Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 22.525
Filtrar
3.
Recurso na Internet em Inglês, Espanhol, Português | LIS - Localizador de Informação em Saúde | ID: lis-48429

RESUMO

No marco do Dia Mundial da Prevenção ao Suicídio, que acontece no dia 10 de setembro de cada ano, a Organização Pan-Americana da Saúde (OPAS) alertou que a pandemia de COVID-19 exacerbou os fatores de risco associados a comportamentos suicidas e pediu pela priorização da prevenção ao suicídio.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Suicídio/prevenção & controle , Organização Pan-Americana da Saúde , Saúde Mental
4.
Preprint em Inglês | medRxiv | ID: ppmedrxiv-21263447

RESUMO

BackgroundThe SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, with all its impacts on our way of life, is affecting our experiences and mental health. Notably, individuals with mental disorders have been reported to have a higher risk of contracting SARS-CoV-2. Personality traits could represent an important determinant of preventative health behavior and, therefore, the risk of contracting the virus. AimsWe examined overlapping genetic underpinnings between major psychiatric disorders, personality traits, and susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 infection. MethodsLinkage disequilibrium score regression was used to explore the genetic correlations of COVID-19 susceptibility with psychiatric disorders and personality traits based on data from the largest available respective genome-wide association studies (GWAS). In two cohorts (the PsyCourse (n=1346) and the HeiDE (n=3266) study), polygenic risk scores were used to analyze if a genetic association between, psychiatric disorders, personality traits, and COVID-19 susceptibility exists in individual-level data. ResultsWe observed no significant genetic correlations of COVID-19 susceptibility with psychiatric disorders. For personality traits, there was a significant genetic correlation for COVID-19 susceptibility with extraversion (p=1.47x10-5; rg=0.284). Yet, this was not reflected in individual-level data from the PsyCourse and HeiDE studies. ConclusionsWe identified no significant correlation between genetic risk factors for severe psychiatric disorders and genetic risk for COVID-19 susceptibility. Among the personality traits, extraversion showed evidence for a positive genetic association with COVID-19 susceptibility, in one but not in another setting. Overall, these findings highlight a complex contribution of genetic and non-genetic components in the interaction between COVID-19 susceptibility and personality traits or mental disorders.

5.
Preprint em Inglês | medRxiv | ID: ppmedrxiv-21262986

RESUMO

ObjectiveThis study aimed to evaluate the effects of physical rehabilitation for adults with sequelae after COVID-19. MethodsThis clinical, nonrandomized, controlled, and open study will examine 82 participants who have met the inclusion criteria and who will be divided into treatment and control groups according to participant preference. The intervention group will receive face-to-face care; the control group will receive remote educational guidance for 8 weeks, with pre-post evaluations. The primary outcomes are dyspnea, fatigue, and exercise capacity; the secondary outcomes are lung function, heart rate variability, handgrip strength, knee extensor strength and electrical activity, physical activity, functional limitation, cognitive function, depression and anxiety, and biochemical measures of hypoxia, inflammation, oxidative stress, blood glucose, and lactate blood tests. The survey will follow the Standard Protocol Items for Randomized Trials guidelines, and the results will be reported according to the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials guidelines. Effects will be assessed based on the intent-to-treat data collected. Analysis of covariance will be used for the initial and final evaluations, with a significance level of 5%. Results and ConclusionsThe results will show the effectiveness of rehabilitation in adults with post-COVID-19 sequelae. ImpactFatigue, dyspnea, cough, and muscle and joint pain are common sequelae of post-COVID-19 syndrome. Physical rehabilitation is one modality for treating these sequelae. This protocol can provide a treatment model for patients with post-COVID-19 sequelae.

6.
Preprint em Inglês | medRxiv | ID: ppmedrxiv-21263246

RESUMO

ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to measure the prevalence and incidence of stress, depression, and anxiety symptoms in Brazilians during the COVID-19 pandemic. MethodWe assessed 103 (54 women, 49 men) participants online in three periods of the epidemic curve: time 1 (T1; first cases of community transmission; March 20 to 25, 2020), time 2 (T2; acceleration; April 15 to 20, 2020) and time 3 (T3; continued acceleration; June 25 to 30, 2020). The criteria adopted for calculating prevalence and incidence was identifying participants with scores two standard deviations above the mean compared to normative data. Stress was measured using the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10), depression was measured using the Filgueiras Depression Index (FDI), and anxiety was measured using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory - State Subscale (STAI-S). ResultsInitially, 89% of individuals were free of severe stress, anxiety, and depression, which dropped to 35% by T3. Prevalence of stress increased from 1.9% (95% CI [0.5, 6.8]) at T1 to 7.8% (95% CI [4.0, 14.6]) at T2, and 28.2% (95% CI [20.4, 37.5]) at T3. Depression prevalence increased from 0% (95% CI [0, 3.6]) at T1 to 23.3% (95% CI [16.2, 32.3]) at T2 and 25.2% (95% CI [17.8, 34.4]) at T3. The prevalence of severe anxiety-state symptoms increased from 10.7% (95% CI [6.1, 18.1]) at T1 to 11.7% (95% CI [6.8, 19.3]) at T2 and 45.6% (95% CI [36.3, 55.2]) at T3. Stress incidence increased by 7.8% (95% CI = [4, 14.6]) from time 1 to time 2, 23.3% (95% CI [16.2, 32.3]) from time 2 to time 3, and 26.2% (95% CI [18.7, 35.5]) from time 1 to time 3. Depression incidence increased by 23.3% (95% CI [16.2, 32.3]) from T1 to T2, 15.5 (95% CI [9.8, 23.8]) T2 to T3, and 25.2% (95% CI [17.8, 34.4]) from T1 to T3. Anxiety incidence increased by 9.7% (95% CI [5.4, 17]) from T1 to T2, 39.8% (95%CI [30.9, 49.5]) from T2 to T3, and 35.9% (95% CI [27.3, 45.5]) from T1 to T3. The severity of stress significantly increased from 16.1{+/-}8.7 at T1 to 23.5{+/-}8.4 at T2, and 30.3{+/-}6.0 at T3. Depression severity significantly increased from 48.5{+/-}20.5 at T1 to 64.7{+/-}30.2 at T2, and 75.9{+/-}26.1 at T3. Anxiety increased from 49.0{+/-}13.4 at T1 to 53.5{+/-}12.5 at T2 and 62.3{+/-}13.4 at T3. Females and individuals without comorbidities that increased COVID-19 lethality had higher anxiety scores than males and individuals with comorbidities. Age was inversely associated with mental health outcomes at baseline. ConclusionThe prevalence and severity of stress, depression, and anxiety significantly increased throughout the course of the pandemic. Anxiety seems to be sensitive to gender and risk status, where females and individuals without pre-existing comorbidities had higher anxiety by the final collection point. Depression and stress increased throughout time but were not different between genders or risk status. HighlightsO_LIPerceived stress, depression and anxiety symptoms were assessed in 103 participants at three points in the COVID-19 pandemic C_LIO_LIParticipants showed higher prevalence of depression, stress, and anxiety throughout progression of the pandemic C_LIO_LIOnly 35% of individuals were free of severe stress, anxiety, and depression the third data collection point - even though 89% were free of these conditions at the start C_LIO_LIFemale and individuals without a comorbidity that increased risk of COVID-19 fatality had greater anxiety by the third time point compared to males, and those with a comorbidity C_LI

7.
Preprint em Inglês | medRxiv | ID: ppmedrxiv-21262808

RESUMO

The effect of the COVID-19 vaccination as an individual-based preventive measure on mental health is largely unclear in the literature. The authors report a preliminary finding on whether vaccination effectively improves mental health among employees in Japan based on a prospective study (E-COCO-J). Of the total sample (N=948), 105 (11.1%) were vaccinated at least once at the follow-up survey (June 2021). There was no significant effect of vaccination on the change of psychological distress at baseline (February 2021) and follow-up (June 2021), after adjusting for gender, age, marital status, education, chronic disease, company size, industry, and occupation (healthcare workers or non-HCWs). Providing continuous mental health care for employees is important in an early vaccination phase.

8.
Preprint em Inglês | medRxiv | ID: ppmedrxiv-21263055

RESUMO

ObjectiveTo examine the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic, the effect of sex, and the joint effect of sex and the COVID-19 pandemic in relation to health communication, physical activity, mental health, and behavioral health. MethodsWe drew data from the National Cancer Institutes 2020 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS). We described and compared the characteristics of social determinants of health, physical activity, mental health, alcohol use, patterns of social networking service use, and health information data sharing. Analyses were weighted to provide nationally representative estimates. Multivariate models (multiple linear regression, multiple logistic regression, and multinomial logistic model) were used to assess the sole and joint effect of sex and pandemic. In addition, we applied the Bonferroni correction to adjust p-values to decrease the risks of type I errors when making multiple statistical tests. ResultsWomen are more likely to use mobile health and health communication technologies. The effect of sex after the COVID-19 pandemic is significant on mental health, and women are more possible to have depression or anxiety disorders. The effect of sex is also significant before and after the pandemic regarding seeking health or medical information. Women have a smaller quantity and intensity of physical activity, which has a negative effect on health. ConclusionGender differences exist regardless of the COVID-19 pandemic and the pandemic amplifies the differences in some health and health care domains. Intersectional gender analyses are integral to addressing issues that arise and mitigating the exacerbation of inequities. Responses to the pandemic should consider diverse perspectives, including sex and gender.

9.
Preprint em Inglês | medRxiv | ID: ppmedrxiv-21263743

RESUMO

Background. The majority of COVID-19 symptom presentations in adults and children appear to run their course within a couple of weeks. However, a subgroup of adults has started to emerge with effects lasting several months or more after initial infection. However, little is known about long term physical, mental and social health effects of COVID-19 in the pediatric population. The purpose of this review was to determine these impacts well into the second year of the pandemic. Methods. A search was conducted using PUBMED, Web of Science, Science Direct, and COCHRANE between 11/1/2019 and 9/1/2021. Search inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) COVID-19 illness and symptoms in children; (2) SARS-COv2 in children; (3) English language; and (4) human studies only. Results. The few studies that have documented long-term physical symptoms in children show that fatigue, difficulty in concentrating (brain fog), sleep disturbances, and sensory problems are the most reported outcomes. Most studies examining the impact of COVID-19 in pediatric populations have focused on initial clinical presentation, and symptoms, which are similar to those in adult populations. Additionally, COVID-19 has had a moderate impact on children and adolescents social environment, which may exacerbate current and future physiological, psychological, behavioral, and academic outcomes. Conclusions. There are limited studies reporting long physical symptoms of COVID-19 in the pediatric population. However, pediatric COVID-19 cases are underreported due to low rates of testing and symptomatic infection, which calls for more longitudinal studies. Children who have experienced COVID-19 illness should be monitored for long physiological, psychological, behavioral, and academic outcomes.

10.
Preprint em Inglês | medRxiv | ID: ppmedrxiv-21262844

RESUMO

BackgroundCOVID-19 vaccines have been approved for use in Canada since December 2020. However, data about factors associated with vaccine hesitancy and the impact of mental health and/or substance use (MHSU) issues on vaccine uptake are currently not available. The goal of this study was to explore factors, particularly MHSU factors, that impact COVID-19 vaccination intentions in Ontario, Canada. MethodsA community-based cross-sectional survey with recruitment based on age, gender, and geographical location (to ensure a representative population of Ontario), was conducted in February 2021. Multinomial logistic regression was used to test the relationship between COVID-19 vaccination status and plans and sociodemographic background, social support, anxiety about contracting COVID-19, and MHSU concerns. ResultsOf the total sample of 2528 respondents, 1932 (76.4%) were vaccine ready, 381 (15.1%) were hesitant, and 181 (7.1%) were resistant. Significant independent predictors of vaccine hesitancy compared with vaccine readiness included younger age (OR=2.11, 95%CI=1.62-2.74), female gender (OR=1.36, 95%CI=1.06-1.74), Black ethnicity (OR=2.11, 95%CI=1.19-3.75), lower education (OR=1.69, 95%CI=1.30-2.20), lower SES status (OR=.88, 95%CI=.84-.93), lower anxiety about self or someone close contracting COVID-19 (OR=2.06, 95%CI=1.50-2.82), and lower depression score (OR=.90, 95%CI=.82-.98). Significant independent predictors of vaccine resistance compared with readiness included younger age (OR=1.72, 95%CI=1.19-2.50), female gender (OR=1.57, 95%CI=1.10-2.24), being married (OR=1.50, 95%CI=1.04-2.16), lower SES (OR=.80, 95%CI=.74-.86), lower satisfaction with social support (OR=.78, 95%CI=.70-.88), lower anxiety about contracting COVID-19 (OR=7.51, 95%CI=5.18-10.91), and lower depression score (OR=.85, 95%CI=.76-.96). InterpretationCOVID-19 vaccination intention is affected by sociodemographic factors, anxiety about contracting COVID-19, and select mental health issues.

11.
Preprint em Inglês | medRxiv | ID: ppmedrxiv-21262917

RESUMO

Background and aimFollowing emergency approval of vaccines, the amount of scientific literature investigating population hesitancy towards vaccination against the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has increased exponentially. Nevertheless, the associated psychological behaviors with this phenomenon are still not clearly understood. This study aims to assess the psychological antecedents of the Arab population toward COVID-19 vaccines. MethodsA cross-sectional, online study using a validated Arabic version of the 5C questionnaire was conducted through different media platforms in different Arabic-speaking countries. The questionnaire included three sections: socio-demographics, COVID-19 related questions, and the 5C scale of vaccine psychological antecedents, namely confidence, complacency, constraints, calculation, and collective responsibility. ResultsA total of 4,474 participants, 40.8% males from 13 Arab countries were included in the study. About 26.7% of participants had confidence in COVID-19 vaccination, 10.7% had complacency, 96.5% had no constraints, 48.8% had calculation and 40.4% had collective responsibility. The 5C antecedents showed variation among countries with confidence and collective responsibility being higher in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) (59% and 58%, respectively), complacency and constraints were higher in Morocco (21% and 7%, respectively) and calculation was higher in Sudan (60%). Regression analysis revealed that sex, age, educational degrees, being a health care professional, getting a COVID-19 infection, having a relative infected or died from COVID-19 can affect the 5C psychological antecedents by different degrees. Conclusion and recommendationsWide variations of psychological antecedents between Arab countries exist. Different determinants can affect vaccine psychological antecedents.

12.
Preprint em Inglês | medRxiv | ID: ppmedrxiv-21262819

RESUMO

BackgroundA growing body of literature shows profound effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on mental health, among which increased rates of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and adjustment disorder (AD). However, current research efforts have largely been unilateral, focusing on psychopathology and not including well-being, and are dominated by examining average psychopathology levels or on disorder absence/presence, thereby ignoring individual differences in mental health. Knowledge on individual differences, as depicted by latent subgroups, in the full spectrum of mental health may provide valuable insights in how individuals transition between health states and factors that predict transitioning from resilient to symptomatic classes. Our aim is to (1) identify longitudinal classes (i.e., subgroups of individuals) based on indicators of PTSD, AD, and well-being in response to the pandemic and (2) examine predictors of transitioning between these subgroups. Methods and analysisWe will conduct a three-wave longitudinal online survey-study of n [≥] 2000 adults from the general Dutch population. The first measurement occasion takes place six months after the start of the pandemic, followed by two follow-up measurements with six months intervals. Latent transition analysis will be used for data-analysis. Ethics and disseminationEthical approval has been obtained from four Dutch universities. Longitudinal study designs are vital to monitor mental health (and predictors thereof) in the pandemic to develop preventive and curative mental health interventions. This study is carried out by researchers who are board members of the Dutch Society for Traumatic Stress Studies and is part of a pan-European study (initiated by the European Society for Traumatic Stress Studies) examining the impact of the pandemic in eleven countries. Results will be published in peer-reviewed journals and disseminated at conferences, via newsletters, and media-appearance among (psychotrauma-)professionals and the general public. Strengths and limitations of this studyO_LIThis is one of the first studies examining the mental health impact of the COVID-19 pandemic by focusing on negative and positive mental health in the general population. C_LIO_LIA longitudinal research design is used, which enable us to examine predictors of transitioning between mental health classes over three time points. C_LIO_LIA limitation of this study is that we used self-report measures, instead of clinical interviews, to assess mental health. C_LI

13.
Preprint em Inglês | medRxiv | ID: ppmedrxiv-21263588

RESUMO

Information on vaccine acceptance among healthcare workers is needed as health professionals provide front line care to COVID-19 patients. We developed and implemented an anonymous internet-based cross-sectional survey with direct solicitation among employees of a safety net health system. Items queried demographic and health-related characteristics, experience with and knowledge of COVID-19, and determinants of decisions to vaccinate. COVID-19 vaccine acceptance groups (acceptors, hesitant, refusers) were defined; an adapted version of the WHO vaccine hesitancy scale was included. The survey demonstrated good reliability (Cronbachs alpha = 0.92 for vaccine hesitancy scale; 0.93 for determinants). General linear and logistic regression methods examined factors which were univariately associated with vaccine hesitancy and vaccine acceptance, respectively. Multivariable models were constructed with stepwise model-building procedures. Race/ethnicity, marital status, job classification, immunocompromised status, flu vaccination and childhood vaccination opinions independently predicted hesitancy scale scores. Gender, education, job classification and BMI independently predicted acceptance, hesitancy and refusal groups. Among hesitant employees, uncertainty was reflected in reports of motivating factors influencing their indecision. Despite a strong employee-support environment and job protection, respondents reported physical and mental health effects. Appreciation of varied reasons for refusing vaccination should lead to culturally sensitive interventions to increase vaccination rates in healthcare workers.

14.
Rehabil Nurs ; 2021 Aug 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34469405

RESUMO

ABSTRACT: The COVID-19 pandemic has caused a significant increase in stress for frontline healthcare workers, including rehabilitation workers. Contributing factors include disrupted workflows, heavier workloads, increased time restraints, and fear of contracting/passing the virus. Prolonged high stress levels can produce adverse health outcomes when unaddressed. Resilience can mitigate the negative effects of prolonged stress. Four healthcare workers relate their experiences from the frontlines of the pandemic, discussing their strategies to build resilience and maintain health. Highlighted strategies include mindfulness (the purposeful act of paying attention to the present moment without judgment), gratitude (the practice of being grateful for the positive things in life), self-care (the maintenance of a healthy lifestyle using physical, psychological, and emotional tools), and social support (the sense of belonging that comes from being cared for and valued). These strategies reduce negative outcomes produced by elevated stress levels and promote resilience in frontline healthcare workers.

15.
Rev Esp Enferm Dig ; 2021 Sep 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34470450

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The impact of the COVID-19 outbreak and lockdown in liver transplant (LT) patients remains unknown. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic on the physical and mental health of LT patients during the lockdown period. METHODS: Between August and October 2020 a Web-based questionnaire was emailed to 238 LT patients undergoing regular follow-up at our unit. This pseudonymized survey explored demographic and lifestyle variables (i.e. eating and physical habits), disruptions in routine medical care, and different dimensions of mental health, COVID-19-related mood and coping (worries/anxiety, depression, insomnia, fear of Covid, resilience, etc.), and health perception using different validated instruments. RESULTS: 48.7% (116 of 238) LT recipients accepted to participate, 104 of whom gave their consent to publish the data. The median age was 63 years. Up to 39.4% presented worrying scores indicating moderate/severe generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), whereas 25.5% exhibited moderate/severe insomnia and only 10.5% moderate/severe depression. Forty patients (38.5%) gained weight, 24% experienced a worsening in their eating habits and 63.4% referred to practice less or much less exercise during the lockdown. Only 25% perceived a worsening in the control of their chronic comorbidities. Missed medical appointments (0.9%) or worsening adherence to therapy (1.9%) were exceptional. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 lockdown has negatively impacted the mental and physical health of LT patients. Long-term consequences remain unclear.

16.
J Pediatr Psychol ; 2021 Sep 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34472600

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 pandemic has the potential to disrupt the lives of families and may have implications for children with existing sleep problems. As such, we aimed to: (1) characterize sleep changes during the COVID-19 pandemic in children who had previously been identified as having sleep problems, (2) identify factors contributing to sleep changes due to COVID-19 safety measures, and (3) understand parents' and children's needs to support sleep during the pandemic. METHODS: Eighty-five Canadian parents with children aged 4-14 years participated in this explanatory sequential, mixed-methods study using an online survey of children's and parents' sleep, with a subset of 16 parents, selected based on changes in their children's sleep, participating in semi-structured interviews. Families had previously participated in the Better Nights, Better Days (BNBD) randomized controlled trial. RESULTS: While some parents perceived their child's sleep quality improved during the COVID-19 pandemic (14.1%, n = 12), many parents perceived their child's sleep had worsened (40.0%, n = 34). Parents attributed children's worsened sleep to increased screen time, anxiety, and decreased exercise. Findings from semi-structured interviews highlighted the effect of disrupted routines on sleep and stress, and that stress reciprocally influenced children's and parents' sleep. CONCLUSIONS: The sleep of many Canadian children was affected by the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, with the disruption of routines influencing children's sleep. eHealth interventions, such as BNBD with modifications that address the COVID-19 context, could help families address these challenges.

17.
Nurs Crit Care ; 2021 Sep 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34472664

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has challenged critical care nursing through increased critical care service utilization. This may have a profound impact on intensive care unit (ICU) nurses' ability to maintain patient safety. However, the experiences of ICU nurses in managing patient safety during an infectious disease outbreak remains unexplored. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore ICU nurses' narratives in managing patient safety in the outbreak ICUs during the COVID-19 pandemic. DESIGN: A narrative inquiry design. METHODS: A purposive sample of 18 registered nurses who practiced in the outbreak ICUs during the COVID-19 pandemic were recruited between June and August 2020. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted, transcribed verbatim, and narratively analysed. RESULTS: Findings reviewed an overarching anatomy-specific storyline of a 'hand-brain-heart' connection that describes nurses' experience with managing patient safety during the COVID-19 pandemic. Firstly, stories on 'the hands of clinical practice' revealed how critical care nursing is practiced and adapted by ICU nurses during the pandemic. In particular, ICU nurses banded together to safeguard patient safety by practicing critical care nursing with mastery. Secondly, stories on 'the brain of psychosocial wellness' highlights the tumultuous impact of COVID-19 on the nurses' psychosocial well-being and how nurses demonstrated resilience to continually uphold patient safety during the pandemic. Lastly, stories on 'the heart of nursing' drew upon the nurses' intrinsic professional nursing identity and values to safeguard patient safety. Specific patient tales further boosted the nurses' commitment to render safe nursing care during the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: Through their stories, ICU nurses reported how they continually seek to uphold patient safety through clinical competence, resilience, and heightened nursing identity. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: ICU nurses require sustainable clinical resources and references such as clinical instructors, as well as visible psychosocial support channels, for ICU nurses to continue to uphold patient safety during COVID-19.

18.
J Fam Psychol ; 2021 Sep 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34472935

RESUMO

Family lives have been changed dramatically due to the stay-at-home orders implemented during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak. A variety of factors serve to increase the risk for children and adolescents in developing mental health issues during the prolonged stay-at-home period. The primary aim of this study was to examine a complex conceptual model linking daily routines, parent-child conflict, and indices of psychological maladjustment during the COVID-19 pandemic in a large sample of Chinese children and adolescents. Participants were N = 1,594 children and adolescents (50.6% girls; Mage = 13.13, SDage = 1.54) and their mothers, from Zhengzhou in Mainland China. Multisource assessments include youth self-reports of loneliness, depressive symptoms, and perceived conflict with parents during the stay-at-home period, as well as maternal reports of their child's daily routines during this time. Among the results, parent-child conflict mediated the relations between daily routines and indices of psychological maladjustment, such that a lack of routine predicted greater parent-child conflict, which in turn was associated with higher levels of loneliness and symptoms of depression. Further, results from multiple group analyses revealed that associations between daily routines and maladjustment were stronger among boys than girls-as well as stronger among primary school children than middle school adolescents. Findings highlighted the importance of maintaining regular routines for children's and adolescents' mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).

19.
Psychol Trauma ; 2021 Sep 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34472945

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The virulence of COVID-19 has been particularly problematic in countries such as Spain. This led the government to decide that the population should be locked down at home to reduce the spread of the disease and avoid the collapse of the health system. Considering this, this study analyzed the changes in intimate relationships that occurred during lockdown in terms of dyadic adjustment, conflict, and quality of the relationship, as well as their relationship with anxiety symptoms. METHOD: Cross-sectional questionnaire-based study with adults (N = 342) aged 20-67 years who lived in Spain. Each participant completed self-report measures of anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory state and trait subscales), dyadic adjustment (Dyadic Adjustment Scale), relationship conflict and quality, and sociodemographic variables. RESULTS: The results showed significant levels of state anxiety, which was associated with poorer dyadic adjustment and a decrease in the perceived quality of relationships since the start of lockdown. Increased partner conflict seems to be an important predictor of dyadic adjustment and relationship quality during social isolation. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that the COVID-19 pandemic has negatively affected the mental health of the population, especially women. This finding is closely associated with difficulties with one's cohabiting partner (e.g., worse dyadic adjustment), but the most determining factor seems to be the previous state of the relationship. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).

20.
Ann Oncol ; 2021 Sep 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34509615

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Telemedicine services have been increasingly used to facilitate post-treatment cancer survivorship care, including improving access; monitoring health status, health behaviors, and symptom management; enhancing information exchange; and mitigating the costs of care delivery, especially since the COVID-19 pandemic. To inform guidance for the use of telemedicine in the post-COVID era, the aim of this overview of systematic reviews was to evaluate the efficacy of, and survivor engagement in, telemedicine interventions in the post-treatment survivorship phase, and to consider implementation barriers and facilitators. METHODS: PubMed, Cochrane CENTRAL, CINAHL, Embase, and Web of Science databases were searched. Systematic reviews that examined the use of telemedicine in the post-treatment phase of cancer survivorship, published between January 2010 and April 2021 were included. Efficacy data were synthesized narratively. Implementation barriers and facilitators were synthesized using the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research. RESULTS: Twenty-nine systematic reviews were included. A substantive body of evidence found telemedicine to benefit the management of psychosocial and physical effects, particularly for improving fatigue and cognitive function. There was a lack of evidence on the use of telemedicine in the prevention and surveillance for recurrences and new cancers as well as management of chronic medical conditions. This overview highlights a range of diverse barriers and facilitators at the patient, health service, and system levels. CONCLUSIONS: This review highlights the benefits of telemedicine in addressing psychosocial and physical effects, but not in other areas of post-treatment cancer survivorship care. This large review provides practical guidance for use of telemedicine in post-treatment survivorship care.

SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA
...