Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 20
Filtrar
Mais filtros










Base de dados
Intervalo de ano de publicação
1.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 68(53): 1201-1205, 2020 Jan 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31945036

RESUMO

Control of communicable diseases in children, including respiratory and diarrheal illnesses that affect U.S. school-aged children, might require public health preventive efforts both in the home and at school, a primary setting for transmission. National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data on school absenteeism and gastrointestinal and respiratory illnesses in the United States during 2010-2016 were analyzed to examine their associations with income. Prevalence of gastrointestinal and respiratory illnesses (queried for the 2 weeks preceding the survey) increased as income decreased. The likelihood of missing any school days during the past year decreased with reduced income. However, among children who missed school, those from low-income households missed more days of school than did children from higher income households. Although the reason for absenteeism cannot be ascertained from this analysis, these data underscore the importance of preventive measures (e.g. hand hygiene promotion and education) and the opportunity for both homes and schools to serve as important points for implementation of public health preventive measures, including improved hand hygiene practices.


Assuntos
Absenteísmo , Gastroenteropatias/epidemiologia , Renda/estatística & dados numéricos , Infecções Respiratórias/epidemiologia , Instituições Acadêmicas , Adolescente , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
2.
J Adolesc Health ; 66(1): 100-106, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31757626

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has been proven safe and effective in preventing HIV among adolescent sexual minority males (ASMM), but the cost-effectiveness of PrEP in ASMM remains unknown. Building on a recent epidemiological network modeling study of PrEP among ASMM, we estimated the cost-effectiveness of PrEP use in a high prevalence U.S. setting with significant disparities in HIV between black and white ASMM. METHODS: Based on the estimated number of infections averted and the number of ASMM on PrEP from the previous model and published estimates of PrEP costs, HIV treatment costs, and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained per infection prevented, we estimated the cost-effectiveness of PrEP use in black and white ASMM over 10 years using a societal perspective and lifetime horizon. Effectiveness was measured as lifetime QALYs gained. Cost estimates included 10-year PrEP costs and lifetime HIV treatment costs saved. Cost-effectiveness was measured as cost/QALY gained. Multiple sensitivity analyses were performed on key model input parameters and assumptions used. RESULTS: Under base-case assumptions, PrEP use yielded an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $33,064 per QALY in black ASMM and $427,788 per QALY in white ASMM. In all sensitivity analyses, the cost-effectiveness ratio of PrEP use remained <$100,000 per QALY in black ASMM and >$100,000 per QALY in white ASMM. CONCLUSIONS: We found favorable cost-effectiveness ratios for PrEP use among black ASMM or other ASMM in communities with high HIV burden at current PrEP costs. Clinicians providing services in high-prevalence communities, and particularly those serving high-prevalence communities of color, should consider including PrEP services.

3.
PLoS One ; 14(5): e0217315, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31116802

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is an effective and safe intervention approved for use to prevent HIV transmission. PrEP scale-up strategies and clinical practice are currently being informed by modeling studies, which have estimated the impact of PrEP in adult and adolescent MSM populations separately. This partitioning may miss important effects or yield biased estimates by excluding dependencies between populations. METHODS: We combined two published models of HIV transmission among adults and adolescent MSM. We simulated an HIV epidemic among MSM aged 13-39 without PrEP, with PrEP for adult MSM ages (19-39) and with the addition of PrEP for adolescents ages (16-18), comparing percent of incident infections averted (impact), the number of person-years on PrEP per infection averted (efficiency), and changes in prevalence. RESULTS: PrEP use among eligible 19-39 year old MSM averted 29.0% of infections and reduced HIV prevalence from 23.2% to 17.0% over ten years in the population as a whole. Despite being ineligible for PrEP in this scenario, prevalence among sexually active 18 year-olds declined from 6.0% to 4.3% due to reduced transmissions across age cohorts. The addition of PrEP for adolescents ages 16-18 had a small impact on the overall epidemic, further reducing overall prevalence from 17.0% to 16.8%; however prevalence among the sexually active 18 year-olds further declined from 4.3% to 3.8%. CONCLUSIONS: PrEP use among adults may significantly reduce HIV prevalence among MSM and may also have significant downstream effects on HIV incidence among adolescents; PrEP targeting adolescents remains an important intervention for HIV prevention.

4.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 68(9): 209-213, 2019 03 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30845117

RESUMO

Control of communicable diseases in children, including respiratory and diarrheal illnesses that affect U.S. school-aged children, might require public health preventive efforts both in the home and at school, a primary setting for transmission. National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data on school absenteeism and gastrointestinal illness in the United States during 2010-2016 were analyzed to identify associations among income, illness, and absenteeism. Prevalence of gastrointestinal and respiratory illnesses in the 2 weeks preceding the survey increased as income decreased. Although the likelihood of missing any school days during the past year decreased with reduced income, among children missing school, those from low-income households missed more days of school than did children from higher income households. Although the reason for absenteeism cannot be ascertained from this analysis, these data underscore the importance of preventive measures, such as hand hygiene promotion and education, and the opportunity for both homes and schools to serve as an important point for implementation of public health preventive measures, including hand hygiene practice and education.


Assuntos
Absenteísmo , Gastroenteropatias/epidemiologia , Renda/estatística & dados numéricos , Infecções Respiratórias/epidemiologia , Instituições Acadêmicas , Adolescente , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
5.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 68(3): 67-71, 2019 Jan 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30677012

RESUMO

Transgender youths (those whose gender identity* does not align with their sex†) experience disparities in violence victimization, substance use, suicide risk, and sexual risk compared with their cisgender peers (those whose gender identity does align with their sex) (1-3). Yet few large-scale assessments of these disparities among high school students exist. The Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) is conducted biennially among local, state, and nationally representative samples of U.S. high school students in grades 9-12. In 2017, 10 states (Colorado, Delaware, Hawaii, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Rhode Island, Vermont, Wisconsin) and nine large urban school districts (Boston, Broward County, Cleveland, Detroit, District of Columbia, Los Angeles, New York City, San Diego, San Francisco) piloted a measure of transgender identity. Using pooled data from these 19 sites, the prevalence of transgender identity was assessed, and relationships between transgender identity and violence victimization, substance use, suicide risk, and sexual risk behaviors were evaluated using logistic regression. Compared with cisgender males and cisgender females, transgender students were more likely to report violence victimization, substance use, and suicide risk, and, although more likely to report some sexual risk behaviors, were also more likely to be tested for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. These findings indicate a need for intervention efforts to improve health outcomes among transgender youths.


Assuntos
Vítimas de Crime/estatística & dados numéricos , Assunção de Riscos , Comportamento Sexual/psicologia , Estudantes/psicologia , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias/epidemiologia , Suicídio/estatística & dados numéricos , Pessoas Transgênero/psicologia , Violência/estatística & dados numéricos , Adolescente , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Risco , Instituições Acadêmicas/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudantes/estatística & dados numéricos , Pessoas Transgênero/estatística & dados numéricos , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , População Urbana/estatística & dados numéricos
6.
Am J Public Health ; 108(S4): S284-S291, 2018 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30383415

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To assess the potential impact of preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) on the HIV epidemic among Black and White adolescent sexual minority males (ASMM). METHODS: We used a network model and race-specific data from recent trials to simulate HIV transmission among a population of Black and White 13- to 18-year-old ASMM over 20 years. We estimated the number of infections prevented (impact) and the number needed to treat to prevent an infection (efficiency) under multiple coverage and adherence scenarios. RESULTS: At modeled coverage and adherence, PrEP could avert 3% to 20% of infections among Black ASMM and 8% to 51% among White ASMM. A larger number, but smaller percentage, of infections were prevented in Black ASMM in all scenarios examined. PrEP was more efficient among Black ASMM (number needed to treat to avert an infection = 25-32) compared with White ASMM (146-237). CONCLUSIONS: PrEP can reduce HIV incidence among both Black and White ASMM but is far more efficient for Black ASMM because of higher incidence. Public Health Implications. Black ASMM communities suffer disproportionate HIV burden; despite imperfect adherence, PrEP programs could prevent HIV efficiently in these communities.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV , Homossexualidade Masculina/estatística & dados numéricos , Profilaxia Pré-Exposição/estatística & dados numéricos , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero/estatística & dados numéricos , Adolescente , Afro-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/estatística & dados numéricos , Infecções por HIV/tratamento farmacológico , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Infecções por HIV/prevenção & controle , Humanos , Masculino , Estudos Retrospectivos
7.
J Prim Prev ; 39(3): 263-301, 2018 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29700674

RESUMO

Transgender and gender variant (GV) youth experience elevated risk for poor health and academic outcomes due mainly to social experiences of stigma and discrimination. To supplement the growing evidence on health risks encountered by transgender/GV youth, we identified factors theorized to be protective for these youth across all four levels of Bronfenbrenner's socioecological model (individual, relationship, community, societal). We conducted a systematic search of peer-reviewed research. The articles included in this review were published in peer-reviewed journals in English or Spanish between 1999 and 2014, analyzed data from a sample or subsample of transgender or GV participants with a mean age between 10 and 24 years, and examined the relationship of at least one theorized protective factor to a health or behavioral outcome. Twenty-one articles met inclusion criteria. Transgender/GV youth in included articles ranged from 11 to 26 years of age, were racially/ethnically diverse, and represented varied gender identities. Within these articles, 27 unique protective factors across four levels of the ecological model were identified as related to positive health and well-being. Self-esteem at the individual level, healthy relationships with parents and peers at the relationship-level, and gay-straight alliances at the community level emerged as protective factors across multiple studies. Our findings underscore the relative lack of research on transgender/GV youth and protective factors. Novel recruitment strategies for transgender/GV youth and better measurement of transgender identities are needed to confirm these protective relationships and identify others. Growth in these areas will contribute to building a body of evidence to inform interventions.


Assuntos
Fatores de Proteção , Pessoas Transgênero , Adolescente , Criança , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Estigma Social , Adulto Jovem
8.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 67(7): 212-215, 2018 Feb 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29470457

RESUMO

In 2014, persons aged 13-29 years represented 23% of the U.S. population, yet accounted for 40% of diagnoses of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection during the same year (1). During 2010-2014, the rates of diagnosis of HIV infection decreased among persons aged 15-19 years, were stable among persons aged 20-24 years, and increased among persons aged 25-29 years (1). However, these 5-year age groups encompass multiple developmental stages and potentially mask trends associated with the rapid psychosocial changes during adolescence through young adulthood. To better understand HIV infection among adolescents aged 13-17 years and young adults aged 18-29 years in the United States and identify ideal ages to target primary HIV prevention efforts, CDC analyzed data from the National HIV Surveillance System (NHSS)* using narrow age groups. During 2010-2014, rates of diagnosis of HIV infection per 100,000 population varied substantially among persons aged 13-15 years (0.7), 16-17 years (4.5), 18-19 years (16.5), and 20-21 years (28.6), and were higher, but less variable, among persons aged 22-23 years (34.0), 24-25 years (33.8), 26-27 years (31.3), and 28-29 years (28.7). In light of the remarkable increase in rates between ages 16-17, 18-19, and 20-21 years, and a recent study revealing that infection precedes diagnosis for young persons by an average of 2.7 years (2), these findings demonstrate the importance of targeting primary prevention efforts to persons aged <18 years and continuing through the period of elevated risk in their mid-twenties.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV/diagnóstico , Adolescente , Adulto , Feminino , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Humanos , Masculino , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
9.
Prev Sci ; 19(4): 490-506, 2018 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28786046

RESUMO

We systematically reviewed the literature to assess the effectiveness of school-based programs to prevent HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STI) among adolescents in the USA. We searched six databases including PubMed for studies published through May 2017. Eligible studies included youth ages 10-19 years and assessed any school-based programs in the USA that reported changes in HIV/STI incidence or testing. We used Cochrane tool to assess the risk of bias and GRADE to determine the evidence quality for each outcome. Three RCTs and six non-RCTs, describing seven interventions, met study inclusion criteria. No study reported changes in HIV incidence or prevalence. One comprehensive intervention, assessed in a non-RCT and delivered to pre-teens, reduced STI incidence into adulthood (RR 0.36, 95% CI 0.23-0.56). A non-RCT examining chlamydia and gonorrhea incidence before and after a condom availability program found a significant effect at the city level among young men 3 years later (RR 0.43, 95% CI 0.23-0.80). The remaining four interventions found no effect. The effect on STI prevalence was also not significant (pooled RR 0.83 from two non-RCTs, RR 0.70 from one RCT). Only one non-RCT showed an increase in HIV testing (RR 3.19, 95% CI 1.24-8.24). The quality of evidence for all outcomes was very low. Studies, including the RCTs, were of low methodological quality and had mixed findings, thus offering no persuasive evidence for the effectiveness of school-based programs. The most effective intervention spanned 6 years, was a social development-based intervention with multiple components, rather than a sex education program, and started in first grade.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV/prevenção & controle , Instituições Acadêmicas , Educação Sexual/normas , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis/prevenção & controle , Adolescente , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde
10.
J Adolesc Health ; 62(3): 311-319, 2018 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29248392

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is an effective and safe intervention to prevent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission in men who have sex with men; current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines indicate its use among high-risk adults. Adolescent sexual minority males (ASMM) also have significant HIV risk, but implementation strategies are likely to differ for this population. We aimed to estimate impact and efficiency of PrEP for ASMM in higher prevalence US settings, using a variety of implementation strategies and assumptions about coverage, adherence, and background prevalence. METHODS: We develop a stochastic, dynamic, network-based model, parametrized using numerous ASMM behavioral and clinical data sources. We simulate 10 years with and without PrEP, comparing percent of incident infections averted (impact) and number of person-years on PrEP per infection averted (efficiency). RESULTS: Our main scenario (PrEP for 16- to 18-year-old ASMM, initiating PrEP 6 months after first anal intercourse, 40% coverage, adherence profiles from the ATN 113 trial; 2.9% background HIV prevalence among ASMM) prevents 27.8% of infections, with 38 person-years on PrEP per infection averted. Expanding implementation to cover younger ages or earlier initiation has small effects on impact and efficiency. Targeting highest risk ASMM increases efficiency, but requires querying sexual histories. Across levels examined, coverage and adherence do not have major impacts on efficiency, whereas background prevalence does. CONCLUSIONS: PrEP can have a large impact on HIV incidence among ASMM in the United States, especially in settings with high prevalence. However, willingness of, and support for, providers will be central to achieving the coverage needed to make this a success.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Infecções por HIV/prevenção & controle , Homossexualidade Masculina/estatística & dados numéricos , Modelos Estatísticos , Profilaxia Pré-Exposição/métodos , Adolescente , Humanos , Masculino , Prevalência , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
13.
J Adolesc Health ; 54(3): 312-318.e1, 2014 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24268359

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To examine associations between (1) youth violence victimization and perpetration and later sexually transmitted infections (STI) and (2) parent-family and school connectedness and later STI, and to explore the moderating role of connectedness on the associations between youth violence victimization and perpetration and later STI. METHODS: We used data from Waves I and IV of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, which provided a baseline weighted sample of 14,800 respondents. We used logistic regression to examine associations between youth violence and connectedness with self-reported ever STI diagnosis, including gonorrhea, chlamydia, syphilis, genital herpes, genital warts or human papillomavirus, or human immunodeficiency virus. If participants reported having an STI at Wave I they were excluded from the analysis. RESULTS: Controlling for biological sex, race/ethnicity, age, parent's highest education level, and parent's marital status, both youth violence victimization and perpetration were associated with an increased risk of later STI (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.27, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07-1.52; and AOR, 1.21, 95% CI, 1.04-1.41, respectively). Parent-family and school connectedness in adolescence were associated with a decreased risk for later STI (AOR, .96, 95% CI, .95-.98; and AOR, .97, 95% CI, .95-.99, respectively); however, connectedness did not moderate the associations between nonsexual violence involvement and later STI. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that youth violence victimization and perpetration may be risk factors for STI later in life. Conversely, parent-family and school connectedness in adolescence appear to protect against subsequent STI. The findings suggest that provider efforts to address youth violence and connectedness in adolescence can promote positive sexual health outcomes in adulthood.


Assuntos
Comportamento do Adolescente , Relações Pais-Filho , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis/epidemiologia , Violência , Adolescente , Vítimas de Crime/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health , Fatores de Risco , Comportamento Sexual , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
14.
Public Health Rep ; 127(6): 565-71, 2012.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23115381

RESUMO

Shortly after the influenza A (H1N1) 2009 pandemic began, the U.S. government provided guidance to state and local authorities to assist decision-making for the use of nonpharmaceutical strategies to minimize influenza spread. This guidance included recommendations for flexible decision-making based on outbreak severity, and it allowed for uncertainty and course correction as the pandemic progressed. These recommendations build on a foundation of local, collaborative planning and posit a series of questions regarding epidemiology, the impact on the health-care system, and locally determined feasibility and acceptability of nonpharmaceutical strategies. This article describes -recommendations and key questions for decision makers.


Assuntos
Controle de Doenças Transmissíveis/métodos , Vírus da Influenza A Subtipo H1N1/patogenicidade , Influenza Humana/prevenção & controle , Comportamento Cooperativo , Tomada de Decisões , Comunicação em Saúde , Diretrizes para o Planejamento em Saúde , Humanos , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Influenza Humana/transmissão , Pandemias , Estados Unidos
15.
J Phys Act Health ; 4(3): 325-42, 2007 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-17846461

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Few studies have focused on the relationship between physical activity-related (PA) injury and overweight among youth. METHODS: We analyzed data from the 2001 and 2003 Youth Risk Behavior Surveys (n = 28,815). Logistic regression was used to examine the independent effects of BMI and frequency of participation in vigorous activity, moderate activity, strengthening exercises, physical education (PE) classes, and team sports on the likelihood of PA injury. RESULTS: Approximately 14% of females and 19% of males reported seeing a doctor or nurse during the previous 30 d for an injury that happened while exercising or playing sports. PA injury was associated with participation in team sports, strengthening exercises, and (among females) vigorous physical activity. Controlling for type and frequency of physical activity, injury was not associated with being overweight (BMI >or= 95th percentile). CONCLUSIONS: Moderate physical activity and school PE classes may provide relatively low-risk alternatives for overweight youth who need to increase their physical activity.


Assuntos
Traumatismos em Atletas/epidemiologia , Índice de Massa Corporal , Exercício , Atividade Motora , Sobrepeso , Recreação , Instituições Acadêmicas , Estudantes , Adolescente , Feminino , Inquéritos Epidemiológicos , Humanos , Masculino , Obesidade , Prevalência , Fatores de Risco , Inquéritos e Questionários , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
16.
J Sch Health ; 77(5): 273-9, 2007 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-17430440

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Approximately 10-25% of child and adolescent injuries occur at school. Little is known about school-related injuries to teachers and other adults or about the direct cost of injuries to schools. This study examined the characteristics of cases involving injuries resulting in lawsuits against schools, compared cases in which schools paid awards with those in which schools did not pay awards, and compared student and nonstudent injuries resulting in lawsuits against schools. METHODS: Descriptions of cases of school liability for personal injury that were tried or settled between July 1996 and May 2002 were purchased from Jury Verdict Research, which maintains a national database of verdicts and settlements. The 455 cases reviewed were coded according to the characteristics of the case, school, award, and injured party. RESULTS: In two thirds of the cases, schools or school districts paid an award to plaintiffs (mean =$562,915, median =$50,000). In most cases, the injured party was male (57.1%) and younger than 18 years of age (79.9%). Fractures (38.9%) were the most common type of injury. Falls (21.9%) were the most common cause of injury. Among cases of intentional injury, 93.2% involved an injury to a student; among cases of unintentional injury, 74.6% involved injury to a student. CONCLUSIONS: Preventing school-related injuries is an ethical and legal obligation for schools and school districts. Prevention is also critical because a wide range of injuries are litigated, and such lawsuits often require schools and school districts to pay costly awards to injured parties.


Assuntos
Responsabilidade Legal , Instituições Acadêmicas/legislação & jurisprudência , Ferimentos e Lesões , Adolescente , Criança , Humanos , Responsabilidade Legal/economia , Estados Unidos
17.
J Sch Health ; 76(2): 57-66, 2006 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-16466468

RESUMO

The School Health Index (SHI) is a self-assessment and planning tool that helps individual schools identify the strengths and weaknesses of their health policies and programs. To determine the percentage of US schools meeting the recommendations in the SHI, the present study analyzed data from the School Health Policies and Programs Study (SHPPS) 2000. The SHPPS 2000 data were collected through computer-assisted personal interviews with faculty and staff in a nationally representative sample of schools. The SHPPS 2000 questions were then matched to SHI items to calculate the percentage of schools meeting the recommendations in 4 areas: school health and safety policies and environment, health education, physical education and other physical activity programs, and nutrition services. Although schools nationwide are meeting a few SHI items in each of these areas, few schools are addressing the entire breadth of items. A more coordinated approach to school health would help schools reinforce health messages.


Assuntos
Fidelidade a Diretrizes/estatística & dados numéricos , Educação em Saúde/normas , Promoção da Saúde/normas , Política Organizacional , Educação Física e Treinamento/normas , Serviços de Saúde Escolar/normas , Adolescente , Criança , Feminino , Serviços de Alimentação/normas , Pesquisas sobre Serviços de Saúde , Humanos , Entrevistas como Assunto , Masculino , Ciências da Nutrição/educação , Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde , Segurança/normas , Serviços de Saúde Escolar/organização & administração , Serviços de Saúde Escolar/estatística & dados numéricos , Ensino , Estados Unidos
20.
Am J Prev Med ; 22(3): 146-50, 2002 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-11897457

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: This study examined the impact that the violent incident at Columbine High School may have had on reports of behaviors related to violence and suicide among U.S. high school students. METHODS: Nationally representative data from the 1999 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) were analyzed using logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: Students who completed the 1999 YRBS after the Columbine incident were more likely to report feeling too unsafe to go to school and less likely to report considering or planning suicide than were students who completed the 1999 YRBS before the incident. CONCLUSIONS: These results highlight how an extreme incident of school violence can affect students nationwide.


Assuntos
Homicídio , Meios de Comunicação de Massa , Estudantes , Suicídio , Violência , Ferimentos por Arma de Fogo , Adolescente , Comportamento do Adolescente/psicologia , Análise por Conglomerados , Colorado , Feminino , Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Instituições Acadêmicas , Transtornos de Estresse Pós-Traumáticos/epidemiologia , Estudantes/psicologia , Estudantes/estatística & dados numéricos , Suicídio/psicologia , Suicídio/estatística & dados numéricos , Suicídio/tendências , Tentativa de Suicídio/psicologia , Tentativa de Suicídio/estatística & dados numéricos , Tentativa de Suicídio/tendências , Inquéritos e Questionários , Estados Unidos , Violência/psicologia , Violência/estatística & dados numéricos , Violência/tendências , Ferimentos por Arma de Fogo/psicologia
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA