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1.
J Allergy Clin Immunol ; 145(1): 192-198.e11, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31369801

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is more common among African American children. Whether there are racial/ethnic difference among adults with AD and the causes for those disparities are unclear. OBJECTIVE: We sought to examine the relationship between self-reported race/ethnicity and AD and determine whether African genetic ancestry is predictive of these outcomes among African American subjects. METHODS: We analyzed data from 2 independent multiethnic longitudinal studies: 86,893 subjects aged 18 to 100 years from the Kaiser Permanente Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) cohort and 5467 subjects aged 2 to 26 years from the national Pediatric Eczema Elective Registry (PEER) cohort. The primary outcomes were physician-diagnosed AD in GERA and repeated measures of self-reported disease control among patients with physician-diagnosed AD at 6-month intervals in PEER. We examined whether self-identified African American race/ethnicity was predictive of these outcomes and then tested whether a continuous measure of African genetic ancestry was associated with outcomes within the African American group. RESULTS: AD was more common among self-identified African American subjects than non-Hispanic white subjects in GERA (4.4% vs 2.1%; odds ratio, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.70-2.48) and less well-controlled in PEER subjects (odds of 1-level worse control, 1.91; 95% CI, 1.64-2.22). However, African genetic ancestry was not associated with AD risk or control among self-identified African American subjects in either cohort, nor did an AD polygenic risk score or genetic skin pigment score explain the AD disparities in patients with AD. CONCLUSION: Ancestry-related genetic effects do not explain increased AD prevalence or poorer disease control among African American subjects.

2.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract ; 8(1): 248-257.e16, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31479767

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Atopic eczema is a common and debilitating condition associated with depression and anxiety, but the nature of this association remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: To explore the temporal relationship between atopic eczema and new depression/anxiety. METHODS: This matched cohort study used routinely collected data from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink, linked to hospital admissions data. We identified adults with atopic eczema (1998-2016) using a validated algorithm, and up to 5 individuals without atopic eczema matched on date of diagnosis, age, sex, and general practice. We estimated the hazard ratio (HR) for new depression/anxiety using stratified Cox regression to account for age, sex, calendar period, Index of Multiple Deprivation, glucocorticoid treatment, obesity, smoking, and harmful alcohol use. RESULTS: We identified 526,808 adults with atopic eczema who were matched to 2,569,030 without. Atopic eczema was associated with increased incidence of new depression (HR, 1.14; 99% CI, 1.12-1.16) and anxiety (HR, 1.17; 99% CI, 1.14-1.19). We observed a stronger effect of atopic eczema on depression with increasing atopic eczema severity (HR [99% CI] compared with no atopic eczema: mild, 1.10 [1.08-1.13]; moderate, 1.19 [1.15-1.23]; and severe, 1.26 [1.17-1.37]). A dose-response association, however, was less apparent for new anxiety diagnosis (HR [99% CI] compared with no atopic eczema: mild, 1.14 [1.11-1.18]; moderate, 1.21 [1.17-1.26]; and severe, 1.15; [1.05-1.25]). CONCLUSIONS: Adults with atopic eczema are more likely to develop new depression and anxiety. For depression, we observed a dose-response relationship with atopic eczema severity.

3.
J Allergy Clin Immunol ; 145(2): 563-571.e8, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31757515

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Limited evidence suggests increased fracture risk in people with atopic eczema. Any link could have substantial effect; atopic eczema is common, and fractures have associated morbidity and mortality. OBJECTIVE: We sought to examine whether atopic eczema is associated with fracture and whether fracture risk varies with eczema severity. METHODS: We performed a matched cohort study set in primary care (Clinical Practice Research Datalink GOLD 1998-2016) and linked hospital admissions data (Hospital Episode Statistics), including adults (≥18 years old) with atopic eczema matched (by age, sex, general practice, and cohort entry date) with up to 5 individuals without eczema. We estimated hazard ratios (HRs) from stratified Cox regression comparing risk of major osteoporotic (hip, pelvis, spine, wrist, and proximal humerus) fractures individually and any fracture in those with and without atopic eczema. RESULTS: We identified 526,808 people with atopic eczema and 2,569,030 people without atopic eczema. Those with eczema had increased risk of hip (HR, 1.10; 99% CI, 1.06-1.14), pelvic (HR, 1.10; 99% CI, 1.02-1.19), spinal (HR, 1.18; 99% CI, 1.10-1.27), and wrist (HR, 1.07; 99% CI, 1.03,-1.11) fractures. We found no evidence of increased proximal humeral (HR, 1.06; 99% CI, 0.97-1.15) fracture risk. Fracture risk increased with increasing eczema severity, with the strongest associations in people with severe eczema (compared with those without) for spinal (HR, 2.09; 99% CI, 1.66-2.65), pelvic (HR, 1.66; 99% CI, 1.26-2.20), and hip (HR, 1.50; 99% CI, 1.30-1.74) fractures. Associations persisted after oral glucocorticoid adjustment. CONCLUSIONS: People with atopic eczema have increased fracture risk, particularly major osteoporotic fractures.

4.
Evol Appl ; 12(10): 1960-1970, 2019 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31700538

RESUMO

Pigmentation evolved in ancestral humans to protect against toxic, ultraviolet B irradiation, but the question remains: "what is being protected?" Because humans with dark pigmentation display a suite of superior epidermal functions in comparison with their more lightly pigmented counterparts, we hypothesized and provided evidence that dark pigmentation evolved in Africa to support cutaneous function. Because our prior clinical studies also showed that a restoration of a competent barrier dampens cutaneous inflammation, we hypothesized that resistance to inflammation could have provided pigmented hominins with yet another, important evolutionary benefit. We addressed this issue here in two closely related strains of hairless mice, endowed with either moderate (Skh2/J) or absent (Skh1) pigmentation. In these models, we showed that (a) pigmented mice display a markedly reduced propensity to develop inflammation after challenges with either a topical irritant or allergen in comparison with their nonpigmented counterparts; (b) visible and histologic evidence of inflammation was paralleled by reduced levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (i.e., IL-1α and INFα); (c) because depigmentation of Skh2/J mouse skin enhanced both visible inflammation and pro-inflammatory cytokine levels after comparable pro-inflammatory challenges, the reduced propensity to develop inflammation was directly linked to the presence of pigmentation; and (d) furthermore, in accordance with our prior work showing that pigment production endows benefits by reducing the surface pH of skin, acidification of albino (Skh1) mouse skin also protected against inflammation, and equalized cytokine levels to those found in pigmented skin. In summary, pigmentation yields a reduced propensity to develop inflammation, consistent with our hypothesis that dark pigmentation evolved in ancestral humans to provide a suite of barrier-linked benefits that now include resistance to inflammation.

5.
J Allergy Clin Immunol ; 144(3): 710-719, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31260715

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Atopic eczema onset is described primarily in early childhood, and the frequency and characteristics of adult-onset disease remain controversial. OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine the proportion of subjects who report atopic eczema symptoms between birth and midadulthood and to examine demographic, immunologic, and genetic factors associated with period of symptom onset. METHODS: We conducted a longitudinal study using data from 2 nationally representative community-based birth cohorts from the United Kingdom: the British Cohort Studies 1958 and 1970. Subjects were followed from birth through age 42 to 50 years. The primary outcome was the age period of self-reported atopic eczema symptom onset based on repeated measures of self-reported atopic eczema at each survey wave. RESULTS: The annual period prevalence of atopic eczema ranged from 5% to 15% in 2 cohorts of more than 17,000 participants each followed from birth through middle age. There was no clear trend in prevalence by age, and among adults reporting active atopic eczema during a given year, only 38% had symptom onset reported in childhood. When compared with subjects whose eczema started in childhood, those with adult-onset disease were more likely to be women, from Scotland or Northern England, of lower childhood socioeconomic group, smokers in adulthood, and less likely to have a history of asthma. In a subanalysis using data from the 1958 cohort only, genetic mutations previously associated with atopic eczema, including filaggrin-null mutations, and allergen-specific IgE were more common among those with childhood-onset disease. CONCLUSION: Rates of self-reported atopic eczema remain high after childhood, and adult-onset atopic eczema has different risk factor associations than childhood-onset eczema.

6.
JAMA Dermatol ; 155(5): 556-563, 2019 05 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30892577

RESUMO

Importance: The well-being and development of children is strongly influenced by parents' physical and psychosocial health. Data from small, clinic-based studies suggest that sleep loss may be common in parents of children with atopic dermatitis (AD), but longitudinal population-based studies are lacking. Objectives: To compare sleep disturbances over time between mothers of children with and without AD and to determine whether these disturbances are associated with the child's disease severity and the child's sleep disturbances. Design, Setting, and Participants: In the ongoing Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, all pregnant women residing in Avon, United Kingdom, with an expected delivery date between April 1, 1991, and December 31, 1992, were recruited. Analyses for this study, a secondary analysis of this cohort, were performed from September 2017 to September 2018. Mother-child pairs were followed up with a time-varying measure of child AD activity and severity and self-reported maternal sleep measures repeated at multiple time points between child ages 6 months and 11 years. Main Outcomes and Measures: Time-varying binary measures of maternal sleep duration (<6 vs ≥6 hours per night), difficulty falling asleep, early morning awakening, subjectively insufficient sleep, and daytime exhaustion. Results: The study followed up 13 988 mother-child pairs from birth for a median duration of 11 (interquartile range, 7-11) years. Among the cohort, 11 585 of 13 972 mothers (82.9%) were aged 21 to 34 years and 12 001 of 12 324 (97.4%) were of white race/ethnicity; 7220 of 13 978 children (51.7%) were male. Sleep duration (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.09; 95% CI, 0.90-1.32) and early morning awakenings (AOR, 1.16; 95% CI, 0.93-1.46) were similar between mothers of children with and without AD. In contrast, mothers of children with AD were more likely to report difficulty falling asleep (AOR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.01-1.83), subjectively insufficient sleep (AOR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.24-1.66), and daytime exhaustion (AOR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.12-1.78) independent of the child's comorbid asthma and/or allergic rhinitis. For all measures, worse child AD severity was associated with worse maternal sleep outcomes. The magnitude and significance of the associations were largely unchanged after adjustment for child sleep disturbances. Conclusions and Relevance: Mothers of children with AD reported difficulty falling asleep, subjectively insufficient sleep, and daytime exhaustion throughout the first 11 years of childhood. However, child sleep disturbances did not fully explain maternal sleep disturbances, and future research should investigate other mechanisms. In caring for children with AD, clinicians should consider maternal sleep disturbances and caregiver fatigue.


Assuntos
Dermatite Atópica/psicologia , Mães/psicologia , Transtornos do Sono-Vigília/epidemiologia , Adulto , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Estudos de Coortes , Dermatite Atópica/patologia , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Índice de Gravidade de Doença , Reino Unido , Adulto Jovem
7.
JAMA Pediatr ; 173(5): e190025, 2019 05 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30830151

RESUMO

Importance: Pruritus, a hallmark of atopic dermatitis (AD), is thought to disrupt sleep, yet little is known about how variations in disease activity and severity of this common childhood condition may be associated with sleep patterns over time. Objective: To determine whether children with active AD have impaired sleep duration and quality at multiple time points throughout childhood and whether disease severity affects sleep outcomes. Design, Setting, and Participants: This longitudinal cohort study used data of children enrolled in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, a population-based birth cohort in Avon, United Kingdom. Participants were children (N = 13 988) alive at 1 year and followed up with repeated measures of self-reported AD and sleep through 16 years of age. This study was based on data collected from 1990 to 2008. Data analysis was performed from September 2017 to September 2018. Main Outcomes and Measures: Standardized measure of sleep duration and composite measure of sleep quality, including nighttime awakenings, early morning awakenings, difficulty falling asleep, and nightmares, were repeated at multiple time points between 2 and 16 years of age. Results: The study sample comprised 13 988 children (7220 male [51.6%]) followed up for a median (interquartile range [IQR]) duration of 11 (5-14) years. Of this total, 4938 children (35.3%) met the definition of having atopic dermatitis between 2 and 16 years of age. Total sleep duration was similar between children with active AD and without AD at all ages, and the average estimated difference across childhood was a clinically negligible difference of 2 minutes less per day for children with AD (95% CI, -4 to 0 minutes). In contrast, children with active AD were more likely to report worse sleep quality at all time points, with a nearly 50% higher odds of experiencing more sleep-quality disturbances (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.48; 95% CI, 1.33 to 1.66). Children with more severe active disease (quite bad or very bad AD: aOR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.42 to 1.98) and with comorbid asthma or allergic rhinitis (aOR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.54 to 2.09) had worse sleep quality. However, even children with mild AD (OR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.27 to 1.54) or inactive AD (OR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.28 to 1.55) had statistically significantly increased odds of impaired sleep quality. Conclusions and Relevance: Atopic dermatitis appeared to be associated with impaired sleep quality throughout childhood; thus, it is suggested that clinicians should consider sleep quality among all children with AD, especially those with comorbid asthma or allergic rhinitis and severe disease, and that interventions to improve sleep quality are needed.


Assuntos
Dermatite Atópica/complicações , Transtornos do Sono-Vigília/etiologia , Adolescente , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Dermatite Atópica/psicologia , Humanos , Lactente , Estudos Longitudinais , Prurido/complicações , Prurido/psicologia , Fatores de Risco , Autorrelato , Índice de Gravidade de Doença , Transtornos do Sono-Vigília/diagnóstico , Transtornos do Sono-Vigília/epidemiologia
8.
J Allergy Clin Immunol ; 143(5): 1821-1829, 2019 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30576754

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Atopic eczema is a common inflammatory skin disease. Various inflammatory conditions have been linked to cardiovascular disease, a major cause of global mortality and morbidity. OBJECTIVE: We sought to systematically review and meta-analyze population-based studies assessing associations between atopic eczema and specific cardiovascular outcomes. METHODS: MEDLINE, Embase, and Global Health were searched from inception to December 2017. We obtained pooled estimates using random-effects meta-analyses. We used a multivariate Bayesian meta-regression model to estimate the slope of effect of increasing atopic eczema severity on cardiovascular outcomes. RESULTS: Nineteen relevant studies were included. The effects of atopic eczema reported in cross-sectional studies were heterogeneous, with no evidence for pooled associations with angina, myocardial infarction, heart failure, or stroke. In cohort studies atopic eczema was associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction (n = 4; relative risk [RR], 1.12; 95% CI, 1.00-1.25), stroke (n = 4; RR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.03-1.17), ischemic stroke n = 4; RR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.14-1.20), angina (n = 2; RR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.13-1.24), and heart failure (n = 2; RR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.05-1.51). Prediction intervals were wide for myocardial infarction and stroke. The risk of cardiovascular outcomes appeared to increase with increasing severity (mean RR increase between severity categories, 1.15; 95% credibility interval, 1.09-1.21; uncertainty interval, 1.04-1.28). CONCLUSION: Significant associations with cardiovascular outcomes were more common in cohort studies but with considerable between-study heterogeneity. Increasing atopic eczema severity was associated with increased risk of cardiovascular outcomes. Improved awareness among stakeholders regarding this small but significant association is warranted.

10.
BMJ Open ; 8(9): e023097, 2018 09 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30224395

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Atopic dermatitis is a complex disease with differing clinical presentations. Many attempts have been made to identify uniform subtypes, or phenotypes, of atopic dermatitis in order to identify different aetiologies, improve diagnosis, estimate more accurate clinical prognoses, inform treatment andmanagement or predict treatment efficacy andeffectiveness. However, no consensus yet exists on exactly what defines these phenotypes or how many there are and whether they are genuine or statistical artefacts. This review aims to identify previously reported phenotypes of atopic dermatitis, the features used to define them and any characteristics or clinical outcomes significantly associated with them. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We will search Ovid Embase, Ovid MEDLINE and Web of Science from inception to the latest available date at the time of the search for studies attempting to classify atopic dermatitis in humans using any cross-sectional or longitudinal epidemiological or interventional design. Primary outcomes are atopic dermatitis phenotypes, features used to define them and characteristics associated with them in subsequent analyses. A secondary outcome is the methodological approach used to derive them. Two reviewers will independently screen titles and abstracts for inclusion, extract data and assess study quality. We will present the results of this review descriptively and with frequencies where possible. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval is not required for this study as it is a systematic review. We will report results from this systematic review in a peer-reviewed journal. The main value of this study will be to inform further research. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42018087500.


Assuntos
Dermatite Atópica/classificação , Revisão Sistemática como Assunto , Humanos , Fenótipo , Prognóstico , Projetos de Pesquisa
11.
BMJ ; 361: k1786, 2018 05 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29792314

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether adults with atopic eczema are at an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and whether the risk varies by atopic eczema severity and condition activity over time. DESIGN: Population based matched cohort study. SETTING: UK electronic health records from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink, Hospital Episode Statistics, and data from the Office for National Statistics, 1998-2015. PARTICIPANTS: Adults with a diagnosis of atopic eczema, matched (on age, sex, general practice, and calendar time) to up to five patients without atopic eczema. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Cardiovascular outcomes (myocardial infarction, unstable angina, heart failure, atrial fibrillation, stroke, and cardiovascular death). RESULTS: 387 439 patients with atopic eczema were matched to 1 528 477 patients without atopic eczema. The median age was 43 at cohort entry and 66% were female. Median follow-up was 5.1 years. Evidence of a 10% to 20% increased hazard for the non-fatal primary outcomes for patients with atopic eczema was found by using Cox regression stratified by matched set. There was a strong dose-response relation with severity of atopic eczema. Patients with severe atopic eczema had a 20% increase in the risk of stroke (hazard ratio 1.22, 99% confidence interval 1.01 to 1.48), 40% to 50% increase in the risk of myocardial infarction, unstable angina, atrial fibrillation, and cardiovascular death, and 70% increase in the risk of heart failure (hazard ratio 1.69, 99% confidence interval 1.38 to 2.06). Patients with the most active atopic eczema (active >50% of follow-up) were also at a greater risk of cardiovascular outcomes. Additional adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors as potential mediators partially attenuated the point estimates, though associations persisted for severe atopic eczema. CONCLUSIONS: Severe and predominantly active atopic eczema are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular outcomes. Targeting cardiovascular disease prevention strategies among these patients should be considered.


Assuntos
Doenças Cardiovasculares/etiologia , Dermatite Atópica/complicações , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Angina Instável/etiologia , Fibrilação Atrial/etiologia , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Infarto do Miocárdio/etiologia , Fatores de Risco , Índice de Gravidade de Doença , Adulto Jovem
15.
BMJ Open ; 7(10): e017245, 2017 Oct 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29025838

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Childhood allergic diseases may prevent affected children from achieving their academic potential. Potential mechanisms include absence from school due to illness and medical appointments. Experience of symptoms in classes or leisure time, and stigma associated with visible signs and symptoms, including skin disease, requirements for medication during school time or the need for specific diets, may also contribute to reduced educational attainment. Studies have investigated the association between specific allergic diseases and educational attainment. The aim of this study is to systematically review the literature on allergic diseases, educational attainment and occupational status, and if possible, calculate meta-analytic summary estimates for the associations. METHODS: Systematic electronic searches in Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane, Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PsycINFO and education Resources Information Center (ERIC); hand search in reference lists of included papers and conference reports; search for unpublished studies in clinical trial registers and the New York Academy of Medicine Grey Literature Report; data extraction; and study quality assessment (Newcastle-Ottawa Scale) will be performed. ANALYSIS: Data will be summarised descriptively, and meta-analysis including meta-regression to explore sources of heterogeneities will be performed if possible. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Dissemination in a peer-reviewed, open-access, international scientific journal is planned. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42017058036.


Assuntos
Sucesso Acadêmico , Emprego/estatística & dados numéricos , Hipersensibilidade/epidemiologia , Adolescente , Causalidade , Criança , Humanos , Projetos de Pesquisa , Revisão Sistemática como Assunto
16.
BMJ Open ; 7(9): e017979, 2017 Sep 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28965102

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Chronic inflammatory diseases such as eczema (also known as atopic dermatitis) have been inconsistently linked to cardiovascular disease and stroke in both mechanistic and epidemiological studies. There is a need to review the existing epidemiological data examining the association between eczema and major cardiovascular outcomes, including angina, myocardial infarction, coronary revascularisation, heart failure, cardiac arrhythmias, stroke and cardiovascular death, in order to improve our understanding of the comorbidities of eczema. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We will systematically review population-based studies, including cohort, case-control and cross-sectional studies, reporting on the association between eczema and cardiovascular outcomes. We will search Medline, Embase and Global Health, from their date of inception to April 2017, using a comprehensive search strategy formulated with the help of a librarian. Two reviewers will independently screen titles and abstracts in duplicate, followed by independent data extraction and quality assessment. We will group studies by the cardiovascular outcome under study and synthesise them narratively. If sufficient numbers of homogeneous studies are returned, we will perform meta-analyses to obtain pooled effect estimates. Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis will be used to inform the reporting of this study. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42017060359.


Assuntos
Doenças Cardiovasculares/epidemiologia , Eczema/complicações , Eczema/epidemiologia , Humanos , Projetos de Pesquisa , Fatores de Risco , Revisão Sistemática como Assunto
17.
Dermatol Clin ; 35(3): 291-297, 2017 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28577798

RESUMO

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, relapsing condition, meaning that the intensity of symptoms usually fluctuates over time. Changes in skin physiology may be evident from birth, suggesting that AD may be a lifelong condition marked by intermittent symptoms/disease activity. Methodological considerations for studying the long-term course of AD are reviewed in detail. Improved measurement of the frequency and duration of active disease periods can help to elucidate more about the clinical course AD and the role of treatment in long-term outcomes.


Assuntos
Dermatite Atópica/epidemiologia , Exacerbação dos Sintomas , Dermatite Atópica/tratamento farmacológico , Dermatite Atópica/fisiopatologia , Humanos , Incidência , Prevalência , Recidiva , Indução de Remissão , Prevenção Secundária , Fatores de Tempo
18.
J Invest Dermatol ; 137(8): 1655-1662, 2017 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28428130

RESUMO

Electronic health records hold great promise for clinical and epidemiologic research. Undertaking atopic eczema (AE) research using such data is challenging because of its episodic and heterogeneous nature. We sought to develop and validate a diagnostic algorithm that identifies AE cases based on codes used for electronic records used in the UK Health Improvement Network. We found that at least one of five diagnosis codes plus two treatment codes for any skin-directed therapy were likely to accurately identify patients with AE. To validate this algorithm, a questionnaire was sent to the physicians of 200 randomly selected children and adults. The primary outcome, positive predictive value for a physician-confirmed diagnosis of AE, was 86% (95% confidence interval = 80-91). Additional criteria increased the PPV up to 95% but would miss up to 89% of individuals with physician-confirmed AE. The first and last entered diagnosis codes for individuals showed good agreement with the physician-confirmed age at onset and last disease activity; the mean difference was 0.8 years (95% confidence interval = -0.3 to 1.9) and -1.3 years (95% confidence interval = -2.5 to -0.1), respectively. A combination of diagnostic and prescription codes can be used to reliably estimate the diagnosis and duration of AE from The Health Improvement Network primary care electronic health records in the UK.


Assuntos
Algoritmos , Dermatite Atópica/diagnóstico , Registros Eletrônicos de Saúde , Atenção Primária à Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , Criança , Bases de Dados Factuais , Feminino , Seguimentos , Humanos , Masculino , Inquéritos e Questionários , Fatores de Tempo , Reino Unido , Adulto Jovem
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