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1.
United European Gastroenterol J ; 9(2): 177-192, 2021 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33704918

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: There are concerns that individuals with chronic immune-mediated diseases are at increased risk of COVID-19 and related severe adverse outcome, including intensive care admission or death. We aimed to explore the absolute and relative risk of severe COVID-19 in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: This population-based cohort study used nationwide registers in Sweden, with 67,292 individuals with a diagnosis of IBD 1969-2017 (Crohn's disease, n = 21,599; ulcerative colitis: n = 43,622; IBD-unclassified: n = 2071) and alive on 1 February 2020. Patients with IBD were matched to up to five controls from the general population (n = 297,910). Cox regression estimated hazard ratios (HRs) for (i) hospital admission with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 as the primary diagnosis, and (ii) severe COVID-19 (composite outcome consisting of (a) COVID-19 intensive care admission, or (b) death from COVID-19 or (c) death within 30 days of COVID-19 hospital admission), were calculated. Analyses were conditioned on age, sex, calendar period, and county and adjusted for other comorbidities. RESULTS: Between 1 February and 31 July 2020, 179 (0.27%) IBD patients and 500 (0.17%) general population controls were admitted to hospital with COVID-19 (adjusted HR [aHR] = 1.43; 95% CI = 1.19-1.72). The corresponding numbers for severe COVID-19 was 65 (0.10%) and 183 (0.06%; aHR = 1.11; 95% CI = 0.81-1.52). Adjusted HRs were similar in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. In a propensity score-matched model taking comorbidity into account until 2016, the increased risk for COVID-19 hospital admission remained (aHR = 1.32; 1.12-1.56), but there was no increased risk of severe COVID-19 (aHR = 1.12; 0.85-1.47). CONCLUSIONS: While individuals with IBD were more likely to be admitted to hospital for COVID-19 than the general population, the risk of severe COVID-19 was not higher.


Assuntos
Doenças Inflamatórias Intestinais , Adolescente , Adulto , /diagnóstico , /mortalidade , Comorbidade , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Hospitalização/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Doenças Inflamatórias Intestinais/complicações , Doenças Inflamatórias Intestinais/epidemiologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Prognóstico , Pontuação de Propensão , Suécia/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
3.
Dig Dis Sci ; 2021 Feb 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33606139

RESUMO

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Thirty percent of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients hospitalized with flare require salvage therapy or surgery. Additionally, 40% experience length of stay (LOS) > 7 days. No emergency department (ED)-based indices exist to predict these adverse outcomes at admission for IBD flare. We examined whether clinical, laboratory, and endoscopic markers at presentation predicted prolonged LOS, inpatient colectomy, or salvage therapy in IBD patients admitted with flare. METHODS: Patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) or colonic involvement of Crohn's disease (CD) hospitalized with flare and tested for Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI) between 2010 and 2020 at two urban academic centers were studied. The primary outcome was complex hospitalization, defined as: LOS > 7 days, inpatient colectomy, or inpatient infliximab or cyclosporine. A nested k-fold cross-validation identified predictive factors of complex hospitalization. RESULTS: Of 164 IBD admissions, 34% (56) were complex. Predictive factors included: tachycardia in ED triage (odds ratio [OR] 3.35; confidence interval [CI] 1.79-4.91), hypotension in ED triage (3.45; 1.79-5.11), hypoalbuminemia at presentation (2.54; 1.15-3.93), CDI (2.62; 1.02-4.22), and endoscopic colitis (4.75; 1.75-5.15). An ED presentation score utilizing tachycardia and hypoalbuminemia predicted complex hospitalization (area under curve 0.744; CI 0.671-0.816). Forty-four of 48 (91.7%) patients with a presentation score of 0 (heart rate < 99 and albumin ≥ 3.4 g/dL) had noncomplex hospitalization. CONCLUSIONS: Over 90% of IBD patients hospitalized with flare with an ED presentation score of 0 did not require salvage therapy, inpatient colectomy, or experience prolonged LOS. A simple ED-based score may provide prognosis at a juncture of uncertainty in patient care.

4.
Gastroenterology ; 160(5): 1599-1607.e5, 2021 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33421519

RESUMO

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Gastrointestinal infections have been linked to changes in the composition and function of gut microbiome and development of inflammatory bowel diseases. We therefore sought to examine the relationship between gastroenteritis and risk of microscopic colitis (MC). METHODS: We conducted a case-control study of all adult patients with MC diagnosed between 1990 and 2016 in Sweden matched to up to 5 general population controls according to age, sex, calendar year, and county. Cases of MC were identified using Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine codes from the ESPRESSO (Epidemiology Strengthened by histoPathology Reports in Sweden) study, a cohort of gastrointestinal pathology reports from all 28 pathology centers in Sweden. We used logistic regression modeling to estimate adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: Through December of 2016, we matched 13,468 MC cases to 64,479 controls. The prevalence of previous diagnosed gastrointestinal infection was 7.5% among patients with MC, which was significantly higher than in controls (3.0%, Pcomparison < .001). After adjustment, gastroenteritis was associated with an increased risk of MC (aOR 2.63; 95% CI 2.42-2.85). Among specific pathogens, Clostridioides difficile (aOR 4.39; 95% CI 3.42-5.63), Norovirus (aOR 2.87; 95% CI 1.66-4.87), and Escherichia species (aOR 3.82; 95% CI 1.22-11.58), but not Salmonella species, were associated with an increased risk of MC. The association between gastrointestinal infections and risk of MC was stronger for collagenous subtype (aOR 3.23; 95% CI 2.81-3.70) as compared with lymphocytic colitis (aOR 2.51; 95% CI 2.28-2.76; Pheterogeneity = .005). The associations remained significant after adjustment for immune-mediated conditions and polypharmacy and when compared with unaffected siblings. CONCLUSION: In a nationwide study, we found that gastrointestinal infection, particularly Clostridioides difficile, is associated with an increased risk of subsequent MC. This study was approved by the Regional Ethics Committee, Stockholm, Sweden (Protocol no. 2014/1287-31/4).

5.
Inflamm Bowel Dis ; 2021 Jan 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33386740

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Differentiating between enteric infection and relapse of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a common clinical challenge. Few studies have evaluated the impact of multiplex gastrointestinal polymerase chain reaction (GI PCR) pathogen panels on clinical practice compared to stool culture. Our aim was to compare the impact of PCR stool testing to conventional stool testing in outpatients presenting with relapse of IBD. METHODS: In a retrospective cohort study of outpatients with IBD presenting to NYU Langone Health with flare from September 2015 to April 2019, we compared patients who underwent stool testing with GI PCR to age-, sex-, and IBD-subtype-matched patients who underwent culture and ova and parasite exam (conventional testing). The primary outcome was IBD therapy escalation after testing. Secondary outcomes included rates of posttesting endoscopy, abdominal radiography, antibiotics, and IBD-related emergency department visits, hospitalizations, and abdominal surgeries. RESULTS: We identified 134 patients who underwent GI PCR matched to 134 patients who underwent conventional testing. Pathogens were more frequently identified on GI PCR (26 vs 5%; P < 0.01). We found that GI PCR was associated with less escalation in IBD therapy (16 vs 29%; P < 0.01) and fewer posttest endoscopies (10% vs 18%; P = 0.04), with no differences in IBD outcomes. On multivariate analysis, testing with GI PCR was associated with an odds ratio of 0.26 (95% confidence interval, 0.08-0.84; P = 0.02) for escalation of IBD therapies. CONCLUSIONS: Testing with GI PCR was associated with higher rates of pathogen detection and lower rates of IBD therapy escalation and endoscopy in the outpatient setting. These changes in management were not associated with a difference in IBD outcomes.

6.
Dig Dis Sci ; 2021 Jan 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33474649

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: There is wide variation in the quality of care of hospitalized patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Prior studies have demonstrated that a specialized inpatient IBD service improves short-term outcomes. In this study, we assessed the impact of a dedicated IBD service on the quality of care and long-term outcomes. METHODS: This retrospective cohort study included adult patients admitted for a complication of IBD between March 2017 and February 2019 to a tertiary referral center. In March 2018, a dedicated inpatient IBD service co-managed by IBD gastroenterologists and colorectal surgeons was implemented. Quality of care outcomes included C. difficile stool testing, confirmed VTE prophylaxis administration and opiate avoidance. Long-term outcomes were clinical remission, IBD-related surgery, ED visits, and hospital readmissions at 90 days and 12 months. RESULTS: In total, 143 patients were included; 66 pre- and 77 post-implementation of the IBD service. Fifty-two percent had ulcerative colitis and 48% had Crohn's disease. After implementation, there was improvement in C.difficile testing (90% vs. 76%, P = 0.04), early VTE prophylaxis (92% vs. 77%, P = 0.01) and decreases in narcotic use (14% vs. 30%, P = 0.02), IBD-related ED visits at 90 days (7% vs 18%, P = 0.03) and 12 months (16% vs 30%, P = 0.04), and IBD readmissions at 90 days (16% vs. 30%, P = 0.04). There were no differences in rates of clinical remission or surgery. CONCLUSIONS: The creation of a dedicated inpatient IBD service improved quality of IBD care and reduced post-discharge ED visits and readmissions and broader implementation of this strategy may help optimize care of hospitalized IBD patients.

7.
Gastroenterology ; 160(5): 1679-1693, 2021 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33359089

RESUMO

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis is a surgical procedure in patients with ulcerative colitis refractory to medical therapies. Pouchitis, the most common complication, is inflammation of the pouch of unknown etiology. To define how the intestinal immune system is distinctly organized during pouchitis, we analyzed tissues from patients with and without pouchitis and from patients with ulcerative colitis using single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq). METHODS: We examined pouch lamina propria CD45+ hematopoietic cells from intestinal tissues of ulcerative colitis patients with (n = 15) and without an ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (n = 11). Further in silico meta-analysis was performed to generate transcriptional interaction networks and identify biomarkers for patients with inflamed pouches. RESULTS: In addition to tissue-specific signatures, we identified a population of IL1B/LYZ+ myeloid cells and FOXP3/BATF+ T cells that distinguish inflamed tissues, which we further validated in other scRNA-seq datasets from patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Cell-type-specific transcriptional markers obtained from scRNA-seq was used to infer representation from bulk RNA sequencing datasets, which further implicated myeloid cells expressing IL1B and S100A8/A9 calprotectin as interacting with stromal cells, and Bacteroidales and Clostridiales bacterial taxa. We found that nonresponsiveness to anti-integrin biologic therapies in patients with ulcerative colitis was associated with the signature of IL1B+/LYZ+ myeloid cells in a subset of patients. CONCLUSIONS: Features of intestinal inflammation during pouchitis and ulcerative colitis are similar, which may have clinical implications for the management of pouchitis. scRNA-seq enables meta-analysis of multiple studies, which may facilitate the identification of biomarkers to personalize therapy for patients with IBD. The processed single cell count tables are provided in Gene Expression Omnibus; GSE162335. Raw sequence data are not public and are protected by controlled-access for patient privacy.

8.
Clin Epidemiol ; 12: 1059-1072, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33116900

RESUMO

Background: The Swedish Quality Register for Inflammatory Bowel Disease (SWIBREG) contains clinical data for the study of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The Epidemiology Strengthened by histoPathology Reports in Sweden (ESPRESSO) cohort was recently established for the study of gastrointestinal histopathology. We aimed to develop and validate a histology score from ESPRESSO using clinical information from SWIBREG, and secondarily, to evaluate the association of the score on IBD-related hospitalization. Methods: In a nationwide, population-based cohort study of patients with IBD during 1969-2017, we linked endoscopic inflammation in SWIBREG with histologic inflammation in ESPRESSO. We established a clinically interpretable model for predicting the endoscopic score from histology using scalable Bayesian rule lists to define a SNOMED-based histology score applicable to the ESPRESSO cohort. We also assessed the impact of baseline endoscopic and histology scores on time to IBD-related hospitalization. Results: We identified 5225 individuals with IBD comprising 11,051 endoscopic assessments in SWIBREG linked to a histopathology record in ESPRESSO. We created predictive models to calculate a SNOMED-based histology score which predicted the endoscopic score. Split-sample validated areas under the ROC curves for the score predicting a non-zero endoscopic score were 0.80 (0.78-0.81) in UC, 0.70 (0.68-0.72) in CD, and 0.76 (0.73-0.78) in IBD-U. In a subset of 2741 individuals with an initial IBD diagnosis and a corresponding record in ESPRESSO with an endoscopic assessment in SWIBREG, the baseline endoscopic and histology scores were associated with time to IBD-related hospitalization (endoscopy log-rank UC p<0.001, CD p=0.020, IBD-U p<0.001; histology log-rank UC p=0.018, CD p=0.960, IBD-U p=0.034). Conclusion: Histopathology data in ESPRESSO accurately predict endoscopic scores in SWIBREG. Baseline endoscopic and histologic scores were associated with time to IBD-related hospitalization, particularly in UC. The SNOMED-based histology score can be used as a measure of disease activity in future register-based IBD studies.

10.
Inflamm Bowel Dis ; 2020 Aug 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32793977

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Sacroiliitis is an inflammatory arthritis of the sacroiliac joints and is associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Yet, sacroiliitis often goes undiagnosed in IBD, and the clinical association between IBD disease activity and sacroiliitis is not well established. Patients with Crohn's disease (CD) often receive magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) to assess disease activity, affording clinicians the opportunity to evaluate for the presence of sacroiliitis. We aimed to identify the prevalence and disease characteristics associated with sacroiliitis in CD patients undergoing MRE. METHODS: All CD patients undergoing MRE for any indication between 2014 and 2018 at an IBD referral center were identified. The MREs were reviewed for the presence of sacroiliitis based on bone marrow edema (BME) and structural lesions. We analyzed demographics, IBD characteristics, clinical and endoscopic disease activity, and management between CD patients with and without sacroiliitis. RESULTS: Two hundred fifty-eight patients with CD underwent MRE during the study period. Overall, 17% of patients had MR evidence of sacroiliitis, of whom 73% demonstrated bone marrow edema. Female gender, back pain, and later age of CD diagnosis were associated with sacroiliitis (P = 0.05, P < 0.001, P = 0.04, respectively). Disease location and CD therapy were not associated with sacroiliitis on MRE. Clinical, endoscopic, and radiographic disease activity were not associated with sacroiliitis on MRE. CONCLUSION: Sacroiliitis is a common comorbid condition in CD. With limited clinical clues and disease characteristics to suggest sacroiliitis, physicians may utilize MRE to identify sacroiliitis, especially in CD patients with back pain.

11.
Aliment Pharmacol Ther ; 52(7): 1117-1124, 2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32780484

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Ileal pouch-anal anastomosis is a common surgical procedure in patients with an initial diagnosis of ulcerative colitis or indeterminate colitis. Tobacco smoking has been associated with protection from onset of ulcerative colitis. Smoking has been reported to be both a protective factor and a risk factor for the development of pouchitis. AIM: To examine the influence of smoking on the risk of pouchitis. METHODS: We identified 15 studies evaluating smoking as a risk factor for developing pouchitis in ulcerative colitis or indeterminate colitis patients with a history of ileal pouch-anal anastomosis in a systematic search performed from inception through May 4, 2020. A meta-analysis was then performed using a random-effects model to generate risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). RESULTS: A history of smoking compared with never smoking was not associated with an increased risk of developing pouchitis (RR = 0.94, 95% CI 0.76-1.18, I2  = 73.7%). There was also no significant risk of pouchitis when comparing current smokers vs nonsmokers (RR = 0.93, 95% CI 0.70-1.24, I2  = 78.5%) and former smokers vs nonsmokers (RR = 0.96, 95% CI 0.74-1.23, I2  = 78.5%). CONCLUSIONS: Smoking, past or present, is not associated with an increased risk for the development of pouchitis in patients with ulcerative colitis or indeterminate colitis.

12.
Dig Dis Sci ; 2020 Jul 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32729015

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients who have Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI) have worse outcomes. AIMS: We aimed to determine whether such outcomes are the result of CDI or whether CDI occurs in patients who have more severe IBD. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of patients hospitalized for ≥ 2 IBD flares from 2010 to 2019. The primary outcome was time to IBD flare between hospitalizations. First, time to flare was compared between patients who were hospitalized for a flare complicated by CDI and subsequently for a CDI-negative flare (cohort A, denoted +/-) versus patients who were hospitalized for two CDI-negative flares (cohort B, -/-). Second, time between flares was compared within the subset of cohort A patients who had three flares (cohort C, -/+/-) before and after CDI. RESULTS: Time between flares was a median of 4 months (IQR 1-9) among 51 cohort A patients versus 12 months (IQR 6-38) among 51 cohort B patients (log-rank P < 0.01). In contrast, the median time between flares was similar within cohort C before and after CDI (log-rank P = 0.54). At time of the second IBD flare, patients in cohort A (+/-) were more likely to have moderate or severe disease compared to patients in cohort B (-/-). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with prior CDI had shorter time to subsequent IBD flare relative to their CDI-negative counterparts. This is not likely due to CDI itself because there was no difference in time between flares before versus after acquiring CDI. Rather, patients who acquire CDI may have more severe IBD.

13.
Therap Adv Gastroenterol ; 13: 1756284820920779, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32523622

RESUMO

Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are at an increased risk of developing intestinal neoplasia-particularly colorectal neoplasia, including dysplasia and colorectal cancer (CRC)-as a primary consequence of chronic inflammation. While the current incidence of CRC in IBD is lower compared with prior decades, due, in large part, to more effective therapies and improved colonoscopic technologies, CRC still accounts for a significant proportion of IBD-related deaths. The focus of this review is on the pathogenesis; epidemiology, including disease- and patient-related risk factors; diagnosis; surveillance; and management of IBD-associated neoplasia.

14.
Inflamm Bowel Dis ; 2020 Jun 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32578843

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: We aimed to characterize patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: We performed a case series of patients with IBD and confirmed or highly suspected COVID-19 to assess rates of severe outcomes. RESULTS: We identified 83 patients with IBD with confirmed (54%) or highly suspected (46%) COVID-19. The overall hospitalization rate was 6%, generally comprising patients with active Crohn's disease or older men with comorbidities, and 1 patient expired. DISCUSSION: In this series of patients with IBD, severe outcomes of COVID-19 were rare and comparable to similarly aged individuals in the general population.

16.
Gut ; 2020 May 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32474410

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Crohn's disease (CD) is associated with increased risk of small bowel cancer (SBC), but previous studies have been small. We aimed to examine the risk of incident SBC and death from SBC in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). DESIGN: In a binational, population-based cohort study from Sweden and Denmark of patients with IBD during 1969-2017 and matched reference individuals from the general population, we evaluated the risk of incident SBC and death from SBC. Cox regression was used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs). RESULTS: We identified 161 896 individuals with IBD (CD: 47 370; UC: 97 515; unclassified IBD: 17 011). During follow-up, 237 cases of SBC were diagnosed in patients with IBD (CD: 24.4/100 000 person-years; UC: 5.88/100 000 person-years), compared with 640 cases in reference individuals (2.81/100 000 person-years and 3.32/100 000 person-years, respectively). This corresponded to one extra case of SBC in 385 patients with CD and one extra case in 500 patients with UC, followed up for 10 years. The aHR for incident SBC was 9.09 (95% CI 7.34 to 11.3) in CD and 1.85 (95% CI 1.43 to 2.39) in UC. Excluding the first year after an IBD diagnosis, the aHRs for incident SBC decreased to 4.96 in CD and 1.69 in UC. Among patients with CD, HRs were independently highest for recently diagnosed, childhood-onset, ileal and stricturing CD. The relative hazard of SBC-related death was increased in both patients with CD (aHR 6.59, 95% CI 4.74 to 9.15) and patients with UC (aHR 1.57; 95% CI 1.07 to 2.32). CONCLUSION: SBC and death from SBC were more common in patients with IBD, particularly among patients with CD, although absolute risks were low.

17.
Aliment Pharmacol Ther ; 51(12): 1222-1232, 2020 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32372471

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The initiating events of chronic gastrointestinal (GI) inflammation in Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are not well-defined, but GI infections are implicated. AIMS: To define the role of GI infections in risk of incident inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and synthesise the current body of relevant translational data to provide biological context for associations between GI infections and IBD risk. METHODS: We systematically reviewed electronic databases through February 2020. Clinical studies that provided risk estimates of the association between GI infections and incident IBD were included. Inclusion criteria were broader for translational studies aiming to define mechanisms of GI infections and predisposition to or protection from IBD. RESULTS: Of the studies identified, 63 met full inclusion criteria. Among studies of clinical gastroenteritis, bacteria-specifically, Salmonella species, Campylobacter species and Clostridioides difficile-demonstrated consistent positive associations with risk of incident IBD. Of viruses, norovirus was associated with increased risk of incident CD. Regarding inverse associations with incident IBD, Helicobacter pylori and helminth infections were associated with a generally consistent reduced risk of IBD. Based on a qualitative analysis of the translational data, putative mechanisms involve multiple microbial and immunologic pathways. CONCLUSIONS: Based on this systematic review, certain enteric pathogens are associated with an increased risk of incident IBD, while others are potentially protective. Prospective studies are required to clarify the clinical implications of these enteric pathogens on the risk and course of IBD, and possible therapeutic or preventative benefit.


Assuntos
Doenças Transmissíveis/epidemiologia , Gastroenteropatias/epidemiologia , Doenças Inflamatórias Intestinais/epidemiologia , Colite Ulcerativa/epidemiologia , Doenças Transmissíveis/complicações , Doença de Crohn/complicações , Doença de Crohn/epidemiologia , Gastroenteropatias/complicações , Helicobacter pylori/imunologia , Humanos , Incidência , Doenças Inflamatórias Intestinais/etiologia , Estudos Prospectivos , Fatores de Risco
18.
Inflamm Bowel Dis ; 26(7): 971-973, 2020 06 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32393973

RESUMO

First detected in Wuhan, China, the novel 2019 severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is an enveloped RNA beta-coronavirus responsible for an unprecedented, worldwide pandemic caused by COVID-19. Optimal management of immunosuppression in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients with COVID-19 infection currently is based on expert opinion, given the novelty of the infection and the corresponding lack of high-level evidence in patients with immune-mediated conditions. There are limited data regarding IBD patients with COVID-19 and no data regarding early pregnancy in the era of COVID-19. This article describes a patient with acute severe ulcerative colitis (UC) during her first trimester of pregnancy who also has COVID-19. The case presentation is followed by a review of the literature to date on COVID-19 in regard to inflammatory bowel disease and pregnancy, respectively.


Assuntos
Aborto Espontâneo , Colite Ulcerativa , Infecções por Coronavirus , Ciclosporina/administração & dosagem , Metilprednisolona/administração & dosagem , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral , Complicações na Gravidez , Indução de Remissão/métodos , Adulto , Antivirais/administração & dosagem , Betacoronavirus/isolamento & purificação , Proteína C-Reativa/análise , Técnicas de Laboratório Clínico/métodos , Colite Ulcerativa/sangue , Colite Ulcerativa/complicações , Colite Ulcerativa/fisiopatologia , Colite Ulcerativa/terapia , Infecções por Coronavirus/complicações , Infecções por Coronavirus/diagnóstico , Infecções por Coronavirus/fisiopatologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/terapia , Feminino , Humanos , Imunossupressores/administração & dosagem , Gravidade do Paciente , Pneumonia Viral/complicações , Pneumonia Viral/fisiopatologia , Pneumonia Viral/terapia , Gravidez , Complicações na Gravidez/fisiopatologia , Complicações na Gravidez/terapia , Sigmoidoscopia/métodos , Resultado do Tratamento
20.
JGH Open ; 4(2): 256-259, 2020 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32280774

RESUMO

Background and Aim: Enteric tube (ET) placement is approached with caution in patients with esophageal varices (EV) due to concern of causing variceal bleeding. Data are limited on rates and predictors of gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) in these patients. This study aims to assess the rate and predictors of bleeding from EV after ET placement. Methods: We performed a retrospective chart review on patients requiring ET access with known EV. Inclusion criteria were age >18 with endoscopically proven EV who required ET placement. Patients who were admitted with, or developed a GIB prior to placement of ET were excluded, as were patients admitted for liver transplantation. Primary outcome was incidence of GIB within 48 h of tube placement. Secondary outcome was a >2 g/dL drop in hemoglobin within 48 h of placement without evidence of bleed. Statistical analysis was performed using Fischer's exact test, Mann-Whitney U test, and univariate logistic regression model. Results: A total of 75 patients were included in the analysis. The most common etiology of cirrhosis was alcohol (44%). The most common location of EV was in the lower third of the esophagus (61%). The primary outcome was observed in 11 (14.6%) patients. The secondary outcome was found in eight (10.6%) patients. On univariate analysis, GIB was associated with higher MELD-Na (P = 0.026) and EV located in the lower third of the esophagus (P = 0.048). Conclusion: ET placement in patients with EV is associated with low risk of bleeding. Elevated MELD-Na and lower EV location conferred a higher risk of bleeding after ET placement.

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