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1.
Contraception ; 2021 Apr 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33939985

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To examine provision of direct-to-patient medication abortion during COVID-19 by United States family physicians through a clinician-supported, asynchronous online service, Aid Access. STUDY DESIGN: We analyzed data from United States residents in New Jersey, New York, and Washington who requested medication abortion from 3 family physicians using the online service from Aid Access between April and November 2020. This study seeks to examine individual characteristics, motivations, and geographic locations of patients receiving abortion care through the Aid Access platform. RESULTS: Over 7 months, three family physicians using the Aid Access platform provided medication abortion care to 534 residents of New Jersey, New York, and Washington. There were no demographic differences between patients seeking care in these states. A high percentage (85%) were less than 7 weeks gestation at the time of their request for care. The reasons patients chose Aid Access for abortion services were similar regardless of state residence. The majority (71%) of Aid Access users lived in urban areas. Each family physician provided care to most counties in their respective states. Among those who received services in the three states, almost one-quarter (24%) lived in high Social Vulnerability Index (SVI) counties, with roughly one-third living in medium-high SVI counties (33%), followed by another quarter (26%) living in medium-low SVI counties. CONCLUSIONS: Family physicians successfully provided medication abortion in three states using asynchronous online consultations and medications mailed directly to patients. IMPLICATIONS: Primary care patients are requesting direct-to-patient first trimester abortion services online. By providing abortion care online, a single provider can serve the entire state, thus greatly increasing geographic access to medication abortion.

2.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33431614

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: In most European countries, patients seeking medication abortion during the COVID-19 pandemic are still required to attend healthcare settings in person. We assessed whether demand for self-managed medication abortion provided by online telemedicine increased following the emergence of COVID-19. METHODS: We examined 3915 requests for self-managed abortion to online telemedicine service Women on Web (WoW) between 1 January 2019 and 1 June 2020. We used regression discontinuity to compare request rates in eight European countries before and after they implemented lockdown measures to slow COVID-19 transmission. We examined the prevalence of COVID-19 infection, the degree of government-provided economic support, the severity of lockdown travel restrictions and the medication abortion service provision model in countries with and without significant changes in requests. RESULTS: Five countries showed significant increases in requests to WoW, ranging from 28% in Northern Ireland (97 requests vs 75.8 expected requests, p=0.001) to 139% in Portugal (34 requests vs 14.2 expected requests, p<0.001). Two countries showed no significant change in requests, and one country, Great Britain, showed an 88% decrease in requests (1 request vs 8.1 expected requests, p<0.001). Among countries with significant increases in requests, abortion services are provided mainly in person in hospitals or abortion is unavailable and international travel was prohibited during lockdown. By contrast, Great Britain implemented a fully remote no-test telemedicine service. CONCLUSION: These marked changes in requests for self-managed medication abortion during the COVID-19 pandemic demonstrate demand for remote models of care, which could be fulfilled by expanding access to medication abortion by telemedicine.

3.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33361119

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: After having one of the most restrictive abortion laws worldwide, Ireland legalised abortion in January 2019. We examine how legalisation impacted on demand for online telemedicine outside the jurisdiction. METHODS: We analysed anonymised data from 534 people from Ireland seeking online telemedicine abortion prior to legalisation (January-March and October-December 2018) and in the first 3 months following legalisation (January-March 2019). Numbers, characteristics and reasons for seeking the service before and after legalisation were compared. Content analysis of emails from people seeking the service following legalisation explored reasons for seeking care. RESULTS: Half as many people contacted Women on Web in the 3 months immediately after legalisation as compared with contacts 12 months prior (103 vs 221). Of these, the proportion receiving the service reduced, from 72% prior to legalisation to 26% after legalisation (p≤0.001). After legalisation, access related reasons for seeking online telemedicine featured less while reasons relating to privacy, stigma and avoiding protestors featured more. CONCLUSIONS: People continued to seek abortion through online telemedicine after legalisation, though the number of contacts reduced by half and the proportion receiving the service decreased considerably. To address access issues, policy measures should promote normalisation of abortion, legislate for safe zones around providers, and consider access in situations of coercive control or abuse including the role of telemedicine in the local model of care. Abortion provided through online telemedicine continues to be an important part of providing safe, accessible abortion even after legalisation.

6.
Contraception ; 102(5): 314-317, 2020 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32592799

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To examine factors associated with obtaining abortion at 12 or more weeks gestation in Texas after implementation of a restrictive law. STUDY DESIGN: In this retrospective cohort study, we collected data from eight Texas abortion clinics that provided services at 12 or more weeks gestation from April 1, 2015 to March 30, 2016, after a restrictive abortion law enacted in November 2013 shuttered many of the state's clinics. We examined factors associated with obtaining in-clinic abortion services between 3-11 versus 12-24 weeks gestation including patient race-ethnicity, income level, and driving distance to the clinic using chi-square tests and calculating odds ratios. We further subcategorized abortion between 15-24 weeks to determine who may be most affected by a Texas law banning dilation and evacuation (D&E). RESULTS: Among 24,555 in-clinic abortions, 19.2% (n = 4,714) occurred at 12 or more weeks gestation. Compared to patients who obtained care between 3-11 weeks, those who obtained care at 12 or more weeks were more likely to be Black than White (OR 1.18; 95% CI 1.05-1.31), live ≤110% of the federal poverty level than have higher income (OR 2.09; 95% CI 1.94-2.26), and drive 50+ miles than 1-24 miles to obtain care (OR 1.25; 95% CI 1.15-1.38). These associations remained for those obtaining care between 15-24 weeks. Even after adjusting for race-ethnicity and driving distance, low-income patients had greater odds of obtaining care in between 15-24 weeks (aOR 1.52; 95% CI 1.21-1.91). CONCLUSIONS: Patients obtaining abortion at 12 or more weeks gestation in Texas are more likely to be Black, low-income, and travel far distances to obtain in-clinic care. IMPLICATIONS: In Texas, patients who are Black, low-income, and travel the farthest are more likely to obtain in-clinic abortion between 15-24 weeks gestation, commonly performed via D&E. If Texas Senate Bill 8 (SB8) banning D&E goes into effect, these patients may be prevented from obtaining care.

7.
Am J Obstet Gynecol ; 223(2): 238.e1-238.e10, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32142830

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: A rapid increase in restrictive abortion legislation in the United States has sparked renewed interest in self-managed abortion as a response to clinic access barriers. Yet little is known about knowledge of, interest in, and experiences of self-managed medication abortion among patients who obtain abortion care in a clinic. OBJECTIVES: We examined patients' knowledge of, interest in, and experience with self-managed medication abortion before presenting to the clinic. We characterized the clinic- and person-level factors associated with these measures. Finally, we examined the reasons why patients express an interest in or consider self-management before attending the clinic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We surveyed 1502 abortion patients at 3 Texas clinics in McAllen, San Antonio, and Fort Worth. All individuals seeking abortion care who could complete the survey in English or Spanish were invited to participate in an anonymous survey conducted using iPads. The overall response rate was 90%. We examined the prevalence of 4 outcome variables, both overall and separately by site: (1) knowledge of self-managed medication abortion; (2) having considered self-managing using medications before attending the clinic; (3) interest in medication self-management as an alternative to accessing care at the clinic; and (4) having sought or tried any method of self-management before attending the clinic. We used binary logistic regression models to explore the clinic- and patient-level factors associated with these outcome variables. Finally, we analyzed the reasons reported by those who had considered medication self-management before attending the clinic, as well as the reasons reported by those who would be interested in medication self-management as an alternative to in-clinic care. RESULTS: Among all respondents, 30% knew about abortion medications available outside the clinic setting (37% in Fort Worth, 33% in McAllen, 19% in San Antonio, P < .001), and among those with prior knowledge, 28% had considered using this option before coming to the clinic (36% in McAllen, 25% in Fort Worth, 21% in San Antonio, P = .028). Among those without prior knowledge of self-management, 39% expressed interest in this option instead of coming to the clinic (54% in San Antonio, 30% in McAllen, 29% in Fort Worth, P < .001). Overall, 13% had sought out or tried any method of self-management before presenting to the clinic (16% in McAllen and 15% in Fort Worth vs 9% in San Antonio, P < .001). Experiencing barriers to clinic access was associated with having considered medication self-management (odds ratio, 2.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.7-3.0) and with seeking or trying any method of self-management before attending the clinic (odds ratio, 1.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-2.7). Difficulty affording the cost of in-clinic care was the most commonly cited reason for having considering medication self-management before attending the clinic. Reasons for interest in medication self-management as an alternative to clinic care included both access barriers and preferences for the privacy and comfort of home. CONCLUSION: Considering or attempting self-managed abortion may be part of the pathway to seeking in-clinic care, particularly among those experiencing access barriers. However, considerable interest in medication self-management as an alternative to the clinic also suggests a demand for more autonomous abortion care options.


Assuntos
Abortivos/uso terapêutico , Aspirantes a Aborto , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Motivação , Automedicação , Adulto , Instituições de Assistência Ambulatorial , Status Econômico , Feminino , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde , Humanos , Gravidez , Texas , Adulto Jovem
8.
Am J Trop Med Hyg ; 102(6): 1386-1395, 2020 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32207401

RESUMO

Strongyloidiasis affects an estimated hundreds of millions of people worldwide, with infection possibly persisting for life without appropriate therapy because of the helminth's unique autoinfection cycle. Like other soil-transmitted helminths, because of the environmental conditions required for the life cycle of Strongyloides stercoralis, this parasite is endemic to tropical, subtropical, and temperate countries and areas with inadequate sanitation infrastructure. Given continued poverty and that nearly one in five American homes are lacking proper sanitation systems, many U.S. regions are at risk for intestinal parasites. A central Texas community was chosen as the study site, given previous reports of widespread sanitation failure, degree of poverty, and community willingness to participate. A total of 92 households were surveyed and residents tested for nine intestinal parasites using a multi-parallel quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and ELISA serology. From 43 stool samples, 27 (62.8%) tested positive for Blastocystis spp. and one (2.3%) for Giardia lamblia. From 97 serum samples, Strongyloides serology detected 16 (16.5%) positive individuals. These high rates of heterokont and helminthic laboratory findings in a peri-urban central Texas community suggest several key policy implications, including that strongyloidiasis should be added to the Texas notifiable conditions list, that clinical suspicion for this infection should be heightened in the region, and that residents without access to functioning and sustainable sanitation infrastructure should be provided that access as a basic human right and to promote public health.


Assuntos
Helmintíase/parasitologia , Enteropatias Parasitárias/economia , Enteropatias Parasitárias/epidemiologia , Pobreza , Adolescente , Adulto , Criança , Pré-Escolar , DNA de Protozoário/genética , Feminino , Helmintíase/economia , Helmintíase/epidemiologia , Humanos , Lactente , Masculino , Projetos Piloto , Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase em Tempo Real , Texas/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
9.
Am J Obstet Gynecol ; 223(2): 236.e1-236.e8, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32109462

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: In 2013, the Texas legislature passed House Bill 2, restricting use of medication abortion to comply with Food and Drug Administration labeling from 2000. The Food and Drug Administration updated its labeling for medication abortion in 2016, alleviating some of the burdens imposed by House Bill 2. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to identify the impact of House Bill 2 on medication abortion use by patient travel distance to an open clinic and income status. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this retrospective study, we collected patient zip code, county of residence, type of abortion, family size, and income data on all patients who received an abortion (medication or aspiration) from 7 Texas abortion clinics in 3 time periods: pre-House Bill 2 (July 1, 2012-June 30, 2013), during House Bill 2 (April 1, 2015-March 30, 2016), and post-Food and Drug Administration labeling update (April 1, 2016-March 30, 2017). Patient driving distance to the clinic where care was obtained was categorized as 1-24, 25-49, 50-99, or 100+ miles. Patient county of residence was categorized by availability of a clinic during House Bill 2 (open clinic), county with a House Bill 2-related clinic closure (closed clinic), or no clinic any time period. Patient income was categorized as ≤110% federal poverty level (low-income) and >110% federal poverty level. Change in medication abortion use in the 3 time periods by patient driving distance, residence in a county with an open clinic, and income status were evaluated using χ2 tests and logistic regression. We used geospatial mapping to depict the spatial distribution of patients who obtained a medication abortion in each time period. RESULTS: Among 70,578 abortion procedures, medication abortion comprised 26%, 7%, and 29% of cases pre-House Bill 2, during House Bill 2, and post-Food and Drug Administration labeling update, respectively. During House Bill 2, patients traveling 100+ miles compared to 1- 24 miles were less likely to use medication abortion (odds ratio, 0.21; 95% confidence interval, 0.15, 0.30), as were low-income compared to higher-income patients (odds ratio, 0.76; 95% confidence interval, 0.68, 0.85), and low-income, distant patients (adjusted odds ratio, 0.14; 95% confidence interval, 0.08, 0.25). Similarly, post-Food and Drug Administration labeling update, rebound in medication abortion use was less pronounced for patients traveling 100+ miles compared to 1-24 miles (odds ratio, 0.82; 95% confidence interval, 0.74, 0.91), low-income compared to higher-income patients (odds ratio, 0.77; 95% confidence interval, 0.72, 0.81), and low-income, distant patients (adjusted odds ratio, 0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.68, 0.94). Post-Food and Drug Administration labeling update, patients residing in counties with House Bill 2-related clinic closures were less likely to receive medication abortion as driving distance increased (52% traveling 25-49 miles, 41% traveling 50-99 miles, and 26% traveling 100+ miles, P < .05). Geospatial mapping demonstrated that patients traveled from all over the state to receive medication abortion pre-House Bill 2 and post-Food and Drug Administration labeling update, whereas during House Bill 2, only those living in or near a county with an open clinic obtained medication abortion. CONCLUSION: Texas state law drastically restricted access to medication abortion and had a disproportionate impact on low-income patients and those living farther from an open clinic. After the Food and Drug Administration labeling update, medication abortion use rebounded, but disparities in use remained.


Assuntos
Abortivos/uso terapêutico , Aborto Induzido/estatística & dados numéricos , Instituições de Assistência Ambulatorial/legislação & jurisprudência , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde , Disparidades em Assistência à Saúde , Viagem/estatística & dados numéricos , Aborto Induzido/legislação & jurisprudência , Instituições de Assistência Ambulatorial/estatística & dados numéricos , Rotulagem de Medicamentos , Feminino , Mapeamento Geográfico , Humanos , Mifepristona/uso terapêutico , Misoprostol/uso terapêutico , Pobreza , Gravidez , Estudos Retrospectivos , População Rural , Análise Espacial , Texas , Estados Unidos , United States Food and Drug Administration
10.
Womens Health Issues ; 30(3): 161-166, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31859189

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: U.S. servicewomen have high rates of unintended pregnancy, but federal policy prohibits abortion provision at military treatment facilities and military insurance coverage of abortion, except in cases of rape, incest, or a life-endangering pregnancy. Such restrictions pose challenges to abortion access for servicemembers, particularly during deployment. We aimed to explore the experiences of U.S. servicewomen when accessing abortion during overseas tours and deployment. METHODS: We reviewed de-identified data from email inquiries and online consultation forms from U.S. servicewomen or military spouses seeking medication abortion from the telemedicine service Women on Web between January 2010 and December 2017. We used descriptive statistics and inductively coded textual responses to describe client characteristics, circumstances of pregnancy, reasons for abortion, and barriers to abortion care. RESULTS: Our sample included data for 323 individuals. Reasons for abortion related to military service included disruption of deployment, fear of military reprimand, and potential career impacts. Additionally, servicemembers faced barriers to abortion access related to overseas military deployment or tour, including a lack of legal abortion in-country, limited financial resources, language barriers, travel restrictions, and a lack of confidentiality. CONCLUSIONS: U.S. military servicewomen stationed in countries where safe, legal abortion is restricted or unavailable face deployment-related barriers to abortion care, which compound those barriers they may face regardless of deployment status. Removal of federal bans on the provision and coverage of abortion care and improved education about existing regulations could improve access to timely abortion care and in some cases allow servicewomen who wish to obtain abortion care to remain deployed.


Assuntos
Aspirantes a Aborto/estatística & dados numéricos , Aborto Induzido/legislação & jurisprudência , Aborto Legal/estatística & dados numéricos , Militares/estatística & dados numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , Feminino , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Internet , Gravidez , Gravidez não Planejada , Estados Unidos , Adulto Jovem
11.
Am J Public Health ; 110(1): 90-97, 2020 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31622157

RESUMO

Objectives. To examine demand for abortion medications through an online telemedicine service in the United States.Methods. We examined requests from US residents to the online telemedicine abortion service Women on Web (WoW) between October 15, 2017, and August 15, 2018. We calculated the population-adjusted rate of requests by state and examined the demographics, clinical characteristics, and motivations of those seeking services, comparing those in states with hostile versus supportive abortion policy climates.Results. Over 10 months, WoW received 6022 requests from US residents; 76% from hostile states. Mississippi had the highest rate of requests (24.9 per 100 000 women of reproductive age). In both hostile and supportive states, a majority (60%) reported a combination of barriers to clinic access and preferences for self-management. Cost was the most common barrier (71% in hostile states; 63% in supportive states; P < .001). Privacy was the most common preference (49% in both hostile and supportive states; P = .66).Conclusions. Demand for self-managed medication abortion through online telemedicine is prevalent in the United States. There is a public health justification to make these abortions as safe, effective, and supported as possible.


Assuntos
Abortivos/administração & dosagem , Aborto Induzido/métodos , Aborto Induzido/estatística & dados numéricos , Autogestão/estatística & dados numéricos , Telemedicina/estatística & dados numéricos , Aborto Induzido/economia , Aborto Induzido/psicologia , Adulto , Confidencialidade , Feminino , Idade Gestacional , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde/economia , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Necessidades e Demandas de Serviços de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Internet/estatística & dados numéricos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Motivação , Gravidez , Privacidade , Autogestão/psicologia , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Estados Unidos , Adulto Jovem
14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30341065

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: In Northern Ireland, abortion is illegal except in very limited circumstances to preserve a woman's life or to prevent permanent or long-term injury to her physical or mental health. Abortions conducted outside the law are a criminal offence punishable by imprisonment. We assessed the impacts of Northern Ireland's abortion laws on women's decision-making and experiences in accessing abortion. METHODS: Between April 2017 and February 2018 we interviewed 30 women living in Northern Ireland who had sought abortion by travelling to a clinic in Great Britain or by using online telemedicine to self-manage a medication abortion at home. We interviewed women both before and after a policy change that allowed women from Northern Ireland access to free abortion services in Great Britain. We used a semi-structured in-depth approach and analysed the interviews using grounded theory methodology to identify key themes. RESULTS: Four key findings emerged from our analysis: (1) women experience multiple barriers to travelling for abortion services, even when abortion is provided without charge; (2) self-management is often preferred over travel, but its criminalisation engenders fear and isolation; (3) obstruction of import of abortion medications by Northern Ireland Customs contributes to stress, anxiety, a higher risk of complications, and trial of ineffective or unsafe methods; and (4) lack of clarity surrounding the obligations of healthcare professionals in Northern Ireland causes mistrust of the healthcare system. CONCLUSIONS: Northern Ireland's abortion laws negatively affect the quality and safety of women's healthcare and can have serious implications for women's physical and emotional health. Our findings offer new perspectives for the current policy debate over Northern Ireland's abortion laws and suggest a public health rationale for decriminalising abortion.

15.
Perspect Sex Reprod Health ; 50(4): 157-163, 2018 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29992793

RESUMO

CONTEXT: State legislation restricting access to abortion in the clinic setting raises the possibility that an increasing number of individuals in the United States will self-manage their abortion at home. Medications sourced online represent a potential pathway to abortion self-management. Yet, very little is known about the reasons U.S. residents may seek abortion online or their experiences finding medications and information. METHODS: In January-June 2017, anonymous in-depth interviews were conducted with 32 people from 20 states who sought abortion medications online (30 women and two men seeking medications for their partners). Participants were asked about their (or their partners') motivations for considering self-managed abortion, the sources of medications they identified and any other methods they considered. Transcripts were coded and analyzed according to the principles of grounded theory. RESULTS: The analysis revealed four key themes: Seeking abortion medications online can be a response to clinic access barriers both in states with and in ones without restrictive abortion laws; self-managed abortion can be a preference over clinical care; online options offer either information or medications, but not both; and the lack of trusted online options can delay care and lead to consideration of ineffective or unsafe alternatives. CONCLUSION: Current online options for abortion medications leave many important needs unmet, particularly for women who encounter barriers to obtaining clinic-based abortion services. There is a public health justification to reduce clinic access barriers and to make medication abortion that is sourced online and managed at home as safe and supported as possible.


Assuntos
Abortivos , Aborto Induzido/psicologia , Motivação , Aceitação pelo Paciente de Cuidados de Saúde/psicologia , Autogestão/psicologia , Aborto Induzido/legislação & jurisprudência , Adulto , Instituições de Assistência Ambulatorial , Feminino , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde , Humanos , Internet , Masculino , Gravidez , Estados Unidos
16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29972360

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The Republic of Ireland has one of the world's most restrictive abortion laws, allowing abortion only to preserve a pregnant woman's life. We examined the impact of the law on women's options for accessing abortion, their decision-making regarding whichpathway to follow, and their experiences with their chosen approach. METHODS: We conducted semi-structured in-depth interviews with 38 women who had either travelled abroad to access abortion in a clinic or had self-managed a medical abortion at home using online telemedicine, between 2010 and 2017. We coded interview transcripts according to an iteratively developed coding guide and performed a thematic analysis to identify key themes. RESULTS: We identified four key themes: (1) self-managing a medical abortion at home using online telemedicine can be a preference over travelling abroad to access abortion services; (2) regardless of the pathway chosen, women experience a lack of pre- and post-abortion support in the Irish healthcare system; (3) feelings of desperation while searching for safe abortion care can lead to considering or attempting dangerous methods; and (4) Irish abortion law and attitudes have impacts beyond physical health considerations, engendering shame and stigma. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the country's restrictive abortion law, women in Ireland do obtain abortions, using methods that are legal and safe elsewhere. However, the law negatively impacts women's ability to discuss their options with their healthcare professionals and to seek follow-up care, and can have serious implications for their physical and emotional health. This study's findings provide evidence to inform public and policy discourse on Ireland's abortion laws.

18.
BMJ Sex Reprod Health ; 44(2): 114-121, 2018 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29921634

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Incorporating thorough contraception counselling into an abortion consultation is challenging. We compared contraceptive choices and methods received between two counselling models: (1) telephone counselling separate from the abortion consultation and (2) face-to-face counselling integrated into the consultation. METHODS: We obtained de-identified data on demographic characteristics and contraceptive methods that had been chosen and received by women who had an abortion at British Pregnancy Advisory Service between 2011 and 2014 and had a choice of counselling models. We compared the characteristics of women who chose each model of counselling and the contraceptive methods they chose and received using Fisher's exact test, and used logistic regression to explore associations between counselling model and choice and receipt of Tier 1 contraceptive methods (intrauterine contraception, implant, sterilisation), controlling for covariates. RESULTS: The sample included 18 573 women. Women choosing telephone counselling were more likely to be non-White (34% vs 22%, P<0.001), to report prior difficulty obtaining contraception (40% vs 3%, P<0.001), and to have not used contraception at conception (37.1% vs 33.8%, P<0.001). Overall, 93% of women chose a contraceptive method after counselling. Telephone counselling was significantly associated with both choosing and receiving a Tier 1 method (OR 1.80, 95% CI 1.66 to 1.96 and OR 1.60, 95% CI 1.42 to 1.71, respectively). Fewer women who had telephone counselling received a less effective method (eg, condom, diaphragm) compared with those who chose integrated counselling (6.0% vs 19.2%, P<0.001). DISCUSSION: Telephone-based contraception counselling separate from the abortion consultation may serve some women better than integrated counselling, particularly those reporting past difficulty obtaining contraception.

19.
Obstet Gynecol ; 131(4): 635-641, 2018 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29528933

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate outcomes with simultaneous administration of mifepristone and misoprostol for medical abortion at 63 days of gestation or less in the year after its implementation in a British clinic system. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study using deidentified data from the electronic booking and complications databases and medical records of women who underwent medical abortion at British Pregnancy Advisory Service. Our primary outcome was treatment success with simultaneous dosing compared with a regimen with a 24- to 48-hour interval between medications. We defined success as complete abortion without surgical evacuation and without continuing pregnancy. To assess relative regimen effectiveness while accounting for self-assignment to simultaneous or interval dosing, we modeled the probability of treatment success using logistic regression with propensity score adjustment for demographic and clinical characteristics. Secondary outcomes were reasons for abortion failure and clinically significant adverse events (hospital admission, blood transfusion, intravenous antibiotic administration). RESULTS: Of 28,901 women treated between May 2015 and April 2016, 85% chose simultaneous dosing. Overall success rates were high with both regimens but lower with simultaneous than with interval dosing (94.5% vs 97.1%, respectively, adjusted relative risk 0.973, 95% CI 0.967-0.979). For both regimens, success rates were lower at higher gestational ages, but the relative effectiveness of simultaneous dosing did not vary significantly with gestational age (P=.268). Surgical intervention rates for continuing pregnancy were lowest at 49 days of gestation or less (1.4% simultaneous vs 0.2% interval, P<.001) and highest at 57-63 days of gestation (5.0% and 2.2%, P<.001). The rate of clinically significant adverse events was 0.2% and did not differ by regimen (P=.972). CONCLUSION: Simultaneous administration of mifepristone and misoprostol is 97% as effective as a 24- to 48-hour interval at all gestational ages 63 days or less with no increase in the risk of clinically significant adverse events. Pragmatic use of simultaneous dosing is reasonable given the small difference in effectiveness.


Assuntos
Abortivos/administração & dosagem , Aborto Induzido/métodos , Esquema de Medicação , Mifepristona/administração & dosagem , Misoprostol/administração & dosagem , Abortivos/efeitos adversos , Aborto Induzido/efeitos adversos , Adulto , Bases de Dados Factuais , Quimioterapia Combinada , Feminino , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Mifepristona/efeitos adversos , Misoprostol/efeitos adversos , Gravidez , Primeiro Trimestre da Gravidez , Estudos Retrospectivos , Resultado do Tratamento , Reino Unido , Adulto Jovem
20.
Contraception ; 97(2): 177-183, 2018 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28941978

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To examine reasons for seeking abortion services outside the formal healthcare system in Great Britain, where abortion is legally available. STUDY DESIGN: We conducted a mixed-methods study among women resident in England, Scotland, and Wales who requested at-home medication abortion through online telemedicine initiative Women on Web (WoW) between November 22, 2016, and March 22, 2017. We examined the demographics and circumstances of all women requesting early medication abortion and conducted a content analysis of a sample of their anonymized emails to the service to explore their reasons for seeking help. RESULTS: Over a 4-month period, 519 women contacted WoW seeking medication abortion. These women were diverse with respect to age, parity, and circumstance. One hundred eighty women reported 209 reasons for seeking abortion outside the formal healthcare setting. Among all reasons, 49% were access barriers, including long waiting times, distance to clinic, work or childcare commitments, lack of eligibility for free NHS services, and prior negative experiences of abortion care; 30% were privacy concerns, including lack of confidentiality of services, perceived or experienced stigma, and preferring the privacy and comfort of using pills at home; and 18% were controlling circumstances, including partner violence and partner/family control. CONCLUSION: Despite the presence of abortion services in Great Britain, a diverse group of women still experiences logistical and personal barriers to accessing care through the formal healthcare system, or prefer the privacy of conducting their abortions in their own homes. Health services commissioning bodies could address existing barriers if supported by policy frameworks. IMPLICATIONS: The presence of multiple barriers to accessing abortion care in Great Britain highlights the need for future guidelines to recommend a more woman-centered approach to service provision. Reducing the number of clinic visits and designing services to meet the needs of those living in controlling circumstances are particularly important goals.


Assuntos
Abortivos não Esteroides/administração & dosagem , Aborto Induzido/psicologia , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Mifepristona/administração & dosagem , Misoprostol/administração & dosagem , Autoadministração/psicologia , Aborto Induzido/métodos , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Gravidez , Reino Unido , Adulto Jovem
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