Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 68
Filtrar
1.
Rev Peru Med Exp Salud Publica ; 38(2): 224-231, 2021.
Artigo em Espanhol, Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34468568

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To describe the Peruvian scientific output on COVID-19 up to January 31, 2021. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We carried out a bibliometric study using two databases (MEDLINE and SciELO). We included original or short original articles with at least one author with Peruvian institutional affiliation. Scientific output was described according to: institution, approval by a Research Ethics Committee, registration in the platforms established by regulations, scientific journals in which they were published, research funding, and Peruvian collaboration networks. RESULTS: A total of 106 articles were analyzed, only three (2.8%) were clinical trials. Of the top 10 institutions with the highest scientific output, only two did not belong to the education sector. A total of 53 (50.0%) articles had no information regarding ethical aspects or it was not explicitly stated whether or not it was approved by a Research Ethics Committee. Only 8 (7.7%) of 104 articles were registered in PRISA; 12 (11.3%) articles were published in Peruvian journals. Regarding funding, 71 (67.0%) investigations did not specify the source or they were self-financed. We found international collaboration in 70 publications (66.0%). CONCLUSIONS: The most productive Peruvian institutions are found in Lima. Half of the articles did not state ethical aspects in any part of the document. Almost all of the studies were not registered on the platforms established by regulations. In more than half of the articles the source of funding is not stated or they were self-financed.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Bibliometria , Humanos , Peru , Publicações , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Front Public Health ; 9: 713487, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34497794

RESUMO

Purpose: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak, which began in December 2019, has not been completely controlled; therefore, COVID-19 has received much attention from countries around the world. Many related clinical studies, such as clinical trials, have been published, but to the knowledge of the authors, there has been no bibliometric analysis of these publications focusing on clinical research studies on COVID-19. Methods: Global publications on COVID-19 from January 2020 to December 2020 were extracted from the Web of Science (WOS) collection database. The VOSviewer software and CiteSpace were employed to perform a bibliometric study. In addition, we obtained information on relevant clinical trials from the website http://clinicaltrials.gov. Results: China published most of the articles in this field and had the highest number of citations and H-index. The Journal of Medical Virology published most of the articles related to COVID-19. In terms of institutions, Huazhong University of Science and Technology had the most publications, and Wang, JW received the highest number of citations. Conclusion: The diagnosis, prevention, and prognosis of COVID-19 are still the focus of attention at present. The overall analysis of the disease were identified as the emerging topics from the perspectives of epidemiology and statistics. However, finding an effective treatment remains the focus of clinical trials.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Bibliometria , Bases de Dados Factuais , Humanos , Publicações , SARS-CoV-2
3.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0254988, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34370749

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: During uncertainties associated with the COVID-19 pandemic, effectively improving people's health literacy is more important than ever. Drawing knowledge maps of health literacy research through data mining and visualized measurement technology helps systematically present the research status and development trends in global academic circles. METHODS: This paper uses CiteSpace to carry out a metric analysis of 9,492 health literacy papers included in Web of Science through mapping knowledge domains. First, based on the production theory of scientific knowledge and the data mining of citations, the main bodies (country, institution and author) that produce health literacy knowledge as well as their mutual cooperation (collaboration network) are both clarified. Additionally, based on the quantitative framework of cocitation analysis, this paper introduces the interdisciplinary features, development trends and hot topics of the field. Finally, by using burst detection technology in the literature, it further reveals the research frontiers of health literacy. RESULTS: The results of the BC measures of the global health literacy research collaboration network show that the United States, Australia and the United Kingdom are the major forces in the current international collaboration network on health literacy. There are still relatively very few transnational collaborations between Eastern and Western research institutions. Collaborations in public environmental occupational health, health care science services, nursing and health policy services have been active in the past five years. Research topics in health literacy research evolve over time, mental health has been the most active research field in recent years. CONCLUSIONS: A systematic approach is needed to address the challenges of health literacy, and the network framework of cooperation on health literacy at regional, national and global levels should be strengthened to further promote the application of health literacy research. In the future, we anticipate that this research field will expand in two directions, namely, mental health literacy and eHealth literacy, both of which are closely linked to social development and issues. The results of this study provide references for future applied research in health literacy.


Assuntos
Mineração de Dados , Saúde Global , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Letramento em Saúde , Bibliometria , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Humanos , Saúde Pública
4.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34299724

RESUMO

Scientometrics enables scholars to assess and visualize emerging research trends and hot-spots in the scientific literature from a quantitative standpoint. In the last decades, Africa has nearly doubled its absolute count of scholarly output, even though its share in global knowledge production has dramatically decreased. The still-ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has profoundly impacted the way scholarly research is conducted, published, and disseminated. However, the COVID-19-related research focus, the scientific productivity, and the research collaborative network of African researchers during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic remain to be elucidated. This study aimed to clarify the COVID-19 research patterns among African researchers and estimate the strength of collaborations and partnerships between African researchers and scholars from the rest of the world during the COVID-19 pandemic, collecting data from electronic scholarly databases such as Web of Science (WoS), PubMed/MEDLINE and African Journals OnLine (AJOL), the largest and prominent platform of African-published scholarly journals. We found that COVID-19-related collaboration patterns varied among African regions. For instance, most of the scholarly partnerships occurred with formerly colonial countries (such as European or North-American countries). In other cases, scholarly ties of North African countries were above all with the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. In terms of number of publications, South Africa and Egypt were among the most productive countries. Bibliometrics and, in particular, scientometrics can help scholars identify research areas of particular interest, as well as emerging topics, such as the COVID-19 pandemic. With a specific focus on the still-ongoing viral outbreak, they can assist decision- and policy-makers in allocating funding and economic-financial, logistic, organizational, and human resources, based on the specific gaps and needs of a given country or research area.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Pandemias , África do Norte , Bibliometria , Egito , Humanos , Liderança , América do Norte , SARS-CoV-2 , Arábia Saudita , África do Sul
5.
Front Immunol ; 12: 669539, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34093568

RESUMO

Acute lung injury (ALI) is an intractable disorder associated with macrophages. This bibliometric analysis was applied to identify the characteristics of global scientific output, the hotspots, and frontiers about macrophages in ALI over the past 10 years. We retrieved publications published from 2011 to 2020 and their recorded information from Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-expanded) of Web of Science Core Collection (WoSCC). Bibliometrix package was used to analyze bibliometric indicators, and the VOSviewer was used to visualize the trend and hotspots of researches on macrophages in ALI. Altogether, 2,632 original articles were reviewed, and the results showed that the annual number of publications (Np) concerning the role of macrophages in ALI kept increasing over the past 10 years. China produced the most papers, the number of citations (Nc) and H-index of the USA ranked first. Shanghai Jiaotong University and INT IMMUNOPHARMACOL were the most prolific affiliation and journal, respectively. Papers published by Matute-Bello G in 2011 had the highest local citation score (LCS). Recently, the keywords "NLRP3" and "extracellular vesicles" appeared most frequently. Besides, researches on COVID-19-induced ALI related to macrophages seemed to be the hotspot recently. This bibliometric study revealed that publications related to macrophages in ALI tend to increase continuously. China was a big producer and the USA was an influential country in this field. Most studies were mainly centered on basic researches in the past decade, and pathways associated with the regulatory role of macrophages in inhibiting and attenuating ALI have become the focus of attention in more recent studies. What is more, our bibliometric analysis showed that macrophages play an important role in COVID-19-induced ALI and may be a target for the treatment of COVID-19.


Assuntos
Lesão Pulmonar Aguda/imunologia , Bibliometria , Macrófagos/imunologia , Lesão Pulmonar Aguda/etiologia , Ásia , Brasil , COVID-19/complicações , COVID-19/imunologia , Europa (Continente) , Humanos , América do Norte , Editoração/tendências , SARS-CoV-2
7.
BMJ Glob Health ; 6(5)2021 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33972261

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to an unprecedented global research effort to build a body of knowledge that can inform mitigation strategies. We carried out a bibliometric analysis to describe the COVID-19 research output in Africa in terms of setting, study design, research themes and author affiliation. METHODS: We searched for articles published between 1 December 2019 and 3 January 2021 from various databases including PubMed, African Journals Online, medRxiv, Collabovid, the WHO global research database and Google. All article types and study design were included. RESULTS: A total of 1296 articles were retrieved. 46.6% were primary research articles, 48.6% were editorial-type articles while 4.6% were secondary research articles. 20.3% articles used the entire continent of Africa as their study setting while South Africa (15.4%) was the most common country-focused setting. The most common research topics include 'country preparedness and response' (24.9%) and 'the direct and indirect health impacts of the pandemic' (21.6%). However, only 1.0% of articles focus on therapeutics and vaccines. 90.3% of the articles had at least one African researcher as author, 78.5% had an African researcher as first author, while 63.5% had an African researcher as last author. The University of Cape Town leads with the greatest number of first and last authors. 13% of the articles were published in medRxiv and of the studies that declared funding, the Wellcome Trust was the top funding body. CONCLUSIONS: This study highlights Africa's COVID-19 research and the continent's existing capacity to carry out research that addresses local problems. However, more studies focused on vaccines and therapeutics are needed to inform local development. In addition, the uneven distribution of research productivity among African countries emphasises the need for increased investment where needed.


Assuntos
Bibliometria , Pesquisa Biomédica , COVID-19 , África/epidemiologia , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Humanos
8.
Rev Esp Salud Publica ; 952021 May 27.
Artigo em Espanhol | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34042088

RESUMO

The impact and the universality of the pandemic by SARS-CoV-2 has caused the need to have information quickly and accessible for the benefit of decision-making among healthcare professionals. In 10 months the scientific production on this new coronavirus has exceeded the number of 66 thousand articles, according to the LitCovid database, created by the National Library of Medicine, doubling and tripling every few weeks. This same urgency has characterized some of the main features of this voluminous production, in addition to its continuous and exponential growth, such as greater dissemination in open access and preprint repositories, a certain acceleration in the manuscript review process by editorials and an abundance of opinion articles, recommendations or comments compared to a smaller number of original articles with clinical data from large groups of patients.


Assuntos
Bibliometria , Pesquisa Biomédica/tendências , COVID-19 , Editoração/tendências , Acesso à Informação , COVID-19/diagnóstico , COVID-19/epidemiologia , COVID-19/terapia , Tomada de Decisão Clínica , Bases de Dados Factuais , Medicina Baseada em Evidências , Saúde Global , Humanos , Pandemias
9.
Yearb Med Inform ; 30(1): 245-256, 2021 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33882597

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: The study aims at understanding the structural characteristics and content features of COVID-19 literature and public health data from the perspective of the 'Language and Meaning in Biomedicine' Working Group (LaMB WG) of IMIA. The LaMB WG has interest in conceptual characteristics, transparency, comparability, and reusability of medical information, both in science and practice. METHODS: A set of methods were used (i) investigating the overall speed and dynamics of COVID-19 publications; (ii) characterizing the concepts of COVID-19 (text mining, visualizing a semantic map of related concepts); (iii) assessing (re)usability and combinability of data sets and paper collections (as textual data sets), and checking if information is Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable (FAIR). A further method tested practical usability of FAIR requirements by setting up a common data space of epidemiological, virus genetics and governmental public health measures' stringency data of various origin, where complex data points were visualized as scatter plots. RESULTS: Never before were that many papers and data sources dedicated to one pandemic. Worldwide research shows a plateau at ∼ 2,200 papers per week - the dynamics of areas of studies being slightly different. Ratio of epidemic modelling is rather low (∼1%). A few 'language and meaning' methods, such as using integrated terminologies, applying data and metadata standards for processing epidemiological and case-related clinical information and in general, principles of FAIR data handling could contribute to better results, such as improved interoperability and meaningful knowledge sharing in a virtuous cycle of continuous improvements.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Publicações/estatística & dados numéricos , Bibliometria , Pesquisa Biomédica , Humanos , Armazenamento e Recuperação da Informação
11.
Global Health ; 17(1): 31, 2021 03 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33766073

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: At the global level and in the Arab world, particularly in low-income countries, COVID-19 remains a major public health issue. As demonstrated by an incredible number of COVID-19-related publications, the research science community responded rapidly. Therefore, this study was intended to assess the growing contribution of the Arab world to global research on COVID-19. METHODS: For the period between December 2019 and March 2021, the search for publications was conducted via the Scopus database using terms linked to COVID-19. VOSviewer 1.6.16 software was applied to generate a network map to assess hot topics in this area and determine the collaboration patterns between different countries. Furthermore, the research output of Arab countries was adjusted in relation to population size and gross domestic product (GDP). RESULTS: A total of 143,975 publications reflecting the global overall COVID-19 research output were retrieved. By restricting analysis to the publications published by the Arab countries, the research production was 6131 documents, representing 4.26% of the global research output regarding COVID-19. Of all these publications, 3990 (65.08%) were original journal articles, 980 (15.98%) were review articles, 514 (8.38%) were letters and 647 (10.55%) were others, such as editorials or notes. The highest number of COVID-19 publications was published by Saudi Arabia (n = 2186, 35.65%), followed by Egypt (n = 1281, 20.78%) and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), (n = 719, 11.73%). After standardization by population size and GDP, Saudi Arabia, UAE and Lebanon had the highest publication productivity. The collaborations were mostly with researchers from the United States (n = 968), followed by the United Kingdom (n = 661). The main research lines identified in COVID-19 from the Arab world are related to: public health and epidemiology; immunological and pharmaceutical research; signs, symptoms and clinical diagnosis; and virus detection. CONCLUSIONS: A novel analysis of the latest Arab COVID-19-related studies is discussed in the current study and how these findings are connected to global production. Continuing and improving future collaboration between developing and developed countries will also help to facilitate the sharing of responsibilities for COVID-19 in research results and the implementation of policies for COVID-19.


Assuntos
Bibliometria , Pesquisa Biomédica , COVID-19 , Países em Desenvolvimento , SARS-CoV-2 , Árabes , COVID-19/virologia , Bases de Dados Factuais , Egito , Humanos , Cooperação Internacional , Líbano , Editoração , Arábia Saudita , Reino Unido , Estados Unidos
12.
CMAJ Open ; 9(1): E295-E301, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33785477

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The quality of case reports, which are often the first reported evidence for a disease, may be negatively affected by a rush to publication early in a pandemic. We aimed to determine the completeness of reporting (COR) for case reports published on coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: We conducted a systematic search of the PubMed database for all single-patient case reports of confirmed COVID-19 published from Jan. 1 to Apr. 24, 2020. All included case reports were assessed for adherence to the CARE (Case Report) 31-item checklist, which was used to create a composite COR score. The primary outcome was the mean COR score assessed by 2 independent raters. Secondary outcomes included whether there was a change in overall COR score with certain publication factors (e.g., publication date) and whether there was a linear relation between COR and citation count and between COR scores and social media attention. RESULTS: Our search identified 196 studies that were published in 114 unique journals. We found that the overall mean COR score was 54.4%. No one case report included all of the 31 CARE checklist items. There was no significant correlation between COR with either citation count or social media attention. INTERPRETATION: We found that the overall COR for case reports on COVID-19 was poor. We suggest that journals adopt common case-reporting standards to improve reporting quality.


Assuntos
COVID-19/epidemiologia , Lista de Checagem/normas , Editoração/normas , Relatório de Pesquisa/normas , Bibliografia de Medicina , Bibliometria , COVID-19/diagnóstico , COVID-19/virologia , Gerenciamento de Dados , Estudos Epidemiológicos , Ética , Fidelidade a Diretrizes , Humanos , Avaliação de Resultados em Cuidados de Saúde , Relatório de Pesquisa/tendências , SARS-CoV-2/genética , SARS-CoV-2/isolamento & purificação , Mídias Sociais/estatística & dados numéricos
13.
Radiology ; 300(1): E301-E307, 2021 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33724061

RESUMO

Background Early reports show the unequal effect the COVID-19 pandemic might have on men versus women engaged in medical research. Purpose To investigate whether the COVID-19 pandemic has had an impact on scientific publishing by female physicians in medical imaging. Materials and Methods The authors conducted a descriptive bibliometric analysis of the gender of the first and last authors of manuscripts submitted to the top 50 medical imaging journals from March to May 2020 (n = 2480) compared with the same period of the year in 2018 (n = 2238) and 2019 (n = 2355). Manuscript title, date of submission, first and last names of the first and last authors, journal impact factor, and author country of provenance were recorded. The Gender-API software was used to determine author gender. Statistical analysis comprised χ2 tests and multivariable logistic regression. Results Percentages of women listed as first and last authors were 31.6% (1172 of 3711 articles) and 19.3% (717 of 3711 articles), respectively, in 2018-2019 versus 32.3% (725 of 2248 articles) and 20.7% (465 of 2248 articles) in 2020 (P = .61 and P = .21, respectively). For COVID-19-related articles, 35.2% (89 of 253 articles) of first authors and 20.6% (52 of 253 articles) of last authors were women. No associations were found between first- and last-author gender, year of publication, and region of provenance. First and last authorship of high-ranking articles was not in favor of North American women whatever the year (odds ratio [OR], 0.79 [P = .05] and 0.72 [P = .02], respectively). Higher rates of female last authorship of high-ranking articles were observed in Europe (P = .003) and of female first authorship of low-ranking publications in Asia in 2020 (OR, 1.38; 95% CI: 0.98, 1.92; P = .06). Female first and last authorship of COVID-19-related articles was overrepresented for lowest-rank publications (P = .02 and P = .01, respectively). Conclusion One in three first authors and one in five last authors were women in 2018-2019 and 2020, respectively. Although the first 2020 lockdown did not diminish the quantity of women-authored publications, the impact on the quality was variable. ©RSNA, 2021 See also the editorial by Robbins and Khosa in this issue.


Assuntos
Autoria , Bibliometria , Pesquisa Biomédica/estatística & dados numéricos , COVID-19 , Publicações Periódicas como Assunto/estatística & dados numéricos , Sexismo/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pandemias , Quarentena , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Biosci Trends ; 15(2): 64-73, 2021 May 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33746182

RESUMO

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), has affected tens of millions of people globally since it was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO) on March 11, 2020. There is an urgent need for safe and effective preventive vaccines to curb this pandemic. A growing amount of related research has been published. This study aimed to provide the current status of COVID-19 vaccine using bibliometric analysis. We searched Embase.com and MEDLINE comprehensively and included articles, articles in press, reviews, short surveys, conference abstracts and conference papers about COVID-19 vaccine. VOSviewer1.6.11 (Leiden University, Leiden, Netherlands) was applied to perform the bibliometric analysis of these papers. A total of 1,312 papers were finally included. The BMJ has been the most popular journal in this field. The United States maintained a top position worldwide and has provided a pivotal influence, followed by China, India and United Kingdom. Among all the institutions, Harvard University was regarded as a leader for research collaboration. We analyzed the keywords and identified seven COVID-19 vaccine research hotspot clusters. COVID-19 vaccine research hotspots focus on clinical trials on vaccine safety and efficacy, research on vaccine immunology and immunoinformatics, and vaccine hesitancy. Our analysis results demonstrated that cooperation between countries, institutions, and authors were insufficient. The results suggested that clinical trials on vaccine safety, efficacy, immunology, immunoinformatics, production and delivery are research hotspots. Furthermore, we can predict that there will be a lot of research focusing on vaccine adverse reactions.


Assuntos
Bibliometria , Vacinas contra COVID-19 , COVID-19/prevenção & controle , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , SARS-CoV-2 , Pesquisa Biomédica/tendências , COVID-19/epidemiologia , COVID-19/imunologia , Vacinas contra COVID-19/efeitos adversos , Vacinas contra COVID-19/imunologia , Vacinas contra COVID-19/farmacologia , Bases de Dados Bibliográficas , Humanos , MEDLINE , SARS-CoV-2/imunologia , Segurança
15.
Mycopathologia ; 186(2): 155-162, 2021 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33704625

RESUMO

The 2020 COVID-19 pandemic had a profound impact on the publishing landscape. The 'pre-peer-review' publication model is likely to become common as a lag in publishing is not acceptable in a pandemic or other time! Mycopathologia is well placed to adopt such changes with its improved editorial processes, article formats, author engagements, and published articles' access and citation. Mycopathologia had an improved journal impact factor and article downloads in 2018-2019. A limited sampling suggested a slight decrease in the total submissions in 2019 (352 articles) compared to 2018 (371 articles). However, the acceptance rate improved to 30% in 2019 from 19% in 2018. Nearly half of all submissions in 2019 were rejected before peer-review or transferred to other Springer Nature journals. The published articles were contributed from 34 different countries, with authors from China, the USA, and Brazil among the top three contributors. An enhanced editorial oversight allowed peer-reviewers to focus on fewer articles that were well-matched to their expertise, which led to lower rejection rates post-peer-review. The introduction of MycopathologiaGENOME and MycopathologiaIMAGE article types received a good reception with notable downloads and citations.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Micologia , Patologia , Revisão da Pesquisa por Pares/normas , Publicações Periódicas como Assunto/estatística & dados numéricos , Publicações Periódicas como Assunto/normas , Relatório de Pesquisa/normas , Guias como Assunto , Humanos , Fator de Impacto de Revistas , Pandemias , SARS-CoV-2
17.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 15(2): 185-190, 2021 03 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33690198

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) outbreak has been a global pandemic. Researchers have made great efforts to investigate SARS-CoV-2. However, there are few studies analyzing the general situation of SARS-CoV-2 research at global level. This study aimed to characterize global scientific efforts based on SARS-CoV-2 publications. METHODOLOGY: SARS-CoV-2 -related publications were retrieved using Web of Science. The number of publications, citation, country, journal, study topic, total confirmed cases, and total deaths were analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 441 publications were identified. China contributed the largest number of publications (198, 44.90%), followed by USA (51, 11.56%), Italy (28, 6.35%), Germany (19, 4.31%), and South Korea (13, 2.95%). Upper-middle-income economies (51.70%) produced the most SARS-CoV-2 publications, followed by high-income (45.12%), lower-middle-income (2.95%), and low-income economies (0.23%). The research output had a significant correlations with total confirmed cases (r = 0.666, p = 0.000) and total deaths (r = 0.610, p = 0.000). China had the highest total citations (1947), followed by USA (204), and Germany (54). China also had the highest average citations (9.83), followed by Netherlands (5.80), and Canada (5.43). The most popular journals were Journal of Medical Virology, Eurosurveillance, and Emerging Microbes and Infections. The most discussed topic was the epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2. CONCLUSIONS: Scientific research on SARS-CoV-2 is from worldwide researchers' efforts, with some countries and journals having special contributions. The countries with more total confirmed cases and total deaths tend to have more research output in the field of SARS-CoV-2. China was the most prolific country, and had the highest quality of publications on SARS-CoV-2.


Assuntos
Pesquisa Biomédica/estatística & dados numéricos , COVID-19 , Publicações Seriadas/estatística & dados numéricos , Bibliometria , China , Países Desenvolvidos , Países em Desenvolvimento , Alemanha , Humanos , Itália , República da Coreia , Inquéritos e Questionários
18.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(4): e25379, 2021 04 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33735097

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Gender imbalances in academia have been evident historically and persist today. For the past 60 years, we have witnessed the increase of participation of women in biomedical disciplines, showing that the gender gap is shrinking. However, preliminary evidence suggests that women, including female researchers, are disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic in terms of unequal distribution of childcare, elderly care, and other kinds of domestic and emotional labor. Sudden lockdowns and abrupt shifts in daily routines have had disproportionate consequences on their productivity, which is reflected by a sudden drop in research output in biomedical research, consequently affecting the number of female authors of scientific publications. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to test the hypothesis that the COVID-19 pandemic has had a disproportionate adverse effect on the productivity of female researchers in the biomedical field in terms of authorship of scientific publications. METHODS: This is a retrospective observational bibliometric study. We investigated the proportion of male and female researchers who published scientific papers during the COVID-19 pandemic, using bibliometric data from biomedical preprint servers and selected Springer-Nature journals. We used the ordinary least squares regression model to estimate the expected proportions over time by correcting for temporal trends. We also used a set of statistical methods, such as the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and regression discontinuity design, to test the validity of the results. RESULTS: A total of 78,950 papers from the bioRxiv and medRxiv repositories and from 62 selected Springer-Nature journals by 346,354 unique authors were analyzed. The acquired data set consisted of papers that were published between January 1, 2019, and August 2, 2020. The proportion of female first authors publishing in the biomedical field during the pandemic dropped by 9.1%, on average, across disciplines (expected arithmetic mean yest=0.39; observed arithmetic mean y=0.35; standard error of the estimate, Sest=0.007; standard error of the observation, σx=0.004). The impact was particularly pronounced for papers related to COVID-19 research, where the proportion of female scientists in the first author position dropped by 28% (yest=0.39; y=0.28; Sest=0.007; σx=0.007). When looking at the last authors, the proportion of women dropped by 7.9%, on average (yest=0.25; y=0.23; Sest=0.005; σx=0.003), while the proportion of women writing about COVID-19 as the last author decreased by 18.8% (yest=0.25; y=0.21; Sest=0.005; σx=0.007). Further, by geocoding authors' affiliations, we showed that the gender disparities became even more apparent when disaggregated by country, up to 35% in some cases. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings document a decrease in the number of publications by female authors in the biomedical field during the global pandemic. This effect was particularly pronounced for papers related to COVID-19, indicating that women are producing fewer publications related to COVID-19 research. This sudden increase in the gender gap was persistent across the 10 countries with the highest number of researchers. These results should be used to inform the scientific community of this worrying trend in COVID-19 research and the disproportionate effect that the pandemic has had on female academics.


Assuntos
Autoria , Bibliometria , Pesquisa Biomédica/estatística & dados numéricos , COVID-19 , Editoração/estatística & dados numéricos , Pesquisadores/estatística & dados numéricos , Distribuição por Sexo , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Eficiência , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pandemias , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores Sexuais
19.
Int Nurs Rev ; 68(2): 214-218, 2021 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33565619

RESUMO

AIM: Reflect upon the visibility of nursing-led research during the COVID-19 pandemic. BACKGROUND: The emerging SARS-CoV-2 infection has galvanized collaborative and multidisciplinary efforts in clinical and research practice worldwide. The scarce evidence-base to manage patients with COVID-19 has included limited nurse-led research. INTRODUCTION: Clinical research nurses have greatly contributed to the delivery of COVID-19 research, yet the number of COVID-19 nursing-led research papers appears to be limited, with even fewer nurse-led research projects funded. METHODS: Authors' views and PubMed search on 'COVID-19 and nursing'. FINDINGS: There is a dearth of nursing-led research. Most papers describe the nursing contribution to COVID-19 care, changes in nursing working arrangements and emotional burden. There are opportunities to explore the consequences to vulnerable population groups of public health measures implemented to stop the progress of the COVID-19 pandemic. DISCUSSION: Workforce gaps, limited integration in research structures and clinical redeployment may have hampered nurse-led research. COVID-19 may exacerbate staffing deficits by disrupting the education pipeline, obstructing the transition from clinical to academic practice, particularly in areas where clinical academic roles are yet to emerge. CONCLUSION: The absence of nurse-led research in COVID-19 can be explained by chronic, underlying factors and the features of the pandemic response. Emerging models of care, effective staffing and inequalities related to COVID-19 appear obvious research areas. Nursing leadership needs to strengthen its political voice and lobbying skills to secure nurse-led research funding. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING POLICY: Embracing international nursing research, strengthening collaborations and lobbying policymakers for investment in nurse-sensitive research would enhance the response to COVID-19.


Assuntos
COVID-19/enfermagem , Enfermagem Baseada em Evidências , Pesquisa em Enfermagem/tendências , Pneumonia Viral/enfermagem , Bibliometria , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Humanos , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/virologia , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Transfusion ; 61(6): 1690-1693, 2021 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33527397

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Several studies have highlighted the disparities in gender equity that exist in different medical specialties. The COVID-19 pandemic has further heightened the inequity faced by female physicians as they are challenged by increasing household and childcare duties in addition to their professional responsibilities. Given these hurdles, fewer women than men have published in various medical disciplines. In this brief report, we wanted to determine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the academic output of female physicians and researchers in transfusion medicine. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: We compared all articles in four transfusion medicine journals published from January 1 to July 31, 2019 with the same time period in 2020. Overall, 1024 articles were reviewed for whether they included women as first or senior authors. RESULTS: Overall, women were first authors in 45.9% (n = 458) of all publications and senior authors in 35% (n = 356) of all publications. There was a statistically significant decrease in the percentage of women as first authors between 2019 (49.1%) and 2020 (42.7%) (p = .04). There was no significant change in the percentage of women as senior authors between 2019 (35.4%) and 2020 (35.5%) (p = 0.99). CONCLUSIONS: Similar to other medical specialties, the COVID-19 pandemic has further increased the disparities faced by female researchers in transfusion medicine as evidenced by a decrease in publications with women as first authors.


Assuntos
Pesquisa Biomédica , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Médicas , Publicações/estatística & dados numéricos , Medicina Transfusional , Academias e Institutos/organização & administração , Academias e Institutos/estatística & dados numéricos , Bibliometria , Pesquisa Biomédica/organização & administração , Pesquisa Biomédica/estatística & dados numéricos , Pesquisa Biomédica/tendências , Eficiência , Feminino , História do Século XXI , Humanos , Masculino , Medicina , Pandemias , Médicas/organização & administração , Médicas/estatística & dados numéricos , Médicas/tendências , Publicações/tendências , Pesquisadores/organização & administração , Pesquisadores/estatística & dados numéricos , Pesquisadores/tendências , Fatores Sexuais , Medicina Transfusional/organização & administração , Medicina Transfusional/estatística & dados numéricos , Medicina Transfusional/tendências
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA
...