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2.
Am J Epidemiol ; 2020 Oct 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33025002

RESUMO

The health benefits and risks of menopausal hormone therapy among women aged 50-59 years are examined in the Women's Health Initiative randomized, placebo-controlled trials using long-term follow-up data and a parsimonious statistical model that leverages data from older participants to increase precision. These trials enrolled 27,347 healthy post-menopausal women aged 50-79 at 40 U.S. clinical centers during 1993-1998, including 10,739 post-hysterectomy participants in a trial of conjugated equine estrogens, and 16,608 participants with uterus in the trial of these estrogens plus medroxyprogesterone acetate. Over an 18-year (median) follow-up period (1993-2016) risk for a global index, defined as the earliest of coronary heart disease, invasive breast cancer, stroke, pulmonary embolism, colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, hip fracture, and all-cause mortality, is reduced with conjugated equine estrogens with hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) of 0.82 (0.71, 0.95), and with nominally significant reductions for coronary heart disease, breast cancer, hip fracture and all-cause mortality. Corresponding global index hazard ratio estimates of 1.06 (0.95, 1.19) were non-significant for combined estrogens plus progestin, but increased breast cancer risk and reduced endometrial cancer risk were observed. These results, among women 50-59, substantially agree with the worldwide observational literature, with the exception of breast cancer for estrogens alone.

3.
Menopause ; 27(11): 1265-1273, 2020 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33110042

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated whether vasomotor symptom (VMS) severity and number of moderate/severe menopausal symptoms (nMS) were associated with health outcomes, and whether calcium and vitamin D (CaD) modified the risks. METHODS: The Women's Health Initiative CaD study was a double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, which tested 400 IU of 25-hydroxyvitamin-D and 1,000 mg of calcium per day in women aged 50 to 79 years. This study included 20,050 women (median follow-up of 7 y). The outcomes included hip fracture, colorectal cancer, invasive breast cancer, all-cause mortality, coronary heart disease, stroke, cardiovascular death, and total cardiovascular disease (CVD). MS included: hot flashes, night sweats, dizziness, heart racing, tremors, feeling restless, feeling tired, difficulty concentrating, forgetfulness, mood swings, vaginal dryness, breast tenderness, migraine, and waking up several times at night. Associations between VMS severity and nMS with outcomes were tested. RESULTS: No association between VMS severity and any outcome were found. In contrast, nMS was associated with higher stroke (hazard ratio [HR] 1.40 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04-1.89 for ≥ 2 MS vs none; HR 1.20 95% CI 0.89-1.63 for 1 MS vs none, P trend = 0.03) and total CVD (HR 1.35, 95% CI, 1.18-1.54 for ≥ 2 MS vs none; HR 0.99, 95% CI, 0.87-1.14 for 1 MS vs none P trend < 0.001). CaD did not modify any association. CONCLUSION: Severity of VMS was not associated with any outcome. Having ≥2 moderate or severe MS was associated with an increased risk for CVD. The number of moderate/severe MS may be a marker for higher CVD risk. : Video Summary:http://links.lww.com/MENO/A669.

4.
JAMA ; 324(4): 369-380, 2020 07 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32721007

RESUMO

Importance: The influence of menopausal hormone therapy on breast cancer remains unsettled with discordant findings from observational studies and randomized clinical trials. Objective: To assess the association of prior randomized use of estrogen plus progestin or prior randomized use of estrogen alone with breast cancer incidence and mortality in the Women's Health Initiative clinical trials. Design, Setting, and Participants: Long-term follow-up of 2 placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials that involved 27 347 postmenopausal women aged 50 through 79 years with no prior breast cancer and negative baseline screening mammogram. Women were enrolled at 40 US centers from 1993 to 1998 with follow-up through December 31, 2017. Interventions: In the trial involving 16 608 women with a uterus, 8506 were randomized to receive 0.625 mg/d of conjugated equine estrogen (CEE) plus 2.5 mg/d of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) and 8102, placebo. In the trial involving 10 739 women with prior hysterectomy, 5310 were randomized to receive 0.625 mg/d of CEE alone and 5429, placebo. The CEE-plus-MPA trial was stopped in 2002 after 5.6 years' median intervention duration, and the CEE-only trial was stopped in 2004 after 7.2 years' median intervention duration. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was breast cancer incidence (protocol prespecified primary monitoring outcome for harm) and secondary outcomes were deaths from breast cancer and deaths after breast cancer. Results: Among 27 347 postmenopausal women who were randomized in both trials (baseline mean [SD] age, 63.4 years [7.2 years]), after more than 20 years of median cumulative follow-up, mortality information was available for more than 98%. CEE alone compared with placebo among 10 739 women with a prior hysterectomy was associated with statistically significantly lower breast cancer incidence with 238 cases (annualized rate, 0.30%) vs 296 cases (annualized rate, 0.37%; hazard ratio [HR], 0.78; 95% CI, 0.65-0.93; P = .005) and was associated with statistically significantly lower breast cancer mortality with 30 deaths (annualized mortality rate, 0.031%) vs 46 deaths (annualized mortality rate, 0.046%; HR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.37-0.97; P = .04). In contrast, CEE plus MPA compared with placebo among 16 608 women with a uterus was associated with statistically significantly higher breast cancer incidence with 584 cases (annualized rate, 0.45%) vs 447 cases (annualized rate, 0.36%; HR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.13-1.45; P < .001) and no significant difference in breast cancer mortality with 71 deaths (annualized mortality rate, 0.045%) vs 53 deaths (annualized mortality rate, 0.035%; HR, 1.35; 95% CI, 0.94-1.95; P= .11). Conclusions and Relevance: In this long-term follow-up study of 2 randomized trials, prior randomized use of CEE alone, compared with placebo, among women who had a previous hysterectomy, was significantly associated with lower breast cancer incidence and lower breast cancer mortality, whereas prior randomized use of CEE plus MPA, compared with placebo, among women who had an intact uterus, was significantly associated with a higher breast cancer incidence but no significant difference in breast cancer mortality.


Assuntos
Neoplasias da Mama/epidemiologia , Estrogênios Conjugados (USP)/efeitos adversos , Terapia de Reposição Hormonal/efeitos adversos , Histerectomia , Acetato de Medroxiprogesterona/efeitos adversos , Idoso , Neoplasias da Mama/induzido quimicamente , Neoplasias da Mama/mortalidade , Neoplasias da Mama/prevenção & controle , Estrogênios Conjugados (USP)/uso terapêutico , Feminino , Seguimentos , Humanos , Histerectomia/efeitos adversos , Incidência , Acetato de Medroxiprogesterona/uso terapêutico , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pós-Menopausa , Risco
5.
J Clin Oncol ; 38(26): 3071-3072, 2020 Sep 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32614701
6.
Am J Epidemiol ; 189(9): 972-981, 2020 09 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32314781

RESUMO

Dual-outcome intention-to-treat hazard rate analyses have potential to complement single-outcome analyses for the evaluation of treatments or exposures in relation to multivariate time-to-response outcomes. Here we consider pairs formed from important clinical outcomes to obtain further insight into influences of menopausal hormone therapy on chronic disease. As part of the Women's Health Initiative, randomized, placebo-controlled hormone therapy trials of conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) among posthysterectomy participants and of these same estrogens plus medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) among participants with an intact uterus were carried out at 40 US clinical centers (1993-2016). These data provide the context for analyses covering the trial intervention periods and a nearly 20-year (median) cumulative duration of follow-up. The rates of multiple outcome pairs were significantly influenced by hormone therapy, especially over cumulative follow-up, providing potential clinical and mechanistic insights. For example, among women randomized to either regimen, hazard ratios for pairs defined by fracture during intervention followed by death from any cause were reduced and hazard ratios for pairs defined by gallbladder disease followed by death were increased, though these findings may primarily reflect single-outcome associations. In comparison, hazard ratios for diabetes followed by death were reduced with CEE but not with CEE + MPA, and those for hypertension followed by death were increased with CEE + MPA but not with CEE.


Assuntos
Terapia de Reposição de Estrogênios , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Idoso , Doenças Cardiovasculares/epidemiologia , Estrogênios Conjugados (USP)/administração & dosagem , Feminino , Fraturas Ósseas/epidemiologia , Doenças da Vesícula Biliar/epidemiologia , Humanos , Incidência , Análise de Intenção de Tratamento , Acetato de Medroxiprogesterona/administração & dosagem , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pós-Menopausa , Fatores de Risco , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
8.
Oncologist ; 25(8): 712-721, 2020 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32250503

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Recent clinical trials have evaluated angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (ACEis), angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), and beta blockers (BBs) in relation to cardiotoxicity in patients with cancer, typically defined by ejection fraction declines. However, these trials have not examined long-term, hard clinical endpoints. Within a prospective study, we examined the risk of heart failure (HF) and coronary heart disease (CHD) events in relation to use of commonly used antihypertensive medications, including ACEis/ARBs, BBs, calcium channel blockers (CCB), and diuretics, comparing women with and without cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a cohort of 56,997 Women's Health Initiative study participants free of cardiovascular disease who received antihypertensive treatment, we used multivariable-adjusted Cox regression models to calculate the hazard ratios (HRs) of developing CHD, HF, and a composite outcome of cardiac events (combining CHD and HF) in relation to use of ACEis/ARBs, CCBs, or diuretics versus BBs, separately in women with and without cancer. RESULTS: Whereas there was no difference in risk of cardiac events comparing ACEi/ARB with BB use among cancer-free women (HR = 0.99 [0.88-1.12]), among cancer survivors ACEi/ARB users were at a 2.24-fold risk of total cardiac events (1.18-4.24); p-interaction = .06). When investigated in relation to CHD only, an increased risk was similarly observed in ACEi/ARB versus BB use for cancer survivors (HR = 1.87 [0.88-3.95]) but not in cancer-free women (HR = 0.91 [0.79-1.06]; p-interaction = .04). A similar pattern was also seen in relation to HF but did not reach statistical significance (p-interaction = .23). CONCLUSION: These results from this observational study suggest differing risks of cardiac events in relation to antihypertensive medications depending on history of cancer. Although these results require replication before becoming actionable in a clinical setting, they suggest the need for more rigorous examination of the effect of antihypertensive choice on long-term cardiac outcomes in cancer survivors. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Although additional research is needed to replicate these findings, these data from a large, nationally representative sample of postmenopausal women indicate that beta blockers are favorable to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in reducing the risk of cardiac events among cancer survivors. This differs from the patterns observed in a noncancer cohort, which largely mirrors what is found in the randomized clinical trials in the general population.

9.
Curr Dev Nutr ; 4(3): nzaa021, 2020 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32159070

RESUMO

Background: Women without cardiovascular disease (CVD) or hypertension at baseline assigned to intervention in the Women's Health Initiative Dietary Modification (DM) trial experienced 30% lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), whereas results in women with hypertension or prior CVD could have been confounded by postrandomization use of statins. Objectives: Intervention participants reported various self-selected changes to achieve the 20% total fat goals. Reviewed are intervention compared with comparison group HRs for CHD, stroke, and total CVD in relation to specific dietary changes in normotensive participants. Methods: Dietary change was assessed by comparing baseline with year 1 FFQ data in women (n = 10,371) without hypertension or CVD at baseline with intake of total fat above the median to minimize biases due to use of the FFQ in trial eligibility screening. Results: Intervention participants self-reported compensating reduced energy intake from total fat by increasing carbohydrate and protein. Specifically they increased plant protein, with those in the upper quartile (increased total protein by ≥3.3% of energy) having a CHD HR of 0.39 (95% CI: 0.22, 0.71), compared with 0.92 (95% CI: 0.57, 1.48) for those in the lower quartile of change (decreased total protein ≥0.6% of energy), with P-trend of 0.04. CHD HR did not vary significantly with change in percentage energy from carbohydrate, and stroke HR did not vary significantly with any macronutrient changes. Scores reflecting adherence to recommended dietary patterns including the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension Trial and the Healthy Eating Index showed favorable changes in the intervention group. Conclusions: Intervention group total fat reduction replaced with increased carbohydrate and some protein, especially plant-based protein, was related to lower CHD risk in normotensive women without CVD who reported high baseline total fat intake. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00000611. Link to the WHI trial protocol: https://www.whi.org/about/SitePages/Dietary%20Trial.aspx.

10.
Cancer ; 126(13): 2956-2964, 2020 Jul 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32212335

RESUMO

After reports from the Women's Health Initiative randomized trial evaluating estrogen plus progestin, there was a sudden, substantial, and sustained decrease in all categories of menopausal hormone therapy, and the first reduction in age-adjusted breast cancer incidence in more than 20 years was seen in 2003-2004 among US women 50 years of age or older. Subsequent trends in breast cancer incidence have been described, but most reports have not focused on the postmenopausal age group or fully engaged the potential influence of reduced hormone therapy on breast cancer incidence trends by race/ethnicity. To address this gap, this commentary examines trends for annual age-adjusted breast cancer incidence over a 40-year period from 1975 to 2015 for white and black women on the basis of findings from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results 9 registries. Overall, the sharp decline in breast cancer incidence seen in 2003-2004 was followed in the subsequent decade by a continued low breast cancer incidence plateau in white women that has largely persisted. In contrast, a new discordance between breast cancer incidence trends in black and white women has emerged. In the 2005-2015 decade, a sustained increase in breast cancer incidence in black women has resulted in annual incidence rates comparable, for the first time, to those in white women. This commentary explores the hypothesis that the over-decade-long and discordant changes in breast cancer incidence rates in postmenopausal black and white women are, to a large extent, associated with changes in hormone therapy use in these 2 groups.

11.
J Clin Oncol ; 38(13): 1419-1428, 2020 May 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32031879

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Observational studies of dietary fat intake and breast cancer have reported inconsistent findings. This topic was addressed in additional analyses of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Dietary Modification (DM) clinical trial that evaluated a low-fat dietary pattern influence on breast cancer incidence. METHODS: In the WHI DM trial, 48,835 postmenopausal women, ages 50-79 years, with no prior breast cancer, and a dietary fat intake of ≥ 32% of energy were randomly assigned at 40 US centers to a usual diet comparison group (60%) or dietary intervention group (40%). The goals were to reduce fat intake to 20% of energy and increase vegetable, fruit, and grain intake. Breast cancers were confirmed after central medical record review and serial National Death Index linkages to enhance mortality findings. RESULTS: During 8.5 years of dietary intervention, breast cancer incidence and deaths as a result of breast cancer were nonsignificantly lower in the intervention group, while deaths after breast cancer were statistically significantly lower both during intervention and through a 16.1-year (median) follow-up. Now, after a long-term, cumulative 19.6-year (median) follow-up, the significant reduction in deaths after breast cancer persists (359 [0.12%] v 652 [0.14%] deaths; hazard ratio [HR], 0.85; 95% CI, 0.74 to 0.96; P = .01), and a statistically significant reduction in deaths as a result of breast cancer (breast cancer followed by death attributed to the breast cancer) emerged (132 [0.037%, annualized risk] v 251 [0.047%] deaths, respectively; HR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.64 to 0.97; P = .02). CONCLUSION: Adoption of a low-fat dietary pattern associated with increased vegetable, fruit, and grain intake, demonstrably achievable by many, may reduce the risk of death as a result of breast cancer in postmenopausal women.

12.
EClinicalMedicine ; 18: 100240, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31938786

RESUMO

Background: Meta-analyses of observational studies associate adherence to several dietary patterns with cognitive health. However, limited evidence from full scale, randomized controlled trials precludes causal inference regarding dietary effects on cognitive function. Methods: The Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Dietary Modification (DM) randomized trial, in 48,835 postmenopausal women, included a subset of 1,606 WHI Memory Study (WHIMS) participants >= 65 years old, to assess low-fat dietary pattern influence on global cognitive function, evaluated with annual screening (Modified Mini-Mental State Examinations [3MSE]). Participants were randomized by a computerized, permuted block algorithm, stratified by age group and center, to a dietary intervention (40%) to reduce fat intake to 20% of energy and increase fruit, vegetable and grain intake or usual diet comparison groups (60%). The study outcome was possible cognition impairment (failed cognitive function screening) through the 8.5 year (median) dietary intervention. Those failing screening received a comprehensive, multi-phase cognitive function assessment to classify as: no cognitive impairment, mild cognitive impairment, or probable dementia. Exploratory analyses examined the composite endpoint of death after possible cognitive impairment through 18.7 years (median) follow-up. The WHI trials are registered at ClinicalTrials.gov:NCT00000611. Findings: Among the 1,606 WHIMS participants, the dietary intervention statistically significantly reduced the incidence of possible cognitive impairment (n = 126; hazard ratio [HR] 0.59 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.38-0. 91, P = 0.01) with HR for dietary influence on subsequent mild cognitive impairment of 0.65 (95% CI 0.35-1.19) and HR of 0.63 (95% CI 0.19-2.10) for probable dementia (PD). Through 18.7 years, deaths from all-causes after possible cognitive impairment were non-significantly lower in the dietary intervention group (0.56% vs 0.77%, HR 0.83 95% CI 0.35 to 2.00, P = 0.16). Interpretation: Adoption of a low-fat eating pattern, representing dietary moderation, significantly reduced risk of possible cognitive impairment in postmenopausal women. Funding: Several Institutes of the US National Institutes of Health.

13.
J Natl Cancer Inst ; 112(2): 170-178, 2020 02 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31184362

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Insulin resistance has been proposed as a mediator of the increased cancer incidence and mortality associated with obesity. However, prior studies included limited cancer deaths and had inconsistent findings. Therefore, we evaluated insulin resistance and cancer-specific and all-cause mortality in postmenopausal women participating in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI). METHODS: Eligible were a subsample of 22 837 WHI participants aged 50-79 years enrolled at 40 US clinical centers from 1993 to 1998 who had baseline fasting glucose and insulin levels. Baseline insulin resistance was measured by the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Cancers were verified by central medical record review and deaths verified by medical record and death certificate review enhanced by National Death Index queries. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to calculate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for cancer-specific and all-cause mortality. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: During a median of 18.9 years of follow-up, 1820 cancer deaths and 7415 total deaths occurred. Higher HOMA-IR quartile was associated with higher cancer-specific mortality (Q4 vs Q1, HR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.09 to 1.47; Ptrend = .003) and all-cause mortality (Q4 vs Q1, HR = 1.63, 95% CI = 1.51 to 1.76; Ptrend < .001). A sensitivity analysis for diabetes status did not change findings. Among women with body mass index less than 25 kg/m2, higher HOMA-IR quartile was associated with higher cancer mortality (Fine and Gray, P = .004). CONCLUSIONS: High insulin resistance, as measured by HOMA-IR, identifies postmenopausal women at higher risk for cancer-specific and all-cause mortality who could potentially benefit from early intervention.


Assuntos
Causas de Morte , Resistência à Insulina , Neoplasias/epidemiologia , Pós-Menopausa , Saúde da Mulher , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Índice de Massa Corporal , Feminino , Seguimentos , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Neoplasias/mortalidade , Modelos de Riscos Proporcionais , Vigilância em Saúde Pública , Fatores de Risco , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
14.
Ann Intern Med ; 171(6): 406-414, 2019 09 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31499528

RESUMO

Background: Whether health outcomes of menopausal estrogen therapy differ between women with and without bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO) is unknown. Objective: To examine estrogen therapy outcomes by BSO status, with additional stratification by 10-year age groups. Design: Subgroup analyses of the randomized Women's Health Initiative Estrogen-Alone Trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00000611). Setting: 40 U.S. clinical centers. Participants: 9939 women aged 50 to 79 years with prior hysterectomy and known oophorectomy status. Intervention: Conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) (0.625 mg/d) or placebo for a median of 7.2 years. Measurements: Incidence of coronary heart disease and invasive breast cancer (the trial's 2 primary end points), all-cause mortality, and a "global index" (these end points plus stroke, pulmonary embolism, colorectal cancer, and hip fracture) during the intervention phase and 18-year cumulative follow-up. Results: The effects of CEE alone did not differ significantly according to BSO status. However, age modified the effect of CEE in women with prior BSO. During the intervention phase, CEE was significantly associated with a net adverse effect (hazard ratio for global index, 1.42 [95% CI, 1.09 to 1.86]) in older women (aged ≥70 years), but the global index was not elevated in younger women (P trend by age = 0.016). During cumulative follow-up, women aged 50 to 59 years with BSO had a treatment-associated reduction in all-cause mortality (hazard ratio, 0.68 [CI, 0.48 to 0.96]), whereas older women with BSO had no reduction (P trend by age = 0.034). There was no significant association between CEE and outcomes among women with conserved ovaries, regardless of age. Limitations: The timing of CEE in relation to BSO varied; several comparisons were made without adjustment for multiple testing. Conclusion: The effects of CEE did not differ by BSO status in the overall cohort, but some findings varied by age. Among women with prior BSO, in those aged 70 years or older, CEE led to adverse effects during the treatment period, whereas women randomly assigned to CEE before age 60 seemed to derive mortality benefit over the long term. Primary Funding Source: The WHI program is funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; National Institutes of Health; and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Wyeth Ayerst donated the study drugs.


Assuntos
Terapia de Reposição de Estrogênios/métodos , Estrogênios Conjugados (USP)/uso terapêutico , Ovariectomia , Fatores Etários , Idoso , Neoplasias da Mama/epidemiologia , Causas de Morte , Neoplasias Colorretais/epidemiologia , Doença das Coronárias/epidemiologia , Feminino , Seguimentos , Fraturas do Quadril/epidemiologia , Humanos , Incidência , Menopausa , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Embolia Pulmonar/epidemiologia , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/epidemiologia , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
15.
J Nutr ; 149(9): 1565-1574, 2019 09 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31175807

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The preferred macronutrient dietary composition, and the health consequences of dietary fat reduction specifically, have been debated for decades. Here we provide a comprehensive overview of long-term health outcomes in the Women's Health Initiative Dietary Modification (DM) trial. OBJECTIVE: The DM trial aimed to examine whether a low-fat dietary pattern would reduce the risk of invasive breast cancer, colorectal cancer, and, secondarily, coronary heart disease (CHD), with various other health outcomes also considered. METHODS: The DM trial is a randomized controlled trial conducted at 40 centers in the US, among 48,835 postmenopausal women aged 50-79 y with baseline intake of ≥32% energy from fat. Participants were randomly assigned to a low-fat dietary pattern intervention group or to a usual-diet comparison group, during 1993-1998. Intervention goals were to reduce fat intake from ∼35% to 20% of total energy, in conjunction with increasing vegetables and fruit to 5 servings/d and grains to 6 servings/d. RESULTS: Over an 8.5-y (median) intervention period, intervention and comparison group differences included lower fat by 8-10%, and higher carbohydrate by 8-10%, of total energy, in conjunction with higher consumption of vegetables, fruit, and grains. Time-to-outcome analyses did not show significant differences between intervention and comparison groups for invasive breast cancer, colorectal cancer, or CHD, either over the intervention period or over longer-term cumulative follow-up. Additional analyses showed significant intervention group benefits related to breast cancer, CHD, and diabetes, without adverse effects. Over a 19.6-y (median) follow-up period, HRs (95% CIs) were 0.84 (0.74, 0.96) for breast cancer followed by death, and 0.87 (0.77, 0.98) for diabetes requiring insulin. CONCLUSIONS: Reduction in dietary fat with corresponding increase in vegetables, fruit, and grains led to benefits related to breast cancer, CHD, and diabetes, without adverse effects, among healthy postmenopausal US women.This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00000611.


Assuntos
Neoplasias da Mama/prevenção & controle , Neoplasias Colorretais/prevenção & controle , Doença das Coronárias/prevenção & controle , Diabetes Mellitus/terapia , Dieta com Restrição de Gorduras , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pós-Menopausa , Saúde da Mulher
16.
Menopause ; 26(8): 841-849, 2019 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31145202

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Data in humans and nonhuman primates have suggested a possible synergistic effect of vitamin D and calcium (CaD) and estrogen on the cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. Using randomized trial data we explored whether the effect of menopausal hormone therapy (HT) on CVD events is modified by CaD supplementation. METHODS: A prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was implemented among postmenopausal women in the Women's Health Initiative. A total of 27,347 women were randomized to the HT trials (0.625 mg/d of conjugated equine estrogens [CEE] alone for women without a uterus vs placebo; or 0.625 mg of CEE in addition to 2.5 mg of medroxyprogesterone acetate daily [CEE + MPA] for women with a uterus vs placebo). After 1 year, 16,089 women in the HT trial were randomized to the CaD trial and received either 1,000 mg of elemental calcium carbonate and 400 IU of vitamin D3 daily or placebo. The mean (SD) duration of follow-up after CaD randomization was 6.2 (1.3) years for the CEE trial and 4.6 (1.1) years for the CEE + MPA trial. CVD and venous thromboembolism events evaluated in this subgroup analysis included coronary heart disease, stroke, pulmonary embolism, all-cause mortality, plus select secondary endpoints (total myocardial infarction, coronary revascularization, deep venous thrombosis, cardiovascular death, and all CVD events). Time-to-event methods were used and models were fit with a Cox proportional hazards regression model. RESULTS: In the CEE trial, CaD significantly modified the effect of CEE on stroke (P interaction = 0.04). In the CaD-placebo group, CEE's effect on stroke was harmful (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval] = 2.19[1.34-3.58]); however, it was neutral in the CaD-supplement group (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval] = 1.07[0.66-1.73]). We did not observe significant CEE-CaD interactions for coronary heart disease, total CVD events, or any of the remaining endpoints. In the CEE + MPA trial, there was no evidence that the effect of CEE + MPA on any of CVD endpoints was modified by CaD supplementation. CONCLUSIONS: CaD did not consistently modify the effect of CEE therapy or CEE + MPA therapy on CVD events. However, the increased risk of stroke due to CEE therapy appears to be mitigated by CaD supplementation. In contrast, CaD supplementation did not influence the risk of stroke due to CEE + MPA.


Assuntos
Carbonato de Cálcio/administração & dosagem , Cálcio/administração & dosagem , Doenças Cardiovasculares/prevenção & controle , Estrogênios Conjugados (USP)/administração & dosagem , Estrogênios/administração & dosagem , Idoso , Doenças Cardiovasculares/epidemiologia , Suplementos Nutricionais , Método Duplo-Cego , Feminino , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pós-Menopausa , Estudos Prospectivos , Fatores de Risco , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/epidemiologia , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/prevenção & controle , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Saúde da Mulher
17.
Oncotarget ; 10(33): 3088-3092, 2019 May 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31139321

RESUMO

Two complementary studies in separate components of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) examined relationships among weight loss, diet composition and breast cancer incidence and outcome in postmenopausal women. In the WHI Observational Study, 61,335 postmenopaus al women had their weight change determined over a 3-year period with subsequent follow-up. Women with weight loss greater than or equal to 5% had significantly lower breast cancer incidence compared to women with stable weight. In the WHI Dietary Modification randomized clinical trial involving 48,835 postmenopausal women, implementation of a low-fat eating pattern significantly reduced deaths after breast cancer. Thus, moderation regarding dietary composition and body weight maintenance can reduce a postmenopausal woman's risk of being diagnosed with breast cancer and of dying after breast cancer.

18.
J Natl Cancer Inst ; 111(2): 146-157, 2019 02 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29917119

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 42 loci (P < 5 × 10-8) associated with risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). Expanded consortium efforts facilitating the discovery of additional susceptibility loci may capture unexplained familial risk. METHODS: We conducted a GWAS in European descent CRC cases and control subjects using a discovery-replication design, followed by examination of novel findings in a multiethnic sample (cumulative n = 163 315). In the discovery stage (36 948 case subjects/30 864 control subjects), we identified genetic variants with a minor allele frequency of 1% or greater associated with risk of CRC using logistic regression followed by a fixed-effects inverse variance weighted meta-analysis. All novel independent variants reaching genome-wide statistical significance (two-sided P < 5 × 10-8) were tested for replication in separate European ancestry samples (12 952 case subjects/48 383 control subjects). Next, we examined the generalizability of discovered variants in East Asians, African Americans, and Hispanics (12 085 case subjects/22 083 control subjects). Finally, we examined the contributions of novel risk variants to familial relative risk and examined the prediction capabilities of a polygenic risk score. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: The discovery GWAS identified 11 variants associated with CRC at P < 5 × 10-8, of which nine (at 4q22.2/5p15.33/5p13.1/6p21.31/6p12.1/10q11.23/12q24.21/16q24.1/20q13.13) independently replicated at a P value of less than .05. Multiethnic follow-up supported the generalizability of discovery findings. These results demonstrated a 14.7% increase in familial relative risk explained by common risk alleles from 10.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 7.9% to 13.7%; known variants) to 11.9% (95% CI = 9.2% to 15.5%; known and novel variants). A polygenic risk score identified 4.3% of the population at an odds ratio for developing CRC of at least 2.0. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides insight into the architecture of common genetic variation contributing to CRC etiology and improves risk prediction for individualized screening.


Assuntos
Neoplasias Colorretais/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Colorretais/genética , Grupos Étnicos/genética , Loci Gênicos , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Seguimentos , Genótipo , Humanos , Prognóstico , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
19.
JAMA Oncol ; 4(10): e181212, 2018 10 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29800122

RESUMO

Importance: In a randomized clinical trial, a low-fat eating pattern was associated with lower risk of death after breast cancer. However, the extent to which results were driven by dietary influence on survival after breast cancer diagnosis was unknown. Objective: To determine the association of a low-fat dietary pattern with breast cancer overall survival (breast cancer followed by death from any cause measured from cancer diagnosis). Design, Setting, and Participants: This is a secondary analysis of the Women's Health Initiative randomized clinical trial that was conducted at 40 US clinical centers enrolling participants from 1993 through 1998. Participants were 48 835 postmenopausal women with no previous breast cancer and dietary fat intake of greater than 32% by food frequency questionnaire. Interventions: Participants were randomized to a dietary intervention group (40%; n = 19 541) with goals to reduce fat intake to 20% of energy and increase fruit, vegetable, and grain intake or a usual-diet comparison group (60%; n = 29 294). Dietary group participants with incident breast cancers continued to participate in subsequent dietary intervention activities. Main Outcomes and Measures: Breast cancer overall survival for incident breast cancers diagnosed during the 8.5-year (median) dietary intervention, examined in post hoc analyses after 11.5 years (median) postdiagnosis follow-up. Results: Of 1764 women diagnosed with breast cancer during the dietary intervention period, mean (SD) age at screening was 62.7 (6.7) years and age at diagnosis was 67.6 (6.9) years. With 516 total deaths, breast cancer overall survival was significantly greater for women in the dietary intervention group than in the usual-diet comparison group (10-year survival of 82% and 78%, respectively; hazard ratio [HR], 0.78; 95% CI, 0.65-0.94; P = .01). In the dietary group there were fewer deaths from breast cancer (68 vs 120; HR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.64-1.17), other cancers (36 vs 65; HR, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.50-1.17), and cardiovascular disease (27 vs 64; HR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.39-0.99). Conclusions and Relevance: In women who received a diagnosis of breast cancer during the dietary intervention period, those in the dietary group had increased overall survival. The increase is due, in part, to better survival from several causes of death. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00000611.


Assuntos
Neoplasias da Mama/prevenção & controle , Dietoterapia/métodos , Dieta , Gorduras na Dieta/administração & dosagem , Saúde da Mulher/estatística & dados numéricos , Idoso , Neoplasias da Mama/diagnóstico , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Fatores de Risco , Análise de Sobrevida
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