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1.
Materials (Basel) ; 14(21)2021 Oct 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34771800

RESUMO

The contemporary approach for operative caries management emphasizes personalized interventions for each patient, dependent upon the individual's caries susceptibility/risk, the stage of the carious lesion and its activity. The clinician's challenge is to optimize the extent of cavity preparation and the choice of dental restorative biomaterials, appreciating the benefits offered by ion-releasing restorative materials. There is a growing application of bioactive/bio-interactive materials in minimally invasive operative dentistry, as they may help with tissue recovery by ion release. In case of moderate or extensive occlusal cavitation, the clinical criteria include the individual caries susceptibility and carious lesion activity. In high caries risk cases, ion-releasing biomaterials (IRB) can be used, as well as for active carious lesions. In proximal lesions, the clinical criteria include the individual caries susceptibility, the lesion activity and presence of cavities with little or no enamel at the gingival margin. This article aims to discuss the restorative ion-releasing options, according to different clinical situations, and the caries susceptibility to manage cavitated carious lesions in permanent adult teeth.

2.
Dent Mater ; 37(11): 1734-1750, 2021 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34561100

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To assess the microtensile bond strength (MTBS) and interfacial characteristics of universal adhesives applied on dentine air-abraded using different powders. The analysis includes the cytotoxicity of the powders and their effect on odontogenic gene expression. METHODS: Sound human dentine specimens were air-abraded using bioglass 45S5 (BAG), polycarboxylated zinc-doped bioglass (SEL), alumina (AL) and submitted to SEM analysis. Resin composite was bonded to air-abraded or smear layer-covered dentine (SML) using an experimental (EXP) or a commercial adhesive (ABU) in etch&rinse (ER) or self-etch (SE) modes. Specimens were stored in artificial saliva (AS) and subjected to MTBS testing after 24 h and 10 months. Interfacial nanoleakage assessment was accomplished using confocal microscopy. The cytotoxicity of the powders was assessed, also the total RNA was extracted and the expression of odontogenic genes was evaluated through RT-PCR. RESULTS: After prolonged AS storage, specimens in the control (SML) and AL groups showed a significant drop in MTBS (p > 0.05), with degradation evident within the bonding interface. Specimens in BAG or SEL air-abraded dentine groups showed no significant difference, with resin-dentine interfaces devoid of important degradation. The metabolic activity of pulp stem cells was not affected by the tested powders. SEL and BAG had no effect on the expression of odontoblast differentiation markers. However, AL particles interfered with the expression of the odontogenic markers. SIGNIFICANCE: The use of bioactive glass air-abrasion may prevent severe degradation at the resin-dentine interface. Unlike alumina, bioactive glasses do not interfere with the normal metabolic activity of pulp stem cells and their differentiation to odontoblasts.


Assuntos
Colagem Dentária , Adesivos Dentinários , Resinas Compostas , Cimentos Dentários , Dentina , Expressão Gênica , Humanos , Teste de Materiais , Cimentos de Resina , Propriedades de Superfície , Resistência à Tração
3.
BMC Oral Health ; 21(1): 336, 2021 07 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34243733

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Dental caries is one of the most prevalent non-communicable disease globally and can have serious health sequelae impacting negatively on quality of life. In the UK most adults experience dental caries during their lifetime and the 2009 Adult Dental Health Survey reported that 85% of adults have at least one dental restoration. Conservative removal of tooth tissue for both primary and secondary caries reduces the risk of failure due to tooth-restoration, complex fracture as well as remaining tooth surfaces being less vulnerable to further caries. However, despite its prevalence there is no consensus on how much caries to remove prior to placing a restoration to achieve optimal outcomes. Evidence for selective compared to complete or near-complete caries removal suggests there may be benefits for selective removal in sustaining tooth vitality, therefore avoiding abscess formation and pain, so eliminating the need for more complex and costly treatment or eventual tooth loss. However, the evidence is of low scientific quality and mainly gleaned from studies in primary teeth. METHOD: This is a pragmatic, multi-centre, two-arm patient randomised controlled clinical trial including an internal pilot set in primary dental care in Scotland and England. Dental health professionals will recruit 623 participants over 12-years of age with deep carious lesions in their permanent posterior teeth. Participants will have a single tooth randomised to either the selective caries removal or complete caries removal treatment arm. Baseline measures and outcome data (during the 3-year follow-up period) will be assessed through clinical examination, patient questionnaires and NHS databases. A mixed-method process evaluation will complement the clinical and economic outcome evaluation and examine implementation, mechanisms of impact and context. The primary outcome at three years is sustained tooth vitality. The primary economic outcome is net benefit modelled over a lifetime horizon. Clinical secondary outcomes include pulp exposure, progession of caries, restoration failure; as well as patient-centred and economic outcomes. DISCUSSION: SCRiPT will provide evidence for the most clinically effective and cost-beneficial approach to managing deep carious lesions in permanent posterior teeth in primary care. This will support general dental practitioners, patients and policy makers in decision making. Trial Registration Trial registry: ISRCTN. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ISRCTN76503940. Date of Registration: 30.10.2019. URL of trial registry record: https://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN76503940?q=ISRCTN76503940%20&filters=&sort=&offset=1&totalResults=1&page=1&pageSize=10&searchType=basic-search .


Assuntos
Cárie Dentária , Adulto , Assistência Odontológica , Cárie Dentária/terapia , Suscetibilidade à Cárie Dentária , Odontólogos , Inglaterra , Humanos , Atenção Primária à Saúde , Papel Profissional , Qualidade de Vida , Escócia , Dente Decíduo
4.
Dent J (Basel) ; 9(5)2021 May 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34066871

RESUMO

AIMS: This study aimed to identify the risk factors of using DSM to provide an insight into the inherent implications this has on dental professionals in practice and trainee professionals' education. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-one participants (10 dental professionals and 11 undergraduate and postgraduate dental students) participated in this qualitative study using semi-structured interviews in a dental school in the UK. The interviews were analysed and categorised into themes, some of which were identified from previous literature (e.g., privacy and psychological risks) and others emerged from the data (e.g., deceptive and misleading information). RESULTS: The thematic analysis of interview transcripts identified nine perceived risk themes. Three themes were associated with the use of DSM in the general context, and six themes were related to the use of DSM in professional and education context. CONCLUSIONS: This study provided evidence to understand the risk factors of using DSM in dental education and the profession, but the magnitude of these risks on the uptake and usefulness of DSM needs to be assessed.

5.
BMC Oral Health ; 21(1): 217, 2021 04 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33926448

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Preventive strategies targeting Streptococcus mutans may be effective in reducing the global burden of caries. The aim of the current systematic review of published literature was to determine the difference in level of Streptococcus mutans in adults and children who chew sugar-free gum (SFG), compared with those who did not chew gum, who chewed a control gum or received alternatives such as probiotics or fluoride varnish. METHODS: Systematic review (PROSPERO registration No. CRD42018094676) of controlled trials with adult and child participants where chewing of SFG was the main intervention. Databases searched (1 Jan 1946 to 31 August 2020): MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Scopus, Web of Science, Allied and Complimentary Medicine Database, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Open Grey, PROSPERO and the Cochrane library of systematic reviews. 'Search terms included Medical Subject Headings, and free text to cover the following range of constructs: chewing gum, sugar free, oral health, caries, xerostomia, periodontal disease. Data extraction and Risk of Bias assessment was undertaken by three researchers using a modified version of the Cochrane RoB tool (version 1). Data synthesis was conducted using meta-analysis in STATA. RESULTS: Thirteen studies of SFG with micro-organisms as outcomes were identified. The use of SFG significantly reduced the load of Streptococcus mutans (effect size - 0.42; 95% CI - 0.60 to - 0.25) compared to all controls. In seven of the 13 studies the confidence intervals of the effect size estimate included zero, suggesting no effect of the intervention. Twelve trials used xylitol gum only as the basis of the intervention; xylitol gum significantly reduced the load of Streptococcus mutans (effect size - 0.46; 95% CI - 0.64 to - 0.28) in comparison to all controls. There was a moderate level of heterogeneity across the included studies. No adverse effects were recorded. CONCLUSION: Chewing SFG reduces the load of Streptococcus mutans in the oral cavity in comparison to non-chewing controls. Considering the degree of variability in the effect and the moderate quality of the trials included, there is a need for future research exploring the use SFG as a preventive measure for reducing the cariogenic oral bacterial load.


Assuntos
Goma de Mascar , Cárie Dentária , Adulto , Criança , Cárie Dentária/prevenção & controle , Humanos , Saúde Bucal , Streptococcus mutans , Xilitol
6.
J Adhes Dent ; 23(1): 47-56, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33512115

RESUMO

Purpose: To study the effect of the varnish type, application time and surface polishing on the shear bond strength (SBS) of a universal adhesive in healthy and demineralized bovine enamel. Materials and Methods: 432 bovine primary central incisors were assigned to 18 groups according to enamel mineralization [healthy and demineralized], topical varnish [Clinpro White Varnish (CWV; 3M Oral Care) and Profluorid (PFV, Voco)], remineralization time [24 h or 21 days] and polishing or not of the enamel surface. Adhesion was tested using Futurabond M (Voco)+ and GrandioSO (Voco). Sheer bond strength (SBS) was measured and the fracture mode studied. The statistical analysis was performed using two-way ANOVA, Tukey's test, and Pearson's chi-squared test. Results: In healthy bovine enamel, CWV reduced SBS at 24 h and 21 days; polishing significantly improved SBS. PFV increased SBS in healthy enamel at 21 days and demineralized enamel at 24 h and 21 days; polishing had no effect on SBS. The application time and polishing of the enamel surface affected the behavior of varnishes with respect to SBS. There was a correlation between the type of fracture and the degree of mineralization as well as the timepoint of varnish application. Conclusions: Remineralization of demineralized enamel with fluoride varnishes permits the recovery of the bond strength obtained in healthy enamel. Of the two varnishes studied, PFV had the highest SBS and more uniform behavior, regardless of the application timepoint, degree of mineralization, and surface treatment of the enamel..


Assuntos
Fluoretos Tópicos , Fluoretos , Animais , Bovinos , Cimentos Dentários , Esmalte Dentário , Resistência ao Cisalhamento , Remineralização Dentária
7.
Caries Res ; 54(5-6): 1-7, 2020 Dec 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33291110

RESUMO

AIM: To provide recommendations for dental clinicians for the management of dental caries in older adults with special emphasis on root caries lesions. METHODS: A consensus workshop followed by a Delphi consensus process were conducted with an expert panel nominated by ORCA, EFCD, and DGZ boards. Based on a systematic review of the literature, as well as non-systematic literature search, recommendations for clinicians were developed and consented in a two-stage Delphi process. RESULTS: Demographic and epidemiologic changes will significantly increase the need of management of older adults and root caries in the future. Ageing is associated with a decline of intrinsic capacities and an increased risk of general diseases. As oral and systemic health are linked, bidirectional consequences of diseases and interventions need to be considered. Caries prevention and treatment in older adults must respond to the patient's individual abilities for self-care and cooperation and often involves the support of caregivers. Systemic interventions may involve dietary counselling, oral hygiene instruction, the use of fluoridated toothpastes, and the stimulation of salivary flow. Local interventions to manage root lesions may comprise local biofilm control, application of highly fluoridated toothpastes or varnishes as well as antimicrobial agents. Restorative treatment is often compromised by the accessibility of such root caries lesions as well as the ability of the senior patient to cooperate. If optimum restorative treatment is impossible or inappropriate, long-term stabilization, e.g., by using glass-ionomer cements, and palliative treatments that aim to maintain oral function as long and as well as possible may be the treatment of choice for the individual.

8.
Br Dent J ; 229(7): 393-395, 2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33037331
9.
Br Dent J ; 229(7): 417-424, 2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33037361

RESUMO

Dental phobia is relatively common among adults and often associated with poorer oral health as a consequence of delaying dental treatment until advanced disease has caused intolerable symptoms. The increased rates of active disease may also have an impact on oral health-related quality of life (OHR QoL).Minimum intervention oral healthcare (MIOC) combines four key domains: detection and diagnosis, prevention and control of oral disease, minimally invasive (MI) operative interventions and review/recall. Team delivery and patient-focused care are the underpinning tenets to these four domains. The MIOC approach offers advantages to both patients with dental phobia and the oral healthcare team involved in their long-term management. This paper presents an adaptation of MIOC for patients with dental phobia, which is founded on a comprehensive assessment approach followed by the provision of dental care with behavioural management techniques in combination with conscious sedation. This approach has the potential to provide a comprehensive personalised patient management pathway for delivering better oral health for this vulnerable patient group in a primary care setting.


Assuntos
Ansiedade ao Tratamento Odontológico , Qualidade de Vida , Adulto , Sedação Consciente , Atenção à Saúde , Ansiedade ao Tratamento Odontológico/prevenção & controle , Humanos , Saúde Bucal
10.
Br Dent J ; 229(7): 450-458, 2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33037365

RESUMO

Minimally invasive (MI) concepts in restorative dentistry in the year 2020 request from the practitioner not only a scientifically supported rationale for carious tissue removal/excavation and defect-oriented, biological cavity preparation, but also a deep understanding of how to ensure a biomechanically stable and durable restoration in different clinical situations by applying different restorative options. Bio-interactive materials play an increasingly relevant role, as they not only replace diseased or lost tissue, but also optimise tissue mineral recovery (among other properties) when used in restorative and preventive dentistry. Indeed, this is of certain interest in MI restorative dentistry, especially in those cases where gap formation jeopardises the integrity of the margins along resin composite restorations, causing penetration of bacteria and eventually promoting the formation of secondary caries. Recently, the interest in whether ion-releasing materials may reduce such biofilm penetration into margin gaps and reduce such a risk for development and propagation of secondary caries is growing significantly among clinicians and scientists. The aim of this article was to explore mechanisms involved in the process that allow mineral deposition at the interface between such materials and dentine, and to describe how conventional 'bioactive' restorative materials currently available on the market may benefit treatments in MI dentistry.


Assuntos
Cárie Dentária , Preparo da Cavidade Dentária , Resinas Compostas , Assistência Odontológica , Cárie Dentária/terapia , Materiais Dentários , Restauração Dentária Permanente , Humanos
11.
Br Dent J ; 229(7): 459-465, 2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33037366

RESUMO

This paper aims to update the reader on how minimally invasive (MI) techniques may be used to improve the longevity of carious or defective/compromised first permanent molars (cFPMs) in young children. Clinical and radiographic diagnosis and the prognostic factors will be discussed in view of recent studies showing that these teeth can be kept in function and have an improved prognosis as the child gets older. Clinical protocols for their care, based on the latest evidence and techniques for MI restorations, together with longevity information of possible restorative options, are described. This paper also explores the rationale behind enforced extractions and related morbidity, in order to help oral healthcare practitioners to determine the optimal management of these key elements in the dentition for the benefit of the patients.


Assuntos
Cárie Dentária , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Cárie Dentária/terapia , Restauração Dentária Permanente , Dentição Permanente , Humanos , Dente Molar/diagnóstico por imagem , Prognóstico
12.
Br Dent J ; 229(7): 474-482, 2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33037372

RESUMO

Objectives To define an expert Delphi consensus on when to intervene in the caries process and existing carious lesions.Methods Non-systematic literature synthesis, expert Delphi consensus process and expert panel conference.Results Lesion activity, cavitation and cleansability determine intervention thresholds. Inactive lesions do not require treatment (in some cases, restorations may be placed for form, function, aesthetics); active lesions do. Non-cavitated carious lesions should be managed non- or micro-invasively, as should most cavitated lesions which are cleansable. Cavitated lesions which are not cleansable usually require minimally invasive management. In specific circumstances, mixed interventions may be applicable. Occlusally, cavitated lesions confined to enamel/non-cavitated lesions extending radiographically into deep dentine may be exceptions. Proximally, cavitation is hard to assess tactile-visually. Most lesions extending radiographically into the middle/inner third of dentine are assumed to be cavitated. Those restricted to the enamel are not cavitated. For lesions extending radiographically into the outer third of dentine, cavitation is unlikely. These lesions should be managed as if they were non-cavitated unless otherwise indicated. Individual decisions should consider factors modifying these thresholds.Conclusions Comprehensive diagnosis is the basis for systematic decision-making on when to intervene in the caries process and existing lesions.


Assuntos
Cárie Dentária , Dentina , Consenso , Cárie Dentária/terapia , Suscetibilidade à Cárie Dentária , Estética Dentária , Humanos
13.
BDJ Open ; 6: 12, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32821430

RESUMO

Objectives: The last decade has seen a variety of modifications of glass-ionomer cements (GICs), such as inclusion of bioactive glass particles and dispensing systems. Hence, the aim was to systematically evaluate effect of mixing modes and presence of reactive glass additives on the physical properties of several GICs. Materials and methods: The physical properties of eight commercial restorative GICs; Fuji IX GP Extra (C&H), KetacTM Fill Plus Applicap (C&H), Fuji II LC (C&H), Glass Carbomer Cement and Equia® Forte Fil, capsulated versus manually mixed were assessed. 256 cylindrical specimens were prepared for compressive strength and microhardness, whilst 128 disc-shaped specimens were prepared for biaxial flexural strength tests. Fluid uptake and fluoride release were assessed. Data were analysed using one-way ANOVA and Games-Howell post-hoc tests (alpha = 0.05). Results: Both encapsulated GIC/RMGICs exhibited significantly improved mechanical properties in comparison to manually mixed equivalents, which in turn showed higher fluid uptake and early fluoride release (p < 0.05). The glass carbomer cement exhibited improved mechanical properties post ageing and evidence of mineral deposits were apparent in the microstructure. Conclusions: The mixing mode and inclusion of reactive glass additives in cements had a statistically significant effect on physical properties of the selected GICs-RMGICs.

14.
J Clin Med ; 9(9)2020 Aug 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32854206

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: the aim of this study was to assess the 2-year pulp survival of deep carious lesions in teeth excavated using a self-limiting protocol in a single-blind randomized controlled clinical trial. METHODS: At baseline, 101 teeth with deep carious lesions in 86 patients were excavated randomly using self-limiting or control protocols. Standardized clinical examination and periapical radiographs of teeth were performed after 1- and 2-year follow-ups (REC 14/LO/0880). RESULTS: During the 2-year period of the study, 24 teeth failed (16 and 8 at T12 and T24, respectively). Final analysis shows that 39/63 (61.9%) of teeth were deemed successful (16/33 (48.4%) and 23/30 (76.6%) in the control and experimental groups, respectively with a statistically significant difference (z score = 2.3, p = 0.021). Of teeth with severe and mild symptoms at T0, 42.9% and 36.7% respectively failed at T24 (p > 0.05). Within the self-limiting group, there was a lower success in premolars compared to molars (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: after 2 years, there was a statistically significant higher pulp survival rate of teeth with deep carious lesions excavated using self-limiting protocols in patients with reversible pulpitis. Molars showed higher success than premolars in teeth excavated using the self-limiting protocol. There was no statistically significant association between the outcome and the severity of symptoms at T0 (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03071588).

15.
Clin Oral Investig ; 24(9): 3315-3321, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32643090

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To provide consensus recommendations on how to intervene in the caries process in adults, specifically proximal and secondary carious lesions. METHODS: Based on two systematic reviews, a consensus conference and followed by an e-Delphi consensus process were held with EFCD/ORCA/DGZ delegates. RESULTS: Managing an individual's caries risk using non-invasive means (oral hygiene measures including flossing/interdental brushes, fluoride application) is recommended, as both proximal and secondary carious lesions may be prevented or their activity reduced. For proximal lesions, only cavitated lesions (confirmed by visual-tactile, or radiographically extending into the middle/inner dentine third) should be treated invasively/restoratively. Non-cavitated lesions may be successfully arrested using non-invasive measures in low-risk individuals or if radiographically confined to the enamel. In high-risk individuals or if radiographically extended into dentine, for these lesions, additional micro-invasive (lesion sealing and infiltration) treatment should be considered. For restoring proximal lesions, adhesive direct restorations allow minimally invasive, tooth-preserving preparations. Amalgams come with a lower risk of secondary lesions and may be preferable in more clinically complex scenarios, dependent on specific national guidelines. In structurally compromised (especially endodontically treated) teeth, indirect cuspal coverage restorations may be indicated. Detection methods for secondary lesions should be tailored according to the individual's caries risk. Avoiding false positive detection and over-treatment is a priority. Bitewing radiographs should be combined with visual-tactile assessment to confirm secondary caries detections. Review/refurbishing/resealing/repairing instead of replacing partially defective restorations should be considered for managing secondary caries, if possible. CONCLUSIONS: An individualized and lesion-specific approach is recommended for intervening in the caries process in adults. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Dental clinicians have an increasing number of interventions available for the management of dental caries. Many of them are grounded in the growing understanding of the disease. The best evidence, patients' expectations, clinicians' expertise, and the individual clinical scenario all need to be considered during the decision-making process.


Assuntos
Cárie Dentária , Adulto , Consenso , Técnica Delfos , Cárie Dentária/prevenção & controle , Esmalte Dentário , Materiais Dentários , Humanos , Higiene Bucal
16.
Caries Res ; 54(4): 297-305, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32610317

RESUMO

This paper provides recommendations for dentists for the treatment of dental caries in children, with an emphasis on early childhood caries (ECC), primary teeth, and occlusal surfaces in permanent teeth. A consensus workshop followed by an e-Delphi consensus process was conducted with an expert panel nominated by the European Organization for Caries Research (ORCA) and European Federation of Conservative Dentistry (EFCD)/German Association of Conservative Dentistry (DGZ) boards. Based on 3 systematic reviews and a nonsystematic literature search, recommendations were developed. The caries decline has led to a more polarized disease distribution in children and adolescents along social gradients which should be taken into account when managing the caries process at all levels, such as the individual, the group, or a population. The control or reduction of caries activity is the basis for successful caries management. In children, caries management requires adequate daily oral hygiene and fluoride application via toothpaste, ensured by caregivers, and especially for ECC prevention an emphasis on sugar intake reduction is needed. These noninvasive interventions are also suitable to arrest or control initial or even cavitated dentine caries lesions in the absence of irreversible pulpitis. Fluoride varnish or silver diammine fluoride can be added as supplementary agents. In pits and fissures, composite resin materials can be used as preventive sealants and for defect-oriented minimally invasive restorations. In primary molars, preformed metal crowns are more successful than multisurface fillings, especially in caries-active patients. With persisting high caries activity, multiple lesions, and limited cooperation, caries control should consist of robust measures with high success rates, even including extraction in selected cases. This applies especially to treatments performed under general anesthesia.


Assuntos
Cárie Dentária , Selantes de Fossas e Fissuras , Adolescente , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Consenso , Cárie Dentária/prevenção & controle , Suscetibilidade à Cárie Dentária , Dentição Permanente , Humanos
17.
Clin Oral Investig ; 24(5): 1869-1876, 2020 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32300980

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To assess how to control, detect, and treat secondary caries. This review serves to inform a joint ORCA/EFCD consensus process. METHODS: Systematic and non-systematic reviews were performed or consulted and narratively synthesized. RESULTS: Secondary (or recurrent) caries is defined as a lesion associated with restorations or sealants. While the restorative material itself has some influence on secondary caries, further factors like the presence and size of restoration gaps, patients' caries risk, and the placing dentist's experience seem more relevant. Current detection methods for secondary caries are only sparsely validated and likely prone for the risk of over-detection. In many patients, it might be prudent to prioritize specific detection methods to avoid invasive overtreatment. Detected secondary caries can be managed either by repair of the defective part of the restoration or its complete replacement. CONCLUSIONS: There is sparse data towards the nature of secondary caries and how to control, detect, and treat it. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Despite often claimed to be a major complication of restorations, there is surprisingly little data on secondary caries. Longer-term studies may be needed to identify differences in secondary caries risk between materials and to identify characteristic features of progressive lesions (i.e., those in need of treatment).


Assuntos
Cárie Dentária/diagnóstico , Cárie Dentária/prevenção & controle , Cárie Dentária/terapia , Restauração Dentária Permanente , Materiais Dentários , Humanos
19.
Int J Paediatr Dent ; 30(5): 556-569, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32112461

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Dentists need training in the management of children's anxiety (DA), fear (DF) and behaviour management problems (DBMP) but little is known of their competence on this topic. AIM: To report dentists' opinions and attitudes about protective stabilisation and pharmacological techniques for the management of children with DA/DF/DBMP; to propose a postgraduate curriculum focussing on DA/DF/DBMP. DESIGN: A survey of 301 Brazilian dentists and later a modified Delphi process to outline the curriculum in two phases: (a) face-to-face discussions with 33 early career researchers mentored by six researchers, both from UK and Brazil; (b) online discussions by eight early and senior researchers on the knowledge, experience, and competencies necessary for a specialist in paediatric dentistry in Brazil that should be included in the core curriculum of postgraduate courses. RESULTS: Almost all (99.0%) of the survey respondents provide treatment to children with DA/DF/DBMP, and 91.2% do not systematically diagnose these conditions; 94.3% use protective stabilisation, and 20.0%-30.0% have training in pharmacological techniques. The four-domain framework supporting the proposed curriculum is as follows: DA/DF/DBMP assessment, non-pharmacological and pharmacological approaches, and decision-making. CONCLUSION: Dental curricula should be customised to solve the misconceptions and promote a comprehensive and positive attitude to DA/DF/DBMP by paediatric oral healthcare practitioners.


Assuntos
Ansiedade ao Tratamento Odontológico , Odontopediatria , Brasil , Criança , Comportamento Infantil , Currículo , Humanos
20.
Clin Oral Investig ; 24(9): 3029-3038, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31845069

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To study the repair potential of seven commercial glass-ionomer cements (GICs) using an in vitro edge compression test model. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 448 normal and 192 repaired cylindrical specimens (6 × 4 mm) were produced from 6 GICs and one resin-modified GIC. Repaired samples consisted of a base aged for 1 month before repaired by an overlying layer. All samples were matured for 1 day, 1 week, 1 month or 3 months before compression, and edge tests were performed respectively on the whole surface (compressive strength, CS) or on the edge (edge stability, ES) using a universal testing machine. RESULTS: For normal specimens, Ketac Universal (KU) illustrated a significantly higher CS than other groups at all time points (p < 0.001). ES of KU was weaker than EQUIA Forte (EQF), FIX (Fuji IX) and RSC (Riva Self Cure) after 1 day, increasing after 1 week. Repaired specimens showed CS comparable to normal specimens (p > 0.05). Repaired KU significantly improved CS compared to repaired EQF and Fuji II (FII) after 1 day. No statistical difference was found in ES among these groups (p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: KU provided the fastest maturation and greatest CS and ES in both normal and repair models after short-term ageing. Repair of GICs could potentially be achieved directly onto the fractured substrate and the subsequent improved mechanical performance could be maintained for at least 3 months. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: This study provides a potential alternative in-vitro method to assess GIC restoration failure as well as provide insight into the mechanisms of GIC restoration repair.


Assuntos
Cimentos de Ionômeros de Vidro , Força Compressiva , Materiais Dentários , Teste de Materiais
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