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2.
Homeopathy ; 109(1): 37-40, 2020 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32023658

ABSTRACT

The Homeopathy Research Institute's (HRI's) 4th International Research Conference took place in the heart of London from 14 to 16 June 2019. With 352 attendees from 38 countries, this was HRI's largest and most international conference to date. HRI London 2019 will be remembered for the highest quality scientific programme so far, combined with a vibrant, positive atmosphere throughout, making it the perfect way to celebrate HRI's 10th Anniversary. Here we summarise the science presented during the intense 2.5-day programme.

3.
Sex Reprod Healthc ; 24: 100497, 2020 Jan 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32036281

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Although abortion has been legal in India since 1971, but very little research has been done so far on the issue of the quality of abortion services. To fill this gap, this paper examines whether the quality of abortion services provided in the country is in line with the WHO's recommendations. STUDY DESIGN: We analyse a cross-sectional health facilities survey conducted in six Indian states, representing different sociocultural and geographical regions, as part of a study done in 2015. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Percentage of facilities offering different abortion methods, type of anaesthesia given, audio-visual privacy level, compliance with the law by obtaining woman's consent only, imposing the requirement of adopting a contraceptive method as a precondition to receive abortion. RESULTS: Except for the state of Madhya Pradesh, fewer than half of the facilities in the other states offer safe abortion services. Fewer than half of the facilities offer the WHO recommended manual vacuum aspiration method. Only 6-26% facilities across the states seek the woman's consent alone for providing abortion. About 8-26% facilities across the states also require that women adopt some method of contraception before receiving abortion. CONCLUSION: To provide comprehensive quality abortion care, India needs to expand the provider base by including doctors from the Ayurveda, Unani, Siddha, and Homeopathy streams as also nurses and auxiliary midwives after providing them necessary skills. Medical and nursing colleges and training institutions should expand their curriculum by offering an in-service short-term training on vacuum aspiration (VA) and medical methods of abortion.

4.
Adv Exp Med Biol ; 1191: 415-449, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32002940

ABSTRACT

Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) encompasses a wide range of different nonmainstream therapies that have been increasingly used for treatment or adjunctive treatment of various ailments with anxiety/anxiety disorders being one of the commonly CAM (self)-medicated conditions. Thousands of published papers refer to use of CAM in various psychiatric disorders or in healthy or medically ill patients with mood or anxiety difficulties. In this chapter we focus specifically on clinically diagnosed (in line with the standard criteria) anxiety disorders and overview evidence of efficacy/safety of a range of CAM modalities: biologically based therapies (typically herbal preparations and less so nutraceuticals); manipulative and body-based therapies (acupuncture, aerobic exercise, massage, therapeutic touch, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, balneotherapy, and others); mind-body therapies (yoga, Morita therapy, Tai Chi, reiki, Chinese cognitive therapy, religious and spiritual interventions, relaxation, mediation, and mindfulness-based interventions); and alternative medical systems (Ayurveda, homeopathy). We focus exclusively on randomized controlled trials and attempt to evaluate the existing body of evidence in the same manner that is applied to mainstream treatments.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/therapy , Complementary Therapies , Evidence-Based Practice , Acupuncture Therapy , Exercise , Humans , Massage , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Tai Ji , Yoga
5.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32057625

ABSTRACT

Venous thrombosis (VT) of deep vein is a life-threatening condition which may lead to sudden death as an immediate complication due to formation of thrombo-embolism. VT is associated with various risk factors such as prolonged immobilization, inflammation, and/or coagulation disorders including muscular or venous injury. Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) frequently occurs in the lower limb. Successful treatment of DVT exclusively with homeopathic remedies has rarely been recorded in peer-reviewed journals. The present case report intends to record yet another case of DVT in an old patient totally cured exclusively by the non-invasive method of treatment with micro doses of potentized homeopathic drugs selected on the basis of the totality of symptoms and individualization of the case. Since this report is based on a single case of recovery, results of more such cases are warranted to strengthen the outcome of the present study.

6.
Homeopathy ; 2020 Feb 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32028537

ABSTRACT

This article explores the historical growth patterns in homeopathy, recent shifts in perception, and a likely future of this type of medicine. Homeopathic medicine developed as a contradictory approach to health compared to the orthodox view of mainstream medicine. Over the past two centuries, this form of health care has maintained its heterodox position under continued attacks from the established order. Modern medicine is being pushed by materialism and the drive to generate profits by large pharmaceutical and health care corporations. Whilst homeopathy has also enjoyed economic growth in many markets around the world, rising popularity of this type of treatment has been shown to generate regulatory concerns on some fronts. Recent pressures from regulatory authorities have resulted in both setbacks and improved situations for homeopathic prescribers, varying by country where they are located. Despite widespread attacks in the press and from some governmental authorities, users of homeopathic therapies remain staunchly attached to this form of treatment. The future of homeopathy will likely continue to be as rocky as it has been for the past two centuries.

7.
BMC Complement Med Ther ; 20(1): 51, 2020 Feb 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32054461

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The use of medicinal plants or other alternative practices can be the only therapeutic resources for many communities and ethnic groups, especially in developing countries. In Brazil, the Ministry of Health incorporated Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) as a public health policy since 2006. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of CAM use in Brazil. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study performed as an epidemiological survey, with data from the National Health Survey, 2013 that evaluated a sample of adult Brazilians (18+ years old). The outcome was the use of CAM therapies, such as acupuncture, homeopathy, medicinal plants and herbal medicines in the last 12 months. We employed a logistic regression model (CI 95%) to evaluate the chances of CAM use. RESULTS: The prevalence of CAM use in Brazil was 4.5%. The subjects with higher chances to use CAM were: women (AOR = 1.42), aged > 40 years (AOR = 1.64), with higher educational levels (AOR = 2.35), and residents at North (AOR = 2.02) and South (AOR = 1.67) regions of Brazil, all with p-value < 0.001. According to the socioeconomic status, subjects from upper classes had higher chances to use acupuncture and homeopathy when compared to the other classes, and individuals from lower classes had higher chances to use medicinal plants and herbal medicines. Almost half of all individuals reporting CAM use did so outside the health care system. The Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS) was the least used funding for CAM when compared to other types of funding. CONCLUSIONS: We recommend that the Ministry of Health invests in capacity building for health professionals who work with CAM, providing structure for those practices in health services, increasing the access of CAM therapies for SUS users, and improving the registering of information about those therapies, encouraging the use of CAM by the Brazilian population.

8.
Homeopathy ; 2020 Feb 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32052393

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Information on homeopathic medicines is derived from "provings" or homeopathic pathogenetic trials (HPTs), in which people (often homeopaths and homeopathy students) are invited to take an unnamed and often untested highly diluted and serially succussed substance, and record in detail their experiences and perceived effects. HPTs are assumed to have an "excellent safety record", but there has been no academic research to date into provers' experiences of participating in an HPT. AIMS: This qualitative study aimed to explore the lived experience of participation in an HPT. It is hoped that the results from this study will inform the future conduct of HPTs. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted in person, by phone or via Skype, according to the interviewees' preferences. Thematic analysis was used for the generation of themes. RESULTS: Eight former provers were interviewed from across the European Union (EU) and Australia. Of these, seven were practicing homeopaths and one was not a practitioner. Overarching themes were identified as: (1) the ethical conduct of HPTs, and (2) the impact of participation in HPTs. CONCLUSION: Former provers who participated in this study reported enthusiasm for, and trust in, the proving process. However, some also reported adverse events, which varied in intensity and duration. The process of gaining fully informed consent for participation in an HPT is complex and there were examples of both failure and inadequacy in terms of informed consent and support mechanisms. RECOMMENDATIONS: The researchers recommend that HPTs are subject to ethical approval processes and that consent is fully informed and ongoing. It is also recommended that appropriate and robust support mechanisms be developed.

9.
Complement Med Res ; : 1-7, 2020 Jan 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31945769

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Recurrent urinary tract infections are of importance for public health as most clinicians are faced with repeated and long-term administration of broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents leading to an increased risk of resistant bacteria. One encouraging treatment approach may be individualized homeopathy. CASE REPORTS: Here, four female cases with recurrent urinary tract infections are reported. They were treated successfully with the homeopathic strategy after several conventional approaches revealed no improvement. The follow-up period was a minimum of 3 years and the frequency of episodes with urinary tract infection as well as of antibiotic treatment was documented. Additionally, the patients were asked to assess the treatment outcome retrospectively in a validated questionnaire. RESULTS: The treatment resulted in a reduction of urinary tract infections and the need for antibiotics from monthly to less than 3 times a year. Three of the four women had no cystitis and related intake of antibiotics for more than 1.5 years. A relapse of symptoms could be treated efficiently with a repetition of the homeopathic remedy. All subjective outcome assessments resulted positive. CONCLUSION: This case series suggests a possible benefit of individualized homeopathic treatment for female patients with recurrent urinary tract infections. Larger observational studies and controlled investigations are warranted.

10.
Homeopathy ; 2020 Jan 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31958866

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are frequent in women. Cystitis after intercourse (post-coital cystitis) accounts for 60% of recurrent cases. Most physicians treat recurrent UTIs (R-UTIs) with multiple courses of antibiotics. The high prevalence indicates that this bacteria-oriented approach in the long term is ineffective for many women. A change in clinical behavior regarding use of antibiotics and recognizing the importance of a patient's self-defense mechanisms are important considerations in combating antimicrobial resistance. METHODS: The intervention for each of two women with R-UTI was integrated treatment with a non-conventional and tailor-made homeopathy regimen, addressing multiple levels of disease simultaneously, for the prevention of recurrence as well as for treatment. Assessment of causal attribution of homeopathy treatment effect was carried out using the Modified Naranjo Criteria. RESULTS: Case 1 presented with chronic multi-morbid conditions, including R-UTI which had become multi-drug resistant. With regular homeopathic treatment, her antibiotic use reduced, her diabetic profile improved, and she did not need prophylactic antibiotics. Case 2 suffered from R-UTI with post-coital cystitis and burning sensation, despite following all conventional advice for treatment and prophylaxis. Addition of homeopathy improved her quality of life and prevented relapses. The Modified Naranjo Criteria total score for each patient was +10/13 and +9/13, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Addition of homeopathy can be an effective approach in integrated management of antibiotic-resistant R-UTIs. Controlled research on the topic is thus indicated.

11.
Homeopathy ; 2020 Jan 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31958867

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Current recommendations for treating obesity in adolescence include a comprehensive approach (nutritional, behavioral, and exercise). Calcarea carbonica ostrearum (CCO) is a homeopathic medicine usually prescribed in obese individuals, but its effects on weight and body fat are not completely known. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study will be to evaluate the efficacy of homeopathic CCO, in addition to a multidisciplinary intervention (diet, motivational support, and exercise program), on body fat and weight in obese adolescents. METHODS/DESIGN: A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel-group, superiority trial with 3-month study duration will be undertaken. The study will be conducted in a public research hospital in Mexico City, Hospital Juárez de México, in the outpatient services of homeopathy and sports medicine. Eighty non-diabetic adolescents, 12 to 19 years old, who are overweight or obese, will be included. The primary outcome: change in body fat percentage at week 12. The secondary outcomes: change in mean total weight, total body mass index, fat mass index, waist-hip ratio, lean muscle mass, fasting glucose, insulin, insulin resistance, lipid profile, score of Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale Revised (CESD-R) and score of Screen for Child Anxiety-Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED) at week 12. Efficacy data will be analyzed in the intention-to-treat sample. To determine the difference in the outcomes between groups at baseline and week 12, data will be analyzed using Student's t-test. DISCUSSION: This is the first randomized controlled trial aimed to determine the fat-reducing efficacy in obese adolescents of a homeopathic medicine, CCO, given in addition to a multidisciplinary intervention, compared with placebo plus the same intervention. It is an attempt to support scientific evidence in homeopathy for one of the most common chronic diseases, which causes high mortality due to its complications. CLINICALTRIALS. GOV IDENTIFIER: NCT03945396: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03945396?term=homeopathy+for+obesity+in+Mexican+adolescents&rank=1.

12.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 68(Suppl 1): S56-S58, 2020 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31937731

ABSTRACT

Purpose: In India, people with diabetes (PwDM) often seek care in the government-approved alternative medicine system, AYUSH (Ayurveda, Yoga and naturopathy, Unani, Siddha and Homeopathy). The purpose of this pilot study was to assess whether health education plus retinal imaging for diabetic retinopathy (DR) within an AYUSH hospital increased the uptake of screening for DR compared with health education and referral. Methods: The study was a nonrandomized pilot conducted in two AYUSH hospitals. Both hospitals received intervention on educating the AYUSH practitioners about DR screening and distributing health education materials to diabetic patients. In one hospital in addition to education, retinal imaging by a trained technician with remote grading by an ophthalmologist was provided, while in another hospital PwDM were referred to nearby eye hospitals for screening. The uptake of screening was assessed through registers and phone calls. Results: At baseline, only 10.7% of 178 PwDM were aware of DR and only 8% had undergone DR screening. After the intervention, in the hospital where screening was provided, all (100%) eligible patients (101) underwent digital imaging, whereas in the other hospital only 25% of 77 eligible patients underwent screening in eye hospitals (P < 0.001). Conclusion: AYUSH hospitals could provide a feasible and acceptable location for providing DR screening services. Further studies are required to assess scale-up of such intervention.

13.
Support Care Cancer ; 2020 Jan 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31919664

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Palliative care for cancer deals with physical, psychosocial, and spiritual issues faced by cancer patients, their families, communities, and healthcare providers. Research on complementary medicine (CM) use in France is limited despite high rates of reported CM use in other countries including by palliative patients. This study describes the use of CM by individuals receiving palliative care in Lyon, France. DESIGN: This study employed an observational cross-sectional survey design. SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: The study was conducted in three palliative care centers in Lyon, France; two tertiary hospitals and one palliative care unit (3 sites). Inpatients and outpatients visiting the palliative care clinic with a primary diagnosis of cancer at each study site were invited to participate. RESULTS: Of 138 eligible patients, 100 completed the survey (RR 72.4%). The majority (90.7%) reported using CM in the previous 6 months or since their primary cancer diagnosis. Participant CM use was either the same (20.7%) or increased since their primary cancer diagnosis (33.7%). Average out-of-pocket expenses associated with CM use in the previous 6 months or since diagnosis were €157.40 (SD €330.15). The most common CM health professional visited was an aromatherapist (72.7%), a Coupeurs de feu (38.6%), osteopath (28.6%) and naturopath (15.3%). The most common CM used were aromatherapy oils (33.7%), homeopathy (30.0%), and vitamins (29.4%). CONCLUSION: This second survey on CM use in France; is the first conducted in palliative care centers. Results show people with cancer in Lyon, France, have a very high prevalence of CM utilization.

14.
Arch Immunol Ther Exp (Warsz) ; 68(1): 3, 2020 Jan 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31965304

ABSTRACT

The effects of infection with Toxoplasma gondii vary from asymptomatic to the development of alterations in various organs (including the liver and kidneys) which may be irreversible, and lead to the death of the host. Whereas homeopathy is an alternative and effective method for treating various diseases, including those caused by protozoa, we questioned the effect of using Lycopodium clavatum in mice infected with T. gondii. One hundred male Swiss mice, 60 days old, were divided into four groups (n = 25/group): NIC (uninfected and untreated control), IC (infected and treated with un-dynamized 7% alcohol solution [vehicle]), G48 (infected and treated 48 h before infection and treated three more times; at 2, 4, and 6 days post-infection (dpi) with L. clavatum 200dH), and G72 (infected and treated for 3 consecutive days before infection with L. clavatum 200dH). In this study, physiological, histopathological, and immunological parameters were evaluated. The L. clavatum 200dH intensified renal damage in mice infected with T. gondii from 7 dpi, causing severe and progressive alterations during this period, such as various degrees of inflammation, edema, atrophy, and tubular cystic dilation, degenerated tubules with intra-cytoplasmic vacuoles and coalescing spots, severe vascular lesions, glomerulonephritis, and peri-glomerular congestion. In the G72 animals, which received L. clavatum 200dH, more severe cortex damage was observed (91.66-96.66%) as compared to the IC group (55-80%) and more renal corpuscle, and renal tubule injury was observed (80 ± 5 to 96.7% ± 2.89 of the total area) during all periods, as compared to the IC group (p < 0.05). Both groups presented high liver enzyme levels, and the highest values for AST were observable at 60 dpi. We observed significant increases of type I and III collagen, as well as high levels of TGF-ß1 in both organs of the treated animals, the main factor involved in fibrosis in areas damaged by the process. L. clavatum 200dH intensifies kidney and liver alterations in mice infected with T. gondii. Our results reinforce caution when indicating administration schemes and dosages for ultra-diluted drugs.

15.
Curr Drug Deliv ; 17(1): 52-73, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31752655

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Psoriasis is a genetically predisposed autoimmune disease mediated by cytokines released by the activated immune cells. It manifests inflammatory, scaly red or white silvery flaky skin which may be a fluid-filled lesion with soreness and itchiness. The prevalence rate of psoriasis is increasing day by day. Despite having such a high prevalence rate, the treatment of psoriasis is still limited. Hence, there is a need to rethink the various treatment strategies available in the allopathic as well as in the alternative systems of medicine. METHODS: Various bibliographic databases of previously published peer-reviewed research papers were explored and systematic data culminated in terms of various treatment strategies used for the management of psoriasis. The prime focus is given towards modern as well as alternative systems of medicine such as phototherapy, a combination of phototherapy with pharmacotherapy such as Ayurveda, Yoga and naturopathy, Unani, Siddha, and Homeopathy to treat psoriasis. RESULTS: A comprehensive review of 161 papers, including both research and review articles, was carried out to make the article readily understandable. The pathogenesis including inflammatory mediators and type of psoriasis is discussed before the treatment strategies to understand the pathophysiology of the disease. The uniqueness, procedure, advantages, and limitations of conventional, advanced, and traditional systems of medicine to treat psoriasis are discussed in detail. Emphasis has also been given towards marine sources such as fish oil, marine sponges, and algae. CONCLUSION: Although there are many modern and alternative treatment strategies available to treat psoriasis, none of them have been proven to provide complete relief to patients. Moreover, they are associated with certain side effects. In order to overcome them, novel drug delivery systems have been utilized and found effective; however, their stability and safety become the major impediments towards their successful positioning. Traditional and alternative treatment strategies have found to be safe and effective but their use is localized to certain areas. In a nutshell, to achieve successful treatment of psoriasis, there is a need to focus on the development of stable and non-toxic novel drug delivery systems or the promotion of traditional systems to treat psoriasis.

16.
Food Chem ; 307: 125535, 2020 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31639574

ABSTRACT

The research of antioxidants and natural pigments to replace synthetic molecules is increasingly considering wastes from plant food supply chains. Red chicory (RCH) and red cabbage (RCA) are rich sources of polyphenols (PP), especially anthocyanins, well know natural pigments possessing strong antioxidant capacity and beneficial health effects. The aim of this work was to compare different solvents for PP extraction and to evaluate the effect of spray-drying encapsulation using modified starch on PP, antioxidant capacity (AOC) and color properties. Methanol:water (70:30) showed the best extraction capacity, while ethanol:water (70:30) extracts displayed the highest thermal stability. Ethanol:water extracts were spray-dried with a yield of 95-99% for both crops, while the efficiency of PP encapsulation was 79% (RCA) and 88% (RCH). Encapsulation improved retention of PP and AOC upon thermal treatment (RCH: 20-30%, RCA: 44-55%) without altering color properties. This process can be employed for the development of functional foods and supplements.


Subject(s)
Brassica/chemistry , Chemical Fractionation/methods , Chicory/chemistry , Drug Compounding , Polyphenols/isolation & purification , Anthocyanins/chemistry , Anthocyanins/isolation & purification , Antioxidants , Color , Desiccation , Functional Food , Polyphenols/chemistry , Solvents
18.
Hist Cienc Saude Manguinhos ; 26(4): 1243-1262, 2019.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31800840

ABSTRACT

As doctors sought state support to regulate professional training and practice after Independence, Mexicans also developed different attitudes toward foreign ideas, influences, and professionals. Leveraging the allure of the foreign among Mexicans, homeopaths strategically used work, products, and organizations from abroad to establish their practices and fight changing professional policies in the country that threatened homeopathic institutions. Homeopaths inhabited the blurry and shifting boundary between professional and lay medical practice during the early Republican period, the Porfiriato, and the post-revolutionary era, and used the ambivalent feelings about medical licensing, and foreign influence in Mexican society to consolidate their position.

19.
Hist Cienc Saude Manguinhos ; 26(4): 1263-1280, 2019.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31800841

ABSTRACT

Homeopathy arrived from the United States to Peruvian soil in the last decades of the nineteenth century, broadening the repertoire of existing medical knowledge, which included an emerging medical profession, Chinese herbalists, and indigenous practitioners. This article examines the circulation and use of homeopathic therapies and medicines in Lima from the time when the American homeopath George Deacon initiated his practice, in the 1880s, until his death, in 1915. Although homeopathy was not the most widely used medical therapy in the country, it nevertheless posed a threat to professional medicine and the School of Medicine's desired monopoly of the field of medicine.

20.
Hist Cienc Saude Manguinhos ; 26(4): 1281-1297, 2019.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31800842

ABSTRACT

The comparative approach has been advocated to overcome some flaws inherent to case studies. Here, the spread of homeopathy in the early nineteenth century is addressed through a comparison of the cases of Sweden and Brazil, where homeopathy met diametrically opposed fates. The parameters used for the comparison are the standard for studies on the early spread of homeopathy, such as the concept of the "introducer," and reception by the medical and academic community, the government, and society at large. The results suggest that analysis of contexts, determinants, and the interactions of practitioners and institutions representing different health care approaches, whether dominant or alternative, seems to provide a more accurate picture of different moments in the global history of medicine.

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