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1.
Wellcome Open Res ; 6: 202, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34746442

RESUMO

Background: Interventions delivered in schools have been found to be effective in improving knowledge of antibiotics and antimicrobial resistance (AMR) among school-aged children, particularly those in high-income countries, but the evidence is largely lacking in low- and middle-income countries. This study aimed to design, implement and assess storytelling and picture drawing as engagement approaches for improving knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about antibiotics and AMR among schoolchildren in Ghana. Methods: Two schools with a total population of 375 schoolchildren ages 11-15 years in Tema, a city in Ghana, participated in public engagement interventions involving storytelling in one school and picture drawing in another school. The interventions included eight weeks of engagement led by science teachers and a competition held in each school. For quantitative outcome-based evaluation, some schoolchildren were randomly sampled in each school. Purposive sampling was also used to select some schoolchildren in each school for qualitative outcome-based evaluation. Respondents completed identical knowledge, attitudes and beliefs questionnaires and were interviewed at two time points (before and at most a week) after key interventions to assess changes in antibiotics and AMR knowledge, attitudes and beliefs. Results: Picture drawing had more significant effects (both positive and negative) on schoolchildren's AMR knowledge, attitudes and beliefs, whereas storytelling had a negative effect on children's AMR knowledge and no significant impact on beliefs and attitudes. Conclusions: Our project's findings suggest that public engagement interventions that use picture drawing and storytelling may influence the knowledge, attitudes and beliefs of schoolchildren regarding antibiotic misuse and AMR. However, modifications are required to make them more effective. These include making the storytelling effective by turning it into drama or plays.

2.
Curr Nutr Rep ; 2021 Nov 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34837637

RESUMO

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Nutritional status is affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, directly or indirectly. Even with the recent rollout of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccines and availability of medicines such as remdesivir, and monoclonal antibodies, host nutritional status is pivotal in the fight against the acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and outcomes. The purpose of this review is to discuss the effects of COVID-19-related lockdown on lifestyle behaviors, and the nutritional consequences, and the direct sequelae of the infection on nutrition including potential nutritional interventions. RECENT FINDINGS: The COVID-19-related lockdown imposed radical changes in lifestyle behaviors with considerable short-term and long-term health and nutritional consequences including weight gain and obesity and increased cardiometabolic risk, consistently linked to worsened prognosis. The extent of the impact was dependent on food insecurity, overall stress and disordered eating, physical inactivity, and exposure to COVID-19-related nutrition information sources. COVID-19 could directly induce inflammatory responses and poor nutrient intake and absorption leading to undernutrition with micronutrient deficiencies, which impairs immune system function with subsequent amplified risk of infection and disease severity. Nutrition interventions through nutrition support, dietary supplementation, and home remedies such as use of zinc, selenium, vitamin D, and omega-3 fatty acids showed the most significant promise to mitigate the course of COVID-19 infection and improve survival rates. The nutrition-COVID-19 relationship and related dietary changes mimic a vicious cycle of the double burden of malnutrition, both obesity and undernutrition with micronutrient deficiencies, which promote infection, disease progression, and potential death.

3.
Lancet Haematol ; 8(10): e770-e776, 2021 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34481544

RESUMO

The low recruitment and retention of blood donors in sub-Saharan Africa is a grave concern for blood transfusion services in the region. This problem is exacerbated by factors such as a high prevalence of transfusion-transmissible infections and anaemia, over-reliance on family replacement donors, resource constraints, and poor communication with the public. To improve blood safety and availability, innovative intervention strategies must be developed and implemented. The primary objective of this Series paper is to discuss the available evidence in the region and to provide recommendations on how to improve safe blood supply in sub-Saharan Africa. These recommendations include a call for renewed attention to donor recruitment in blood transfusion centres, a consistent and structured educational intervention, the development and adherence to national policies on blood donor selection with focus on voluntary donations, and comprehensive screening of donations for transfusion-transmissible infections. TRANSLATION: For the French translation of the abstract see Supplementary Materials section.


Assuntos
Segurança do Sangue/estatística & dados numéricos , África ao Sul do Saara/epidemiologia , Transfusão de Sangue , Humanos
5.
Res Social Adm Pharm ; 2021 Aug 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34362688

RESUMO

As several low- and middle-income countries roll out their COVID-19 vaccination programmes, COVID-19 vaccines hesitancy could threaten the success of such programmes. But pharmacists can play a leading role in addressing COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy by using a critical mobile phone-based technology. This technology, known as caller tunes or ringback tones, is flourishing in low- and middle-income countries such as those in Africa and Asia where it is used to promote popular songs and religious messages. With this technology, callers to mobile phones hear a message or a song instead of the typical ringing sound. There is a need for pharmacists associations to collaborate with the creative arts industry and telecommunication companies to have caller tunes on COVID-19 vaccines. As pharmacists and others download COVID-19 vaccine caller tunes onto their mobile phones, their callers will hear COVID-19 vaccines messages or songs. This could help combat disinformation and hesitancy, and promote widespread vaccination as availability increases.

6.
Int J Clin Pharm ; 43(5): 1370-1380, 2021 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33835372

RESUMO

Background Medication adherence is essential in the management of schizophrenia. Yet poor treatment uptake has negative consequences on patients and their primary caregivers. Objective To examine the association among beliefs about psychotropic medications, side effects and adherence from a patient-caregiver dyad perspective. Setting This study was conducted in a public psychiatric hospital setting in Accra, Ghana. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 121 patient-caregiver dyads using an interviewer-administered data collection approach.Main outcome measure Beliefs about medicines, side-effects and medication adherence. Results The patient and caregiver-reported level of medication adherence was 28.1 %. Using the Kappa index, the level of agreement between the responses of patients and their caregivers ranged from slight to moderate. Both patients and caregivers rated necessity higher than concern (patients: 1.67 ± 0.84, caregiver: 1.79 ± 0.96). Significant positive relations between specific-necessity, necessity-concerns differential and medication adherence were recorded while specific-concern, general harm and side-effects correlated negatively with medication adherence from the dyad. The odds of adhering to medications increased by 58 and 64 % for each unit increase in specific-necessity and general overuse scores respectively. However, a unit increase in specific-concern score and high side-effects scores were associated with lower odds of adherence. Conclusions This study highlights the need for patient-caregiver collaborations in decision-making relating to medication adherence in schizophrenia. Thus, in clinical practice, there is the need to recognize that caregivers are essential partners, and patient-caregiver views about psychotropic medications are critical in enhancing adherence for positive mental health outcomes.


Assuntos
Cuidadores , Esquizofrenia , Estudos Transversais , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Humanos , Adesão à Medicação , Psicotrópicos , Esquizofrenia/tratamento farmacológico , Esquizofrenia/epidemiologia , Inquéritos e Questionários
7.
Vox Sang ; 116(3): 324-335, 2021 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33161604

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: This study seeks to identify factors that are predictive of intention to return to donate blood among first-time blood donors. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey of 505 first-time blood donors, selected from blood donation sessions across three regions in Ghana. Data were obtained on their intention to donate blood in the next four months, factors that would influence this decision. Logistic regression models were used to test factors that were predictive of intention to return. RESULTS: First-time donors were young with 87·4% below 35 years of age, male (72·5%), single (73·3%), Christian (93·7%), employed (58·8%), with at least a basic education (98%). Factors that positively predicted intention to return included: motivational incentives (OR = 1·67, 95%CI: 1·01-2·78; P = 0·045); ease of access to the donation site (OR = 2·65, 95%CI: 1·48-4·73; P = 0·001); SMS and email reminders (OR = 2·84, 95%CI: 1·60-5·06; P < 0·001); and television, radio or newspaper advertisements (OR = 2·97, 95%CI: 1·66-5·31; P < 0·001). Factors that negatively predicted intention included preferential access to transfusions (i.e. 'blood credits') (OR = 0·43, 95%CI: 0·23-0·83; P = 0·012); getting to know test results (OR = 0·40, 95%CI: 0·20-0·80; P = 0·010); and not knowing and/or trusting what happens to the blood after donating (OR = 0·50, 95%CI: 0·28-0·88; P = 0·016). CONCLUSION: Motivational incentives, convenient access to donation sessions, reminders and mass media advertisements appear to positively influence intention to return to donate. Conversely not knowing what happens to the blood after donation negatively influenced intention to return. Interventions to promote repeat blood donation should consider the identified factors.


Assuntos
Doadores de Sangue/psicologia , Motivação , Adolescente , Adulto , Doadores de Sangue/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Gana , Humanos , Intenção , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Adulto Jovem
8.
Acta Diabetol ; 58(1): 39-46, 2021 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32809070

RESUMO

AIMS: Medication adherence and persistence are important determinants of treatment success in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluated the real-world adherence, persistence, and in-class switching among patients with T2DM prescribed dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) inhibitors. METHODS: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, PsychINFO, and CINAHL were searched for relevant observational studies published in the English language up to 20 December 2019. This was supplemented by manual screening of the references of included papers. Random-effects meta-analysis was performed. RESULTS: Thirty-four cohort studies involving 594,138 patients with T2DM prescribed DPP4 inhibitors from ten countries were included. The pooled proportion adherent (proportion of days covered (PDC) or medication possession ratio (MPR) ≥ 0.80) was 56.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] 49.3-64.4) at one year and 44.2% (95% CI 36.4-52.1) at two years. The proportion persistent with treatment decreased from 75.6% (95% CI 71.5-79.5) at six months to 52.8% (95% CI 51.6-59.8) at two years. No significant differences in adherence and persistence were observed between individual DPP4 inhibitors. At one year, just 3.2% (95% CI 3.1-3.3) of patients switched from one DPP4 inhibitor to another. Switching from saxagliptin and alogliptin to others was commonest. CONCLUSIONS: Adherence to and persistence with DPP4 inhibitors is suboptimal but similar across all medications within the class. While in-class switching is uncommon, saxagliptin and alogliptin are the DPP4 inhibitors most commonly switched. Interventions to improve treatment adherence and persistence among patients with T2DM prescribed DPP4 inhibitors may be warranted.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/tratamento farmacológico , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/epidemiologia , Inibidores da Dipeptidil Peptidase IV/uso terapêutico , Substituição de Medicamentos/estatística & dados numéricos , Adesão à Medicação/estatística & dados numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Humanos , Hipoglicemiantes/uso terapêutico , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Resultado do Tratamento , Suspensão de Tratamento/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto Jovem
9.
J Diabetes Res ; 2020: 4760624, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32190697

RESUMO

Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a major public health problem associated with distress. T2DM can affect health outcomes and adherence to medications. Little is however known about the association between diabetes distress and medication adherence among patients with T2DM in Ghana. Objective: The objective of the present study is twofold: to estimate distress associated with T2DM and to examine its association with medication adherence. Methods: A hospital-based cross-sectional study was conducted among 188 patients with T2DM recruited from a diabetes specialist outpatient clinic at the Pantang Hospital in Accra, Ghana. Data were obtained using the Problem Areas In Diabetes (PAID) scale and the Medication Adherence Report Scale. Results: The findings showed that about 44.7% of the patients showed high levels of diabetes-related distress. Poor adherence to medications was recorded in 66.5% of the patients. Patients who were highly distressed had 68% lower odds of adhering to their medications compared to those who were not (OR: 0.32, 95% CI: 0.15-0.65). A principal component analysis revealed four areas of T2DM distress which were conceptualized as negative emotions about diabetes, dietary concerns and diabetes care, dissatisfaction with external support, and diabetes management helplessness. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that diabetes distress is a significant determinant of medication adherence behaviour in patients with T2DM. Thus, incorporating routine screening for distress into the standard diabetes care within the Ghanaian health system and having health practitioners adopt holistic approaches to diabetes management will be important context-specific interventions to improve adherence and health outcomes of people living and coping with T2DM.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/tratamento farmacológico , Hipoglicemiantes/uso terapêutico , Adesão à Medicação/psicologia , Angústia Psicológica , Idoso , Estudos Transversais , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/psicologia , Feminino , Gana , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Autocuidado
10.
PLoS One ; 15(1): e0227874, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31995606

RESUMO

Medication adherence is a key health outcome that reflects the health and general well-being of patients with hypertension. Challenges with adherence are common and associated with clinical, behavioural and psychosocial factors. This study sought to provide data on the extent of medication adherence among male patients with hypertension and their biopsychosocial predictors. Patient and clinical characteristics, psychological distress, insomnia and sexual dysfunction were hypothesized to predict outcomes of medication adherence. Utilizing quantitative data from a hospital-based cross-sectional study from 358 male out-patients with hypertension attending a tertiary hospital in Ghana, medication adherence was associated with age, marital status, educational level, income, duration of diagnosis, number of medications taken and sexual dysfunction. These findings support the need for biopsychosocial interventions aiming at promoting adherence while taking these factors into consideration for the benefit of improving the health and general well-being of male patients with hypertension.


Assuntos
Hipertensão/epidemiologia , Adesão à Medicação , Disfunções Sexuais Psicogênicas/epidemiologia , Estresse Psicológico/epidemiologia , Adulto , Fatores Etários , Anti-Hipertensivos/efeitos adversos , Anti-Hipertensivos/uso terapêutico , Gana/epidemiologia , Humanos , Hipertensão/complicações , Hipertensão/psicologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pacientes Ambulatoriais , Disfunções Sexuais Psicogênicas/etiologia , Disfunções Sexuais Psicogênicas/psicologia , Distúrbios do Início e da Manutenção do Sono/epidemiologia , Distúrbios do Início e da Manutenção do Sono/etiologia , Distúrbios do Início e da Manutenção do Sono/psicologia , Estresse Psicológico/etiologia , Estresse Psicológico/psicologia , Centros de Atenção Terciária
11.
Wellcome Open Res ; 4: 180, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32734003

RESUMO

Engagement between health researchers and local schools, or School Engagement, has become incorporated into the engagement strategies of many health research institutions worldwide. Innovative initiatives have emerged within Wellcome Trust-funded African and Asian Programmes (APPs) and elsewhere, and continued funding from the Wellcome Trust and other funders is likely to catalyse further innovation. Worldwide, engagement between scientists and schools is well-described in the scientific literature (1-4), however, engagement between health researchers and schools is much newer, particularly in Africa, and rarely documented in the academic literature. In November 2018 the KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research Programme (KWTRP) hosted an international meeting in Kilifi, Kenya, drawing on an emerging community of School Engagement practitioners towards exploring the broad range of goals for School Engagement, learning about the breadth of evaluation approaches and exploring the usefulness of a practitioner network. The workshop was attended by 29 participants representing 21 institutions in 11 countries and comprised: engagement staff from Wellcome Trust-funded Africa and Asia Programmes (AAPs); facilitators of previously funded Wellcome Trust African School Engagement projects; collaborators of Wellcome Trust funded school engagement projects; and long-established UK and Africa-based School Engagement with research projects. Workshop sessions combining small group discussions with plenary presentations, enabled a range of goals, activities and evaluation approaches to be shared. This report summarises these dicussions, and shares the possible function of a network of School Engagement practitioners. Four broad goals for schools engagement emerged: contributing to science education; capacity strengthening for health research; contributing to goals of community engagement; and health promotion. These aimed ultimately at improving health, but also at supporting development in low- and middle-income countries through promoting science-career uptake. Practitioners identified a range of benefits for creating a network to strengthen School Engagement practice: sharing experiences and resources; facilitating capacity strengthening; and fostering collaboration.

12.
BMC Complement Altern Med ; 18(1): 286, 2018 Oct 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30348173

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The use of herbal medicines in developing countries has been increasing over the years. In Ghana, since 2011, the government has been piloting the integration of herbal medicine in 17 public hospitals. However, the strengths and the weaknesses of the integration have not been fully explored. The current study sought to examine the strengths and weaknesses of the integration using the WHO health systems framework. METHODS: This study used qualitative, exploratory study design involving interviews of 25 key informants. The respondents had experience in conducting herbal medicine research. Two key informants were medical herbalists practising in hospitals piloting the integration in Ghana. We used Framework analysis to identify the perspectives of key informants in regards to the integration.  RESULTS: Key informants mostly support the integration although some noted that the government needs to support scale-up in other public hospitals. Among the strengths cited were the employment of medical herbalists, utilization of traditional knowledge, research opportunities, and efficient service delivery by restricting the prescription and use of fake herbal medicine. The weaknesses were the lack of government policies on implementing the integration, financial challenges because the National Health Insurance Scheme does not cover herbal medicine, poor advocacy and research opportunities, and lack of training of conventional health practitioners in herbal medicine. CONCLUSIONS: Researchers view the integration of the two healthcare systems-biomedicine, and herbal medicine- positively but it has challenges that need to be addressed. The integration could offer more opportunities for researching into herbal medicine. More training for conventional health professionals in herbal medicine could increase the chances of better coordination between the two units. Additionally, strong advocacy and publicity is needed to educate more people on the integration and the utilization of the services.


Assuntos
Medicina Integrativa , Fitoterapia , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Gana , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Medicina Herbária , Humanos , Medicina Tradicional Africana
13.
JMIR Mhealth Uhealth ; 6(5): e117, 2018 May 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29728343

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Voluntary blood donation rates are low in sub-Saharan Africa. Sociobehavioral factors such as a belief that donated blood would be used for performing rituals deter people from donating blood. There is a need for culturally appropriate communication interventions to encourage individuals to donate blood. Health care interventions that use mobile phones have increased in developing countries, although many of them focus on SMS text messaging (short message service, SMS). A unique feature of mobile phones that has so far not been used for aiding blood donation is caller tunes. Caller tunes replace the ringing sound heard by a caller to a mobile phone before the called party answers the call. In African countries such as Ghana, instead of the typical ringing sound, a caller may hear a message or song. Despite the popularity of such caller tunes, there is a lack of empirical studies on their potential use for promoting blood donation. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to use the technology acceptance model to explore the influence of the factors-perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, attitude, and free of cost-on intentions of blood or nonblood donors to download blood donation-themed caller tunes to promote blood donation, if available. METHODS: A total of 478 blood donors and 477 nonblood donors were purposively sampled for an interviewer-administered questionnaire survey at blood donation sites in Accra, Ghana. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, exploratory factor analysis, and confirmatory factory analysis or structural equation modeling, leading to hypothesis testing to examine factors that determine intention to use caller tunes for blood donation among blood or nonblood donors who use or do not use mobile phone caller tunes. RESULTS: Perceived usefulness had a significant effect on intention to use caller tunes among blood donors with caller tunes (beta=.293, P<.001), blood donors without caller tunes (beta=.165, P=.02, nonblood donors with caller tunes (beta=.278, P<.001), and nonblood donors without caller tunes (beta=.164, P=.01). Attitudes had significant effect on intention to use caller tunes among blood donors without caller tunes (beta=.351, P<.001), nonblood donors with caller tunes (beta=.384, P<.001), nonblood donors without caller tunes (beta=.539, P<.001) but not among blood donors with caller tunes (beta=.056, P=.44). The effect of free-of-cost caller tunes on the intention to use for blood donation was statistically significant (beta=.169, P<.001) only in the case of nonblood donors without caller tunes, whereas this path was statistically not significant in other models. CONCLUSIONS: Our results provide empirical evidence for designing caller tunes to promote blood donation in Ghana. The study found that making caller tunes free is particularly relevant for nonblood donors with no caller tunes.

14.
Psychiatry Res ; 259: 289-294, 2018 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29091831

RESUMO

The study examined the association between psychological distress, caregiving burden and caregiver-reported medication adherence in 444 informal family caregivers of patients with schizophrenia. Participants were assessed on the Depression, Anxiety Stress Scale, Zarit Burden Interview and the Medication Adherence Report Scale. Caregivers reported a non-adherence rate of 54.5% among patients with schizophrenia. Poor adherence to antipsychotics was significantly associated with caregiver burden (p < 0.01) and experience of anxiety (p < 0.0001). The burden of caregiving should be considered during the assessment of adherence. The findings suggest a need for culturally appropriate interventions that improve antipsychotic adherence of outpatients with schizophrenia with specific attention to the burden of the caregiver.


Assuntos
Antipsicóticos/administração & dosagem , Cuidadores/psicologia , Adesão à Medicação/estatística & dados numéricos , Esquizofrenia/tratamento farmacológico , Psicologia do Esquizofrênico , Adaptação Psicológica , Adulto , Idoso , Ansiedade/psicologia , Efeitos Psicossociais da Doença , Depressão/psicologia , Feminino , Gana , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pacientes Ambulatoriais/psicologia , Estresse Psicológico/psicologia
15.
Public Underst Sci ; 24(1): 23-37, 2015 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25193967

RESUMO

In Ghana, as in many other developing countries, most science reporting is done by general reporters. However, few studies have investigated science reporting in such a situation. To understand better the dynamics of science reporting in such context, we surveyed 151 general reporters in Ghana. Respondents' demographic characteristics resembled those found in studies elsewhere. Respondents perceived health professionals and scientists as very important sources of information for reporting science. There was an inverse correlation between journalism experience and the number of science feature stories reported in the past 12 months (p=.017). Most respondents indicated that science journalism training would motivate them to report science more. Likewise, most reported that easier access to research findings would do so. We identify characteristics of reporters, media, scientific, and training institutions that are important influences of Ghanaian reporters' coverage of science. We provide recommendations for advancing science reporting in Ghana.


Assuntos
Disseminação de Informação , Jornalismo/normas , Ciência , Gana , Humanos , Meios de Comunicação de Massa/normas , Motivação
16.
Front Public Health ; 2: 182, 2014.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25964911

RESUMO

PURPOSE OF THE STUDY: The current study was designed to examine changes in falls efficacy and physical activities among oldest-old and young-old participants in a falls risk-reduction program called a matter of balance/volunteer lay leader model. DESIGN AND METHODS: An oldest-old group (aged 85 years and older; n = 260) and a young-old group (aged between 65 and 84 years old; n = 1,139) in Texas with both baseline and post-intervention measures were included. Changes in Falls Efficacy Scale scores and weekly physical activity levels were examined from baseline to post-intervention. Repeated measures analysis of covariance were employed to assess program effects on falls efficacy. RESULTS: Results showed significant changes in falls efficacy from baseline to post-intervention, as well as a significant interaction effect between time (baseline and post-intervention) and physical activity on falls efficacy. IMPLICATIONS: Findings from this study imply the effectiveness of evidence-based programs for increasing falls efficacy in oldest-old participants. Future implications for enhancing physical activities and reducing fear of falling for oldest-old adults are discussed.

19.
J Am Board Fam Med ; 26(1): 90-2, 2013.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23288286

RESUMO

PURPOSE: The purpose of this article was to examine primary care providers' perceived challenges when implementing evidence-based diabetes self-management guidelines and opportunities for promoting the use of such guidelines in practice. METHODS: We engaged 3 group discussions with 43 key stakeholders representing family physicians, medical directors, and quality assurance leaders in a large, university-affiliated, integrated health care organization in Central Texas. Transcripts from group discussions were summarized using thematic content analysis. RESULTS: Key themes that emerged as challenges of implementing evidence-based diabetes self-management guidelines included lack of easily retrievable electronic patient health information, inadequate coordination with other health care providers when implementing guidelines, conflict between information in the guidelines and physicians' knowledge, and physician compensation by patient load rather than by quality of care. Two main opportunities identified were the use of health coaches or nurses trained in diabetes self-management and active collaboration between practicing providers and key stakeholders in the development and dissemination of guidelines. CONCLUSION: Our study shows a need for involving front-line family physicians and other primary care providers as well as patients in the design and development of best practice guidelines to enhance implementation of diabetes self-management guidelines in primary care settings.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Prestação Integrada de Cuidados de Saúde/organização & administração , Diabetes Mellitus/terapia , Implementação de Plano de Saúde/organização & administração , Atenção Primária à Saúde/organização & administração , Autocuidado , Comportamento Cooperativo , Medicina de Família e Comunidade , Processos Grupais , Humanos , Guias de Prática Clínica como Assunto , Texas
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