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1.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33588084

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To examine the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of dietary patterns with knee symptoms and structures in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: Participants with symptomatic knee OA were recruited from a randomised, placebo-controlled trial conducted in Tasmania (N=259) and Victoria (N=133). Diet was assessed by the Anti-Cancer Council of Victoria food frequency questionnaire. Factor analysis was used to identify dietary patterns. Knee symptoms were assessed using Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) and structures using MRI. Multivariable linear regressions were used to examine associations. RESULTS: Three dietary patterns ("high-fat", "healthy" and "mixed") were identified in whole sample. Participants with higher "healthy pattern" score had lower total WOMAC, pain, function and stiffness scores at baseline but the associations were not significant over 24 months. Three ("western", "vegetable and meat" and "mediterranean") and two ("processed" and "vegetable") patterns were identified in Tasmania and Victoria, respectively. Cross-sectionally, only "mediterranean pattern" and "vegetable pattern" scores were significantly and negatively associated with total WOMAC or function scores. Longitudinally, participants with higher "western pattern" had worsening function (ß: 0.35, 95%CI: 0.03, 0.67) and total WOMAC (ß: 0.40, 95%CI: 0.07, 0.72) scores; furthermore, "vegetable pattern" was associated with decreased WOMAC stiffness score (ß: -0.47, 95%CI: -0.93, -0.02). In contrast, dietary patterns were largely not associated with structural changes. CONCLUSION: Some healthy dietary patterns were associated with reduced joint symptoms but dietary patterns were not associated with joint structure in this sample with knee OA. Further studies are required to confirm these findings.

2.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33576770

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To describe the associations of blood pressure and arterial stiffness with knee cartilage volume in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHOD: A secondary analysis was performed on the data from participants of a randomized controlled trial, which identified the effects of vitamin D supplementation on knee structures and symptoms among patients with symptomatic knee OA. Brachial and central blood pressure, arterial stiffness indicators and knee cartilage volume were measured at baseline and 2-year follow-up. Associations were assessed using generalized estimating equations. RESULTS: Among 231 participants (average age 63.2 years), 48.9% were females. Higher supine systolic and diastolic pressures were significantly associated with lower tibial cartilage volume (Systolic: Lateral ß -6.23, medial ß -5.14, total ß -11.35 mm3/mmHg. Diastolic: Lateral ß -10.25, medial ß -11.29, total ß -21.50 mm3/mmHg). Higher supine systolic pressure was associated with lower femoral cartilage volume (Lateral ß -17.35, total ß -28.31 mm3/mmHg). Central systolic pressure and arterial stiffness indicators (including pulse wave velocity, central pulse pressure, and peripheral pulse pressure) were largely not associated with knee cartilage volume; however, higher augmentation index was associated with lower tibial and femoral cartilage volume (Tibial: Medial ß -8.24, total ß -19.13 mm3/percent. Femoral: Lateral ß -23.70, medial ß -26.42, total ß -50.12 mm3/percent). CONCLUSIONS: Blood pressure and arterial stiffness are associated with knee cartilage volume at several sites among knee OA patients. This supports that blood pressure and arterial stiffness may involve in the progression of knee OA.

3.
BMC Musculoskelet Disord ; 22(1): 40, 2021 Jan 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33413273

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: To describe demographic and clinical factors associated with the presence and incidence of depression and explore the temporal relationship between depression and joint symptoms in patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: Three hundred ninety-seven participants were selected from a randomized controlled trial in people with symptomatic knee OA and vitamin D deficiency (age 63.3 ± 7.1 year, 48.6% female). Depression severity and knee joint symptoms were assessed using the patient health questionnaire (PHQ-9) and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), respectively, at baseline and 24 months. RESULTS: The presence and incidence of depression was 25.4 and 11.2%, respectively. At baseline, having younger age, a higher body mass index (BMI), greater scores of WOMAC pain (PR: 1.05, 95%CI:1.03, 1.07), dysfunction (PR: 1.02, 95%CI:1.01, 1.02) and stiffness (PR: 1.05, 95%CI: 1.02, 1.09), lower education level, having more than one comorbidity and having two or more painful body sites were significantly associated with a higher presence of depression. Over 24 months, being female, having a higher WOMAC pain (RR: 1.05, 95%CI: 1.02, 1.09) and dysfunction score (RR: 1.02, 95%CI: 1.01, 1.03) at baseline and having two or more painful sites were significantly associated with a higher incidence of depression. In contrast, baseline depression was not associated with changes in knee joint symptoms over 24 months. CONCLUSION: Knee OA risk factors and joint symptoms, along with co-existing multi-site pain are associated with the presence and development of depression. This suggests that managing common OA risk factors and joint symptoms may be important for prevention and treatment depression in patients with knee OA. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01176344 . Anzctr.org.au identifier: ACTRN12610000495022 .

4.
Curr Rheumatol Rep ; 23(2): 11, 2021 Jan 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33511486

RESUMO

PURPOSE OF THE REVIEW: Finding appropriate pharmacological options to treat osteoarthritis (OA) remain challenging. We aimed to determine the efficacy and safety of all types of turmeric extracts for the management of knee OA. RECENT FINDINGS: Sixteen RCTs of up to 16 weeks duration including 1810 adults with knee OA were included. Eleven RCTs compared the efficacy of turmeric extracts with placebo and five with active comparators (NSAIDs). The overall risk bias of included RCTs was moderate. Turmeric extracts significantly reduced knee pain (SMD - 0.82, 95% CI - 1.17 to - 0.47, I2 = 86.23%) and improved physical function (SMD - 0.75, 95% CI - 1.18 to - 0.33, I2 = 90.05%) compared to placebo but had similar effects compared to NSAIDs. BMI was the major contributor to heterogeneity in the placebo-controlled studies (explained 37.68% and 67.24%, respectively, in the models) and modified the effects of the turmeric on pain and physical function with less improvement with higher BMI (SMD 0.26 95% CI 0.04 to 0.48; SMD 0.48 95% CI 0.21 to 0.74). No significant between-group differences were reported for either biochemical markers or imaging outcomes. Turmeric extracts had 12% fewer adverse events than NSAIDs and similar rates to placebo. Turmeric extract is a safe and effective option for the symptomatic management of knee OA, compared to placebo or NSAIDs. However, current evidence from short-term studies is heterogeneous and has moderate risk of bias leading to some uncertainty about the true effect.

5.
Ann Intern Med ; 173(11): 861-869, 2020 Dec 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32926799

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Current pharmacologic therapies for patients with osteoarthritis are suboptimal. OBJECTIVE: To determine the efficacy of Curcuma longa extract (CL) for reducing knee symptoms and effusion-synovitis in patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis and knee effusion-synovitis. DESIGN: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. (Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12618000080224). SETTING: Single-center study with patients from southern Tasmania, Australia. PARTICIPANTS: 70 participants with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis and ultrasonography-defined effusion-synovitis. INTERVENTION: 2 capsules of CL (n = 36) or matched placebo (n = 34) per day for 12 weeks. MEASUREMENTS: The 2 primary outcomes were changes in knee pain on a visual analogue scale (VAS) and effusion-synovitis volume on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The key secondary outcomes were change in Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain and cartilage composition values. Outcomes were assessed over 12 weeks. RESULTS: CL improved VAS pain compared with placebo by -9.1 mm (95% CI, -17.8 to -0.4 mm [P = 0.039]) but did not change effusion-synovitis volume (3.2 mL [CI, -0.3 to 6.8 mL]). CL also improved WOMAC knee pain (-47.2 mm [CI, -81.2 to -13.2 mm]; P = 0.006) but not lateral femoral cartilage T2 relaxation time (-0.4 ms [CI, -1.1 to 0.3 ms]). The incidence of adverse events was similar in the CL (n = 14 [39%]) and placebo (n = 18 [53%]) groups (P = 0.16); 2 events in the CL group and 5 in the placebo group may have been treatment related. LIMITATION: Modest sample size and short duration. CONCLUSION: CL was more effective than placebo for knee pain but did not affect knee effusion-synovitis or cartilage composition. Multicenter trials with larger sample sizes are needed to assess the clinical significance of these findings. PRIMARY FUNDING SOURCE: University of Tasmania and Natural Remedies Private Limited.

6.
J Bone Miner Res ; 35(9): 1652-1659, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32638468

RESUMO

We have found that early-life exposures are associated with areal bone mineral density (aBMD) at ages 8 and 16 years. This study aimed to assess whether these associations persist into young adulthood when peak bone mass (PBM) is achieved and extend this analysis to microarchitecture. Participants were followed from perinatal period to 25 years old (n = 201). Outcomes were total body, spine, and hip aBMD (by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry [DXA]), and cortical and trabecular bone measures at the distal radius and tibia (by high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography [HRpQCT]). Early-life exposures including breastfeeding, maternal smoking during pregnancy, and birth weight. Sex, weight, height, vegetables, fruit and calcium intake at age 25 years were regarded as potential confounders in the analysis. There were significant interactions between period of gestation and early-life exposures for bone measures, so all analyses were stratified by period of gestation. Breastfeeding was beneficially associated with hip and total body aBMD, total, cortical and trabecular volumetric BMD (vBMD), cortical thickness, porosity, trabecular number (Tb.N), separation (Tb.Sp), and bone volume fraction (Tb.BV/TV) at radius and/or tibia at age 25 years in participants born prematurely (ß ranged from -0.92 to 0.94), but there were no associations in those born at term. Maternal smoking had no association with any DXA/HRpQCT measures in those born prematurely but was detrimentally associated with inner transitional zone porosity and Tb.N (ß = 0.40 and ß = -0.37, respectively) in those full-term participants. Associations of birth weight with bone measures did not persist after adjustment for weight gain since birth. Breastfeeding was associated with a lower risk of lower limb fractures and maternal smoking had a deleterious association with upper limb fractures. In conclusion, breastfeeding and maternal smoking may have effects on peak bone microarchitecture whereas the association with birth weight is countered by subsequent growth. © 2020 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

7.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32623812

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: This study aims to determine whether vitamin D supplementation or maintaining sufficient vitamin D level reduces foot pain over two years in patients with symptomatic knee OA. METHODS: A post hoc study was conducted from a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial named the VItamin D Effect on Osteoarthritis (VIDEO) study. Symptomatic knee OA patients with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels between 12.5 nmol/L to 60 nmol/L were included and randomly allocated to either monthly vitamin D3 or placebo treatment (1:1) for 2 years. Manchester Foot Pain and Disability Index (MFPDI) was used to evaluate foot pain and Disabling foot pain was defined as at least one of the 10 functional limitation items (items 1-9,11) being documented as on 'most/every day(s)' in the last month. A repeated-measure mixed effect model was used to analyze the change of MFPDI scores between groups adjusting for potential confounders. RESULTS: A total of 413 patients with a mean age of 63.2 years (49.7% males) were enrolled and 340 completed the study. The mean MFPDI score was 22.8±7.3, with 23.7% participants having disabling foot pain at baseline. There were significant differences in MFPDI scores change between groups over 2 years, with more improvements in vitamin D group than in placebo group (-0.03 vs. 1.30, P=0.013) and more improvement in those maintaining sufficient vitamin D levels (n=226) than those who did not (n=114) (-0.09 vs. 2.19, P=0.001). CONCLUSION: Vitamin D supplementation and maintenance of sufficient vitamin D levels may improve foot pain in those with knee OA.

8.
Neurol Sci ; 41(12): 3697-3703, 2020 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32514858

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The thiazolidinedione (TZD) class of oral antidiabetic agents are used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). This meta-analysis aimed to understand the protective effect of TZD on Parkinson's disease (PD) in people with diabetes. METHOD: A literature search was performed in PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane central from inception to until 30 September 2019. We included all real-world evidence studies assessing the use of TZD class of drugs and the risk of PD in people with diabetes. Quality of the studies was evaluated using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. The primary outcome was the pooled hazard ratio (HR) of PD among type 2 DM TZD users as compared with TZD non-users in people with diabetes. The secondary outcome was the HR of PD among type 2 DM TZD users as compared with non-users (include both diabetic and nondiabetic population). Meta-analysis was performed using RevMan software. RESULTS: Out of five studies selected for inclusion, four studies fulfilled the criteria for primary outcomes. The participants' mean age and follow-up duration were 66.23 ± 9.59 years and 5.25 years (2.97-7.9 years), respectively. There was a significant reduction in the risk of PD (pooled adjusted HR of 0.81 [95% CI 0.70-0.93, p = 0.004]) in TZD users compared with non-TZD users in people with diabetes. A significant protective effect of TZD was observed in Caucasian population (3 studies) (HR 0.78 (95% CI 0.66-0.92), p = 0.003). CONCLUSION: This meta-analysis demonstrates a potential neuroprotective effect of TZD for PD risk in the population with DM.

9.
JAMA ; 323(15): 1456-1466, 2020 04 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32315057

RESUMO

Importance: A proof-of-principle study suggested that intravenous zoledronic acid may reduce knee pain and the size of bone marrow lesions in people with knee osteoarthritis, but data from large trials are lacking. Objective: To determine the effects of intravenous zoledronic acid on knee cartilage volume loss in patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis and bone marrow lesions. Design, Setting, and Participants: A 24-month multicenter, double-blind placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial conducted at 4 sites in Australia (1 research center and 3 hospitals). Adults aged 50 years or older with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis and subchondral bone marrow lesions detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were enrolled from November 2013 through September 2015. The final date of follow-up was October 9, 2017. Interventions: Intravenous infusion with either 5 mg of zoledronic acid in a 100-mL saline solution (n = 113) or a placebo saline solution (n = 110) at baseline and 12 months. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was absolute change in tibiofemoral cartilage volume assessed using MRI over 24 months (the minimum clinically important difference [MCID] has not been established). Three prespecified secondary outcomes were change in knee pain assessed by a visual analog scale (0 [no pain] to 100 [unbearable pain]; MCID, 15) and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (0 [no pain] to 500 [unbearable pain]; MCID, 75) over 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months and change in bone marrow lesion size over 6 and 24 months (the MCID has not been established). Results: Of 223 participants enrolled (mean age, 62.0 years [SD, 8.0 years]; 52% were female), 190 (85%) completed the trial. Change in tibiofemoral cartilage volume was not significantly different between the zoledronic acid group and the placebo group over 24 months (-878 mm3 vs -919 mm3; between-group difference, 41 mm3 [95% CI, -79 to 161 mm3]; P = .50). No significant between-group differences were found for any of the prespecified secondary outcomes, including changes in knee pain assessed by a visual analog scale (-11.5 in the zoledronic acid group vs -16.8 in the placebo group; between-group difference, 5.2 [95% CI, -2.3 to 12.8]; P = .17), changes in knee pain assessed by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (-37.5 vs -58.0, respectively; between-group difference, 20.5 [95% CI, -11.2 to 52.2]; P = .21), and changes in bone marrow lesion size (-33 mm2 vs -6 mm2; between-group difference, -27 mm2 [95% CI, -127 to 73 mm2]; P = .60) over 24 months. Adverse events were more common with zoledronic acid than with placebo (96% vs 83%, respectively) and consisted mainly of acute reactions (defined as symptoms within 3 days of administration of infusion; 87% vs 56%). Conclusions and Relevance: Among patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis and bone marrow lesions, yearly zoledronic acid infusions, compared with placebo, did not significantly reduce cartilage volume loss over 24 months. These findings do not support the use of zoledronic acid in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. Trial Registration: anzctr.org.au Identifier: ACTRN12613000039785.


Assuntos
Conservadores da Densidade Óssea/uso terapêutico , Doenças da Medula Óssea/tratamento farmacológico , Cartilagem Articular/efeitos dos fármacos , Osteoartrite do Joelho/tratamento farmacológico , Ácido Zoledrônico/uso terapêutico , Idoso , Conservadores da Densidade Óssea/administração & dosagem , Medula Óssea/patologia , Doenças da Medula Óssea/complicações , Doenças da Medula Óssea/diagnóstico por imagem , Cartilagem Articular/diagnóstico por imagem , Cartilagem Articular/patologia , Método Duplo-Cego , Feminino , Humanos , Infusões Intravenosas , Articulação do Joelho/diagnóstico por imagem , Articulação do Joelho/patologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Osteoartrite do Joelho/complicações , Osteoartrite do Joelho/patologia , Falha de Tratamento , Ácido Zoledrônico/administração & dosagem
10.
BMJ Open ; 10(4): e035302, 2020 04 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32332006

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Observational data suggest that vitamin D deficiency is associated with the onset and progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA). However, randomised controlled trials (RCTs) to date investigating the efficacy of vitamin D supplementation in knee OA have reported conflicting results. Further research is needed to clarify the effects of vitamin D on patient-reported outcomes and determine whether there are patient subgroups who may benefit from the supplementation. The aim of this individual patient data (IPD) meta-analysis is to identify patient-level predictors of treatment response to vitamin D supplementation on pain and physical function. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: A systematic literature search will be conducted for RCTs of vitamin D supplementation on knee OA. Authors of original RCTs will be contacted to obtain the IPD. The primary outcomes will include long-term (≥12 months) pain and physical function. Secondary outcomes will include medium-term (≥6 months and <12 months) and short-term (<6 months) pain and physical function, as well as patient global assessment, quality of life and adverse events. Potential treatment effect modifiers to be examined in the subgroup analyses include age, gender, body mass index, baseline knee pain severity and physical function, baseline vitamin D level, radiographic stage, presence of bone marrow lesions on MRI, presence of clinical signs of local inflammation and concomitant depressive symptoms. Both one-step and two-step modelling methods will be used to determine the possible modifiable effect of each subgroup of interest. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Research ethical or governance approval is exempt for this study as no new data are being collected. This study will be the first IPD meta-analysis to clarify the effect of vitamin D supplementation on clinical symptoms in different subgroups of patients with knee OA. The findings will be disseminated through peer-review publications and conference presentations. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42018107740.

11.
Mod Rheumatol ; : 1-8, 2020 Feb 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32000551

RESUMO

Background: Takayasu arteritis (TAK) is a chronic immune vasculitis in which Interleukin-6 (IL-6) receptors play a key role in pathogenesis. Tocilizumab (TCZ), an IL-6 receptor antagonist with a favorable safety and efficacy profile, has been tried as an option for patients with TAK. This systematic review analyzed the evidence from randomized control trials (RCT) assessing the safety and efficacy of TCZ in patients with TAK.Methods: MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and clinical trial registries were searched from inception to July 2018. We included RCT assessing the efficacy and safety of TCZ versus placebo/other comparators for the treatment of patients with TAK. The risk of bias (RoB) was assessed using Cochrane RoB tool.Results: 2799 identified articles were screened as per abstract and title; 42 selected full-texts articles were assessed for the potential inclusion. One trial, reported in two publications, comparing subcutaneous TCZ (162 mg/week) versus matching placebo in 36 patients with TAK was included. The relapse-free rate at 24 weeks was 50.6% and 22.9% in TCZ and placebo arm, respectively. The hazard ratio (HR) for time to first relapse was statistically significant in the per-protocol population (HR 0.34 [95.41% CI, 0.11-1.00]; p = .0345), while non-significant in the intention-to-treat population (HR 0.41 [95.41% CI, 0.15-1.10]; p = .0596). The serious adverse events were higher in the placebo arm.Conclusions: This systematic review finds the existing evidence from RCT on efficacy and safety profile of TCZ in TAK to be promising but limited. Additional evidence is required to draw a stronger conclusion.

12.
Rheumatology (Oxford) ; 59(7): 1607-1616, 2020 07 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31652312

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To describe associations of body composition, physical activity and physical performance with knee cartilage thickness and subchondral bone area in young adults. METHODS: Body composition, physical activity and physical performance were measured 4-5 years prior to knee MRI. Cartilage thickness and bone area were measured quantitatively from MRI. Associations were assessed using linear regression analysis, with mediators being identified using mediation analysis. RESULTS: Participants (n = 186) were 31-41 years of age when the MRI was acquired and 48% were female. Greater lean mass was positively associated with cartilage thickness [ß = 6.52 µm/kg (95% CI 0.86, 12.18)] and bone area [ß = 13.37 mm2/kg (95% CI 5.43, 21.31)]. Physical performance measures were positively associated with cartilage thickness [long jump: ß = 2.44 µm/cm (95% CI 0.70, 4.18); hand grip strength: 7.74 µm/kg (95% CI 1.50, 13.98); physical work capacity: 1.07 µm/W (95% CI 0.29, 1.85)] and bone area [long jump: ß = 3.99 mm2/cm (95% CI 0.64, 7.34); hand grip strength: 19.06 mm2/kg (95% CI 7.21, 30.92); leg strength: 3.18 mm2/kg (95% CI 1.09, 5.28); physical work capacity: 3.15 mm2/W (95% CI 1.70, 4.60)]. Mediation analysis suggested these associations were mediated by lean mass (effect mediated: 27-95%). CONCLUSION: Greater lean mass and better physical performance measured 4-5 years prior were associated with greater knee cartilage thickness and subchondral bone area in young adults, and the associations of physical performance were largely mediated by lean mass. These findings suggest lean mass may play an important role in maintaining knee joint health in young adults.


Assuntos
Composição Corporal/fisiologia , Cartilagem Articular/diagnóstico por imagem , Exercício Físico/fisiologia , Força da Mão/fisiologia , Articulação do Joelho/diagnóstico por imagem , Desempenho Físico Funcional , Adulto , Índice de Massa Corporal , Feminino , Humanos , Imagem por Ressonância Magnética , Masculino
13.
Semin Arthritis Rheum ; 50(2): 192-197, 2020 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31699372

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To describe the associations of glucose homeostasis and metabolic syndrome (MetS) measures with knee cartilage defects and cartilage volume in young adults. METHODS: Fasting blood biochemistry, waist circumference and blood pressure measures were collected 4-5 years prior to knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Blood measures included levels of glucose, insulin, triglyceride and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Homeostatic model assessment 2-insulin resistance (HOMA2-IR), HOMA2-beta cell function (HOMA2-ß), HOMA2-insulin sensitivity (HOMA-S) and MetS were calculated or defined. Knee cartilage defects and cartilage volume were measured from MRI scans. Data were analysed using log binomial or linear regressions. RESULTS: Among 328 participants (47.3% were females, aged 26-36 years at baseline), 40 (12.7%) had hyperglycaemia and 21 (6.7%) had MetS. Glucose homeostasis measures (except fasting glucose) were associated with tibiofemoral cartilage defects (fasting insulin: relative risk (RR) 1.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01 to 1.08; HOMA2-IR: 1.44, 1.08 to 1.92; HOMA2-ß: 2.59, 1.33 to 5.07; HOMA2-S: 0.36, 0.18 to 0.72), but not patellar cartilage defects. There were no associations between glucose homeostasis measures and knee cartilage volume. High waist circumference (RR 2.32, 95% CI 1.18 to 4.54) and low HDL-C (RR 1.99, 95% CI 1.08 to 3.69) were associated with tibiofemoral cartilage defects, but no other associations were observed between MetS or its components and cartilage defects or volume. CONCLUSION: Insulin resistance, high waist circumference and low HDL-C were associated with higher risk of tibiofemoral cartilage defects, suggesting glucose homeostasis and some MetS components may affect early cartilage damage in young adults.

14.
J Pediatr ; 212: 188-194.e2, 2019 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31262529

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To describe the association between fractures sustained at different stages of growth and bone measures in early adulthood. STUDY DESIGN: Participants (n = 201) in southern Tasmania were at birth at a higher risk of sudden infant death syndrome; they were followed to age 25. Outcomes were areal bone mineral density at the spine, hip, and total body (by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry) and trabecular and cortical bone measures at the radius and tibia (by high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography). Fractures were self-reported and confirmed by radiographs at 8, 16, and 25 years of age. Multivariable linear regression was used to analyze the association of the occurrence of prepubertal (<9 years of age), pubertal (9-16 years of age), and postpubertal (17-25 years of age) fractures with all bone measures. RESULTS: Over 25 years, 99 participants had at least 1 fracture. For high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography measures at age 25, prepubertal fractures were negatively associated with cortical and trabecular volumetric bone mineral density and most microarchitecture measures at both the tibia and radius. Prepubertal fractures had a significant association with smaller increase of areal bone mineral density from age 8 to 16 years and at 25 years of age compared with participants with no fractures. Pubertal fractures had no association with any bone measures and postpubertal fractures were only associated with a lower trabecular number at the tibia. CONCLUSIONS: Prepubertal fractures are negatively associated with areal bone mineral density increases during growth and high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography bone measures in young adulthood. There is little evidence that fractures occurring from age 8 years onward with bone measures in young adulthood, implying that prepubertal fractures may be associated with bone deficits later in life.


Assuntos
Densidade Óssea , Fraturas Ósseas/diagnóstico por imagem , Fraturas Ósseas/fisiopatologia , Absorciometria de Fóton , Adolescente , Adulto , Fatores Etários , Criança , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Adulto Jovem
15.
Int J Obes (Lond) ; 43(7): 1411-1421, 2019 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30349008

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To describe the associations of childhood and adulthood adiposity measures with knee cartilage thickness, volume and bone area in young adults. METHODS: Childhood and adulthood adiposity measures (weight, height, waist circumference and hip circumference) of 186 participants were collected in 1985 (aged 7-15 years) and during 2004-2006 (aged 26-36 years). Knee magnetic resonance imaging was conducted during 2008-2010 (aged 31-41 years) and cartilage thickness, volume and bone area were measured using a quantitative approach (Chondrometrics, Germany). Linear regressions were used to examine the above associations. RESULTS: The prevalence of overweight was 7.6% in childhood and 42.1% in adulthood. Childhood weight (ß = - 5.57 mm2/kg) and body mass index (BMI) (ß = - 11.55 mm2/kg/m2) were negatively associated with adult patellar bone area, whereas adult weight was positively associated with bone area in medial femorotibial compartment (MFTC) (ß = 3.37 mm2/kg) and lateral femorotibial compartment (LFTC) (ß = 2.08 mm2/kg). Adult waist-hip ratio (WHR) was negatively associated with cartilage thickness (MFTC: ß = - 0.011; LFTC: ß = - 0.012 mm/0.01 unit), volume (Patella: ß = - 20.97; LFTC: ß = - 21.71 mm3/0.01 unit) and bone area (Patella: ß = - 4.39 mm2/0.01 unit). The change in WHR z-scores from childhood to adulthood was negatively associated with cartilage thickness (MFTC: ß = - 0.056 mm), volume (patella: - 89.95; LFTC: - 93.98 mm3), and bone area (patella: - 20.74 mm2). All p-values < 0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Childhood weight and BMI were negatively but adult weight was positively associated with adult bone area. Adult WHR and the change in WHR from childhood to adulthood were negatively associated with cartilage thickness, volume, and bone area. These suggest early-life adiposity measures may affect knee structures in young adults.


Assuntos
Adiposidade/fisiologia , Cartilagem Articular/patologia , Articulação do Joelho/patologia , Osteoartrite do Joelho/patologia , Sobrepeso/fisiopatologia , Patela/patologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Austrália/epidemiologia , Índice de Massa Corporal , Criança , Feminino , Inquéritos Epidemiológicos , Humanos , Masculino , Osteoartrite do Joelho/epidemiologia , Osteoartrite do Joelho/etiologia , Sobrepeso/complicações , Sobrepeso/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
16.
J Am Med Dir Assoc ; 20(12): 1634-1640.e1, 2019 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30401608

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To determine the effect of vitamin D supplementation and maintaining sufficient serum vitamin D on depressive symptoms in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and vitamin D deficiency. DESIGN: A prespecified secondary analysis of a multicentre, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Participants were randomly assigned to receive oral vitamin D3 (50,000 IU, n = 209) or placebo (n = 204) monthly for 24 months. In addition, participants who completed the trial were classified into 2 groups according to their serum 25(OH)D levels at month 3 and 24 as follows: not consistently sufficient (serum 25(OH)D ≤ 50 nmol/L at month 3 and/or 24), and consistently sufficient (serum 25(OH)D > 50 nmol/L at both month 3 and 24). Multilevel mixed-effect models were used to compare differences of change in PHQ-9 scores between groups. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: This clinical trial was conducted in participants with symptomatic knee OA and vitamin D deficiency from June 2010 to December 2013 in Tasmania and Victoria, Australia. MEASURES: The primary outcome was the depressive symptoms change over 24 months, which was measured using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9, 0-27). RESULTS: Of 599 participants who were screened for eligibility, 413 participants were enrolled (mean age: 63.2 years; 50.3% female) and 340 participants (intervention n = 181, placebo n = 159, 82.3% retention rate) completed the study. The baseline prevalence of depression (PHQ-9 score ≥5) was 25.4%. Depressive symptoms improved more in the vitamin D supplementation group compared to the placebo group [ß: -0.66, 95% confidence interval (CI): -1.22 to -0.11, P for difference = .02] and in the participants who maintained vitamin D sufficiency compared to those who did not (ß: -0.73, 95% CI: -1.41 to -0.05, P for difference = .04) over 24 months. CONCLUSIONS/IMPLICATIONS: These findings suggest that vitamin D supplementation and maintaining adequate vitamin D levels over 24 months may be beneficial for depressive symptoms in patients with knee OA.


Assuntos
Depressão/fisiopatologia , Osteoartrite do Joelho/psicologia , Vitamina D/administração & dosagem , Vitaminas/administração & dosagem , Idoso , Austrália/epidemiologia , Depressão/epidemiologia , Suplementos Nutricionais , Método Duplo-Cego , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Prevalência , Autorrelato , Deficiência de Vitamina D
18.
Br J Nutr ; 120(1): 41-48, 2018 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29936918

RESUMO

The aim of this study was to determine whether vitamin D supplementation and maintaining vitamin D sufficiency are associated with changes in inflammatory and metabolic biomarkers in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and vitamin D deficiency. A total of 413 participants with symptomatic knee OA and vitamin D deficiency were enrolled in a randomised, placebo-controlled trial and received 1·25 mg vitamin D3 or placebo monthly for 24 months across two sites. In this post hoc analysis, 200 participants from one site (ninety-four from the placebo group and 106 from the vitamin D group; mean age 63·1 (sd 7·3) years, 53·3 % women) were randomly selected for measurement of serum levels of inflammatory and metabolic biomarkers at baseline and 24 months using immunoassays. In addition, participants were classified into two groups according to serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels at months 3 and 24: (1) not consistently sufficient (25(OH)D≤50 nmol/l at either month 3 or 24, n 61), and (2) consistently sufficient (25(OH)D>50 nmol/l at both months 3 and 24, n 139). Compared with placebo, vitamin D supplementation had no significant effect on change in serum high-sensitive C-reactive protein, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, leptin, adiponectin, resistin, adipsin and apelin. Being consistently vitamin D sufficient over 2 years was also not associated with changes in these biomarkers compared with not being consistently sufficient. Vitamin D supplementation and maintaining vitamin D sufficiency did not alter serum levels of inflammatory and metabolic biomarkers over 2 years in knee OA patients who were vitamin D insufficient, suggesting that they may not affect systemic inflammation in knee OA patients.


Assuntos
Suplementos Nutricionais , Osteoartrite do Joelho/sangue , Deficiência de Vitamina D/terapia , Vitamina D/sangue , Vitamina D/uso terapêutico , Adiponectina/sangue , Idoso , Antropometria , Biomarcadores/sangue , Cartilagem/patologia , Fator D do Complemento/análise , Método Duplo-Cego , Feminino , Humanos , Imunoensaio , Inflamação/patologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Resistina/sangue , Deficiência de Vitamina D/sangue
19.
J Rheumatol ; 44(11): 1644-1651, 2017 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28864651

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To describe the associations between effusion-synovitis and joint structural abnormalities in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) over 24 months. METHODS: A posthoc analysis using data from a randomized controlled trial in 413 patients with symptomatic OA (aged 63 ± 7 yrs, 208 women). Knee effusion-synovitis volume and score, cartilage defects, cartilage volume, and bone marrow lesions (BML) were assessed using magnetic resonance imaging. Joint space narrowing (JSN) and osteophytes were assessed using radiograph. Least significant change criterion was used to define change in effusion-synovitis volume. Knee symptoms were assessed by Western Ontario and McMaster University OA Index. Multivariable linear/logistic regression and multilevel generalized mixed-effects models were used in longitudinal analyses. RESULTS: Total effusion-synovitis volume increased modestly from baseline (8.0 ± 8.5 ml) to followup (9.0 ± 10.5 ml). Baseline BML, cartilage defect, JSN, and osteophyte scores were positively associated with change in effusion-synovitis volume (p < 0.05). Baseline cartilage defects and JSN were also associated with change in effusion-synovitis score (p < 0.05). However, neither baseline effusion-synovitis score nor volume consistently predicted change in the above structures except cartilage volume. In the mixed-effects models, knee effusion-synovitis was positively associated with BML (volume: ß = 1.19 ml/grade; score: OR = 1.75/grade) and cartilage defects (volume: ß = 1.87 ml/grade; score: OR = 2.22/grade), while negatively associated with cartilage volume loss. Change in effusion-synovitis volume was positively correlated with changes in knee pain and stiffness scores (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Knee cartilage and subchondral bone abnormalities predicted change in effusion-synovitis, but effusion-synovitis did not predict knee structural changes. These findings suggest that synovial inflammation is likely the result of joint structural abnormalities in established OA. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01176344. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12610000495022.


Assuntos
Cartilagem Articular/patologia , Articulação do Joelho/patologia , Osteoartrite do Joelho/patologia , Sinovite/patologia , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Cartilagem Articular/diagnóstico por imagem , Progressão da Doença , Feminino , Humanos , Articulação do Joelho/diagnóstico por imagem , Imagem por Ressonância Magnética , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Osteoartrite do Joelho/diagnóstico por imagem , Índice de Gravidade de Doença , Sinovite/diagnóstico por imagem
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