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1.
Am J Health Promot ; : 890117120906960, 2020 Mar 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32133865

RESUMO

PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to examine frequent mental distress (FMD) by demographics, chronic conditions, and health risk factors among Illinois adults. DESIGN: Descriptive analyses included χ2 and pairwise t tests to examine how FMD status differed by selected characteristics and Cox proportional hazards regression analysis to examine the association between FMD and chronic conditions and risk factors. SETTING: Illinois Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2011 to 2017 (n = 37 312). PARTICIPANTS: Adults who self-report FMD (n = 3455) were included. MEASURES: Prevalence of high blood pressure, coronary heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, arthritis, asthma, high blood cholesterol, cancer, kidney disease, stroke, diabetes, weight status, physical activity status, smoking status, and drinking status. RESULTS: A significantly higher FMD prevalence was found among females (11.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 11.1-12.4), non-Hispanic blacks (13.4, 95% CI: 11.9-15.0), adults with less than a high school degree (14.4%; 95% CI: 12.6-16.3), adults with an annual income of less than $15 000 (21.4%; 95% CI: 19.4-23.5), and adults with a disability (23.3%, 95% CI: 21.9-24.7). Adjusted prevalence of FMD was significantly higher among adults for 8 of 10 chronic conditions and 4 of 5 health risk factors studied. CONCLUSIONS: Social stigmas related to depression and anxiety may lead to the underreporting of FMD. Chronic disease management programs in Illinois should consider integrating mental health services.

2.
Prev Chronic Dis ; 17: E08, 2020 01 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31971896

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Evidence-based interventions (referral, team-based care, self-management, and self-monitoring) for chronic disease management are well documented and widely used by Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs). However, how these interventions are implemented varies substantially. METHODS: The Illinois Health Information Systems Survey was deployed to 49 FQHCs. Responses were grouped into 4 distinct policies, systems, and processes (P/S/P) categories: internal policies/workflows, huddles (brief meetings), electronic health record alerts/tracking tools, and case manager/coordinator interaction. Responses were then direct-matched to the 2016 Health Resources and Services and Administration Uniform Data System clinical quality indicator (QI) percent scores. Descriptive statistics were generated and level of significance (P < .05) was tested for hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus. RESULTS: The total number of P/S/Ps in place for hypertension ranged from 0 to 13 (mean, 6.9) and 0 to 8 for diabetes (mean, 5.1). Meeting or exceeding the national mean QI percent score for controlled blood pressure (62.4%) was significant among FQHCs with 9 or more P/S/Ps compared with those with 8 or fewer P/S/Ps. A positive association in clinical QI percent score was found among organizations that had 3 or more P/S/Ps (for all 4 intervention areas), although none were significant. CONCLUSION: An assessment of the types of P/S/Ps used to implement evidence-based interventions for hypertension and diabetes management is a first in Illinois. Initial results support some relationship between the number of P/S/Ps implemented and clinical QI percent score for both hypertension and diabetes.

4.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 68(38): 819-824, 2019 Sep 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31557148

RESUMO

Rheumatic diseases are a leading cause of chronic, noncancer pain. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune rheumatic disease characterized by periodic flares that can result in irreversible target organ damage, including end-stage renal disease. Both intermittent and chronic musculoskeletal pain, as well as fibromyalgia (considered a centralized pain disorder due to dysregulation of pain processing in the central nervous system), are common in SLE. Opioids are generally not indicated for long-term management of musculoskeletal pain or centralized pain (fibromyalgia) because of lack of efficacy, safety issues ranging from adverse medical effects to overdose, and risk for addiction (1,2). In this study of 462 patients with SLE from the population-based Michigan Lupus Epidemiology and Surveillance (MILES) Cohort and 192 frequency-matched persons without SLE, nearly one third (31%) of SLE patients were using prescription opioids during the study period (2014-2015), compared with 8% of persons without SLE (p<0.001). Among the SLE patients using opioids, 97 (68%) were using them for >1 year, and 31 (22%) were concomitantly on two or more opioid medications. Among SLE patients, those using the emergency department (ED) were approximately twice as likely to use prescription opioids (odds ratio [OR] = 2.1; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.3-3.6; p = 0.004). In SLE, the combined contributions of underlying disease and adverse effects of immunosuppressive and glucocorticoid therapies already put patients at higher risk for some known adverse effects attributed to long-term opioid use. Addressing the widespread and long-term use of opioid therapy in SLE will require strategies aimed at preventing opioid initiation, tapering and discontinuation of opioids among patients who are not achieving treatment goals of reduced pain and increased function, and consideration of nonopioid pain management strategies.


Assuntos
Analgésicos Opioides/uso terapêutico , Prescrições de Medicamentos/estatística & dados numéricos , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/tratamento farmacológico , Vigilância da População , Adulto , Idoso , Estudos de Coortes , Serviço Hospitalar de Emergência , Feminino , Humanos , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/epidemiologia , Masculino , Michigan/epidemiologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Manejo da Dor/métodos , Risco
5.
Neurourol Urodyn ; 38(7): 1966-1972, 2019 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31302944

RESUMO

AIMS: The complexity of Interstitial Cystitis/bladder Pain Syndrome (IC/BPS) has led to a great deal of uncertainty around the diagnosis and prevalence of the condition. Under the hypothesis that IC/BPS is frequently misdiagnosed, we sought to assess the accuracy of the ICD-9/ICD-10 code for IC/BPS using a national data set. METHODS: Using the Veterans Affairs Informatics and Computing Infrastructure, we identified a random sample of 100 patients with an ICD-9/ICD-10 diagnosis of IC/BPS (595.1/N30.10) by querying all living patients in the Veterans Affairs (VA) system. We purposely sampled men and women equally to better understand gender-specific practice patterns. Patients were considered a correct IC/BPS diagnosis if they had two visits complaining of bladder-centric pain in the absence of positive urine culture at least 6 weeks apart. Patients were considered not to have IC/BPS if they had a history of pelvic radiation, systemic chemotherapy, metastatic cancer, or bladder cancer. RESULTS: Of the 100 patients, 48 were female and 52 were male. Five had prior radiation, one had active cancer, and 10 had bladder cancer (all male), and an additional fifteen had insufficient records. Of the remaining 69 patients, 43% did not have IC/BPS. Of these patients who did not have IC/BPS, 43% complained only of overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms, which was more common in women (63%) than men (21%), P = .003. CONCLUSIONS: In our small sample from a nationwide VA system, results indicate that IC/BPS has a high misdiagnosis rate. These findings shed light on the gender-specific diagnostic complexity of IC/BPS.

6.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31074595

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To examine associations between dietary intake of omega-3 (n-3; generally anti-inflammatory) and omega-6 (n-6; generally pro-inflammatory) fatty acids and patient-reported outcomes in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). METHODS: This study was based on the population-based Michigan Lupus Epidemiology & Surveillance (MILES) Cohort. Estimates of n-3 and n-6 intake were derived from Diet History Questionnaire II items (DHQ II; past year with portion size version). Patient-reported outcomes included self-reported lupus activity (Systemic Lupus Activity Questionnaire/SLAQ). Multivariable regression, adjusted for age, sex, race, and body mass index, was used to assess associations between absolute intake of n-3 and n-6, as well as the n-6:n-3 ratio, and patient-reported outcomes. RESULTS: Among 456 SLE cases, 425 (93.2%) were female, 207 (45.4%) were black, and mean age was 52.9±12.3 years. Controlling for potential confounders, the average SLAQ score was significantly higher by 0.3 points [(95% CI 0.1, 0.6); p=0.013] with each unit increase of the n-6:n-3 ratio. Both lupus activity and PROMIS-Sleep Disturbance scores were lower with each 1g/1000 Kcal increase of n-3 fatty acids [SLAQ regression coefficient ß=-0.8 (95% CI -1.6, 0.0), p=0.055; PROMIS-Sleep ß=-1.1 (95% CI -2.0, -0.2), p=0.017]. Higher n-3 intakes were non-significantly associated with lower levels of depressive symptoms and comorbid fibromyalgia, and higher quality of life, whereas results for the n6:n3 ratio trended in the opposite direction. CONCLUSION: This population-based study suggests that higher dietary intake of n-3 fatty acids, and lower n-6:n-3 ratios, are favorably associated with patient-reported outcomes in SLE, particularly self-reported lupus activity and sleep quality. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

7.
J Clin Endocrinol Metab ; 104(8): 3303-3310, 2019 Aug 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30802282

RESUMO

CONTEXT: Adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D) have higher fracture risk compared with nondiabetics, despite having higher bone mineral density (BMD). Insulin resistance (IR) has been associated with increased BMD. It is not known if IR increases fracture risk. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the relationship among IR HOMA-IR, BMD, and incident nonspine fractures in nondiabetic individuals. DESIGN: Participants included 2398 community-dwelling, nondiabetic older adults (age 74 ± 3 years, 53% women, 38% black) in the Health, Aging and Body Composition Prospective Cohort Study [median follow-up: 12 (interquartile range: 6) years]. RESULTS: The cut-off values for the HOMA-IR quartiles were 1.05, 1.54, and 2.33. Total hip BMD was 0.104 g/cm2 higher in the fourth vs the first HOMA-IR quartile (P < 0.001). This difference was attenuated after adjustment for BMI (adjusted mean difference 0.007 g/cm2; P = 0.371). In unadjusted models, fracture risk was lower in those with higher HOMA-IR [hazard ratio (HR) 0.86 (95% CI 0.73 to 1.01) and 0.65 (95% CI 0.47 to 0.89) for the third and fourth quartile, respectively, vs the first quartile]. However, after adjustment for BMD and BMI, fracture risk was significantly higher in the third quartile (HR 1.19, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.41) and tended to be increased in the fourth quartile (HR 1.12, 95% CI 0.87 to 1.46) vs the first quartile. CONCLUSIONS: Greater IR is associated with higher BMD in nondiabetic older adults. In contrast to the relationship between T2D and fracture risk, we did not find consistent evidence that greater IR is associated with increased fracture risk after adjustment for BMI and BMD.

8.
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) ; 71(7): 865-874, 2019 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30133173

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The risk of falls among adults with knee osteoarthritis (OA) has been documented, yet, to our knowledge no studies have examined knee OA and the risk of medically treated injurious falls (overall and by sex), which is an outcome of substantial clinical and public health relevance. METHODS: Using data from the Health Aging and Body Composition Knee Osteoarthritis Substudy, a community-based study of white and African American older adults, we tested associations between knee OA status and the risk of injurious falls among 734 participants with a mean ± SD age of 74.7 ± 2.9 years. Knee radiographic OA (ROA) was defined as having a Kellgren-Lawrence grade of ≥2 in at least 1 knee. Knee symptomatic ROA (sROA) was defined as having both ROA and pain symptoms in the same knee. Injurious falls were defined using a validated diagnosis code algorithm from linked Medicare fee-for-service claims. Cox regression modeling was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). RESULTS: The mean ± SD follow-up time was 6.59 ± 3.12 years. Of the 734 participants, 255 (34.7%) had an incident injurious fall over the entire study period. In the multivariate model, compared with those without ROA or pain, individuals with sROA (HR 1.09 [95% CI 0.73-1.65]) did not have a significantly increased risk of injurious falls. Compared with men without ROA or pain, men with sROA (HR 2.57 [95% CI 1.12-5.91]) had a significantly higher risk of injurious falls. No associations were found for women or by injurious fall type. CONCLUSION: Knee sROA was independently associated with an increased risk of injurious falls in older men, but not in older women.


Assuntos
Acidentes por Quedas , Articulação do Joelho/diagnóstico por imagem , Osteoartrite do Joelho/epidemiologia , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Osteoartrite do Joelho/diagnóstico por imagem , Pennsylvania/epidemiologia , Prevalência , Prognóstico , Medição de Risco , Fatores de Risco , Fatores Sexuais , Tennessee/epidemiologia , Fatores de Tempo
10.
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) ; 71(2): 178-188, 2019 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30346654

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Walking is a joint-friendly activity for adults with arthritis. The aim of this study was to estimate, among adults with arthritis, the prevalence of leisure and transportation walking overall (by arthritis status and by sociodemographic and health characteristics), the number of total minutes walking per week in each domain, and the distributions of walking bout length (i.e., short periods of activity) in minutes. METHODS: Data were obtained from the 2010 National Health Interview Survey. Prevalence estimates (percentages and 95% confidence intervals [95% CIs]) of leisure and transportation walking in the past 7 days and walking bout times were calculated (in minutes), as were multivariable Poisson regression models, which account for the complex sample design. RESULTS: Prevalence of leisure walking was 45.9% (95% CI 44.2-47.6) for adults with arthritis versus 51.9% (95% CI 50.9-52.9) for those without. Transportation walking prevalence was 23.0% (95% CI 21.7-24.4) for adults with arthritis versus 32.0% (95% CI 31.0-33.0) for those without. The total time of leisure walking per week did not differ in adults with arthritis compared to those without (77.3 versus 78.3 minutes, respectively; P = 0.62), while total time of transportation walking did differ (49.8 versus 58.1 minutes, respectively; P = 0.03). The most common walking bout length differed between leisure (26-40 minutes) and transportation (10-15 minutes) walking, but not by arthritis status. In separate adjusted multivariable models, obesity was consistently negatively associated with both walking outcomes, and being physically active was positively associated with both; lower extremity joint pain was not associated. CONCLUSION: By adding short bouts, leisure and transportation walking could be adopted by large proportions of adults with arthritis. Existing evidence-based programs can help increase physical activity.


Assuntos
Artrite/epidemiologia , Artrite/terapia , Atividades de Lazer , Transportes/métodos , Caminhada/fisiologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Artrite/psicologia , Estudos Transversais , Exercício/fisiologia , Feminino , Inquéritos Epidemiológicos/métodos , Humanos , Atividades de Lazer/psicologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Autorrelato , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Caminhada/psicologia , Adulto Jovem
11.
J Bone Miner Res ; 34(3): 464-474, 2019 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30461066

RESUMO

Sleep disturbances are common and may influence falls and fracture directly by influencing bone turnover and muscle strength or indirectly through high comorbidity or poor physical function. To investigate the association between self-reported sleep and falls and fractures, we prospectively studied 157,306 women in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) using information on sleep quality, sleep duration, and insomnia from questionnaires. Annual self-report of falling two or more times (ie, "recurrent falling") during each year of follow-up was modeled with repeated measures logistic regression models fit by generalized estimating equations. Cox proportional hazards models were used to investigate sleep disturbance and time to first fracture. We examined the risks of recurrent falls and fracture by sleep duration with 7 hours as referent. We examined the risks across categories of sleep disturbance, insomnia status, and sleep quality. The average follow-up time was 7.6 years for falls and 12.0 years for fractures. In multivariable adjusted models, including adjustment for comorbidity, medications, and physical function, women who were short (≤5 hours) and long (≥10 hours) sleepers had increased odds of recurrent falls (odds ratio [OR] 1.28; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23 to 1.34 and OR 1.25; 95% CI, 1.09 to 1.43, respectively). Poor sleep quality, insomnia, and more sleep disturbances were also associated with an increased odds of recurrent falls. Short sleep was associated with an increased risk of all fractures, and upper limb, lower limb, and central body fractures, but not hip fractures, with hazard ratios ranging from 1.10 to 1.13 (p < 0.05). There was little association between other sleep characteristics and fracture. In conclusion, short and long sleep duration and poor sleep quality were independently associated with increased odds of recurrent falls. Short sleep was associated with modest increase in fractures. Future long-term trials of sleep interventions should include falls and fractures as endpoints. © 2018 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

13.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 67(47): 1314-1318, 2018 Nov 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30496159

RESUMO

Compared with other racial/ethnic groups, American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/AN) have a lower life expectancy, lower quality of life, and are disproportionately affected by many chronic conditions (1,2). Arizona has the third largest population of AI/AN in the United States (approximately 266,000 in 2017), and is home to 22 federally recognized American Indian tribal nations.* The small AI/AN sample size in previous Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) surveys has presented analytic challenges in making statistical inferences about this population. To identify health disparities among AI/AN living in Arizona, the Arizona Department of Health Services (ADHS) and CDC analyzed data from the 2017 BRFSS survey, for which AI/AN were oversampled. Compared with whites, AI/AN had significantly higher prevalences of sugar-sweetened beverage consumption (33.0% versus 26.8%), being overweight or having obesity (76.7% versus 63.2%), diabetes (21.4% versus 8.0%), high blood pressure (32.9% versus 27.6%), report of fair or poor health status (28.7% versus 16.3%), and leisure-time physical inactivity during the past month (31.1% versus 23.0%). AI/AN also reported a lower prevalence of having a personal doctor or health care provider (63.1%) than did whites (72.8%). This report highlights the need to enhance surveillance measures at the local, state, and national levels and can inform interventions centered on confronting social inequities, developing culturally competent prevention strategies, and facilitating access to care to improve population health and work toward health equity.


Assuntos
Nativos do Alasca/estatística & dados numéricos , Disparidades nos Níveis de Saúde , Índios Norte-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Arizona/epidemiologia , Sistema de Vigilância de Fator de Risco Comportamental , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Adulto Jovem
14.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 67(44): 1238-1241, 2018 Nov 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30408017

RESUMO

An estimated 54.4 million U.S. adults have doctor-diagnosed arthritis (arthritis), and this number is projected to rise to 78.4 million by 2040 (1,2). Physical inactivity and obesity are two factors associated with an increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes,* and arthritis has been determined to be a barrier to physical activity among adults with obesity (3). The prevalence of arthritis among the 33.9% (estimated 84 million)† of U.S. adults with prediabetes and how these conditions are related to physical inactivity and obesity are unknown. To examine the relationships among arthritis, prediabetes, physical inactivity, and obesity, CDC analyzed combined data from the 2009-2016 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES). Overall, the unadjusted prevalence of arthritis among adults with prediabetes was 32.0% (26 million). Among adults with both arthritis and prediabetes, the unadjusted prevalences of leisure-time physical inactivity and obesity were 56.5% (95% confidence intervals [CIs] = 51.3-61.5) and 50.1% (CI = 46.5-53.6), respectively. Approximately half of adults with both prediabetes and arthritis are either physically inactive or have obesity, further increasing their risk for type 2 diabetes. Health care and public health professionals can address arthritis-specific barriers§ to physical activity by promoting evidence-based physical activity interventions.¶ Furthermore, weight loss and physical activity promoted though the National Diabetes Prevention Program can reduce the risk for type 2 diabetes and reduce pain from arthritis.


Assuntos
Artrite/epidemiologia , Artrite/fisiopatologia , Estado Pré-Diabético/epidemiologia , Estado Pré-Diabético/prevenção & controle , Adulto , Idoso , Artrite/etnologia , Exercício , Feminino , Humanos , Atividades de Lazer , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Inquéritos Nutricionais , Obesidade/epidemiologia , Dor/etiologia , Estado Pré-Diabético/etnologia , Prevalência , Comportamento Sedentário , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
15.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 67(39): 1081-1087, 2018 Oct 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30286053

RESUMO

An estimated 54.4 million (22.7%) U.S. adults have doctor-diagnosed arthritis (1). A report in 2012 found that, among adults aged ≥45 years with arthritis, approximately one third reported having anxiety or depression, with anxiety more common than depression (2). Studies examining mental health conditions in adults with arthritis have focused largely on depression, arthritis subtypes, and middle-aged and older adults, or have not been nationally representative (3). To address these knowledge gaps, CDC analyzed 2015-2017 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data* to estimate the national prevalence of clinically relevant symptoms of anxiety and depression among adults aged ≥18 years with arthritis. Among adults with arthritis, age-standardized prevalences of symptoms of anxiety and depression were 22.5% and 12.1%, respectively, compared with 10.7% and 4.7% among adults without arthritis. Successful treatment approaches to address anxiety and depression among adults with arthritis are multifaceted and include screenings, referrals to mental health professionals, and evidence-based strategies such as regular physical activity and participation in self-management education to improve mental health.


Assuntos
Ansiedade/epidemiologia , Artrite/psicologia , Depressão/epidemiologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Artrite/epidemiologia , Feminino , Inquéritos Epidemiológicos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Prevalência , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
16.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 67(17): 485-490, 2018 May 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29723172

RESUMO

In the United States, 54.4 million adults report having doctor-diagnosed arthritis (1). Among adults with arthritis, 32.7% and 38.1% also have overweight and obesity, respectively (1), with obesity being more prevalent among persons with arthritis than among those who do not have arthritis (2). Furthermore, severe joint pain among adults with arthritis in 2014 was reported by 23.5% of adults with overweight and 31.7% of adults with obesity (3). The American College of Rheumatology recommends weight loss for adults with hip or knee osteoarthritis and overweight or obesity,* which can improve function and mobility while reducing pain and disability (4,5). The Healthy People 2020 target for health care provider (hereafter provider) counseling for weight loss among persons with arthritis and overweight or obesity is 45.3%.† Adults with overweight or obesity who receive weight-loss counseling from a provider are approximately four times more likely to attempt to lose weight than are those who do not receive counseling (6). To estimate changes in the prevalence of provider counseling for weight loss reported by adults with arthritis and overweight or obesity, CDC analyzed National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data.§ Overall, age-standardized estimates of provider counseling for weight loss increased by 10.4 percentage points from 2002 (35.1%; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 33.0-37.3) to 2014 (45.5%; 95% CI = 42.9-48.1) (p<0.001). Providing comprehensive behavioral counseling (including nutrition, physical activity, and self-management education) and encouraging evidence-based weight-loss program participation can result in enhanced health benefits for this population.


Assuntos
Artrite/terapia , Aconselhamento Diretivo/estatística & dados numéricos , Obesidade/terapia , Sobrepeso/terapia , Perda de Peso , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Artrite/epidemiologia , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Pesquisas sobre Serviços de Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Obesidade/epidemiologia , Sobrepeso/epidemiologia , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
17.
MMWR Surveill Summ ; 67(4): 1-28, 2018 03 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29543787

RESUMO

PROBLEM/CONDITION: Doctor-diagnosed arthritis is a common chronic condition affecting an estimated 23% (54 million) of adults in the United States, greatly influencing quality of life and costing approximately $300 billion annually. The geographic variations in arthritis prevalence, health-related characteristics, and management among states and territories are unknown. Therefore, public health professionals need to understand arthritis in their areas to target dissemination of evidence-based interventions that reduce arthritis morbidity. REPORTING PERIOD: 2015. DESCRIPTION OF SYSTEM: The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System is an annual, random-digit-dialed landline and cellular telephone survey of noninstitutionalized adults aged ≥18 years residing in the United States. Self-reported data are collected from the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Guam, and Puerto Rico. Unadjusted and age-standardized prevalences of arthritis, arthritis health-related characteristics, and arthritis management were calculated. County-level estimates were calculated using a validated statistical modeling method. RESULTS: In 2015, in the 50 states and the District of Columbia, median age-standardized prevalence of arthritis was 23.0% (range: 17.2%-33.6%). Modeled prevalence of arthritis varied considerably by county (range: 11.2%-42.7%). In 13 states that administered the arthritis management module, among adults with arthritis, the age-standardized median percentage of participation in a self-management education course was 14.5% (range: 9.1%-19.0%), being told by a health care provider to engage in physical activity or exercise was 58.5% (range: 52.3%-61.9%), and being told to lose weight to manage arthritis symptoms (if overweight or obese) was 44.5% (range: 35.1%-53.2%). Respondents with arthritis who lived in the quartile of states with the highest prevalences of arthritis had the highest percentages of negative health-related characteristics (i.e., arthritis-attributable activity limitations, arthritis-attributable severe joint pain, and arthritis-attributable social participation restriction; ≥14 physically unhealthy days during the past 30 days; ≥14 mentally unhealthy days during the past 30 days; obesity; and leisure-time physical inactivity) and the lowest percentage of leisure-time walking. INTERPRETATION: The prevalence, health-related characteristics, and management of arthritis varied substantially across states. The modeled prevalence of arthritis varied considerably by county. PUBLIC HEALTH ACTION: The findings highlight notable geographic variability in prevalence, health-related characteristics, and management of arthritis. Targeted use of evidence-based interventions that focus on physical activity and self-management education can reduce pain and improve function and quality of life for adults with arthritis and thus might reduce these geographic disparities.


Assuntos
Artrite , Disparidades nos Níveis de Saúde , Características de Residência/estatística & dados numéricos , Atividades Cotidianas , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Artralgia/epidemiologia , Artrite/complicações , Artrite/epidemiologia , Artrite/prevenção & controle , Sistema de Vigilância de Fator de Risco Comportamental , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Prevalência , Fatores de Risco , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
18.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 66(51-52): 1398-1401, 2018 Jan 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29300722

RESUMO

Arthritis affects an estimated 54 million U.S. adults and, as a common comorbidity, can contribute arthritis-specific limitations or barriers to physical activity or exercise for persons with diabetes, heart disease, and obesity (1). The American College of Rheumatology's osteoarthritis management guidelines recommend exercise as a first-line, nonpharmacologic strategy to manage arthritis symptoms (2), and a Healthy People 2020 objective is to increase health care provider counseling for physical activity or exercise among adults with arthritis.* To determine the prevalence and percentage change from 2002 to 2014 in receipt of health care provider counseling for physical activity or exercise (counseling for exercise) among adults with arthritis, CDC analyzed 2002 and 2014 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data. From 2002 to 2014, the age-adjusted prevalence of reporting health care provider counseling for exercise among adults with arthritis increased 17.6%, from 51.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 49.9%-53.8%) to 61.0% (CI = 58.6%-63.4%) (p<0.001). The age-adjusted prevalence of reporting health care provider counseling for exercise among persons with arthritis who described themselves as inactive increased 20.1%, from 47.2% (CI = 44.0%-50.4%) in 2002 to 56.7% (CI = 52.3%-61.0%) in 2014 (p = 0.001). Prevalence of counseling for exercise has increased significantly since 2002; however, approximately 40% of adults with arthritis are still not receiving counseling for exercise. Improving health care provider training and expertise in exercise counseling and incorporating prompts into electronic medical records are potential strategies to facilitate counseling for exercise that can help adults manage their arthritis and comorbid conditions.


Assuntos
Artrite/terapia , Aconselhamento Diretivo/estatística & dados numéricos , Exercício , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Artrite/psicologia , Feminino , Pesquisas sobre Serviços de Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Comportamento Sedentário , Estados Unidos , Adulto Jovem
19.
Med Sci Sports Exerc ; 50(2): 277-283, 2018 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28976494

RESUMO

PURPOSE: This study aimed to examine the association between objectively measured physical activity and risk of developing incident knee osteoarthritis (OA) in a community-based cohort of middle-age and older adults. METHODS: We used data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative, an ongoing prospective cohort study of adults 45 to 83 yr of age at initial enrollment with elevated risk of symptomatic knee OA. Moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was measured by a uniaxial accelerometer for seven continuous days in two data collection cycles and was categorized as inactive (<10 min·wk), low activity (10-<150 min·wk), and active (≥150 min·wk). Incident knee OA based on radiographic and symptomatic OA and joint space narrowing were analyzed as outcomes over 4 yr of follow-up. Participants free of the outcome of interest in both knees at study baseline were included (sample sizes ranged from 694 to 1331 for different outcomes). We estimated hazard ratio (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). RESULTS: In multivariate analyses, active MVPA participation was not significantly associated with risk of incident radiographic knee OA (HR = 1.52, 95% CI = 0.68-3.40), symptomatic knee OA (HR = 1.17, 95% CI = 0.44-3.09), or joint space narrowing (HR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.37-2.06) when compared with inactive MVPA participation. Similar results were found for participants with low activity MVPA. CONCLUSION: MVPA was not associated with the risk of developing incident knee OA or joint space narrowing over 4 yr of follow-up among Osteoarthritis Initiative participants who are at increased risk of knee OA.


Assuntos
Exercício , Osteoartrite do Joelho/epidemiologia , Acelerometria , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Seguimentos , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Análise Multivariada , Estudos Prospectivos , Fatores de Risco
20.
Am J Prev Med ; 53(3): 345-354, 2017 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28601405

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: In 2016, leisure time physical activity among U.S. adults aged ≥18 years with and without arthritis was studied to provide estimates using contemporary guidelines (2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans) and population-based data (U.S. National Health Interview Survey). METHODS: Estimated prevalence of: (1) meeting aerobic, muscle strengthening, and both aerobic and muscle strengthening guidelines, by arthritis status, from 2008 to 2015; and (2) meeting guidelines across selected sociodemographic characteristics and health status and behaviors, among adults with arthritis, in 2015. RESULTS: In 2015, 36.2%, 17.9%, and 13.7% of adults with arthritis met aerobic, muscle strengthening, and both guidelines, respectively; age-standardized prevalence of meeting each guideline was significantly lower among those with arthritis versus those without (e.g., 41.9% [95% CI=39.5%, 44.3%] and 52.2% [95% CI=51.2%, 53.2%] met the aerobic guideline, respectively; p<0.001). From 2008 to 2015, meeting aerobic guideline rose modestly (3 percentage points) among those with arthritis compared with larger gains (7 percentage points) among those without arthritis; the percentage of adults with arthritis meeting muscle strengthening and both guidelines remained the same in contrast to modest (statistically significant) increases among those without arthritis. Among adults with arthritis, age-standardized percentage meeting each guideline was highest among those with at least a university degree. CONCLUSIONS: Percentage meeting each guideline was persistently low among adults with arthritis. The lower prevalence among adults with arthritis versus those without suggests that adults with arthritis need additional strategies to address potential barriers (e.g., pain, psychological distress, inadequate medical support) to physical activity.


Assuntos
Artrite/prevenção & controle , Escolaridade , Exercício/psicologia , Atividades de Lazer/psicologia , Estresse Psicológico/psicologia , Adulto , Fatores Etários , Idoso , Artrite/complicações , Artrite/psicologia , Feminino , Inquéritos Epidemiológicos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Dor/etiologia , Dor/psicologia , Guias de Prática Clínica como Assunto , Autorrelato , Estresse Psicológico/etiologia , Estados Unidos , Adulto Jovem
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