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1.
A A Pract ; 13(8): 313-315, 2019 Oct 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31343432

RESUMO

We report the rare complication of a retained peripheral nerve block catheter (PNBC). A 45-year-old man with intractable postamputation phantom limb pain was treated with continuous infusions via femoral and sciatic peripheral nerve catheters. The catheters were removed by an emergency department physician 2 days after placement. Five months later, the patient presented with a discharging sinus from the sciatic nerve catheter site. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was inconclusive. Surgical exploration showed 15 cm of retained peripheral nerve catheter, which was removed.

2.
Anesth Analg ; 128(6): 1160-1166, 2019 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31094783

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Postoperative pain is common and promotes opioid use. Surgical wounds are hypoxic because normal perfusion is impaired. Local wound ischemia and acidosis promote incisional pain. Some evidence suggests that improving oxygen supply to surgical wounds might reduce pain. We therefore tested the hypothesis that supplemental (80% inspired) intraoperative oxygen reduces postoperative pain and opioid consumption. METHODS: We conducted a post hoc analysis of a large, single-center alternating cohort trial allocating surgical patients having general anesthesia for colorectal surgery to either 30% or 80% intraoperative oxygen concentration in 2-week blocks for a total of 39 months. Irrespective of allocation, patients were given sufficient oxygen to maintain saturation ≥95%. Patients who had regional anesthesia or nerve blocks were excluded. The primary outcome was pain and opioid consumption during the initial 2 postoperative hours, analyzed jointly. The secondary outcome was pain and opioid consumption over the subsequent 24 postoperative hours. Subgroup analyses of the primary outcome were conducted for open versus laparoscopic procedures and for patients with versus without chronic pain. RESULTS: A total of 4702 cases were eligible for analysis: 2415 were assigned to 80% oxygen and 2287 to 30% oxygen. The groups were well balanced on potential confounding factors. Average pain scores and opioid consumption were similar between the groups (mean difference in pain scores, -0.01 [97.5% CI, -0.16 to 0.14; P = .45], median difference in opioid consumption, 0.0 [97.5% CI, 0 to 0] mg morphine equivalents; P = .82). There were also no significant differences in the secondary outcome or subgroup analyses. CONCLUSIONS: Supplemental intraoperative oxygen does not reduce acute postoperative pain or reduce opioid consumption.


Assuntos
Hiperóxia , Manejo da Dor/métodos , Dor Pós-Operatória/terapia , Acidose , Adulto , Idoso , Analgésicos Opioides/efeitos adversos , Anestesia/métodos , Estudos de Coortes , Cirurgia Colorretal/métodos , Interpretação Estatística de Dados , Feminino , Humanos , Hipóxia , Laparoscopia/métodos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Oxigênio/uso terapêutico , Medição da Dor , Resultado do Tratamento
3.
Anesth Analg ; 128(3): 494-501, 2019 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29697506

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Neuraxial anesthesia improves components of the Virchow's triad (hypercoagulability, venous stasis, and endothelial injury) which are key pathogenic contributors to venous thrombosis in surgical patients. However, whether neuraxial anesthesia reduces the incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) remain unclear. We therefore tested the primary hypothesis that neuraxial anesthesia reduces the incidence of 30-day VTE in adults recovering from orthopedic surgery. Secondarily, we tested the hypotheses that neuraxial anesthesia reduces 30-day readmission, 30-day mortality, and the duration of postoperative hospitalization. METHODS: Inpatient orthopedic surgeries from American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database (2011-2015) in adults lasting more than 1 hour with either neuraxial or general anesthesia were included. Groups were matched 1:1 by propensity score matching for appropriate confounders. Logistic regression model was used to assess the effect of neuraxial anesthesia on 30-day VTE, 30-day mortality, and readmission, while Cox proportional hazard regression model was used to assess its effect on length of stay. RESULTS: Neuraxial anesthesia decreased odds of 30-day VTE (odds ratio 0.85, 95% confidence interval, 0.78-0.95; P = .002) corresponding to number-needed-to-treat of 500. Although there was no difference in 30-day mortality, neuraxial anesthesia reduced 30-day readmission (odds ratio 0.90, 98.3% confidence interval, 0.85-0.95; P < .001) corresponding to number-needed-to-treat of 250 and had a shortened hospitalization (2.87 vs 3.11; P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: Neuraxial anesthesia appears to provide only weak VTE prophylaxis, but can be offered as an adjuvant to current thromboprophylaxis in high-risk patients.


Assuntos
Anestesia Epidural/tendências , Procedimentos Ortopédicos/tendências , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/diagnóstico , Pontuação de Propensão , Melhoria de Qualidade/tendências , Tromboembolia Venosa/diagnóstico , Idoso , Anestesia Epidural/efeitos adversos , Bases de Dados Factuais/tendências , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Procedimentos Ortopédicos/efeitos adversos , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/etiologia , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/mortalidade , Estudos Retrospectivos , Sociedades Médicas/tendências , Tromboembolia Venosa/etiologia , Tromboembolia Venosa/mortalidade
4.
Minerva Anestesiol ; 84(7): 803-810, 2018 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29756696

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Various methods for peripheral nerve and epidural catheter location assessment exist, with varying degrees of ease of use, utility, and accuracy. Pulsed wave Doppler (PWD) evaluates the presence of fluid flow and is possible modality to assess the location of a percutaneously inserted perineural catheter. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was conducted in which PWD ultrasonography was used to confirm the position of nerve catheters for regional anesthesia. Data was collected to assess 24-hour postoperative pain scores, opioid consumption, complications, and the incidence of catheter replacement. RESULTS: Eighty-six patients were included; average age was 58 years and a 27% incidence of chronic pain. These catheters were left in place based on the PWD images. Three catheters failed and a total of 16 catheters were repositioned. In the first 24 hours average pain scores ranges between 3.5 to 5.9 and median postoperative opioid consumption range was 11.3 mg to 60.8 mg. For epidural catheters, PWD changes were more obvious with air injection and there was only one episode of hemodynamic instability. CONCLUSIONS: Our preliminary experience with PWD ultrasonography suggests that they may offer the ability to selectively assess flow at different locations to identify the proper location of epidural and perineural catheters. Future randomized, controlled investigations are warranted to further evaluate the effectiveness and safety of this modality.


Assuntos
Anestesia Epidural/métodos , Cateteres , Bloqueio Nervoso/métodos , Nervos Periféricos/diagnóstico por imagem , Ultrassonografia Doppler , Ultrassonografia de Intervenção , Espaço Epidural/diagnóstico por imagem , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Retrospectivos
5.
Anesth Analg ; 123(3): 749-57, 2016 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27537762

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Clonidine is an α2-adrenoceptor agonist, which has analgesic properties. However, the analgesic efficacy of perioperative clonidine remains unclear. We, therefore, tested the hypothesis that clonidine reduces both pain scores and cumulative opioid consumption during the initial 72 hours after noncardiac surgery. METHODS: Six hundred twenty-four patients undergoing elective noncardiac surgery under general and spinal anesthesia were included in this substudy of the PeriOperative ISchemia Evaluation-2 trial. Patients were randomly assigned to 0.2 mg oral clonidine or placebo 2 to 4 hours before surgery, followed by 0.2 mg/d transdermal clonidine patch or placebo patch, which was maintained until 72 hours after surgery. Postoperative pain scores and opioid consumption were assessed for 72 hours after surgery. RESULTS: Clonidine had no effect on opioid consumption compared with placebo, with an estimated ratio of means of 0.98 (95% confidence interval, 0.70-1.38); P = 0.92. Median (Q1, Q3) opioid consumption was 63 (30, 154) mg morphine equivalents in the clonidine group, which was similar to 60 (30, 128) mg morphine equivalents in the placebo group. Furthermore, there was no significant effect on pain scores, with an estimated difference in means of 0.12 (95% confidence interval, -0.02 to 0.26); 11-point scale; P = 0.10. Mean pain scores per patient were 3.6 ± 1.8 for clonidine patients and 3.6 ± 1.8 for placebo patients. CONCLUSIONS: Clonidine does not reduce opioid consumption or pain scores in patients recovering from noncardiac surgery.


Assuntos
Analgésicos Opioides/administração & dosagem , Clonidina/administração & dosagem , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Eletivos/efeitos adversos , Manejo da Dor/métodos , Medição da Dor/efeitos dos fármacos , Dor Pós-Operatória/tratamento farmacológico , Agonistas de Receptores Adrenérgicos alfa 2/administração & dosagem , Idoso , Analgésicos/administração & dosagem , Estudos Cross-Over , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Medição da Dor/métodos , Dor Pós-Operatória/diagnóstico , Adesivo Transdérmico
7.
ScientificWorldJournal ; 2014: 572507, 2014.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25535627

RESUMO

Continuous peripheral nerve blocks (CPNB) are commonly used for intraoperative and postoperative analgesia. Our study aimed at describing our experience with ambulatory peripheral nerve catheters. After Institutional Review Board approval, records for all patients discharged with supraclavicular or popliteal catheters between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2011 were reviewed. A licensed practitioner provided verbal and written instructions to the patients prior to discharge. Daily follow-up phone calls were conducted. Patients either removed their catheters at home with real-time simultaneous telephone guidance by a member of the Acute Pain Service or had them removed by the surgeon during a regular office visit. The primary outcome of this analysis was the incidence of complications, categorized as pharmacologic, infectious, or other. The secondary outcome measure was the average daily pain score. Our study included a total of 1059 patients with ambulatory catheters (769 supraclavicular, 290 popliteal). The median infusion duration was 5 days for both groups. Forty-two possible complications were identified: 13 infectious, 23 pharmacologic, and 6 labeled as other. Two patients had retained catheters, 2 had catheter leakage, and 2 had shortness of breath. Our study showed that prolonged use of ambulatory catheters for a median period of 5 days did not lead to an increased incidence of complications.


Assuntos
Instituições de Assistência Ambulatorial , Cateteres , Nervos Periféricos/patologia , Idoso , Cateterismo/efeitos adversos , Cateteres/efeitos adversos , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Ohio , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/etiologia
8.
Anesthesiology ; 121(2): 239-48, 2014 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24758775

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Ultrasound guidance for continuous femoral perineural catheters may be supplemented by electrical stimulation through a needle or through a stimulating catheter. The authors tested the primary hypothesis that ultrasound guidance alone is noninferior on both postoperative pain scores and opioid requirement and superior on at least one of the two. Second, the authors compared all interventions on insertion time and incremental cost. METHODS: Patients having knee arthroplasty with femoral nerve catheters were randomly assigned to catheter insertion guided by: (1) ultrasound alone (n = 147); (2) ultrasound and electrical stimulation through the needle (n = 152); or (3) ultrasound and electrical stimulation through both the needle and catheter (n = 138). Noninferiority between any two interventions was defined for pain as not more than 0.5 points worse on a 0 to 10 verbal response scale and for opioid consumption as not more than 25% greater than the mean. RESULTS: The stimulating needle group was significantly noninferior to the stimulating catheter group (difference [95% CI] in mean verbal response scale pain score [stimulating needle vs. stimulating catheter] of -0.16 [-0.61 to 0.29], P < 0.001; percentage difference in mean IV morphine equivalent dose of -5% [-25 to 21%], P = 0.002) and to ultrasound-only group (difference in mean verbal response scale pain score of -0.28 [-0.72 to 0.16], P < 0.001; percentage difference in mean IV morphine equivalent dose of -2% [-22 to 25%], P = 0.006). In addition, the use of ultrasound alone for femoral nerve catheter insertion was faster and cheaper than the other two methods. CONCLUSION: Ultrasound guidance alone without adding either stimulating needle or needle/catheter combination thus seems to be the best approach to femoral perineural catheters.


Assuntos
Cateterismo/métodos , Nervo Femoral/diagnóstico por imagem , Bloqueio Nervoso/métodos , Ultrassonografia de Intervenção/métodos , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Analgésicos Opioides/administração & dosagem , Analgésicos Opioides/uso terapêutico , Artroplastia do Joelho/métodos , Cateterismo/economia , Controle de Custos , Custos e Análise de Custo , Estimulação Elétrica , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Morfina/administração & dosagem , Morfina/uso terapêutico , Agulhas , Bloqueio Nervoso/economia , Manejo da Dor , Medição da Dor/efeitos dos fármacos , Dor Pós-Operatória/prevenção & controle , Tamanho da Amostra , Resultado do Tratamento , Adulto Jovem
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