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1.
Int Orthod ; 2020 Jun 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32513608

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Maxillary impacted canines (MIC) could suffer root changes after canine traction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the 3-dimensional root changes in buccal versus palatal MIC after orthodontic traction. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This longitudinal and retrospective study included pre-treatment and after traction cone beam computed tomography scans (CBCTs) of 30 subjects with unilateral/bilateral MIC. A total of 43 MIC were divided into 2 groups: buccal (n=17) or palatal (n=26). Root changes in length and area after orthodontic traction were measured at sagittal, coronal and axial sections. Intergroup comparison was carried out by t or U Mann-Whitney tests, depending on normality. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to evaluate the influence of all predictor variables on root changes (P<0.05). RESULTS: Significant difference between groups was found for root area changes in the upper limit of the cervical third at axial section that showed greater appositional values for the palatal impacted canine group (-1.18mm2) and resorptive values for the buccal impacted canine group (0.62mm2) (P=0.024). Position of impaction palatal influenced the increase of root area in the coronal section and in the upper limit of the cervical third at axial section. Age directly influenced the decrease of total length and root area in sagittal and coronal sections, respectively. CONCLUSION: Orthodontic traction of MIC produced an important appositional root change in the palatal impaction group in the axial root area of the upper limit of the cervical third. Impaction position and age influenced the increase and decrease of root area and length of some specific radicular regions.

2.
Int Orthod ; 2020 Jun 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32513609

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To compare the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) morphological characteristics in people with Class II versus Class I sagittal skeletal relationship and to identify other factors that influence the TMJ dimensions. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This cross-sectional and retrospective study evaluated 188 people divided into two groups, 92 cone-beam computed tomographies (CBCTs) and lateral radiographs (LR) of people with Skeletal class II relationship with Class II division 1 malocclusion versus 96 CBCTs and LR of people with Class I skeletal relationship and Class I malocclusion (controls). The CBCTs included people of both sexes, aged between 15 and 65 years old. The 3D Imaging Carestream Software was used to evaluate the condyle height and neck width, mediolateral and anteroposterior condyle dimensions, the shape of the glenoid fossa and condyle in the CBCTs. Likewise, the ANB angle, the Wits appraisal and other measurements were evaluated on LR. Besides, Mann-Whitney U, Chi2 and multiple linear regression tests were performed. The significance level was set at P˂0.05. RESULTS: The mediolateral and anteroposterior condyle dimensions were smaller in class II people (1.82mm and 0.29mm, respectively) than class I people (P<0.05). Likewise, height and neck width of condyle were smaller in class II people (0.73mm and 0.40mm, respectively) than class I people (P<0.05). Multiple linear regression identified mainly the ANB angle as a factor (P<0.05) that influenced the dimensions, decreasing the condyle dimensions in skeletal class II relationship. CONCLUSIONS: People with skeletal class II relationship showed smaller condyle dimension values than class I people. A decrease in the dimensions of the eminence and the condyle could be expected when the ANB angle increases.

4.
Indian J Dent Res ; 31(1): 103-108, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32246690

RESUMO

Background: The position of the mental foramen (MF) is particularly relevant in dentistry. The incorporation of new imaging techniques, such as cone-beam-computed tomography (CBCT), can be used to identify anatomic dimorphic traits. Aims: This study evaluated the sexual dimorphism of MF position by CBCT among a selected population. Methods: Fifty CBCT images from 20 to 40-year-old subjects (25 men and 25 women) were evaluated. The horizontal position was evaluated using the al Jasser-Nwoku classification to identify the position of the MF in the mandible. Two measurements were obtained on coronal sections to evaluate the vertical position of the MF: the distance from the uppermost alveolar ridge to the upper edge of the foramen and the distance from the inferior edge of the foramen to the lower border of the mandible. Statistical Analysis Used: Comparisons between sexes and sides were performed with Student's t-test and Chi-square tests. Results: The most frequent location of the MF was in line and below of the second premolar tooth in both men and women (P > 0.05). Additionally, significant differences were found between sexes for the distance from the inferior edge of the foramen to the lower border of the mandible in each side (P < 0.001 for the right and left sides). Conclusions: Horizontal position of the MF is not a sexually dimorphic feature and it is predominantly in line and below the second premolar tooth. Women present the MF in a more caudal position, closer to the mandibular base when compared to men.


Assuntos
Forame Mentual , Caracteres Sexuais , Adulto , Tomografia Computadorizada de Feixe Cônico , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Mandíbula , Peru , Adulto Jovem
5.
Int Orthod ; 2020 Apr 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32278665

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To retrospectively compare the dentoskeletal and soft tissue changes of patients with Class II malocclusion treated with cervical headgear and Jones Jig appliances, followed by fixed appliances. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The sample comprised 46 Class II malocclusion patients divided into two groups. Patients with Class II malocclusion based on the ANB angle and plaster model analyses, needing non-extraction orthodontic treatment, absence of mandibular crowding and no previous orthodontic treatment were eligible to be selected. Group 1 consisted of 25 patients treated with cervical headgear (CH) followed by fixed appliances for a mean period of 3.26 years and group 2 consisted of 21 patients treated with the Jones Jig (JJ) appliance for a mean of 4.29 years. Lateral cephalograms were evaluated at the beginning and at the end of orthodontic treatment. For intergroup comparisons, t and Mann-Whitney tests were performed. RESULTS: The cervical headgear group produced significantly greater maxillary anterior displacement restriction (SNA; CH: -0.97°±1.33; JJ: 0.07°±1.73; P=0.025), apical base discrepancy improvement (ANB; CH: -1.52°±1.25; JJ: 0.36°±1.46; P=0.006), FMA reduction (CH: -0.78°±2.68; JJ: 1.07°±2.84; P=0.028) and distal mandibular molar angulation (Md6.PM; CH: 6.97°±3.66; JJ: 2.77°±6.87; P=0.013) than the Jones Jig group. CONCLUSIONS: Both distalizers followed by fixed appliances were effective to correct Class II malocclusion. The cervical headgear group presented skeletal effects with less treatment time and there were no significant intergroup differences regarding soft tissue changes.

6.
J Appl Oral Sci ; 28: e20190364, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32348442

RESUMO

Objective Maxillary molar distalization with intraoral distalizer appliances is a non-extraction orthodontic treatment used to correct molar relationship in patients with Class II malocclusion presenting maxillary dentoalveolar protrusion and minor skeletal discrepancies. This study compares the changes caused by three distalizers with different force systems. Methodology 71 patients, divided into three groups, were included. The Jones jig group (JJG, n=30; 16 male, 14 female, 13.17 years mean age) was treated with the Jones jig for 0.8 years. The Distal jet group (DJG, n=25; 8 male, 17 female, 12.57 years mean age) was treated with the Distal jet for 1.06 years. The First Class group (FCG, n=16; 6 male, 10 female, 12.84 years mean age) was treated with the First Class for 0.69 years. Intergroup treatment changes were compared using one-way ANOVA, followed by post-hoc Tukey's tests. Results Intergroup comparisons showed significantly greater maxillary incisor protrusion in DJG than in FCG (2.56±2.24 mm vs. 0.74±1.39mm, p=0.015). The maxillary first premolars showed progressive and significantly smaller mesial angulation in JJG, FCG and DJG, respectively (14.65±6.31º, 8.43±3.99º, 0.97±3.16º; p<0.001). They also showed greater mesialization in JJG than FCG (3.76±1.46 mm vs. 2.27±1.47 mm, p=0.010), and greater extrusion in DJG compared to JJG (0.90±0.77 mm vs 0.11±0.60 mm, p=0.004). The maxillary second premolars showed progressive and significantly smaller mesial angulation and mesialization in JJG, FCG and DJG, respectively (12.77±5.78º, 3.20±3.94º, -2.12±3.71º and 3.87±1.34 mm, 2.25±1.40 mm, 1.24±1.26 mm, respectively; p<0.001). DJG showed smaller distal angulation of maxillary first molars (-2.14±5.09º vs. -7.73±4.28º and -6.05±3.76º, for the JJG and FCG, respectively; p<0.001) and greater maxillary second molars extrusion (1.17±1.41 mm vs -0.02±1.16 mm and 0.16±1.40 mm, for the JJG and FCG, respectively; p=0.003). Overjet change was significantly larger in DJG compared to FCG (1.79±1.67 mm vs 0.68±0.84; p=0.046). Treatment time was smaller in FCG (0.69±0.22 years vs 0.81±0.33 years and 1.06±0.42 years, comparing it with the JJG and DJG, respectively; p=0.005). Conclusion The three appliances corrected the Class II molar relationship by dentoalveolar changes. The Distal jet produced smaller molar distal angulation than the Jones jig and First Class. The First Class appliance showed less anchorage loss, greater percentage of distalization and shorter treatment time than the Jones jig and Distal jet.


Assuntos
Má Oclusão de Angle Classe II/terapia , Dente Molar/fisiopatologia , Desenho de Aparelho Ortodôntico , Aparelhos Ortodônticos Fixos , Técnicas de Movimentação Dentária/instrumentação , Adolescente , Análise de Variância , Cefalometria , Criança , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Má Oclusão de Angle Classe II/fisiopatologia , Procedimentos de Ancoragem Ortodôntica/instrumentação , Valores de Referência , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Estudos Retrospectivos , Resultado do Tratamento
7.
Int Orthod ; 2020 Apr 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32335124

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Maxillary canine impaction is directly associated with a narrow maxillary arch, mainly in the inter-premolar widths. This study compared the transverse changes at the level of maxillary premolars after traction of maxillary impacted canines (MICs) in adolescents and young adults through three main goals: to compare unilateral versus bilateral cases, to compare buccally versus palatally MIC cases, and to compare the affected versus non-affected side exclusively in the unilateral group. METHODS: This before and after CBCT study involved 45 MIC orthodontically tractioned until the occlusal plane with a standardized protocol. The sample was classified regarding the impaction type (unilateral versus bilateral), impaction location (palatal versus buccal) and the affected versus unaffected sides in the unilateral cases. MIC characteristics as impaction sector, height, and complexity of the traction, as well as α and ß angles, canine root length and area were measured. Moreover, cephalometric characteristics were also evaluated. Mann-Whitney U or Wilcoxon signed-rank tests and multiple regressions were applied (α=0.05). RESULTS: Maxillary inter-premolar widths (first or second) expanded approximately 3mm after traction of unilateral or bilateral MIC (P>0.05). Changes in hemi-arch widths between palatal (1.67mm) versus buccal (1.90mm) MIC were similar (P>0.05). In unilateral impaction, the transversal changes on the affected side were 2mm versus almost 1mm observed in the unaffected side (P<0.05). Finally, the multiple linear regressions were identified to the ANB angle, the impaction sectors and the distance from middle raphe to the cusp tip of MIC as influential variables. CONCLUSION: The maxillary inter-premolar widths increase after traction of MIC without differences between type or location of impaction. In addition, the transverse change in the affected side in unilateral MIC is greater than the unaffected side resolving the earlier transverse asymmetry.

8.
Surg Radiol Anat ; 2020 Mar 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32140764

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To compare the buccal alveolar bone thickness of mesioangulated mandibular impacted third molars (MITM) with buccal versus lingual inclination using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). METHODS: This retrospective cross-sectional study evaluated 69 individuals (39 women and 30 men) who presented a total of 101 mesioangulated MITM according to the Winter classification and in B position according to the Pell and Gregory classification. The average age was 22.99 ± 3.94 years. The superior, medial and inferior alveolar thickness regarding buccal (n = 44) or lingual (n = 57) mandibular third molar inclination were measured. T test or Mann-Whitney U test and finally, a multiple linear regression were applied (p < 0.05). RESULTS: The buccal alveolar bone thickness of mesioangulated mandibular impacted third molars was significantly greater in the group with lingual inclination compared to the group with buccal inclination, in the superior region (6.21 ± 3.27 vs. 4.85 ± 3.06; p = 0.036). The lingual inclination significantly influenced the buccal alveolar bone thickness in the middle region (p = 0.011). CONCLUSIONS: The mesioangulated MITM in B position with lingual inclination have a greater thickness of the superior and medial buccal alveolar bone than the MITM with buccal inclination. These results should be considered during MITM diagnosis and surgical planning.

9.
J Orthod ; 47(2): 170-180, 2020 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32166995

RESUMO

The aim of this article is to report a case series of a miniscrew-anchored maxillary protraction therapy (MAMP). Two male patients presenting with Class III malocclusion were included in this report. The treatment consisted of a hybrid expander and two miniscrews at the anterior region of the mandible anchoring Class III elastics for maxillary protraction. Effective maxillary length, ANB angle and Wits appraisal increased after treatment. Slight dental effects were observed. MAMP therapy produced substantial skeletal effects and might be a good treatment option for Class III growing patients.


Assuntos
Má Oclusão de Angle Classe III , Técnica de Expansão Palatina , Cefalometria , Aparelhos de Tração Extrabucal , Humanos , Masculino , Mandíbula , Maxila
10.
Int Orthod ; 18(2): 237-245, 2020 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32037207

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to compare cranial base linear and angular measurements between individuals with skeletal open bite and different sagittal skeletal relationships. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This observational and cross-sectional study included 101 lateral radiographs of young Latin-American individuals with skeletal open bite that met the inclusion criteria and were collected from a private radiological centre. Three groups were formed. Groups 1, 2 and 3 included individuals with skeletal open bite (negative overbite and FMA>30°) and Class I (n=31), II (n=35) and III (n=35) sagittal skeletal relationship, respectively. The anterior and posterior cranial bases (SN and SBa), and cranial base angles (BaSN and ArSN) were measured. Groups were compared with one-way analysis of variance and post-hoc Scheffé tests. The influence of predictor variables on the cranial base were evaluated with linear regressions (α=0.05). RESULTS: The cranial base angles were significantly smaller (approximately 3° to 5°) in the skeletal open bite Class III group (BaSN=127.97°± 5.86°, ArSN=120.19°±6.12°) when compared with the other groups. BaSN angle, Class I versus Class III (p<0.001) and Class II versus Class III (p<0.001). ArSN angle, Class I versus Class III (p=0.005) and Class II versus Class III (p=0.026). Multiple linear regressions showed that sex had a significant influence on both cranial base dimensions with men showing larger values than women. CONCLUSIONS: Skeletal open bite Class III individuals show a smaller cranial base angle than Skeletal open bite Class I or II individuals.

11.
Int Orthod ; 18(2): 286-296, 2020 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32063473

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: This retrospective study aimed to compare the dentoskeletal and soft-tissue changes in Class II malocclusion patients treated with Jasper Jumper and Twin Force Bite Corrector associated with fixed orthodontic appliances. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The sample comprised 60 subjects divided into 3 groups. Patients with Class II malocclusion, mandibular retrusion, slight or no crowding and with no previous orthodontic treatment were eligible. Group 1 comprised 20 patients treated with the Jasper Jumper (JJ), with an initial age of 12.39 years. Group 2 comprised 20 patients treated with the Twin Force (TF), with an initial age of 11.83 years. The control group consisted of 20 untreated Class II subjects with an initial age of 12.13 years. Intergroup pretreatment comparisons were performed with One-way analysis of variance and intergroup treatment changes were compared with the Analysis of Covariance, both followed by Tukey test. RESULTS: The TF group showed greater increase in mandibular length (6.23mm±4.64, P=0.004) than the control group (2.94mm±1.75). The mandibular incisors in the experimental groups presented significantly greater labial inclination and protrusion than the control (Md1.NB; JJ: 4.19°±2.09; TF: 4.46°±6.83; control: 1.13°±2.08, P=0.000/Md1-NB; JJ: 1.95mm±1.45; TF: 1.74mm±1.79; control: 0.31mm±0.81, P=0.000). In addition, the treated groups also showed significantly improvement of the dental relationships (Overjet; JJ: -4.05mm±4.64; TF: -3.80mm±2.12; control: 0.05mm±1.12, P=0.000/Overbite; JJ: -2.52mm±1.46; TF: -2.93mm±2.13; control: -0.63mm±1.35, P=0.000). CONCLUSION: The Jasper Jumper and Twin Force associated to fixed appliances were effective in correcting Class II malocclusion with a combination of skeletal and dentoalveolar changes. However, the TF seems to provide more skeletal effects with greater maxillary growth restriction and mandibular length increase when compared to the JJ.

12.
Int Orthod ; 18(1): 79-88, 2020 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31735681

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Alveolar bone surrounding mandibular incisors dictates the range of buccolingual inclination that can be achieved with treatment. The objective of this study was to evaluate the mandibular anterior alveolar thickness and height in individuals with different sagittal and vertical skeletal relationships. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Cone beam computed tomography scans of 53 individuals (22 males and 31 females; mean age 21.19±3.7 years) were classified into 3 groups according to the sagittal skeletal relationship (class I, class II, and class III) and the vertical growth pattern (hyperdivergent, normodivergent, and hypodivergent). The alveolar thickness and height of both mandibular central incisors were measured. Group comparisons were performed with analysis of variance and post hoc Scheffé tests. Multiple linear regression was applied to evaluate the influence of all variables on the alveolar conditions. RESULTS: Alveolar thickness and height showed no significant differences among the class I, II and III groups (6 and 7mm regardless of the sagittal group, P>0.05). The middle and lower alveolar thicknesses were significantly smaller in hyperdivergent (5.76mm and 6.34mm) and normodivergent (6.29mm and 7.40mm) than hypodivergent individuals (6.63mm and 8.27mm respectively). The lingual alveolar height was smaller in hyperdivergent (6.04mm) than hypodivergent individuals (7.93mm) (P=0.029, 95%CI: 0.15-3.63) and the lingual bone height was smaller in hypodivergent (3.24mm) than hyperdivergent individuals (5.06mm) (P=0.029, 95%CI: 0.15-3.48). Multiple linear regression indicated a significant influence of the root length on the alveolar thickness and height. CONCLUSIONS: The sagittal skeletal relationship showed no influence on the alveolar thickness or height, even if dental compensation was present. Hyperdivergent individuals showed smaller alveolar thicknesses and heights than hypodivergent individuals.

13.
J. appl. oral sci ; 28: e20190364, 2020. tab, graf
Artigo em Inglês | LILACS-Express | ID: biblio-1101252

RESUMO

Abstract Objective Maxillary molar distalization with intraoral distalizer appliances is a non-extraction orthodontic treatment used to correct molar relationship in patients with Class II malocclusion presenting maxillary dentoalveolar protrusion and minor skeletal discrepancies. This study compares the changes caused by three distalizers with different force systems. Methodology 71 patients, divided into three groups, were included. The Jones jig group (JJG, n=30; 16 male, 14 female, 13.17 years mean age) was treated with the Jones jig for 0.8 years. The Distal jet group (DJG, n=25; 8 male, 17 female, 12.57 years mean age) was treated with the Distal jet for 1.06 years. The First Class group (FCG, n=16; 6 male, 10 female, 12.84 years mean age) was treated with the First Class for 0.69 years. Intergroup treatment changes were compared using one-way ANOVA, followed by post-hoc Tukey's tests. Results Intergroup comparisons showed significantly greater maxillary incisor protrusion in DJG than in FCG (2.56±2.24 mm vs. 0.74±1.39mm, p=0.015). The maxillary first premolars showed progressive and significantly smaller mesial angulation in JJG, FCG and DJG, respectively (14.65±6.31º, 8.43±3.99º, 0.97±3.16º; p<0.001). They also showed greater mesialization in JJG than FCG (3.76±1.46 mm vs. 2.27±1.47 mm, p=0.010), and greater extrusion in DJG compared to JJG (0.90±0.77 mm vs 0.11±0.60 mm, p=0.004). The maxillary second premolars showed progressive and significantly smaller mesial angulation and mesialization in JJG, FCG and DJG, respectively (12.77±5.78º, 3.20±3.94º, -2.12±3.71º and 3.87±1.34 mm, 2.25±1.40 mm, 1.24±1.26 mm, respectively; p<0.001). DJG showed smaller distal angulation of maxillary first molars (-2.14±5.09º vs. -7.73±4.28º and -6.05±3.76º, for the JJG and FCG, respectively; p<0.001) and greater maxillary second molars extrusion (1.17±1.41 mm vs -0.02±1.16 mm and 0.16±1.40 mm, for the JJG and FCG, respectively; p=0.003). Overjet change was significantly larger in DJG compared to FCG (1.79±1.67 mm vs 0.68±0.84; p=0.046). Treatment time was smaller in FCG (0.69±0.22 years vs 0.81±0.33 years and 1.06±0.42 years, comparing it with the JJG and DJG, respectively; p=0.005). Conclusion The three appliances corrected the Class II molar relationship by dentoalveolar changes. The Distal jet produced smaller molar distal angulation than the Jones jig and First Class. The First Class appliance showed less anchorage loss, greater percentage of distalization and shorter treatment time than the Jones jig and Distal jet.

14.
PLoS One ; 14(12): e0226267, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31821357

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To compare the root and alveolar bone changes in first premolars adjacent to the orthodontic traction of buccal versus palatal maxillary impacted canines (MIC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Before and after traction, cone beam tomographic computed (CBCTs) of 25 subjects with unilateral/bilateral MIC were included in this follow-up and retrospective study. Thirty-six first premolars were divided into 2 groups, buccal (n = 15) or palatal (n = 21) MIC, and the tomographic images were evaluated before and after orthodontic traction. Root changes in length and area were measured in sagittal, coronal and axial sections. Dimensions of alveolar bone were evaluated in coronal sections. Intergroup and intragroup comparisons were performed using t or Mann-Whitney U tests. Multiple linear regressions analyses were used to evaluate the influence of all predictor variables on root and alveolar bone changes (P<0.05). RESULTS: Root and alveolar bone changes produced by orthodontic traction were not significant between groups. Root changes were smaller than 1 mm (length) and 2.51 mm2 (area). Alveolar bone changes between buccal and palatal MIC groups ranged from 0.13 mm to 1.69 mm Furthermore, the multivariate analysis showed no significant influence of the impaction condition (buccal or palatal) on root change. Nevertheless, some different predictor variables of the MIC influence these changes. In the alveolar bone, the maximum upper alveolar width (MUAW) is the most affected by the traction of the MIC. CONCLUSIONS: Orthodontic traction of buccal vs palatal MIC produces similar resorptive and appositional root and alveolar bone changes in the adjacent first premolars, without clinical relevance.


Assuntos
Dente Pré-Molar/diagnóstico por imagem , Dente Canino/cirurgia , Tração , Adolescente , Adulto , Tomografia Computadorizada de Feixe Cônico , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Ortodontia , Estudos Retrospectivos , Adulto Jovem
15.
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop ; 156(6): 767-778, 2019 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31784010

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to compare the inclination and position changes of maxillary incisors after traction of unilateral vs bilateral maxillary impacted canines in nonextraction orthodontic treatment. METHODS: This longitudinal and retrospective study evaluated 24 patients with impacted maxillary canines; 12 with unilateral impaction and 12 with bilateral impaction. All subjects had Angle Class I malocclusion and were orthodontically treated with a standardized traction protocol that did not include premolar extractions. Cone-beam computed tomographies were obtained before and after canine traction and the inclination and position of both maxillary central incisors were measured. Furthermore, dental arch, skeletal, and canine impaction characteristics were evaluated. Paired and independent t tests were used for intra and inter group comparisons, respectively. Multiple linear regressions were also used. RESULTS: After canine traction, a significant incisor labial inclination was observed in the bilateral group (10.41° right side, P = 0.008 and 12.79° left side, P = 0.001), while in the unilateral group, this was observed only on the nonaffected side (6.67°, P = 0.008). Furthermore, a significant protrusion of incisors was observed in the bilateral group (2.66 mm right side, P = 0.006, and 3.15 mm left side, P = 0.001) and in the nonaffected side of the unilateral group (1.74 mm, P = 0.022). Intergroup comparisons showed greater values of incisor labial inclination for the bilateral group when compared with the unilateral group, independently of the sides. CONCLUSIONS: Traction of maxillary impacted canines, in nonextraction treatment, produces greater labial inclination of maxillary incisors in bilateral cases and similar protrusion in both unilateral and bilateral cases. Unilateral impaction cases showed significant incisor inclination and protrusion in the nonaffected side. These treatment effects should be considered by clinicians.


Assuntos
Incisivo , Dente Impactado , Tomografia Computadorizada de Feixe Cônico , Dente Canino , Humanos , Maxila , Estudos Retrospectivos , Tração
16.
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop ; 156(3): 391-400, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31474269

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Orthodontic traction of a maxillary impacted canine (MIC) increases the orthodontic treatment time. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of MIC characteristics and factors associated with orthodontic treatment on the duration of active orthodontic traction. METHODS: This follow-up and retrospective study included 45 MICs orthodontically tractioned into the occlusal plane with the use of a standardized protocol. MIC characteristics, including type, sector, side, location, height, and complexity of impaction, as well as α and ß angles and canine root length and area were measured. Likewise, factors associated with orthodontic treatment, including sex, age, malocclusion, premolar extractions, previous incisor root resorption, ANB, APDI, and SNA angles, and PNS-ANS distance were also evaluated. The statistical analysis included multiple linear regressions to estimate the influence of all variables on the duration of traction (α = 0.05). RESULTS: Sex had significant influence (P = 0.027) on the time of traction; in female patients, the time was 2.05 months more than in male patients. Bilateral impaction treatment increased the time by 2.74 months compared with unilateral cases (P = 0.001). Traction of bicortically centered impacted canines increased the duration of traction by 2.85 months (P = 0.001). Finally, the traction time increased in 2.35 months (P = 0.046) when the impaction sectors were 4 or 5 (close to the midline). CONCLUSIONS: The duration of active orthodontic traction of MIC is mainly influenced by sex, bilateral type, bicortically centered location, or when MIC is located in sector 4 or 5 close to midline, increasing the traction time by some months.


Assuntos
Dente Canino/cirurgia , Maxila/cirurgia , Ortodontia Corretiva/métodos , Dente Impactado/complicações , Dente Impactado/terapia , Adolescente , Dente Canino/diagnóstico por imagem , Feminino , Seguimentos , Humanos , Incisivo , Masculino , Má Oclusão/classificação , Má Oclusão/terapia , Maxila/diagnóstico por imagem , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Bucais , Procedimentos de Ancoragem Ortodôntica/instrumentação , Procedimentos de Ancoragem Ortodôntica/métodos , Aparelhos Ortodônticos Fixos , Ortodontia Corretiva/instrumentação , Avaliação de Processos e Resultados em Cuidados de Saúde , Planejamento de Assistência ao Paciente , Radiografia Dentária , Estudos Retrospectivos , Reabsorção da Raiz/complicações , Fatores Sexuais , Fatores de Tempo , Erupção Dentária , Raiz Dentária/anatomia & histologia , Raiz Dentária/diagnóstico por imagem , Dente Impactado/diagnóstico por imagem , Dente Impactado/cirurgia , Tração , Resultado do Tratamento
18.
Angle Orthod ; 89(6): 883-888, 2019 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31306074

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of two different prophylaxis protocols on the friction force in sliding mechanics during in vivo leveling and alignment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The sample comprised 48 hemi-arches divided into three groups according to the prophylactic protocol adopted. Group 1 consisted of patients undergoing prophylaxis with sodium bicarbonate, group 2 consisted of patients submitted to prophylaxis with glycine, and group 3 consisted of patients without prophylaxis, as a control. All patients received hygiene instructions and, with the exception of group 3, prophylaxis was performed monthly. After 10 months, the brackets were removed from the oral cavity and submitted to friction force tests and qualitative analysis by scanning electron microscopy. Analysis of variance followed by Tukey tests was performed for intergroup comparison regarding the friction force. RESULTS: The experimental groups presented significantly smaller friction forces than the group without prophylaxis. Accordingly, qualitative analysis showed greater debris accumulation in the group without the prophylactic procedures. CONCLUSIONS: Prophylactic blasting with sodium bicarbonate or glycine can significantly prevent an increase of the friction force during sliding mechanics.


Assuntos
Braquetes Ortodônticos , Fios Ortodônticos , Ligas Dentárias , Análise do Estresse Dentário , Fricção , Humanos , Teste de Materiais , Desenho de Aparelho Ortodôntico , Aço Inoxidável , Propriedades de Superfície
19.
J Clin Exp Dent ; 11(5): e482-e490, 2019 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31275523

RESUMO

Background: To evaluate the bracket-wire friction force after clinical use. Material and Methods: A systematic search of several electronic databases (PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Scopus, The Cochrane Library, Lilacs and Google Scholar) without limitations regarding publication year or language, was performed. In-vitro studies analyzing the changes in friction force of orthodontic brackets before/after their clinical use were considered. Risk of Bias was assessed with Downs and Black checklist. All methodological features that could interfere in the results were specifically described. Results: Seven studies satisfied the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. All 7 studies reported at least two groups (before and after clinical use). Friction force increased after intraoral aging in most of the studies. However, there is lack of good quality evidence in this research area. Conclusions: Brackets present increased surface roughness after clinical use, and consequently increased coefficient of friction (COF) and Friction Force. Further studies are necessary to obtain more reliable results. Key words:Friction, orthodontic brackets, systematic review.

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