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1.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33588084

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To examine the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of dietary patterns with knee symptoms and structures in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: Participants with symptomatic knee OA were recruited from a randomised, placebo-controlled trial conducted in Tasmania (N=259) and Victoria (N=133). Diet was assessed by the Anti-Cancer Council of Victoria food frequency questionnaire. Factor analysis was used to identify dietary patterns. Knee symptoms were assessed using Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) and structures using MRI. Multivariable linear regressions were used to examine associations. RESULTS: Three dietary patterns ("high-fat", "healthy" and "mixed") were identified in whole sample. Participants with higher "healthy pattern" score had lower total WOMAC, pain, function and stiffness scores at baseline but the associations were not significant over 24 months. Three ("western", "vegetable and meat" and "mediterranean") and two ("processed" and "vegetable") patterns were identified in Tasmania and Victoria, respectively. Cross-sectionally, only "mediterranean pattern" and "vegetable pattern" scores were significantly and negatively associated with total WOMAC or function scores. Longitudinally, participants with higher "western pattern" had worsening function (ß: 0.35, 95%CI: 0.03, 0.67) and total WOMAC (ß: 0.40, 95%CI: 0.07, 0.72) scores; furthermore, "vegetable pattern" was associated with decreased WOMAC stiffness score (ß: -0.47, 95%CI: -0.93, -0.02). In contrast, dietary patterns were largely not associated with structural changes. CONCLUSION: Some healthy dietary patterns were associated with reduced joint symptoms but dietary patterns were not associated with joint structure in this sample with knee OA. Further studies are required to confirm these findings.

2.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33452525

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To describe the impact of OA on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in the forms of health state utilities (HSUs) and health-dimension scores, and to compare the longitudinal changes in HRQoL for people with and without OA, using an Australian population-based longitudinal cohort. METHODS: Participants of the Tasmanian Older Adult Cohort with data on OA diagnosis and HRQoL were included [interviewed at baseline (n = 1093), 2.5 years (n = 871), 5 years (n = 760) and 10 years (n = 562)]. HRQoL was assessed using the Assessment of Quality of Life four-dimensions and analysed using multivariable linear mixed regressions. RESULTS: Compared with participants without OA, HSUs for those with OA were 0.07 (95% confidence interval: 0.09, 0.05) units lower on average over 10 years. HSUs for participants with knee and/or hip OA were similar to those with other types of OA at the 2.5 year follow-up and then diverged, with HSUs of the former being up to 0.09 units lower than the latter. Those with OA had lower scores for psychological wellness, independent living and social relationships compared with those without OA. Independent living and social relationships were mainly impacted by knee and/or hip OA, with the effect on the former increasing over time. CONCLUSION: Interventions to improve HRQoL should be tailored to specific OA types, health dimensions, and times. Support for maintaining psychological wellness should be provided, irrespective of OA type and duration. However, support for maintaining independent living could be more relevant to knee and/or hip OA patients living with the disease for longer.

3.
BMC Musculoskelet Disord ; 22(1): 40, 2021 Jan 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33413273

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: To describe demographic and clinical factors associated with the presence and incidence of depression and explore the temporal relationship between depression and joint symptoms in patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: Three hundred ninety-seven participants were selected from a randomized controlled trial in people with symptomatic knee OA and vitamin D deficiency (age 63.3 ± 7.1 year, 48.6% female). Depression severity and knee joint symptoms were assessed using the patient health questionnaire (PHQ-9) and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), respectively, at baseline and 24 months. RESULTS: The presence and incidence of depression was 25.4 and 11.2%, respectively. At baseline, having younger age, a higher body mass index (BMI), greater scores of WOMAC pain (PR: 1.05, 95%CI:1.03, 1.07), dysfunction (PR: 1.02, 95%CI:1.01, 1.02) and stiffness (PR: 1.05, 95%CI: 1.02, 1.09), lower education level, having more than one comorbidity and having two or more painful body sites were significantly associated with a higher presence of depression. Over 24 months, being female, having a higher WOMAC pain (RR: 1.05, 95%CI: 1.02, 1.09) and dysfunction score (RR: 1.02, 95%CI: 1.01, 1.03) at baseline and having two or more painful sites were significantly associated with a higher incidence of depression. In contrast, baseline depression was not associated with changes in knee joint symptoms over 24 months. CONCLUSION: Knee OA risk factors and joint symptoms, along with co-existing multi-site pain are associated with the presence and development of depression. This suggests that managing common OA risk factors and joint symptoms may be important for prevention and treatment depression in patients with knee OA. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01176344 . Anzctr.org.au identifier: ACTRN12610000495022 .

4.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33253381

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To describe the association between change in subchondral bone marrow lesions (BMLs) and change in tibiofemoral cartilage volume and knee symptoms in patients with symptomatic knee OA. METHODS: In total, 251 participants (mean 61.7 years, 51% female) were included. Tibiofemoral cartilage volume was measured at baseline and 24 months, and BML size at baseline, 6 and 24 months. Knee pain and function scores were evaluated at baseline, 6 and 24 months. Change in total and compartment-specific BML size was categorized according to the Least Significance Criterion. Linear mixed-effects models were used to evaluate the associations of change in BMLs over 6 and 24 months with change in cartilage volume over 24 months and knee symptoms over 6 and 24 months. RESULTS: Total BML size enlarged in 26% of participants, regressed in 31% and remained stable in 43% over 24 months. Compared with stable BMLs in the same compartment, enlarging BMLs over 24 months were associated with greater cartilage loss (difference: -53.0mm3, 95% CI: -100.0, -6.0), and regressing BMLs were not significantly associated with reduced cartilage loss (difference: 32.4mm3, 95% CI: -8.6, 73.3) over 24 months. Neither enlargement nor regression of total BML size over 6 and 24 months was associated with change in knee pain and function over the same time intervals. CONCLUSIONS: In subjects with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis and BMLs, enlarging BMLs may lead to greater cartilage loss but regressing lesions are not associated with reduced cartilage loss while neither is associated with change in knee symptoms.

5.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33026702

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Health state utility values (HSUVs) are a key input in health economic modelling but HSUVs of people with osteoarthritis (OA)-related conditions have not been systematically reviewed and meta-analysed. OBJECTIVE: To systematically review and meta-analyse the HSUVs for people with OA. METHODS: Searches within health economic/biomedical databases were performed to identify eligible studies reporting OA-related HSUVs. Data on study design, participant characteristics, affected OA joint sites, treatment type, HSUV elicitation method, considered health states, and the reported HSUVs were extracted. HSUVs for people with knee, hip and mixed OA in pre- and post-treatment populations were meta-analysed using random effects models. RESULTS: One-hundred and fifty-one studies were included in the systematic review, and 88 in meta-analyses. Of 151 studies, 56% were conducted in Europe, 75% were in people with knee and/or hip OA and 79% were based on the EQ-5D. The pooled mean (95% confidence interval [CI]) baseline HSUVs for knee OA core interventions, medication, injection and primary surgery treatments were 0.64 (0.61-0.66), 0.56 (0.45-0.68), 0.58 (0.50-0.66) and 0.52 (0.49-0.55), respectively. These were 0.71 (0.59-0.84) for hip OA core interventions and 0.52 (0.49-0.56) for hip OA primary surgery. For all knee OA treatments and hip OA primary surgery, pooled HSUVs were significantly higher in the post- than the pre- treatment populations. CONCLUSION: This study provides a comprehensive summary of OA-related HSUVs and generates a HSUVs database for people with different affected OA joint sites undergoing different treatments to guide HSUV choices in future health economic modelling of OA interventions.

6.
J Sci Med Sport ; 2020 Aug 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32896459

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To describe the status of and identify factors associated with physical activity promotion by podiatrists. DESIGN: Cross sectional survey. METHOD: In 2016-17 Australian podiatrists were invited to complete an online survey. Items assessed by Likert scale included; frequency of assessing and promoting physical activity and podiatrists' intentions, attitudes, social norms, confidence, barriers, role beliefs and perceived knowledge and skills regarding the promotion of physical activity. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, exploratory factor analysis and structural equation modelling. RESULTS: Of 316 respondents, 62% reported always/or often giving general and 39% specific physical activity advice. Attitudes to physical activity promotion were mostly positive and 83% agreed it was part of their role. Many believed they have the knowledge 62%) and skills to promote physical activity. Most podiatrists were confident to carry out basic physical activity promotion activities (83%), but fewer were confident assessing physical activity levels (54%), providing specific advice (47%), monitoring patient physical activity levels (49%) and carrying out physical activity counselling (41%). Modelling revealed intention to promote physical activity was most strongly influenced by experiential beliefs (ß=0.35, 95%CI 0.20-0.51) and instrumental beliefs (ß=0.27, 95%CI 0.15-0.40), whereas physical activity promotion was influenced by intention (ß=0.45, 95%CI 0.35-0.55) and behavioural control (ß=0.43, 95%CI 0.33-0.53). CONCLUSION: Physical activity promotion is feasible and regularly practiced in the podiatry setting, however current practice appears suboptimal. Attitudes and behavioural control appear influential in engagement and deserve consideration when designing strategies to improve delivery in podiatric practice.

7.
Intern Med J ; 2020 Sep 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32975868

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: A socioeconomic gradient exists in the utilisation of total hip replacements (THR) and total knee replacements (TKR) for osteoarthritis. However, the relations between socioeconomic status (SES) and time to THR or TKR is unknown. AIM: To describe the association between SES and time to THR and TKR. METHODS: 1072 older-adults residing in Tasmania, Australia were studied. Incident primary THR and TKR were determined by data linkage to the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. At baseline, each participant's area-level SES was determined by the Index of Relative Socioeconomic Advantage and Disadvantage (IRSAD), from the Australian Bureau of Statistics' 2001 census data. IRSAD was analysed in two ways; 1) categorised into quartiles, whereby quartile 1 represented the most socioeconomically disadvantaged group, 2) the cohort dichotomised at the quartile 1 cut-point. RESULTS: The mean age was 63.0 (±7.5) years, and 51% were women. Over the median follow-up of 12.9 (Interquartile range: 12.2-13.9) years, 56 (5%) participants had a THR, and 79 (7%) had a TKR. Compared to the most disadvantaged quartile, less disadvantaged participants were less likely to have a THR (i.e. less disadvantaged participants had a longer time to THR) (HR: 0.56, 95% CI 0.32, 1.00) but not TKR (HR: 0.90, 95% CI 0.53, 1.54). However, the former became non-significant after adjustment for pain and radiographic osteoarthritis, suggesting that the associations may be mediated by these factors. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that time to joint replacement was determined according to the symptoms/need of the participants rather than their SES. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

8.
Ann Intern Med ; 173(11): 861-869, 2020 Dec 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32926799

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Current pharmacologic therapies for patients with osteoarthritis are suboptimal. OBJECTIVE: To determine the efficacy of Curcuma longa extract (CL) for reducing knee symptoms and effusion-synovitis in patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis and knee effusion-synovitis. DESIGN: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. (Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12618000080224). SETTING: Single-center study with patients from southern Tasmania, Australia. PARTICIPANTS: 70 participants with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis and ultrasonography-defined effusion-synovitis. INTERVENTION: 2 capsules of CL (n = 36) or matched placebo (n = 34) per day for 12 weeks. MEASUREMENTS: The 2 primary outcomes were changes in knee pain on a visual analogue scale (VAS) and effusion-synovitis volume on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The key secondary outcomes were change in Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain and cartilage composition values. Outcomes were assessed over 12 weeks. RESULTS: CL improved VAS pain compared with placebo by -9.1 mm (95% CI, -17.8 to -0.4 mm [P = 0.039]) but did not change effusion-synovitis volume (3.2 mL [CI, -0.3 to 6.8 mL]). CL also improved WOMAC knee pain (-47.2 mm [CI, -81.2 to -13.2 mm]; P = 0.006) but not lateral femoral cartilage T2 relaxation time (-0.4 ms [CI, -1.1 to 0.3 ms]). The incidence of adverse events was similar in the CL (n = 14 [39%]) and placebo (n = 18 [53%]) groups (P = 0.16); 2 events in the CL group and 5 in the placebo group may have been treatment related. LIMITATION: Modest sample size and short duration. CONCLUSION: CL was more effective than placebo for knee pain but did not affect knee effusion-synovitis or cartilage composition. Multicenter trials with larger sample sizes are needed to assess the clinical significance of these findings. PRIMARY FUNDING SOURCE: University of Tasmania and Natural Remedies Private Limited.

9.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32799431

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To comprehensively synthesise the evolution of health-economic evaluation models (HEEMs) of all OA interventions including preventions, core treatments, adjunct non-pharmacological interventions, pharmacological and surgical treatments. METHODS: The literature was searched within health-economic/biomedical databases. Data extracted included: OA type, population characteristics, model setting/type/events, study perspective, comparators; and the reporting quality of the studies was assessed. The review protocol was registered at the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (registration: CRD42018092937). RESULTS: Eighty-eight studies were included. Pharmacological and surgical interventions were the focus in 51% and 44% studies, respectively. Twenty-four studies adopted a societal perspective (with increasing popularity after 2013), however most (63%) did not include indirect costs. Quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) was the most popular outcome measure since 2008. Markov models were used by 62% of studies, with increasing popularity since 2008. Until 2010, most studies used short-to-medium time horizons; subsequently a lifetime horizon became popular. Eighty-six percent of studies reported discount rate(s) (predominantly between 3% and 5%). Studies published after 2002 had a better coverage of OA-related adverse events (AEs). Reporting quality significantly improved after 2001. CONCLUSIONS: OA HEEMs have evolved and improved substantially over time, with focus shifting from short-to-medium-term pharmacological decision-tree models to surgical-focused lifetime Markov models. Indirect costs of OA are frequently not considered, despite using a societal perspective. There was lack of reporting sensitivity of model outcome to input parameters including discount rate, OA definition, and population parameters. Whilst the coverage of OA-related AEs has improved over time, it is still not comprehensive.

10.
BMC Musculoskelet Disord ; 21(1): 533, 2020 Aug 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32778082

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Hip effusion-synovitis may be relevant to osteoarthritis (OA) but is of uncertain etiology. The aim of this study was to describe the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of hip effusion-synovitis with clinical and structural risk factors of OA in older adults. METHODS: One hundred ninety-six subjects from the Tasmanian Older Adult Cohort (TASOAC) study with a right hip STIR (Short T1 Inversion Recovery) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) on two occasions were included. Hip effusion-synovitis CSA (cm2) was assessed quantitatively. Hip pain was determined by WOMAC (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis) while hip bone marrow lesions (BMLs), cartilage defects (femoral and/or acetabular) and high cartilage signal were assessed on MRI. Joint space narrowing (0-3) and osteophytes (0-3) were measured on x-ray using Altman's atlas. RESULTS: Of 196 subjects, 32% (n = 63) had no or a small hip effusion-synovitis while 68% (n = 133) subjects had a moderate or large hip effusion-synovitis. Both groups were similar but those with moderate or large hip effusion-synovitis were older, had higher BMI and more hip pain. Cross-sectionally, hip effusion-synovitis at multiple sites was associated with presence of hip pain [Prevalence ratio (PR):1.42 95%CI:1.05,1.93], but not with severity of hip pain. Furthermore, hip effusion-synovitis size associated with femoral defect (ßeta:0.32 95%CI:0.08,0.56). Longitudinally, and incident hip cartilage defect (PR: 2.23 95%CI:1.00, 4.97) were associated with an increase in hip effusion-synovitis CSA. Furthermore, independent of presence of effusion-synovitis, hip BMLs predicted incident (PR: 1.62 95%CI: 1.13, 2.34) and worsening of hip cartilage defects (PR: 1.50 95%CI: 1.20, 1.86). While hip cartilage defect predicted incident (PR: 1.11 95%CI: 1.03, 1.20) and worsening hip BMLs (PR: 1.16 95%CI: 1.04, 1.30). CONCLUSIONS: Hip effusion-synovitis at multiple sites (presumably reflecting extent) may be associated with hip pain. Hip BMLs and hip cartilage defects are co-dependent and predict worsening hip effusion-synovitis, indicating causal pathways between defects, BMLs and effusion-synovitis.

11.
Bone ; 140: 115546, 2020 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32730938

RESUMO

PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to determine and compare risk factors associated with incident fractures in older adults with and without obesity, defined by both body mass index (BMI) and body fat percentage. METHODS: 1,099 older adults (mean ± standard deviation age = 63.0 ± 7.5) years, participated in this prospective cohort study. Obesity status at baseline was defined by BMI (≥30 kg/m2) obtained by anthropometry and body fat percentage (≥30% for men and ≥40% for women) assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Total hip and lumbar spine areal bone mineral density (aBMD) were assessed by DXA up to five years. Incident fractures were self-reported up to 10 years. RESULTS: Prevalence of obesity was 28% according to BMI and 43% according to body fat percentage. Obese older adults by BMI, but not body fat percentage, had significantly higher aBMD at the total hip and spine compared with non-obese (both p-value<0.05). Obese older adults by body fat percentage had significantly higher likelihood of all incident fractures (OR: 1.71; CI:1.08, 2.71) and non-vertebral fractures (OR: 1.88; CI:1.16, 3.04) compared with non-obese after adjusting for confounders. Conversely, obese older adults by BMI had a significantly lower likelihood (OR: 0.54; CI:0.31, 0.94) of non-vertebral fractures although this was no longer significant after adjustment for total hip aBMD (all p-value > 0.05). Mediation analysis confirmed that aBMD meditated the effects of BMI, but not body fat percentage, on all incident fractures. Higher baseline falls risk score was the only consistent predictor of increased likelihood of incident fracture in obese individuals only, according to both BMI and body fat percentage (both p-value<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Obesity defined by body fat percentage is associated with increased likelihood of incident fractures in community-dwelling older adults, whereas those who are obese according to BMI have reduced likelihood of incident fracture which appears to be explained by higher aBMD. Falls risk assessment may improve identification of obese older adults at increased risk of incident fractures.

12.
Arch Gerontol Geriatr ; 90: 104101, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32474169

RESUMO

AIMS: To describe the associations between interindividual (between-person) and intraindividual (within-person) variability in physical activity (PA) and knee pain and functional limitation among older adults. We also investigated the potential bidirectional association of between-person and within-person variability in knee pain and functional limitation with PA. METHOD: Participants (N = 1064; 51% women; mean age 63 ± 7.4 years) were measured at baseline, 2.5, and 5 years. PA was measured using pedometers. Knee pain and functional limitation were assessed using the WOMAC scale. A two-part hurdle model, with adjustment for confounders, estimated the association of between-person and within-person variability in PA with knee pain/functional limitation (as the outcome). Linear mixed effect regression models described the association of between-person and within-person variability in knee pain and functional limitation with PA (as the outcome). RESULTS: Between-person effects showed that participants with a higher 5-year average PA had lower average WOMAC scores (ß= -1.17, 95% CI: -1.82, -0.51). Within-person effects showed that at time-points when participants had a higher PA level than average, they also had lower WOMAC scores (ß= -0.85, 95% CI: -1.36, -0.35). Conversely, both between-person (ß= -15.6, 95% CI: -22.5, -8.8) and within-person increase (ß= -7.4, 95% CI: -13.5, -1.4) in WOMAC scores were associated with lower PA. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that PA and knee pain/dysfunctional contribute to the development of one another. Pain can lead to changes in inter- and intraindividual PA levels, but the reverse is also possible - changes in PA results in changes in inter- and intraindividual pain/dysfunctional levels.

13.
Calcif Tissue Int ; 107(1): 10-17, 2020 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32347321

RESUMO

This study aims to assess whether older adults with low muscle mass or strength, in the presence of obesity, have an increased risk of knee (TKR) and hip replacement (THR) over 13 years. 1082 community-dwelling older adults (51% women; mean age 62.9 ± 7.5 years) were studied at baseline and multiple time points over 13 years. The incidence of TKR and THR was determined by data linkage to National Joint Replacement Registry. Appendicular lean and fat mass were measured using DXA. Lower-limb muscle strength (LMS) was assessed by dynamometer. Low muscle mass and strength were defined as the lowest sex-specific tertiles for appendicular lean mass (adjusted for height and total body fat mass) and lower-limb strength, respectively. Obesity was defined as the highest sex-specific tertile for total body fat mass. Competing risk regression models were used to estimate the sub-distribution hazard ratio (SHR) for TKR and THR. Over 13 years of follow-up, 6.8% (n = 74/1082) of the participants had a TKR and 4.7% (n = 50/1066) had THR. Participants with the combination of obesity and low muscle strength (SHR 3.36, 95% CI 1.50, 7.53) but low muscle mass (SHR 1.11, 95% CI 0.52, 2.40) had a significantly increased risk of TKR, compared to individuals with neither obesity nor low muscle mass/strength. However, obesity with low muscle strength did not lead to a significantly greater risk of TKR compared to having low muscle strength or obesity alone. There was no evidence for an association between obesity with low muscle mass or strength and THR (all p > 0.05). This finding suggests that combining muscle and fat assessments to predict the future risk of TKR is no better than each condition on its own.

14.
JAMA ; 323(15): 1456-1466, 2020 04 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32315057

RESUMO

Importance: A proof-of-principle study suggested that intravenous zoledronic acid may reduce knee pain and the size of bone marrow lesions in people with knee osteoarthritis, but data from large trials are lacking. Objective: To determine the effects of intravenous zoledronic acid on knee cartilage volume loss in patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis and bone marrow lesions. Design, Setting, and Participants: A 24-month multicenter, double-blind placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial conducted at 4 sites in Australia (1 research center and 3 hospitals). Adults aged 50 years or older with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis and subchondral bone marrow lesions detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were enrolled from November 2013 through September 2015. The final date of follow-up was October 9, 2017. Interventions: Intravenous infusion with either 5 mg of zoledronic acid in a 100-mL saline solution (n = 113) or a placebo saline solution (n = 110) at baseline and 12 months. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was absolute change in tibiofemoral cartilage volume assessed using MRI over 24 months (the minimum clinically important difference [MCID] has not been established). Three prespecified secondary outcomes were change in knee pain assessed by a visual analog scale (0 [no pain] to 100 [unbearable pain]; MCID, 15) and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (0 [no pain] to 500 [unbearable pain]; MCID, 75) over 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months and change in bone marrow lesion size over 6 and 24 months (the MCID has not been established). Results: Of 223 participants enrolled (mean age, 62.0 years [SD, 8.0 years]; 52% were female), 190 (85%) completed the trial. Change in tibiofemoral cartilage volume was not significantly different between the zoledronic acid group and the placebo group over 24 months (-878 mm3 vs -919 mm3; between-group difference, 41 mm3 [95% CI, -79 to 161 mm3]; P = .50). No significant between-group differences were found for any of the prespecified secondary outcomes, including changes in knee pain assessed by a visual analog scale (-11.5 in the zoledronic acid group vs -16.8 in the placebo group; between-group difference, 5.2 [95% CI, -2.3 to 12.8]; P = .17), changes in knee pain assessed by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (-37.5 vs -58.0, respectively; between-group difference, 20.5 [95% CI, -11.2 to 52.2]; P = .21), and changes in bone marrow lesion size (-33 mm2 vs -6 mm2; between-group difference, -27 mm2 [95% CI, -127 to 73 mm2]; P = .60) over 24 months. Adverse events were more common with zoledronic acid than with placebo (96% vs 83%, respectively) and consisted mainly of acute reactions (defined as symptoms within 3 days of administration of infusion; 87% vs 56%). Conclusions and Relevance: Among patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis and bone marrow lesions, yearly zoledronic acid infusions, compared with placebo, did not significantly reduce cartilage volume loss over 24 months. These findings do not support the use of zoledronic acid in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. Trial Registration: anzctr.org.au Identifier: ACTRN12613000039785.


Assuntos
Conservadores da Densidade Óssea/uso terapêutico , Doenças da Medula Óssea/tratamento farmacológico , Cartilagem Articular/efeitos dos fármacos , Osteoartrite do Joelho/tratamento farmacológico , Ácido Zoledrônico/uso terapêutico , Idoso , Conservadores da Densidade Óssea/administração & dosagem , Medula Óssea/patologia , Doenças da Medula Óssea/complicações , Doenças da Medula Óssea/diagnóstico por imagem , Cartilagem Articular/diagnóstico por imagem , Cartilagem Articular/patologia , Método Duplo-Cego , Feminino , Humanos , Infusões Intravenosas , Articulação do Joelho/diagnóstico por imagem , Articulação do Joelho/patologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Osteoartrite do Joelho/complicações , Osteoartrite do Joelho/patologia , Falha de Tratamento , Ácido Zoledrônico/administração & dosagem
15.
Clin Rheumatol ; 39(5): 1429-1437, 2020 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31912407

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To identify subgroups of community-dwelling older adults and to assess their longitudinal associations with long-term osteoarthritis (OA) outcomes. METHODS: 1046 older adults aged 50-80 years were studied. At baseline, body mass index (BMI), pedometer-measured ambulatory activity (AA), and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) determined knee pain and information on comorbidities were obtained. Tibial cartilage volume and bone-marrow lesions (BMLs) were assessed using MRI at baseline and 10 years and total knee replacements (TKR) by data linkage to the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Latent class analysis was used to determine participant subgroups, considering baseline BMI, AA, pain and comorbidities, and linear mixed-effects or log-binomial models were used to assess the associations. RESULTS: Three subgroups/classes were identified: subgroup 1 (43%): Normal/overweight participants with higher AA, lower pain and lower comorbidities; subgroup 2 (32%): Overweight participants with lower AA, mild pain and higher comorbidities; subgroup 3 (25%): Obese participants with lower AA, mild pain and higher comorbidities. Subgroup 3 had greater cartilage volume loss (ß - 60.56 mm3, 95% CI - 105.91, - 15.21) and a higher risk of TKR (RR 3.19, 95% CI 1.75, 5.81), compared to subgroup 1. Subgroup 2 was not associated with cartilage volume change (ß 13.06 mm3, 95% CI - 30.87, 57.00) or risk of TKR (RR 1.16, 95% CI 0.56, 2.36), compared to subgroup 1. Subgroup membership was not associated with worsening BMLs. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest the existence of homogeneous subgroups of participants and support the utility of identifying patterns of characteristics/risk factors that may cluster together and using them to identify subgroups of people who may be at a higher risk of developing and/or progressing OA. Key Points • Complex interplay among characteristics/factors leads to conflicting evidence between ambulatory activity and knee osteoarthritis. • Distinct subgroups are identifiable based on ambulatory activity, body mass index, knee pain, and comorbidities. • Identifying subgroups can be used to determine those who are at risk of developing/progressing osteoarthritis.

16.
Clin Nutr ; 39(2): 516-523, 2020 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30852031

RESUMO

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Aging is characterized by progressive decline in physiologic reserves and functions as well as prolonged inflammation, increasing susceptibility to disease. Diet plays an important role in maintaining health, and reducing morbidity and mortality, especially in older populations. This study was designed to determine prospective associations between dietary inflammatory index (DII®) scores and bone health, sarcopenia-related outcomes, falls risk and incident fractures in community-dwelling Australian older adults. METHODS: A total of 1098 [51% male; age (mean ± SD) 63.0 ± 7.5 years] non-institutionalized older adults who participated in the Tasmanian Older Adult Cohort Study (TASOAC) at baseline, 768 at 5 years, and 566 at 10 years follow-up were included in this analysis. Baseline energy-adjusted DII (E-DII) scores were calculated using a validated Food Frequency Questionnaire. Changes in bone mineral density (BMD) and appendicular lean mass (ALM) were measured over ten years using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Ten-year changes in hand grip, knee extensor and whole lower-limb muscle strength and quality were assessed by dynamometers and change in falls risk score using the Physical Profile Assessment (PPA). Incident fractures at any site and non-vertebral fractures over 10 years were self-reported. RESULTS: The E-DII range was -3.48 to +3.23 in men and -3.80 to +2.74 in women. Higher E-DII score (indicating a more pro-inflammatory diet) was associated with lower total hip (B: -0.009; 95% CI: -0.017, 0.000) and lumbar spine BMD (B: -0.013; 95% CI: -0.024, -0.002), and higher falls risk score (B: 0.040; 95% CI: 0.002, 0.078) over 10 years in men. Women with higher E-DII scores had higher whole lower-limb muscle quality over 10 years (B: 0.109; 95% CI: 0.002, 0.215). For every unit increase in E-DII score, incident fracture rates increased by 9.0% in men (IRR: 1.090; 95% CI: 1.011, 1.175) and decreased by 12.2% in women (IRR: 0.878; 95% CI: 0.800, 0.964) in a fully adjusted model. CONCLUSION: Higher E-DII scores were associated with lower bone density, higher falls risk, and increased incidence of fractures in community-dwelling older men, but decreased fracture incidence in women, over 10 years. This suggests pro-inflammatory diets may be more detrimental to musculoskeletal health in older men than in women. Additional studies are warranted to elucidate these sex differences.

17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31841267

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To describe cross-sectional associations between features observed on ultrasound (US) or clinical joint examination and hand symptoms amongst community-dwelling older adults (n=519), and determine whether such associations are independent of age, sex, BMI, and other imaging features. METHODS: Hand pain, function, and stiffness were assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Australian/Canadian hand osteoarthritis (AUSCAN) index. Standardised clinical and ultrasound examinations were performed. Grip strength was assessed using dynamometer. Data were analysed using hurdle and linear models and adjusted for demographic factors and other features. RESULTS: Abnormal findings on joint examination and visualised by ultrasound are common in older adults with and without hand pain. Greater numbers of tender joints were associated with greater pain (VAS, ß=2.63 (95% CI; 1.88, 3.39)); AUSCAN pain, ß=10.57 (4.00, 17.13)), poorer AUSCAN function (ß=4.07 (1.28, 6.86)), and poorer grip strength (ß=-0.15 psi (-0.27, -0.03)). Power Doppler imaging (PDI) synovitis was associated with greater pain (VAS ß=2.61 (1.03, 4.19), AUSCAN pain (ß=13.07 (3.82, 22.32)), but not function. Joint deformity was associated with poorer function (ß=4.51 (1.75, 7.26)) and grip strength (ß=-0.23 (-0.40, -0.05)) but not pain. Grey-scale synovitis was associated only with poorer grip strength (ß=-0.22 (-0.41, -0.04)). Associations with function and grip strength were partially mediated by pain. CONCLUSION: Joints which are tender on palpation or have US-identified PDI synovitis are potential treatment targets for hand pain. Treating tender joints and preventing hand deformity is required to improve hand function in community-dwelling older adults.

18.
Ther Adv Musculoskelet Dis ; 11: 1759720X19880054, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31692649

RESUMO

Background: The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of zoledronic acid (ZA) plus intravenous methylprednisolone (VOLT01) to ZA, and placebo for knee osteoarthritis. Methods: A single-center, double-blind, randomized controlled trial (RCT) was carried out. Adults (aged ⩾50 years) with knee osteoarthritis, significant knee pain [⩾40 mm on a 100 mm visual analog scale (VAS)], and magnetic resonance imaging-detected bone marrow lesion (BML) were randomized to receive a one-off administration of VOLT01, ZA, or placebo. The primary hypothesis was that VOLT01 was superior to ZA in having a lower incidence of acute phase responses (APRs) over 3 days. Secondary hypotheses were that VOLT01 was noninferior to ZA, and both treatments were superior to placebo in decreasing BML size over 6 months and in improving knee pain [Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and VAS] and function (WOMAC) over 3 and 6 months. Results: A total of 117 patients (62.2 ± 8.1 years, 63 women) were enrolled. The incidence of APRs was similar in the VOLT01 (90%) and ZA (87%) groups (p = 0.74). VOLT01 was superior to ZA in improving knee pain and function after 6 months and noninferior to ZA in reducing BML size. However, BML size change was small in all groups and there were no between-group differences. Compared with placebo, VOLT01 but not ZA improved knee function and showed a trend toward improving knee pain after 6 months. Conclusions: Administering intravenous methylprednisolone with ZA did not reduce APRs or change knee BML size over 6 months, but in contrast to ZA or placebo, it may have a beneficial effect on symptoms in knee osteoarthritis. Trial registration: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12613000039785.

19.
J Am Med Dir Assoc ; 20(10): 1242-1246, 2019 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31444016

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Resistin acts as an endogenous ligand of Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 that triggers major inflammatory pathways and mediates inflammatory processes. The role of resistin in osteoarthritis (OA) pathogenesis is unclear. The aim of this study is to describe the longitudinal associations of serum levels of resistin with knee synovitis measures and structural abnormalities in patients with knee OA. DESIGN: A prospective cohort study. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Patients (n = 200) with symptomatic knee OA (mean age 63.1 years, range 49-79; female 46.5%) participated. MEASURES: All measures were performed at baseline and 2 years later. Serum resistin was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Infrapatellar fat pad (IPFP) high signal intensity alteration and effusion synovitis were measured from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Knee structures including cartilage volume, cartilage defects, and bone marrow lesions (BMLs) were also assessed by MRI semiquantitatively or quantitatively. Linear or logistic mixed effects regression analyses were used in longitudinal analyses. RESULTS: Serum resistin was positively associated with high signal intensity alteration measures of IPFP as well as the presence [relative risk = 1.06, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02, 1.10] and volume (ß = 0.77, 95% CI 0.01, 1.53) of effusion synovitis in multivariable analyses. Serum levels of resistin were also positively associated with higher tibiofemoral cartilage defect (ß = 1.98, 95% CI 0.34, 3.57) and BML scores (ß = 3.18, 95% CI 0.99, 5.37) after adjustment for covariates. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS: Higher serum levels of resistin are associated with knee synovitis surrogate measures and structural abnormalities, suggesting that obesity may promote OA not only by increasing weight loading on joints but also by triggering 1 or more inflammatory pathways.

20.
Sci Rep ; 9(1): 9648, 2019 07 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31273319

RESUMO

To identify serum biomarker(s) for predicting knee cartilage volume loss over time, we studied 139 knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients from a previous 24-month clinical trial cohort. Targeted metabolomic profiling was performed on serum collected at baseline. The pairwise metabolite ratios as proxies for enzymatic reaction were calculated and used in the analysis. Cartilage volume loss between baseline and 24 months was assessed quantitatively by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Data revealed an association between the serum ratio of lysophosphatidylcholine 18:2 (lysoPC 18:2) to phosphatidylcholine 44:3 (PC44:3) and the cartilage volume loss in the lateral compartment (ß = -0.21 ± 0.04, p = 8.53*10-7) and with joint degradation markers, COMP (r = 0.32, p = 0.0002) and MMP1 (r = 0.26, p = 0.002). The significance remained after adjustment for age, sex, BMI, diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and the treatment taken in the original study. As the ratio indicated the over activation of the conversion pathway of PC to lysoPC catalyzed by phospholipase A2 (PLA2), we assessed and found that a specific PLA2, PLA2G5, was significantly increased in human OA cartilage and synovial membrane (85% and 19% respectively, both p < 0.04) compared to controls, and its overexpression correlated with IL-6 (r = 0.63, p = 0.0008). Our data suggest that the serum lysoPC 18:2 to PC44:3 ratio is highly associated with a greater risk of cartilage volume loss of the knee and warrants further investigation in an independent cohort.


Assuntos
Cartilagem Articular/patologia , Articulação do Joelho/patologia , Lisofosfatidilcolinas/metabolismo , Osteoartrite do Joelho/patologia , Fosfatidilcolinas/metabolismo , Proteína de Matriz Oligomérica de Cartilagem/metabolismo , Cartilagem Articular/metabolismo , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Progressão da Doença , Feminino , Humanos , Articulação do Joelho/metabolismo , Masculino , Metaloproteinase 1 da Matriz/metabolismo , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Osteoartrite do Joelho/metabolismo , Membrana Sinovial/metabolismo
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