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1.
J Am Heart Assoc ; 8(11): e011860, 2019 Jun 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31433701

RESUMO

Background Mechanisms related to the influence of diet on the development of cardiovascular disease are not entirely understood, and protein biomarkers may help to understand these pathways. Studies of biomarkers identified with multiplex proteomic methods and dietary patterns are largely lacking. Methods and Results Dietary patterns were generated through principal component analysis in 2 population-based Swedish cohorts, the EpiHealth (EpiHealth study; n=20 817 men and women) and the SMCC (Swedish Mammography Cohort Clinical [n=4650 women]). A set of 184 protein cardiovascular disease biomarkers were measured with 2 high-throughput, multiplex immunoassays. Discovery and replication multivariable linear regression analyses were used to investigate the associations between the principal component analysis-generated dietary patterns and the cardiovascular disease-associated protein biomarkers, first in the EpiHealth (n=2240) and then in the Swedish Mammography Cohort Clinical. Four main dietary patterns were identified in the EpiHealth, and 3 patterns were identified in the Swedish Mammography Cohort Clinical. The healthy and the Western/traditional patterns were found in both cohorts. In the EpiHealth, 57 protein biomarkers were associated with 3 of the dietary patterns, and 41 of these associations were replicated in the Swedish Mammography Cohort Clinical, with effect estimates ranging from 0.057 to 0.083 (P-value range, 5.0×10-2-1.4×10-9) for each SD increase in the relative protein concentration. Independent associations were established between dietary patterns and the 21 protein biomarkers. Two proteins, myeloperoxidase and resistin, were associated with both the healthy and the light meal pattern but in opposite directions. Conclusions We have discovered and replicated independent associations between dietary patterns and 21 biomarkers linked to cardiovascular disease, which have a role in the pathways related to inflammation, endothelial and immune function, cell adhesion, and metabolism.

2.
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol ; 39(1): 97-106, 2019 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30565958

RESUMO

Objective- Higher triglyceride (TG) is a risk factor for incident type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), but paradoxically, genetic susceptibility for higher TG has been associated with lower T2DM risk. There is also evidence that the genetic association may be modified by baseline TG. Whether such associations can be replicated and the interaction is selective for certain TG-rich lipoprotein particles remains to be explored. Approach and Results- Cox regression involving TG, TG-rich lipoprotein particles, and genetic determinants of TG was performed among 15 813 participants with baseline fasting status in the WGHS (Women's Genome Health Study), including 1453 T2DM incident cases during a mean 18.6 (SD=5.3) years of follow-up. A weighted, 40-single-nucleotide polymorphism TG genetic risk score was inversely associated with incident T2DM (hazard ratio [95% CI], 0.66 [0.58-0.75]/10-TG risk alleles; P<0.0001) with adjustment for baseline body mass index, HDL (high-density lipoprotein) cholesterol, and TG. TG-associated risk was higher among individuals in the low compared with the high 40-single-nucleotide polymorphism TG genetic risk score tertile (hazard ratio [95% CI], 1.98 [1.83-2.14] versus 1.68 [1.58-1.80] per mmol/L; Pinteraction=0.0007). In TG-adjusted analysis, large and medium but not small TG-rich lipoprotein particles were associated with higher T2DM incidence for successively lower 40-single-nucleotide polymorphism TG genetic risk score tertiles, Pinteraction=0.013, 0.012, and 0.620 across tertiles, respectively. Conclusions- Our results confirm the previous observations of the paradoxical associations of TG with T2DM while focusing attention on the larger TG-rich lipoprotein particle subfractions, suggesting their importance in clinical profiling of T2DM risk.

3.
Clin Chem ; 64(1): 231-241, 2018 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29097515

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Previous results from Scandinavian cohorts have shown that obesity accentuates the effects of common genetic susceptibility variants on increased triglycerides (TG). Whether such interactions are present in the US population and further selective for particular TG-rich lipoprotein subfractions is unknown. METHODS: We examined these questions using body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) among women of European ancestry from the Women's Genome Health Study (WGHS) (n = 21840 for BMI; n = 19313 for WC). A weighted genetic risk score (TG-wGRS) based on 40 published TG-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms was calculated using published effect estimates. RESULTS: Comparing overweight (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2) and normal weight (BMI < 25 kg/m2) WGHS women, each unit increase of TG-wGRS was associated with TG increases of 1.013% and 1.011%, respectively, and this differential association was significant (Pinteraction = 0.014). Metaanalyses combining results for WGHS BMI with the 4 Scandinavian cohorts (INTER99, HEALTH2006, GLACIER, MDC) (total n = 40026) yielded a more significant interaction (Pinteraction = 0.001). Similarly, we observed differential association of the TG-wGRS with TG (Pinteraction = 0.006) in strata of WC (<80 cm vs ≥80 cm). Metaanalysis with 2 additional cohorts reporting WC (INTER99 and HEALTH2006) (total n = 27834) was significant with consistent effects (Pinteraction = 0.006). We also observed highly significant interactions of the TG-wGRS across the strata of BMI with very large, medium, and small TG-rich lipoprotein subfractions measured by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (all Pinteractions < 0.0001). The differential effects were strongest for very large TG-rich lipoprotein. CONCLUSIONS: Our results support the original findings and suggest that obese individuals may be more susceptible to aggregated genetic risk associated with common TG-raising alleles, with effects accentuated in the large TG-rich lipoprotein subfraction.

4.
JAMA Netw Open ; 1(8): e185708, 2018 12 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30646282

RESUMO

Importance: Higher Mediterranean diet (MED) intake has been associated with lower risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), but limited data are available about the underlying molecular mechanisms of this inverse disease association in human populations. Objective: To better characterize the relative contribution of traditional and novel factors to the MED-related risk reduction in CVD events in a US population. Design, Setting, and Participants: Using a prospective cohort design, baseline MED intake was assessed in 25 994 initially healthy US women in the Women's Health Study who were followed up to 12 years. Potential mediating effects of a panel of 40 biomarkers were evaluated, including lipids, lipoproteins, apolipoproteins, inflammation, glucose metabolism and insulin resistance, branched-chain amino acids, small-molecule metabolites, and clinical factors. Baseline study information and samples were collected between April 30, 1993, and January 24, 1996. Analyses were conducted between August 1, 2017, and October 30, 2018. Exposures: Intake of MED is a 9-category measure of adherence to a Mediterranean dietary pattern. Participants were categorized into 3 levels based on their adherence to the MED. Main Outcomes and Measures: Incident CVD confirmed through medical records and the proportion of CVD risk reduction explained by mediators. Results: Among 25 994 women (mean [SD] age, 54.7 [7.1] years), those with low, middle, and upper MED intakes composed 39.0%, 36.2%, and 24.8% of the study population and experienced 428 (4.2%), 356 (3.8%), and 246 (3.8%) incident CVD events, respectively. Compared with the reference group who had low MED intake, CVD risk reductions were observed for the middle and upper groups, with respective HRs of 0.77 (95% CI, 0.67-0.90) and 0.72 (95% CI, 0.61-0.86) (P for trend < .001). The largest mediators of the CVD risk reduction of MED intake were biomarkers of inflammation (accounting for 29.2% of the MED-CVD association), glucose metabolism and insulin resistance (27.9%), and body mass index (27.3%), followed by blood pressure (26.6%), traditional lipids (26.0%), high-density lipoprotein measures (24.0%) or very low-density lipoprotein measures (20.8%), with lesser contributions from low-density lipoproteins (13.0%), branched-chain amino acids (13.6%), apolipoproteins (6.5%), or other small-molecule metabolites (5.8%). Conclusions and Relevance: In this study, higher MED intake was associated with approximately one-fourth relative risk reduction in CVD events, which could be explained in part by known risk factors, both traditional and novel.


Assuntos
Doenças Cardiovasculares , Dieta Mediterrânea , Biomarcadores/sangue , Doenças Cardiovasculares/sangue , Doenças Cardiovasculares/epidemiologia , Doenças Cardiovasculares/fisiopatologia , Feminino , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Prospectivos , Fatores de Risco , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
6.
Nat Commun ; 8: 14977, 2017 04 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28443625

RESUMO

Few genome-wide association studies (GWAS) account for environmental exposures, like smoking, potentially impacting the overall trait variance when investigating the genetic contribution to obesity-related traits. Here, we use GWAS data from 51,080 current smokers and 190,178 nonsmokers (87% European descent) to identify loci influencing BMI and central adiposity, measured as waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio both adjusted for BMI. We identify 23 novel genetic loci, and 9 loci with convincing evidence of gene-smoking interaction (GxSMK) on obesity-related traits. We show consistent direction of effect for all identified loci and significance for 18 novel and for 5 interaction loci in an independent study sample. These loci highlight novel biological functions, including response to oxidative stress, addictive behaviour, and regulatory functions emphasizing the importance of accounting for environment in genetic analyses. Our results suggest that tobacco smoking may alter the genetic susceptibility to overall adiposity and body fat distribution.


Assuntos
Predisposição Genética para Doença/genética , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/métodos , Obesidade/genética , Locos de Características Quantitativas/genética , Fumar/genética , Adiposidade/genética , Adulto , Distribuição da Gordura Corporal , Índice de Massa Corporal , Epistasia Genética , Humanos , Fenótipo , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Circunferência da Cintura/genética , Relação Cintura-Quadril
7.
PLoS Genet ; 13(4): e1006528, 2017 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28448500

RESUMO

Physical activity (PA) may modify the genetic effects that give rise to increased risk of obesity. To identify adiposity loci whose effects are modified by PA, we performed genome-wide interaction meta-analyses of BMI and BMI-adjusted waist circumference and waist-hip ratio from up to 200,452 adults of European (n = 180,423) or other ancestry (n = 20,029). We standardized PA by categorizing it into a dichotomous variable where, on average, 23% of participants were categorized as inactive and 77% as physically active. While we replicate the interaction with PA for the strongest known obesity-risk locus in the FTO gene, of which the effect is attenuated by ~30% in physically active individuals compared to inactive individuals, we do not identify additional loci that are sensitive to PA. In additional genome-wide meta-analyses adjusting for PA and interaction with PA, we identify 11 novel adiposity loci, suggesting that accounting for PA or other environmental factors that contribute to variation in adiposity may facilitate gene discovery.


Assuntos
Adiposidade/genética , Dioxigenase FTO Dependente de alfa-Cetoglutarato/genética , Exercício , Obesidade/genética , Adiposidade/fisiologia , Índice de Massa Corporal , Epigenômica , Feminino , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Genótipo , Humanos , Masculino , Obesidade/fisiopatologia , Circunferência da Cintura , Relação Cintura-Quadril
9.
Diabetologia ; 59(3): 462-71, 2016 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26625858

RESUMO

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We compared the ability of genetic (established type 2 diabetes, fasting glucose, 2 h glucose and obesity variants) and modifiable lifestyle (diet, physical activity, smoking, alcohol and education) risk factors to predict incident type 2 diabetes and obesity in a population-based prospective cohort of 3,444 Swedish adults studied sequentially at baseline and 10 years later. METHODS: Multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to assess the predictive ability of genetic and lifestyle risk factors on incident obesity and type 2 diabetes by calculating the AUC. RESULTS: The predictive accuracy of lifestyle risk factors was similar to that yielded by genetic information for incident type 2 diabetes (AUC 75% and 74%, respectively) and obesity (AUC 68% and 73%, respectively) in models adjusted for age, age(2) and sex. The addition of genetic information to the lifestyle model significantly improved the prediction of type 2 diabetes (AUC 80%; p = 0.0003) and obesity (AUC 79%; p < 0.0001) and resulted in a net reclassification improvement of 58% for type 2 diabetes and 64% for obesity. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: These findings illustrate that lifestyle and genetic information separately provide a similarly high degree of long-range predictive accuracy for obesity and type 2 diabetes.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/sangue , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/etiologia , Estilo de Vida , Obesidade/sangue , Obesidade/etiologia , Glicemia/metabolismo , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/metabolismo , Exercício/fisiologia , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Obesidade/metabolismo , Estudos Prospectivos
10.
BMC Med Genet ; 16: 114, 2015 Dec 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26683835

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Multiple genetic variants have been reliably associated with obesity-related traits in Europeans, but little is known about their associations and interactions with lifestyle factors in South Asians. METHODS: In 16,157 Pakistani adults (8232 controls; 7925 diagnosed with myocardial infarction [MI]) enrolled in the PROMIS Study, we tested whether: a) BMI-associated loci, individually or in aggregate (as a genetic risk score--GRS), are associated with BMI; b) physical activity and smoking modify the association of these loci with BMI. Analyses were adjusted for age, age(2), sex, MI (yes/no), and population substructure. RESULTS: Of 95 SNPs studied here, 73 showed directionally consistent effects on BMI as reported in Europeans. Each additional BMI-raising allele of the GRS was associated with 0.04 (SE = 0.01) kg/m(2) higher BMI (P = 4.5 × 10(-14)). We observed nominal evidence of interactions of CLIP1 rs11583200 (P(interaction) = 0.014), CADM2 rs13078960 (P(interaction) = 0.037) and GALNT10 rs7715256 (P(interaction) = 0.048) with physical activity, and PTBP2 rs11165643 (P(interaction) = 0.045), HIP1 rs1167827 (P(interaction) = 0.015), C6orf106 rs205262 (P(interaction) = 0.032) and GRID1 rs7899106 (P(interaction) = 0.043) with smoking on BMI. CONCLUSIONS: Most BMI-associated loci have directionally consistent effects on BMI in Pakistanis and Europeans. There were suggestive interactions of established BMI-related SNPs with smoking or physical activity.


Assuntos
Predisposição Genética para Doença/genética , Atividade Motora/fisiologia , Infarto do Miocárdio/genética , Fumar/fisiopatologia , Adulto , Alelos , Índice de Massa Corporal , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Feminino , Frequência do Gene , Genótipo , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Infarto do Miocárdio/fisiopatologia , Obesidade/genética , Obesidade/fisiopatologia , Razão de Chances , Paquistão , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Fatores de Risco
11.
PLoS Genet ; 11(10): e1005378, 2015 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26426971

RESUMO

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 100 genetic variants contributing to BMI, a measure of body size, or waist-to-hip ratio (adjusted for BMI, WHRadjBMI), a measure of body shape. Body size and shape change as people grow older and these changes differ substantially between men and women. To systematically screen for age- and/or sex-specific effects of genetic variants on BMI and WHRadjBMI, we performed meta-analyses of 114 studies (up to 320,485 individuals of European descent) with genome-wide chip and/or Metabochip data by the Genetic Investigation of Anthropometric Traits (GIANT) Consortium. Each study tested the association of up to ~2.8M SNPs with BMI and WHRadjBMI in four strata (men ≤50y, men >50y, women ≤50y, women >50y) and summary statistics were combined in stratum-specific meta-analyses. We then screened for variants that showed age-specific effects (G x AGE), sex-specific effects (G x SEX) or age-specific effects that differed between men and women (G x AGE x SEX). For BMI, we identified 15 loci (11 previously established for main effects, four novel) that showed significant (FDR<5%) age-specific effects, of which 11 had larger effects in younger (<50y) than in older adults (≥50y). No sex-dependent effects were identified for BMI. For WHRadjBMI, we identified 44 loci (27 previously established for main effects, 17 novel) with sex-specific effects, of which 28 showed larger effects in women than in men, five showed larger effects in men than in women, and 11 showed opposite effects between sexes. No age-dependent effects were identified for WHRadjBMI. This is the first genome-wide interaction meta-analysis to report convincing evidence of age-dependent genetic effects on BMI. In addition, we confirm the sex-specificity of genetic effects on WHRadjBMI. These results may provide further insights into the biology that underlies weight change with age or the sexually dimorphism of body shape.


Assuntos
Índice de Massa Corporal , Tamanho Corporal/genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Adulto , Fatores Etários , Idoso , Mapeamento Cromossômico , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Caracteres Sexuais , Relação Cintura-Quadril
12.
Diabetes ; 64(12): 4312-21, 2015 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26253612

RESUMO

Clinically relevant weight loss is achievable through lifestyle modification, but unintentional weight regain is common. We investigated whether recently discovered genetic variants affect weight loss and/or weight regain during behavioral intervention. Participants at high-risk of type 2 diabetes (Diabetes Prevention Program [DPP]; N = 917/907 intervention/comparison) or with type 2 diabetes (Look AHEAD [Action for Health in Diabetes]; N = 2,014/1,892 intervention/comparison) were from two parallel arm (lifestyle vs. comparison) randomized controlled trials. The associations of 91 established obesity-predisposing loci with weight loss across 4 years and with weight regain across years 2-4 after a minimum of 3% weight loss were tested. Each copy of the minor G allele of MTIF3 rs1885988 was consistently associated with greater weight loss following lifestyle intervention over 4 years across the DPP and Look AHEAD. No such effect was observed across comparison arms, leading to a nominally significant single nucleotide polymorphism×treatment interaction (P = 4.3 × 10(-3)). However, this effect was not significant at a study-wise significance level (Bonferroni threshold P < 5.8 × 10(-4)). Most obesity-predisposing gene variants were not associated with weight loss or regain within the DPP and Look AHEAD trials, directly or via interactions with lifestyle.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/prevenção & controle , Fatores de Iniciação em Eucariotos/genética , Estilo de Vida , Proteínas Mitocondriais/genética , Obesidade/terapia , Sobrepeso/terapia , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Estado Pré-Diabético/complicações , Índice de Massa Corporal , Terapia Combinada , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/epidemiologia , Dieta Redutora , Fatores de Iniciação em Eucariotos/metabolismo , Feminino , Estudos de Associação Genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Proteínas Mitocondriais/metabolismo , Atividade Motora , Obesidade/complicações , Obesidade/genética , Obesidade/prevenção & controle , Sobrepeso/complicações , Sobrepeso/genética , Sobrepeso/prevenção & controle , Recidiva , Risco , Ganho de Peso , Perda de Peso
13.
Hum Mol Genet ; 24(16): 4728-38, 2015 Aug 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25994509

RESUMO

Obesity is highly heritable. Genetic variants showing robust associations with obesity traits have been identified through genome-wide association studies. We investigated whether a composite score representing healthy diet modifies associations of these variants with obesity traits. Totally, 32 body mass index (BMI)- and 14 waist-hip ratio (WHR)-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms were genotyped, and genetic risk scores (GRS) were calculated in 18 cohorts of European ancestry (n = 68 317). Diet score was calculated based on self-reported intakes of whole grains, fish, fruits, vegetables, nuts/seeds (favorable) and red/processed meats, sweets, sugar-sweetened beverages and fried potatoes (unfavorable). Multivariable adjusted, linear regression within each cohort followed by inverse variance-weighted, fixed-effects meta-analysis was used to characterize: (a) associations of each GRS with BMI and BMI-adjusted WHR and (b) diet score modification of genetic associations with BMI and BMI-adjusted WHR. Nominally significant interactions (P = 0.006-0.04) were observed between the diet score and WHR-GRS (but not BMI-GRS), two WHR loci (GRB14 rs10195252; LYPLAL1 rs4846567) and two BMI loci (LRRN6C rs10968576; MTIF3 rs4771122), for the respective BMI-adjusted WHR or BMI outcomes. Although the magnitudes of these select interactions were small, our data indicated that associations between genetic predisposition and obesity traits were stronger with a healthier diet. Our findings generate interesting hypotheses; however, experimental and functional studies are needed to determine their clinical relevance.


Assuntos
Índice de Massa Corporal , Epistasia Genética , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/genética , Loci Gênicos , Obesidade/genética , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Adulto , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Dieta Ocidental , Feminino , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Masculino
14.
Hum Hered ; 75(2-4): 106-15, 2013.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24081226

RESUMO

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Obesity is a pervasive and highly prevalent disease that poses substantial health risks to those it affects. The rapid emergence of obesity as a global epidemic and the patterns and distributions of the condition within and between populations suggest that interactions between inherited biological factors (e.g. genes) and relevant environmental factors (e.g. diet and physical activity) may underlie the current obesity epidemic. METHODS: We discuss the rationale for the assertion that gene × lifestyle interactions cause obesity, systematically appraise relevant literature, and consider knowledge gaps future studies might seek to bridge. RESULTS: We identified >200 relevant studies, of which most are relatively small scale and few provide replication data. CONCLUSION: Although studies on gene × lifestyle interactions in obesity point toward the presence of such interactions, improved data standardization, appropriate pooling of data and resources, innovative study designs, and the application of powerful statistical methods will be required if translatable examples of gene × lifestyle interactions in obesity are to be identified. Future studies, of which most will be observational, should ideally be accompanied by appropriate replication data and, where possible, by analogous findings from experimental settings where clinically relevant traits (e.g. weight regain and weight cycling) are outcomes.


Assuntos
Interação Gene-Ambiente , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Obesidade/genética , Humanos , Metanálise como Assunto
15.
PLoS Genet ; 9(7): e1003607, 2013.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23935507

RESUMO

Numerous obesity loci have been identified using genome-wide association studies. A UK study indicated that physical activity may attenuate the cumulative effect of 12 of these loci, but replication studies are lacking. Therefore, we tested whether the aggregate effect of these loci is diminished in adults of European ancestry reporting high levels of physical activity. Twelve obesity-susceptibility loci were genotyped or imputed in 111,421 participants. A genetic risk score (GRS) was calculated by summing the BMI-associated alleles of each genetic variant. Physical activity was assessed using self-administered questionnaires. Multiplicative interactions between the GRS and physical activity on BMI were tested in linear and logistic regression models in each cohort, with adjustment for age, age(2), sex, study center (for multicenter studies), and the marginal terms for physical activity and the GRS. These results were combined using meta-analysis weighted by cohort sample size. The meta-analysis yielded a statistically significant GRS × physical activity interaction effect estimate (Pinteraction  = 0.015). However, a statistically significant interaction effect was only apparent in North American cohorts (n = 39,810, Pinteraction  = 0.014 vs. n = 71,611, Pinteraction  = 0.275 for Europeans). In secondary analyses, both the FTO rs1121980 (Pinteraction  = 0.003) and the SEC16B rs10913469 (Pinteraction  = 0.025) variants showed evidence of SNP × physical activity interactions. This meta-analysis of 111,421 individuals provides further support for an interaction between physical activity and a GRS in obesity disposition, although these findings hinge on the inclusion of cohorts from North America, indicating that these results are either population-specific or non-causal.


Assuntos
Estudos de Associação Genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Atividade Motora/genética , Obesidade/genética , Adulto , Alelos , Índice de Massa Corporal , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/genética , Feminino , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Obesidade/epidemiologia , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Fatores de Risco , Inquéritos e Questionários
16.
Mol Oncol ; 7(3): 555-66, 2013 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23384557

RESUMO

Recurrent prostate cancer remains a major clinical challenge. The lysine specific demethylase-1 (LSD1/KDM1A), together with the JmjC domain-containing JMJD2A and JMJD2C proteins, have emerged as critical regulators of histone lysine methylation. The LSD1-JMJD2 complex functions as a transcriptional co-regulator of hormone activated androgen and estrogen receptors at specific gene promoters. LSD1 also regulates DNA methylation and p53 function. LSD1 is overexpressed in numerous cancers including prostate cancer through an unknown mechanism. We investigated expression of the LSD1 and JMJD2A in malignant human prostate specimens. We correlated LSD1 and JMJD2A expression with known mediators of prostate cancer progression: VEGF-A and cyclin A1. We show that elevated expression of LSD1, but not JMJD2A, correlates with prostate cancer recurrence and with increased VEGF-A expression. We show that functional depletion of LSD1 expression using siRNA in prostate cancer cells decreases VEGF-A and blocks androgen induced VEGF-A, PSA and Tmprss2 expression. We demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of LSD1 reduces proliferation of both androgen dependent (LnCaP) and independent cell lines (LnCaP: C42, PC3). We show a direct mechanistic link between LSD1 over-expression and increased activity of pro-angiogenic pathways. New therapies targeting LSD1 activity should be useful in the treatment of hormone dependent and independent prostate cancer.


Assuntos
Regulação Neoplásica da Expressão Gênica , Histona Desmetilases/metabolismo , Próstata/patologia , Neoplasias da Próstata/genética , Neoplasias da Próstata/patologia , Fator A de Crescimento do Endotélio Vascular/genética , Androgênios/metabolismo , Linhagem Celular Tumoral , Proliferação de Células , Ciclina A1/genética , Histona Desmetilases/análise , Histona Desmetilases/genética , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Próstata/enzimologia , Próstata/metabolismo , Neoplasias da Próstata/enzimologia , Interferência de RNA , Ativação Transcricional , Fator A de Crescimento do Endotélio Vascular/metabolismo
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