (DID) analysis. We found that a refundable SEITC ≥ 10% of the Federal Earned Income Tax Credit was associated with 21% relative risk reduction in reporting any high-risk behavior for HIV in the last year, relative to no SEITC. We also found that a 10-percentage point increase in SEITC generosity was associated with 38% relative risk reduction in reporting any high-risk HIV behavior in the last year. SEITC policy may be an important strategy to reduce the burden of HIV infections among women with low socioeconomic status, particularly single mothers.


RESUMEN: Investigamos el impacto de la generosidad del Crédito Federal Tributario por Ingreso de Trabajo a nivel estatal (SEITC) sobre el comportamiento de riesgo al VIH entre madres solteras con baja educación. Unimos los datos a nivel individual del Sistema de Vigilancia a Factores de Riesgo de Comportamiento (2002­2018) con los datos a nivel estatal del Centro de Investigación de la Pobreza de la Universidad de Kentucky, y conducimos un análisis de diferencia-en-diferencia (DID) multi-estado y multi-año. Encontramos que un reembolso SEITC ≥ 10% del Crédito Federal Tributario por Ingreso de Trabajo estaba asociado con una reducción relativa de riesgo de 21% en reportar cualquier comportamiento de riesgo alto al VIH en el último año, relativo a ningún SEITC. También encontramos que un aumento de punto porcentual de 10 en la generosidad SEITC estaba asociado con una reducción relativa de riesgo de 38% en reportar cualquier comportamiento de riesgo alto al VIH en el último año. La póliza SEITC puede ser una estrategia importante para reducir la carga de infecciones al VIH entre mujeres con bajo nivel socioeconómico, particularmente entre madres solteras.

17.
Am J Public Health ; 112(S4): S344-S346, 2022 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35763730
18.
AIDS Care ; : 1-5, 2022 Jun 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35676752

RESUMO

The success of a study hinges on its recruitment procedures, however there is a paucity of papers focused on innovative recruitment strategies, especially as it relates to the recruitment and retention of marginalized populations. This paper aims to outline how consent-to-contact databases can be used as an effective tool for recruitment. First, we begin by describing the consent-to-contact databases we used. Then, we offer insight into how a consent-to-contact database was utilized to recruit Latino older adults with HIV participants for an interdisciplinary behavioral and physical health promotion intervention. We outline barriers and challenges to recruitment and research participation with a specific emphasis on the unique hurdles associated with recruiting and retaining racial/ethnic minority older adults with HIV in behavioral health studies. Finally, we provide final recommendations for future researchers interested in how to best employ this type of recruitment tool in their own research.

19.
Lancet Psychiatry ; 9(8): 676-688, 2022 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35750060

RESUMO

Integrating HIV-related care with treatment for substance use disorder provides an opportunity to better meet the needs of people living with these conditions. People with substance use disorder are rendered especially vulnerable by prevailing policies, structural inequalities, and stigmatisation. In this Series paper we analyse existing literature and empirical evidence from scoping reviews on integration designs for the treatment of HIV and substance use disorder, to understand barriers to and facilitators of care integration and to map ways forward. We discuss how approaches to integration address two core gaps in current models: a failure to consider human rights when incorporating the perspectives of people living with HIV and people who use drugs, and a failure to reflect critically on structural factors that determine risk, vulnerability, health-care seeking, and health equity. We argue that successful integration requires a person-centred approach, which is grounded in human rights, treats both concerns holistically, and reconnects with underlying social, economic, and political inequalities.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias , Infecções por HIV/terapia , Direitos Humanos , Humanos , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias/terapia
20.
Arch Sex Behav ; 51(5): 2523-2533, 2022 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35705769

RESUMO

Sexual minority men (SMM) remain disproportionately burdened by sexually transmitted infections. Although gay community involvement has been theorized to be protective against many negative health outcomes, research examining the association between community involvement and condomless anal sex (CAS) has yielded conflicting results. The current study, conducted between 2018-2020, examined whether the importance one places on various aspects of community involvement was associated with CAS among a sample of young adult SMM aged 18-34 years with body image concerns (N = 180). Gay community involvement was measured using the Importance of Gay Community Scale, and the results of an exploratory factor analysis indicated the presence of two factors: "social activism" and "going out/nightlife." A zero-inflated Poisson regression was conducted to examine the association between gay "social activism," "going out/nightlife," and their interaction with the number of CAS partners. Upon examining a significant interaction, "social activism" had a protective effect against CAS at low levels of "going out/nightlife," but this effect was non-significant at higher levels. These results suggest that encouraging gay community involvement through activism could be effective at reducing CAS and addressing the health disparity that exists within this population.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Participação da Comunidade , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Homossexualidade Masculina , Humanos , Masculino , Comportamento Sexual , Parceiros Sexuais , Sexo sem Proteção , Adulto Jovem
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