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1.
Circulation ; 2019 Sep 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31510769

RESUMO

Background: Patients treated with antithrombotic drugs are at risk of bleeding. Bleeding may be the first manifestation of underlying cancer. Methods: We examined new cancers diagnosed in relation to gastrointestinal or genitourinary bleeding among patients enrolled in the Cardiovascular Outcomes for People Using Anticoagulation Strategies (COMPASS) trial, and determined the hazard of new cancer diagnosis after bleeding at these sites. Results: Of 27,395 patients enrolled (mean age 68, women 21%), 2,678 (9.8%) experienced any (major or minor) bleeding, 713 (2.6%) experienced major bleeding, and 1,084 (4.0%) were diagnosed with cancer, during a mean follow-up of 23 months. Among 2,678 who experienced bleeding, 257 (9.9%) were subsequently diagnosed with cancer. Gastrointestinal bleeding was associated with a 20-fold higher hazard of new gastrointestinal cancer diagnosis (7.4% versus 0.5%, hazard ratio [HR] 20.6, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 15.2-27.8), and 1.7-fold higher hazard of new non-gastrointestinal cancer diagnosis (3.8% versus 3.1%, HR 1.70, 95% CI: 1.20-2.40). Genitourinary bleeding was associated with a 32-fold higher hazard of new genitourinary cancer diagnosis (15.8% versus 0.8%, HR 32.5, 95% CI: 24.7-42.9) and urinary bleeding was associated with a 98-fold higher hazard of new urinary cancer diagnosis (14.2% versus 0.2%, HR 98.5, 95% CI: 68.0-142.7). Non-gastrointestinal, non-genitourinary bleeding was associated with a 3-fold higher hazard of non-gastrointestinal, non-genitourinary cancers (4.4% versus 1.9%, HR 3.02, 95% CI: 2.32-3.91). Conclusions: In patients with atherosclerosis treated with antithrombotic drugs, any gastrointestinal or genitourinary bleeding was associated with higher rates of new cancer diagnosis. Any gastrointestinal or genitourinary bleeding should prompt investigation for cancers at these sites. Clinical Trial Registration: URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique Identifier: NCT01776424.

3.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31392312

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: The role and selection of antithrombotic therapy to improve limb outcomes in chronic lower extremity artery disease (LEAD) is still debated. We conducted a meta-analysis to examine the efficacy and safety of anti-thrombotic and more intense antithrombotic therapy on limb outcomes and limb salvage in patients with chronic LEAD. METHODS: Study inclusion criteria were: enrollment of patients with LEAD, randomized allocation to more vs. less intense antithrombotic therapy [more vs. less intense single antiplatelet therapy (SAPT); dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) vs. SAPT; dual antithrombotic therapy vs. SAPT or oral anticoagulant]; enrolment of ≥ 200 patients; reporting of at least one of following outcomes: limb amputation or revascularization. Seven randomized studies enrolling 30'447 patients were included. RESULTS: Over a median follow-up of 24 months, more vs. less intense antithrombotic therapy or placebo significantly reduced the risk of limb revascularization (relative risk [RR]: 0.89; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.83 - 0.94) and limb amputation (RR: 0.63, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.46-0.86), as well as stroke (RR: 0.82, 95% CI: 0.70-0.97). There was no statistically significant effect on the risk of myocardial infarction (RR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.87-1.11), all-cause (RR: 0.93, 95% CI: 0.86-1.01) and cardiovascular death (RR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.86-1.08). Risk of major bleeding increased (RR: 1.23, 95% CI: 1.04-1.44). CONCLUSION: In patients with LEAD, more intense antithrombotic therapy reduces risk of limb amputation and revascularization as well as stroke, with an increase in the risk of bleeding events.

4.
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg ; 58(1S): S1-S109.e33, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31182334

RESUMO

GUIDELINE SUMMARY: Chronic limb-threatening ischemia (CLTI) is associated with mortality, amputation, and impaired quality of life. These Global Vascular Guidelines (GVG) are focused on definition, evaluation, and management of CLTI with the goals of improving evidence-based care and highlighting critical research needs. The term CLTI is preferred over critical limb ischemia, as the latter implies threshold values of impaired perfusion rather than a continuum. CLTI is a clinical syndrome defined by the presence of peripheral artery disease (PAD) in combination with rest pain, gangrene, or a lower limb ulceration >2 weeks duration. Venous, traumatic, embolic, and nonatherosclerotic etiologies are excluded. All patients with suspected CLTI should be referred urgently to a vascular specialist. Accurately staging the severity of limb threat is fundamental, and the Society for Vascular Surgery Threatened Limb Classification system, based on grading of Wounds, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) is endorsed. Objective hemodynamic testing, including toe pressures as the preferred measure, is required to assess CLTI. Evidence-based revascularization (EBR) hinges on three independent axes: Patient risk, Limb severity, and ANatomic complexity (PLAN). Average-risk and high-risk patients are defined by estimated procedural and 2-year all-cause mortality. The GVG proposes a new Global Anatomic Staging System (GLASS), which involves defining a preferred target artery path (TAP) and then estimating limb-based patency (LBP), resulting in three stages of complexity for intervention. The optimal revascularization strategy is also influenced by the availability of autogenous vein for open bypass surgery. Recommendations for EBR are based on best available data, pending level 1 evidence from ongoing trials. Vein bypass may be preferred for average-risk patients with advanced limb threat and high complexity disease, while those with less complex anatomy, intermediate severity limb threat, or high patient risk may be favored for endovascular intervention. All patients with CLTI should be afforded best medical therapy including the use of antithrombotic, lipid-lowering, antihypertensive, and glycemic control agents, as well as counseling on smoking cessation, diet, exercise, and preventive foot care. Following EBR, long-term limb surveillance is advised. The effectiveness of nonrevascularization therapies (eg, spinal stimulation, pneumatic compression, prostanoids, and hyperbaric oxygen) has not been established. Regenerative medicine approaches (eg, cell, gene therapies) for CLTI should be restricted to rigorously conducted randomizsed clinical trials. The GVG promotes standardization of study designs and end points for clinical trials in CLTI. The importance of multidisciplinary teams and centers of excellence for amputation prevention is stressed as a key health system initiative.

5.
J Vasc Surg ; 69(6S): 3S-125S.e40, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31159978

RESUMO

Chronic limb-threatening ischemia (CLTI) is associated with mortality, amputation, and impaired quality of life. These Global Vascular Guidelines (GVG) are focused on definition, evaluation, and management of CLTI with the goals of improving evidence-based care and highlighting critical research needs. The term CLTI is preferred over critical limb ischemia, as the latter implies threshold values of impaired perfusion rather than a continuum. CLTI is a clinical syndrome defined by the presence of peripheral artery disease (PAD) in combination with rest pain, gangrene, or a lower limb ulceration >2 weeks duration. Venous, traumatic, embolic, and nonatherosclerotic etiologies are excluded. All patients with suspected CLTI should be referred urgently to a vascular specialist. Accurately staging the severity of limb threat is fundamental, and the Society for Vascular Surgery Threatened Limb Classification system, based on grading of Wounds, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) is endorsed. Objective hemodynamic testing, including toe pressures as the preferred measure, is required to assess CLTI. Evidence-based revascularization (EBR) hinges on three independent axes: Patient risk, Limb severity, and ANatomic complexity (PLAN). Average-risk and high-risk patients are defined by estimated procedural and 2-year all-cause mortality. The GVG proposes a new Global Anatomic Staging System (GLASS), which involves defining a preferred target artery path (TAP) and then estimating limb-based patency (LBP), resulting in three stages of complexity for intervention. The optimal revascularization strategy is also influenced by the availability of autogenous vein for open bypass surgery. Recommendations for EBR are based on best available data, pending level 1 evidence from ongoing trials. Vein bypass may be preferred for average-risk patients with advanced limb threat and high complexity disease, while those with less complex anatomy, intermediate severity limb threat, or high patient risk may be favored for endovascular intervention. All patients with CLTI should be afforded best medical therapy including the use of antithrombotic, lipid-lowering, antihypertensive, and glycemic control agents, as well as counseling on smoking cessation, diet, exercise, and preventive foot care. Following EBR, long-term limb surveillance is advised. The effectiveness of nonrevascularization therapies (eg, spinal stimulation, pneumatic compression, prostanoids, and hyperbaric oxygen) has not been established. Regenerative medicine approaches (eg, cell, gene therapies) for CLTI should be restricted to rigorously conducted randomizsed clinical trials. The GVG promotes standardization of study designs and end points for clinical trials in CLTI. The importance of multidisciplinary teams and centers of excellence for amputation prevention is stressed as a key health system initiative.

6.
Atherosclerosis ; 286: 121-127, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31136913

RESUMO

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is known to be associated with mortality in high income countries but no data regarding Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) populations are documented. This study aimed at assessing the prognostic value of the Ankle Brachial Index (ABI) among older adults in the Republic of Congo. METHODS: Congolese subjects ≥65 years were included in a longitudinal population-based survey (EPIDEMCA-FU). Demographic, biological, and clinical data were collected at baseline. PAD was defined by an ABI≤0.90. Information on mortality was collected from key informants in participants' households. Cox proportional hazard models, adjusted for traditional and cardiovascular risk factors, were fitted to evaluate the association between an ABI≤0.90 and death. RESULTS: 1029 participants were recruited at baseline. ABI measurement was obtained from 927 participants, of whom 17.4% presented an ABI≤0.90. During a 2-year follow-up, a total of 83 (9.1%) deaths were recorded. Mortality was higher in the low-ABI group with 23 deaths (14.7%) vs. 57 (7.8%) and 3 (12.0%), respectively among those with 0.90 < ABI<1.4 and ABI≥1.40 (p = 0.039). After adjustment, an ABI≤0.90 was associated with an increased risk of mortality (HR = 1.86; 95%CI 1.04-3.87). Mortality was also independently associated with increasing age (HR = 1.05; 95%CI 1.02-1.09), dementia (HR = 2.73; 95% CI 1.15-8.05), alcohol use (HR = 0.51; 95%CI 0.29-0.88) and female sex (HR = 0.37; 95%CI 0.19-0.72). CONCLUSIONS: In this study, a low ABI predicted an increased mortality risk among older people. ABI may represent a simple and inexpensive tool to identify older people at high risk of death in SSA.

9.
Eur J Heart Fail ; 21(4): 402-424, 2019 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30859669

RESUMO

Ventricular-arterial coupling (VAC) plays a major role in the physiology of cardiac and aortic mechanics, as well as in the pathophysiology of cardiac disease. VAC assessment possesses independent diagnostic and prognostic value and may be used to refine riskstratification and monitor therapeutic interventions. Traditionally, VAC is assessed by the non-invasive measurement of the ratio of arterial (Ea) to ventricular end-systolic elastance (Ees). With disease progression, both Ea and Ees may become abnormal and the Ea/Ees ratio may approximate its normal values. Therefore, the measurement of each component of this ratio or of novel more sensitive markers of myocardial (e.g. global longitudinal strain) and arterial function (e.g. pulse wave velocity) may better characterize VAC. In valvular heart disease, systemic arterial compliance and valvulo-arterial impedance have an established diagnostic and prognostic value and may monitor the effects of valve replacement on vascular and cardiac function. Treatment guided to improve VAC through improvement of both or each one of its components may delay incidence of heart failure and possibly improve prognosis in heart failure. In this consensus document, we describe the pathophysiology, the methods of assessment as well as the clinical implications of VAC in cardiac diseases and heart failure. Finally, we focus on interventions that may improve VAC and thus modify prognosis.

10.
Thromb Haemost ; 119(4): 576-585, 2019 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30703812

RESUMO

The most common causes of ischaemic stroke are represented by carotid artery atherosclerotic disease (CAAD) and atrial fibrillation. While oral anticoagulants substantially reduce the incidence of thromboembolic stroke (< 1%/year), the rate of ischaemic stroke and other cardiovascular disease events in patients with CAAD remains high, ranging from 8.4 to 18.1 events per 100 patient-years. Similar to any other atherosclerotic disease, anti-thrombotic therapies are proposed for CAAD to reduce stroke and other cardiovascular events. The 2017 European Society of Cardiology (ESC)/European Society for Vascular Surgery (ESVS) guidelines recommend for patients with asymptomatic CAAD ≥60% the use of aspirin 75 to 100 mg once daily or clopidogrel 75 mg once daily at the exception of patient at very high bleeding risk. For patients with symptomatic CAAD ≥50%, the use of aspirin 75 to 100 mg once daily or clopidogrel 75 mg once daily is recommended. New perspectives for anti-thrombotic therapy for the treatment of patients with CAAD come from the novel dual pathway strategy combining a low-dose anticoagulant (i.e. rivaroxaban) and aspirin that may help reduce long-term ischaemic complications in patients with CAAD. This review summarizes current evidence and recommendations for the anti-thrombotic management of patients with symptomatic or asymptomatic CAAD or those undergoing carotid revascularization.


Assuntos
Aterosclerose/tratamento farmacológico , Doenças das Artérias Carótidas/tratamento farmacológico , Inibidores da Agregação de Plaquetas/uso terapêutico , Idoso , Anticoagulantes/administração & dosagem , Anticoagulantes/uso terapêutico , Aspirina/administração & dosagem , Aterosclerose/diagnóstico , Aterosclerose/epidemiologia , Cardiologia/métodos , Doenças Cardiovasculares/complicações , Artérias Carótidas/patologia , Doenças das Artérias Carótidas/diagnóstico , Doenças das Artérias Carótidas/epidemiologia , Clopidogrel/uso terapêutico , Feminino , Hemorragia , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Revascularização Miocárdica , Risco , Rivaroxabana/administração & dosagem
12.
Diabetes Res Clin Pract ; 149: 208-209, 2019 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30753849

RESUMO

The effect of aspirin in primary cardiovascular (CV) prevention in people with diabetes is still a matter of debate. Recent results of ASCEND trial suggest that the absolute benefit on CV events is largely counter-balanced by the bleeding risk. However, one crucial question is whether aspirin should be maintained or withdrawn from the prescription list of those who are already under this therapy since a while ago. Indeed, large epidemiological data reported that the aspirin discontinuation was associated to an increased risk of CV events. Moreover, besides the CV outcome, potential positive impact of aspirin on cancer is still under investigation. To conclude, there is no more systematic indication for aspirin in people with diabetes free of CV disease, especially when diabetes and all other CV risk factors are optimally controlled. For those already on aspirin, data are not conclusive enough for a systematic approach and benefit/risk balance must be discussed with patients to take a shared decision.


Assuntos
Aspirina/efeitos adversos , Aspirina/uso terapêutico , Doenças Cardiovasculares/tratamento farmacológico , Diabetes Mellitus/tratamento farmacológico , Aspirina/administração & dosagem , Aspirina/farmacologia , Diabetes Mellitus/patologia , Humanos , Prevenção Primária , Medição de Risco
13.
Curr Vasc Pharmacol ; 2019 Feb 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30727898

RESUMO

Lower extremity artery disease (LEAD) is a marker of a more advanced atherosclerotic process often affecting multiple vascular beds beyond the lower limbs, with a consequent increased risk for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. Antithrombotic therapy is the cornerstone of management of these patients to prevent ischaemic cardiovascular and limb events and death. In patients with symptomatic LEAD, the efficacy of aspirin has been established long ago for the prevention of cardiovascular events. In the current guidelines, clopidogrel may be preferred over aspirin following its incremental ability to prevent cardiovascular events, while ticagrelor is not superior to clopidogrel in reducing cardiovascular outcomes. Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT, aspirin with clopidogrel) is currently recommended for at least 1 month after endovascular interventions irrespective of the stent type. Antiplatelet monotherapy is recommended after infra-inguinal bypass surgery, and DAPT may be considered in below-the-knee bypass with a prosthetic graft. In symptomatic LEAD the addition of anticoagulant (vitamin K antagonists) to antiplatelet therapy increased the risk of major and life-threatening bleeding without benefit regarding cardiovascular outcomes. In a recent trial, low dose of direct oral anticoagulant rivaroxaban plus aspirin showed promising results, not only to reduce death and major cardiovascular events, but also major limb events including amputation. Yet, this option should be considered especially in very high risk patients, after considering also the bleeding risk. Despite all the evidence accumulated since >40 years, many patients with LEAD remain undertreated and deserve close attention and implementation of guidelines advocating the use of antithrombotic therapies, tailored according to their level of risk.

14.
Int J Cardiovasc Imaging ; 35(5): 845-854, 2019 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30623354

RESUMO

Cardiac involvement in systemic light chain (AL) amyloidosis carries a poor prognosis mainly through involvement of the left ventricular (LV) myocardium. Despite its limitations, two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography (2D-TTE) remains the main tool used for the assessment of LV systolic function in AL patients. We hypothesize that 3D-TTE coupled with speckle tracking imaging allows earlier detection of LV systolic dysfunction than 2D-TTE in AL amyloidosis. We prospectively studied 71 subjects including 58 patients with confirmed AL amyloidosis (mean age 66 ± 10 years, 60% male) and 21 healthy control (mean age 64 ± 7 years, 48% male) from 2011 to 2014 at the University Hospital of Limoges. The AL patients were divided into three groups according to Mayo Clinic (MC) staging and all subjects underwent 2D-TTE and 3D-TTE at the same setting. Using 2D-TTE, there was no significant difference in LV ejection fraction (EF) between the groups [LVEF = 63 ± 7% (control), 59 ± 6% (MC stage I), 60 ± 8% (MC stage II) and 57 ± 14% (MC stage III) (p = 0.24)]. In contrast, 3D-TTE demonstrated significantly worse LV systolic function in stage II and III patients using 3D-LVEF [MC II and III 45 ± 8% and 39 ± 12% vs. control 53 ± 8% (p < 0.0001)], global longitudinal strain (GLS) [MC II and III - 11 ± 4% and - 8 ± 3% vs. control - 15 ± 3% (p < 0.0001)] and global radial strain (GRS) [MC II and III 14 ± 9% and 10 ± 8% vs. control 25 ± 10% (p < 0.0001)]. Furthermore, MC III patients had significantly worse global circumferential strain and area tracking [- 17 ± 6% and - 25 ± 8% vs. - 24 ± 7% and - 36 ± 7% for control (p < 0.0001)]. Additionally, MC I had significantly better 3D GLS, GRS and global strain (- 15 ± 3%, 25 ± 10% and 28 ± 12%) than MC II (- 11 ± 4%, 14 ± 9% and 16 ± 10%) and MC III patients (- 8 ± 3%, 10 ± 8% and 12 ± 8%), respectively. Despite an apparently preserved LVEF by 2D-TTE, AL patients in MC stage II and III demonstrate evidence of LV systolic dysfunction by 3D imaging using LVEF and strain analysis. Worse LV involvement by AL amyloidosis was associated with more impaired 3D-TTE LV systolic parameters.


Assuntos
Cardiomiopatias/diagnóstico por imagem , Ecocardiografia Tridimensional , Amiloidose de Cadeia Leve de Imunoglobulina/diagnóstico por imagem , Volume Sistólico , Disfunção Ventricular Esquerda/diagnóstico por imagem , Função Ventricular Esquerda , Idoso , Cardiomiopatias/imunologia , Cardiomiopatias/fisiopatologia , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Bases de Dados Factuais , Diagnóstico Precoce , Feminino , Humanos , Amiloidose de Cadeia Leve de Imunoglobulina/imunologia , Amiloidose de Cadeia Leve de Imunoglobulina/fisiopatologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Valor Preditivo dos Testes , Estudos Prospectivos , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Índice de Gravidade de Doença , Sístole , Disfunção Ventricular Esquerda/imunologia , Disfunção Ventricular Esquerda/fisiopatologia
15.
PLoS One ; 14(1): e0211131, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30682090

RESUMO

AIM OF STUDY: To determine the prevalence of cardiovascular disease and associated risk factors in the population of Gaza strip in Palestine. METHODS: A cross-sectional stratified cluster sample design was applied in this study. A sample of 2240 participant (1121 males and 1119 females) aged ≥25 years participated in the study. For each individual, trained staff administered a questionnaire, where all variables of interest followed WHO's STEP wise approach to surveillance chronic disease risk factors (STEPS) (WHO, 2001). Sociodemographic data, anthropometric measure (body mass index, blood pressure), and biochemical test (blood sugar and lipids profiles) were measured. Short International Physical Activity (IPAQ) questionnaire form was used. Bivariate analysis and logistic regression were used with SPSS (version 22.0) to analyze the data. RESULTS: The most common condition was coronary artery disease (8.3%), followed by stroke events (3%). The associated risk factors were obesity (47.8%), hypertension (28.4%), current smoking account for (23.2%), diabetes mellitus (19.1%), high cholesterol level (8.8%), and high triglycerides level (40.2%). Additionally, the proportion of being physical active was found to be low (48.3%); particularly with increasing age. More than 30% of the population has less than 4 days of consumption of fruit and vegetables per week and 65.9% has less than 2 servings per day. CONCLUSION: The burden of CVDs and their associated risk factors is considerable in Gaza and represents a major public health concern. Effective strategies in management, education and healthcare centers are required for an accurate management and implementation of preventive measure in this area.

16.
Circulation ; 139(9): 1134-1145, 2019 Feb 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30667279

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Strokes were significantly reduced by the combination of rivaroxaban plus aspirin in comparison with aspirin in the COMPASS trial (Cardiovascular Outcomes for People Using Anticoagulation Strategies). We present detailed analyses of stroke by type, predictors, and antithrombotic effects in key subgroups. METHODS: Participants had stable coronary artery or peripheral artery disease and were randomly assigned to receive aspirin 100 mg once daily (n=9126), rivaroxaban 5 mg twice daily (n=9117), or rivaroxaban 2.5 mg twice daily plus aspirin (n=9152). Patients who required anticoagulation or had a stroke within 1 month, previous lacunar stroke, or intracerebral hemorrhage were excluded. RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 23 months, fewer patients had strokes in the rivaroxaban plus aspirin group than in the aspirin group (83 [0.9% per year] versus 142 [1.6% per year]; hazard ratio [HR], 0.58; 95% CI, 0.44-0.76; P<0.0001). Ischemic/uncertain strokes were reduced by nearly half (68 [0.7% per year] versus 132 [1.4% per year]; HR, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.38-0.68; P<0.0001) by the combination in comparison with aspirin. No significant difference was noted in the occurrence of stroke in the rivaroxaban alone group in comparison with aspirin: annualized rate of 0.7% (HR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.65-1.05). The occurrence of fatal and disabling stroke (modified Rankin Scale, 3-6) was decreased by the combination (32 [0.3% per year] versus 55 [0.6% per year]; HR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.37-0.89; P=0.01). Independent predictors of stroke were prior stroke, hypertension, systolic blood pressure at baseline, age, diabetes mellitus, and Asian ethnicity. Prior stroke was the strongest predictor of incident stroke (HR, 3.63; 95% CI, 2.65-4.97; P<0.0001) and was associated with a 3.4% per year rate of stroke recurrence on aspirin. The effect of the combination in comparison with aspirin was consistent across subgroups with high stroke risk, including those with prior stroke. CONCLUSIONS: Low-dose rivaroxaban plus aspirin is an important new antithrombotic option for primary and secondary stroke prevention in patients with clinical atherosclerosis. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov . Unique identifier: NCT01776424.

20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30465418

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Among patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), around 25% have multisite artery disease (MSAD). Patients with CAD and MSAD are at higher risk of peri-operative and long-term cardiovascular events. Whether off-pump coronary bypass grafting (CABG) can improve their prognosis is unknown.We aimed to assess the benefits of off- vs. on-pump cardiac surgery in patients undergoing CABG, according to coexistence of extra-cardiac artery disease. METHODS: Between April 1998 and September 2008, 1221 patients undergoing CABG without any other intervention were enrolled. Overall death and major cardiovascular events were recorded at 1-month and during long-term follow-up. A propensity score (PS), derived from all relevant variables (p<0.25) associated with on-pump as compared to off-pump CABG, and representing the likelihood for each individual patient to receive off-pump CABG, was calculated. RESULTS: MSAD was observed in 279 patients (23%). Off-pump CABG was performed in 208 (17%) patients. The median follow-up was 7.6 years. The 10-year mortality was significantly lower in offvs. on-pump CABG group (74±4% vs. 68±2%, p=0.024). In patients with MSAD, there was a trend for better survival for off- vs. on-pump CABG (63±8% vs. 50±4%, p=0.078). After adjustment for PS, we found no further difference between on- and off-pump CABG both in the whole cohort (HR=1.30, p=0.10), as well as in MSAD patients (HR=1.51, p=0.14). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with MSAD receiving CABG are at worst prognostic than those with isolated CAD. In these patients, we found no significant difference in the long-term mortality and cardiovascular events between on- and off-pump CABG.

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