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1.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 2021 Apr 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33832966

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Clinical studies with work participation (WP) as an outcome domain pose particular methodological challenges that hamper interpretation, comparison between studies and meta-analyses. OBJECTIVES: To develop Points to Consider (PtC) for design, analysis and reporting of studies of patients with inflammatory arthritis that include WP as a primary or secondary outcome domain. METHODS: The EULAR Standardised Operating Procedures were followed. A multidisciplinary taskforce with 22 experts including patients with rheumatic diseases, from 10 EULAR countries and Canada, identified methodologic areas of concern. Two systematic literature reviews (SLR) appraised the methodology across these areas. In parallel, two surveys among professional societies and experts outside the taskforce sought for additional methodological areas or existing conducting/reporting recommendations. The taskforce formulated the PtC after presentation of the SLRs and survey results, and discussion. Consensus was obtained through informal voting, with levels of agreement obtained anonymously. RESULTS: Two overarching principles and nine PtC were formulated. The taskforce recommends to align the work-related study objective to the design, duration, and outcome domains/measurement instruments of the study (PtC: 1-3); to identify contextual factors upfront and account for them in analyses (PtC: 4); to account for interdependence of different work outcome domains and for changes in work status over time (PtC: 5-7); to present results as means as well as proportions of patients reaching predefined meaningful categories (PtC: 8) and to explicitly report volumes of productivity loss when costs are an outcome (PtC:9). CONCLUSION: Adherence to these EULAR PtC will improve the methodological quality of studies evaluating WP.

2.
Clin Exp Rheumatol ; 38(6): 1056-1067, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33253107

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Despite availability of efficacious treatments, unmet needs still exist, preventing optimal and comprehensive management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Evolving the management of RA (eRA) is a European-wide educational initiative aiming to support improved patient care through practical and educational tools addressing specific unmet needs. METHODS: A multidisciplinary Steering Committee (17 members, 12 countries) identified unmet needs within the management of RA and prioritised those with the greatest impact on patient outcomes. Practical educational tools addressing priority needs were then developed for dissemination and implementation by the rheumatology community across Europe. RESULTS: Five areas of priority need were identified: increasing early recognition of RA and treatment initiation; treating RA to target; optimal, holistic approach to selection of treatment strategy, including shared decision-making; improving identification and management of comorbidities; and non-pharmacological patient management. A suite of 14 eRA tools included educational slides, best-practice guidance, self­assessment questionnaires, clinical checklists, a multidisciplinary team training exercise, an interactive patient infographic, and case scenarios. By April 2020, rheumatology professionals in 17 countries had been actively engaged in the eRA programme; in 11 countries, eRA tools were selected by national leaders in rheumatology and translated for local dissemination. A web platform, with country-specific pages, was developed to support access to the translated tools (https://www.evolvingthemanagementofra.com/). CONCLUSIONS: The eRA programme supports comprehensive management of RA across Europe through development and dissemination of practical educational tools. The eRA tools address priority needs and are available free of charge to the rheumatology community.

3.
Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol ; : 101567, 2020 Aug 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32800698

RESUMO

The key question addressed in this Chapter is "What do people need?", with "people" here meaning those who live with a rheumatic or musculoskeletal disease. The word "patient" is avoided at this point as not all of the problems or solutions identified are medical in nature. Many are personal, societal and/or environmental. The lead authors are all people who not only live with a rheumatic or musculoskeletal disease, but who are experienced "patient representatives". Therefore, their insights here stem from a combination of personal and collective experiences and views. Although from different continents, the authors identify a range of common barriers to social participation and optimum management of these conditions, such as late diagnosis, stigma and access to care. However, several solutions are common across these regions too, such as the need for supported self-management and greater public awareness of the impact of these diseases.

4.
RMD Open ; 6(2)2020 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32683326

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disorder with a global prevalence of approximately 0.5-1%. Patients with RA are at an increased risk of developing comorbidities (eg, cardiovascular disease, pulmonary disease, diabetes and depression). Despite this, there are limited recommendations for the management and implementation of associated comorbidities. This study aimed to identify good practice interventions in the care of RA and associated comorbidities. METHODS: A combination of primary research (180+ interviews with specialists across 12 European rheumatology centres) and secondary research (literature review of existing publications and guidelines/recommendations) were used to identify challenges in management and corresponding good practice interventions. Findings were prioritised and reviewed by a group of 18 rheumatology experts including rheumatologists, comorbidity experts, a patient representative and a highly specialised nurse. RESULTS: Challenges throughout the patient pathway (including delays in diagnosis and referral, shortage of rheumatologists, limited awareness of primary care professionals) and 18 good practice interventions were identified in the study. The expert group segmented and prioritised interventions according to three distinct stages of the disease: (1) suspected RA, (2) recent diagnosis of RA and (3) established RA. Examples of good practice interventions included enabling self-management (self-monitoring and disease management support, for example, lifestyle adaptations); early arthritis clinic; rapid access to care (online referral, triage, ultrasound-guided diagnosis); dedicated comorbidity specialists; enhanced communication with primary care (hotline, education sessions); and integrating patient registries into daily clinical practice. CONCLUSION: Learning from implementation of good practice interventions in centres across Europe provides an opportunity to more widely improved care for patients with RA and associated comorbidities.

5.
Patient Prefer Adherence ; 14: 119-131, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32021123

RESUMO

Purpose: Current knowledge of the reasons for patients' preference for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treatment modes is limited. This study was designed to identify preferences for four treatment modes, and to obtain in-depth information on the reasons for these preferences. Patients and Methods: In this multi-national, cross-sectional, qualitative study, in-depth interviews were conducted with adult patients with RA in the United States, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and Brazil. Patients' strength of preference was evaluated using a 100-point allocation task (0-100; 100=strongest) across four treatment modes: oral, self-injection, clinic-injection, and infusion. Qualitative descriptive analysis methods were used to identify, characterize, and summarize patterns found in the interview data relating to reasons for these preferences. Results: 100 patients were interviewed (female, 75.0%; mean age, 53.9 years; mean 11.6 years since diagnosis). Among the four treatment modes, oral administration was allocated the highest mean (standard deviation) preference points (47.3 [33.1]) and was ranked first choice by the greatest percentage of patients (57.0%), followed by self-injection (29.7 [27.7]; 29.0%), infusion (15.4 [24.6]; 16.0%), and clinic-injection (7.5 [14.1]; 2.0%). Overall, 56.0% of patients had a "strong" first-choice preference (ie, point allocation ≥70); most of these patients chose oral (62.5%) vs self-injection (23.2%), infusion (10.7%), or clinic-injection (3.6%). Speed and/or ease of administration were the most commonly reported reasons for patients choosing oral (52.6%) or self-injection (55.2%). The most common reasons for patients not choosing oral or self-injection were not wanting to take another pill (37.2%) and avoiding pain due to needles (46.5%), respectively. Conclusion: These data report factors important to patients regarding preferences for RA treatment modes. Patients may benefit from discussions with their healthcare professionals and/or patient support groups, regarding RA treatment modes, to facilitate shared decision-making.

6.
BJGP Open ; 4(1)2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32071040

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Although commonly diagnosed, gout often remains a poorly managed disease. This is partially due to a lack of awareness of the long-term effect of gout among patients and healthcare professionals. AIM: To understand unmet needs for patients and provide insight into achieving better treatment. DESIGN & SETTING: A quantitative online questionnaire collected from 1100 people with gout from 14 countries within Europe. METHOD: Patients were recruited to complete an online survey via healthcare professional (HCP) referral, patient associations, or market research panels. Patients were included if they had been diagnosed with gout by a physician. Prior to commencement, patients were made aware that this study was sponsored by Grünenthal. The responses collected were collated and analyses were performed. RESULTS: Patients had an average of 2.9 gout flares within a 12-month period. Although 79% of patients were satisfied with treatment, inadequate gout control was also reported by 71% of patients. Furthermore, 84% experienced moderate-to-severe pain with their most recent flare. Of those who acknowledged treatment dissatisfaction, only 24% discussed other options with their GP. Most patients reported irregular follow-up and serum uric acid (sUA) monitoring. In addition, loss of belief that more can be done was a key barrier for patients. CONCLUSION: Patients reported severe pain and social burden, coupled with low treatment expectation and lack of awareness of target sUA. Education around knowing and reaching sUA target is needed so that patients can receive and GPs can deliver higher quality management.

7.
Curr Med Res Opin ; 34(7): 1179-1186, 2018 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29625532

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Acute postoperative pain is experienced by the majority of hospitalized patients undergoing surgical procedures, with many reporting inadequate pain relief and/or high levels of dissatisfaction with their pain management. Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) ensures patient involvement in acute pain control, a key component for implementing a quality management system. This narrative article overviews the clinical evidence for conventional PCA and briefly discusses new, non-invasive PCA systems, namely the sufentanil sublingual tablet system (SSTS) and the fentanyl iontophoretic transdermal system (FITS). METHODS: A Medline literature search ("patient-controlled analgesia" and "acute postoperative pain") was conducted to 1 April 2017; results from the main clinical trials are discussed. Additional literature was identified from the reference lists of cited publications. RESULTS: Moderate to low quality evidence supports opioid-based intravenous PCA as an efficacious alternative to non-patient-controlled systemic analgesia for postoperative pain. However, despite the benefits of PCA, conventional intravenous PCA is limited by system-, drug- and human-related issues. The non-invasive SSTS and FITS have demonstrated good efficacy and safety in placebo- and intravenous morphine PCA-controlled trials, and are associated with high patient/healthcare practitioner satisfaction/ease of care ratings and offer early patient mobilization. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence-based guidelines for acute postoperative pain management support the use of multimodal regimens in many situations. As effective and safe alternatives to conventional PCA, and with the added benefits of being non-invasive, easy to use and allowing early patient mobilization, the newer PCA systems may complement multimodal approaches, or potentially replace certain regimens, in hospitalized patients with acute postoperative pain.


Assuntos
Analgesia Controlada pelo Paciente/métodos , Analgésicos/farmacologia , Dor Pós-Operatória/terapia , Administração Cutânea , Administração Sublingual , Humanos , Pacientes Internados , Manejo da Dor/métodos , Resultado do Tratamento
8.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 70(6): 826-831, 2018 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29532625

RESUMO

A European League Against Rheumatism-American College of Rheumatology working group consisting of practicing and academic rheumatologists, a rheumatology researcher, and a patient representative created a succinct general statement describing rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases (RMDs) in adults and children in language that can be used in conversations with the lay public, media, healthcare providers, and other stakeholders. Based on the literature review, several elements were deemed important for inclusion in the description of RMDs. First, RMDs encompass many different diseases that can affect individuals at any age, including children. Second, there are various pathophysiological pathways underlying different RMDs. Third, the impact of RMDs on individuals and society should be emphasized. The working group agreed that the language should be comprehensible to the lay public. Thus, the following description of RMDs has been developed: "Rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases (RMDs) are a diverse group of diseases that commonly affect the joints, but can affect any organ of the body. There are more than 200 different RMDs, affecting both children and adults. They are usually caused by problems of the immune system, inflammation, infections, or gradual deterioration of joints, muscles, and bones. Many of these diseases are long term and worsen over time. They are typically painful and limit function. In severe cases, RMDs can result in significant disability, having a major impact on both quality of life and life expectancy." This description can be used by rheumatology groups, researchers, and those who work in advocacy and education related to RMDs.


Assuntos
Informação de Saúde ao Consumidor/normas , Doenças Musculoesqueléticas , Doenças Reumáticas , Reumatologia/normas , Terminologia como Assunto , Adulto , Criança , Europa (Continente) , Pessoal de Saúde , Humanos , Idioma , Sociedades Médicas , Participação dos Interessados , Estados Unidos
9.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 77(6): 829-832, 2018 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29525777

RESUMO

A European League Against Rheumatism-American College of Rheumatology working group consisting of practising and academic rheumatologists, a rheumatology researcher and a patient representative created a succinct general statement describing rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases (RMDs) in adults and children in language that can be used in conversations with the lay public, media, healthcare providers and other stakeholders. Based on the literature review, several elements were deemed important for inclusion in the description of RMDs. First, RMDs encompass many different diseases that can affect individuals at any age, including children. Second, there are various pathophysiological pathways underlying different RMDs. Third, the impact of RMDs on individuals and society should be emphasised. The working group agreed that the language should be comprehensible to the lay public. Thus, the following description of RMDs has been developed: 'Rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases (RMDs) are a diverse group of diseases that commonly affect the joints, but can affect any organ of the body. There are more than 200 different RMDs, affecting both children and adults. They are usually caused by problems of the immune system, inflammation, infections or gradual deterioration of joints, muscles and bones. Many of these diseases are long term and worsen over time. They are typically painful and limit function. In severe cases, RMDs can result in significant disability, having a major impact on both quality of life and life expectancy.' This description can be used by rheumatology groups, researchers and those who work in advocacy and education related to RMDs.


Assuntos
Comunicação , Doenças Musculoesqueléticas/diagnóstico , Terminologia como Assunto , Informação de Saúde ao Consumidor/normas , Humanos , Doenças Musculoesqueléticas/fisiopatologia , Doenças Reumáticas/diagnóstico , Doenças Reumáticas/fisiopatologia
10.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 77(1): 3-17, 2018 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28684559

RESUMO

Therapeutic targets have been defined for axial and peripheral spondyloarthritis (SpA) in 2012, but the evidence for these recommendations was only of indirect nature. These recommendations were re-evaluated in light of new insights. Based on the results of a systematic literature review and expert opinion, a task force of rheumatologists, dermatologists, patients and a health professional developed an update of the 2012 recommendations. These underwent intensive discussions, on site voting and subsequent anonymous electronic voting on levels of agreement with each item. A set of 5 overarching principles and 11 recommendations were developed and voted on. Some items were present in the previous recommendations, while others were significantly changed or newly formulated. The 2017 task force arrived at a single set of recommendations for axial and peripheral SpA, including psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The most exhaustive discussions related to whether PsA should be assessed using unidimensional composite scores for its different domains or multidimensional scores that comprise multiple domains. This question was not resolved and constitutes an important research agenda. There was broad agreement, now better supported by data than in 2012, that remission/inactive disease and, alternatively, low/minimal disease activity are the principal targets for the treatment of PsA. As instruments to assess the patients on the path to the target, the Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS) for axial SpA and the Disease Activity index for PSoriatic Arthritis (DAPSA) and Minimal Disease Activity (MDA) for PsA were recommended, although not supported by all. Shared decision-making between the clinician and the patient was seen as pivotal to the process. The task force defined the treatment target for SpA as remission or low disease activity and developed a large research agenda to further advance the field.


Assuntos
Artrite Psoriásica/terapia , Índice de Gravidade de Doença , Espondilite Anquilosante/terapia , Comitês Consultivos , Vértebra Cervical Áxis , Consenso , Tomada de Decisões , Humanos
11.
Curr Med Res Opin ; 34(1): 187-196, 2018 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29019421

RESUMO

Despite the introduction of evidence-based recommendations for postoperative pain management (POPM), the consensus is that pain control remains suboptimal. Barriers to achieving patient-satisfactory analgesia include deficient knowledge regarding POPM among staff, lack of instructions, insufficient pain assessments and sub-optimal treatment. Effective monitoring of POPM is essential to enable policy makers and healthcare providers to improve the quality of care. Quality indicators (QIs) are quantitative measures of clinical practice that can monitor, evaluate and guide the quality of care provided to patients. QIs can be used to assess various aspects relating to the care process and they have proven useful in improving health outcomes in diseases such as myocardial infarction. In this commentary we critically analyze the evidence regarding the use of QIs in acute POPM based upon the experience of pain specialists from Europe and the USA who are members of the Change Pain Advisory Board. We also undertook a literature review to see what has been published on QIs in acute pain with the goal of assessing which QIs have been developed and used, and which ones have been successful/unsuccessful. In the hospital sector the development and implementation of QIs is complex. The nature of POPM requires a highly trained, multidisciplinary team and it is at this level that major improvements can be made. Greater involvement of patients regarding pain management is also seen as a priority area for improving clinical outcomes. Changes in structure and processes to deliver high-level quality care need to be regularly audited to ensure translation into better outcomes. QIs can help drive this process by providing an indicator of current levels of performance. In addition, outcomes QIs can be used to benchmark levels of performance between different healthcare providers.


Assuntos
Dor Aguda/tratamento farmacológico , Dor Pós-Operatória/tratamento farmacológico , Indicadores de Qualidade em Assistência à Saúde , Consenso , Europa (Continente) , Hospitais , Humanos , Medição da Dor , Período Pós-Operatório , Qualidade da Assistência à Saúde
12.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 75(1): 3-15, 2016 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25969430

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Reaching the therapeutic target of remission or low-disease activity has improved outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) significantly. The treat-to-target recommendations, formulated in 2010, have provided a basis for implementation of a strategic approach towards this therapeutic goal in routine clinical practice, but these recommendations need to be re-evaluated for appropriateness and practicability in the light of new insights. OBJECTIVE: To update the 2010 treat-to-target recommendations based on systematic literature reviews (SLR) and expert opinion. METHODS: A task force of rheumatologists, patients and a nurse specialist assessed the SLR results and evaluated the individual items of the 2010 recommendations accordingly, reformulating many of the items. These were subsequently discussed, amended and voted upon by >40 experts, including 5 patients, from various regions of the world. Levels of evidence, strengths of recommendations and levels of agreement were derived. RESULTS: The update resulted in 4 overarching principles and 10 recommendations. The previous recommendations were partly adapted and their order changed as deemed appropriate in terms of importance in the view of the experts. The SLR had now provided also data for the effectiveness of targeting low-disease activity or remission in established rather than only early disease. The role of comorbidities, including their potential to preclude treatment intensification, was highlighted more strongly than before. The treatment aim was again defined as remission with low-disease activity being an alternative goal especially in patients with long-standing disease. Regular follow-up (every 1-3 months during active disease) with according therapeutic adaptations to reach the desired state was recommended. Follow-up examinations ought to employ composite measures of disease activity that include joint counts. Additional items provide further details for particular aspects of the disease, especially comorbidity and shared decision-making with the patient. Levels of evidence had increased for many items compared with the 2010 recommendations, and levels of agreement were very high for most of the individual recommendations (≥9/10). CONCLUSIONS: The 4 overarching principles and 10 recommendations are based on stronger evidence than before and are supposed to inform patients, rheumatologists and other stakeholders about strategies to reach optimal outcomes of RA.


Assuntos
Antirreumáticos/uso terapêutico , Artrite Reumatoide/tratamento farmacológico , Planejamento de Assistência ao Paciente , Índice de Gravidade de Doença , Artrite Reumatoide/patologia , Artrite Reumatoide/fisiopatologia , Comorbidade , Medicina Baseada em Evidências , Humanos , Quimioterapia de Manutenção , Participação do Paciente , Indução de Remissão , Terminologia como Assunto
14.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 73(3): 492-509, 2014 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24161836

RESUMO

In this article, the 2010 European League against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with synthetic and biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (sDMARDs and bDMARDs, respectively) have been updated. The 2013 update has been developed by an international task force, which based its decisions mostly on evidence from three systematic literature reviews (one each on sDMARDs, including glucocorticoids, bDMARDs and safety aspects of DMARD therapy); treatment strategies were also covered by the searches. The evidence presented was discussed and summarised by the experts in the course of a consensus finding and voting process. Levels of evidence and grades of recommendations were derived and levels of agreement (strengths of recommendations) were determined. Fourteen recommendations were developed (instead of 15 in 2010). Some of the 2010 recommendations were deleted, and others were amended or split. The recommendations cover general aspects, such as attainment of remission or low disease activity using a treat-to-target approach, and the need for shared decision-making between rheumatologists and patients. The more specific items relate to starting DMARD therapy using a conventional sDMARD (csDMARD) strategy in combination with glucocorticoids, followed by the addition of a bDMARD or another csDMARD strategy (after stratification by presence or absence of adverse risk factors) if the treatment target is not reached within 6 months (or improvement not seen at 3 months). Tumour necrosis factor inhibitors (adalimumab, certolizumab pegol, etanercept, golimumab, infliximab, biosimilars), abatacept, tocilizumab and, under certain circumstances, rituximab are essentially considered to have similar efficacy and safety. If the first bDMARD strategy fails, any other bDMARD may be used. The recommendations also address tofacitinib as a targeted sDMARD (tsDMARD), which is recommended, where licensed, after use of at least one bDMARD. Biosimilars are also addressed. These recommendations are intended to inform rheumatologists, patients, national rheumatology societies and other stakeholders about EULAR's most recent consensus on the management of RA with sDMARDs, glucocorticoids and bDMARDs. They are based on evidence and expert opinion and intended to improve outcome in patients with RA.


Assuntos
Antirreumáticos/uso terapêutico , Artrite Reumatoide/tratamento farmacológico , Produtos Biológicos/uso terapêutico , Algoritmos , Quimioterapia Combinada , Medicina Baseada em Evidências/métodos , Glucocorticoides/uso terapêutico , Humanos , Imunossupressores/uso terapêutico , Fator de Necrose Tumoral alfa/antagonistas & inibidores
15.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 73(1): 6-16, 2014 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23749611

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Therapeutic targets have been defined for diseases like diabetes, hypertension or rheumatoid arthritis and adhering to them has improved outcomes. Such targets are just emerging for spondyloarthritis (SpA). OBJECTIVE: To define the treatment target for SpA including ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and develop recommendations for achieving the target, including a treat-to-target management strategy. METHODS: Based on results of a systematic literature review and expert opinion, a task force of expert physicians and patients developed recommendations which were broadly discussed and voted upon in a Delphi-like process. Level of evidence, grade and strength of the recommendations were derived by respective means. The commonalities between axial SpA, peripheral SpA and PsA were discussed in detail. RESULTS: Although the literature review did not reveal trials comparing a treat-to-target approach with another or no strategy, it provided indirect evidence regarding an optimised approach to therapy that facilitated the development of recommendations. The group agreed on 5 overarching principles and 11 recommendations; 9 of these recommendations related commonly to the whole spectrum of SpA and PsA, and only 2 were designed separately for axial SpA, peripheral SpA and PsA. The main treatment target, which should be based on a shared decision with the patient, was defined as remission, with the alternative target of low disease activity. Follow-up examinations at regular intervals that depend on the patient's status should safeguard the evolution of disease activity towards the targeted goal. Additional recommendations relate to extra-articular and extramusculoskeletal aspects and other important factors, such as comorbidity. While the level of evidence was generally quite low, the mean strength of recommendation was 9-10 (10: maximum agreement) for all recommendations. A research agenda was formulated. CONCLUSIONS: The task force defined the treatment target as remission or, alternatively, low disease activity, being aware that the evidence base is not strong and needs to be expanded by future research. These recommendations can inform the various stakeholders about expert opinion that aims for reaching optimal outcomes of SpA.


Assuntos
Antirreumáticos/uso terapêutico , Artrite Psoriásica/tratamento farmacológico , Reumatologia/normas , Espondilartrite/tratamento farmacológico , Espondilite Anquilosante/tratamento farmacológico , Humanos
16.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 72(4): 482-92, 2013 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23172750

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Since approval of tocilizumab (TCZ) for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), interleukin 6 (IL-6) pathway inhibition was evaluated in trials of TCZ and other agents targeting the IL-6 receptor and ligand in various RA populations and other inflammatory diseases. This consensus document informs on interference with the IL-6 pathway based on evidence and expert opinion. METHODS: Preparation of this document involved international experts in RA treatment and RA patients. A systematic literature search was performed that focused on TCZ and other IL6-pathway inhibitors in RA and other diseases. Subsequently, incorporating available published evidence and expert opinion, the steering committee and a broader expert committee (both including RA patients) formulated the current consensus statement. RESULTS: The consensus statement covers use of TCZ as combination- or monotherapy in various RA populations and includes clinical, functional and structural aspects. The statement also addresses the second approved indication in Europe JIA and non-approved indications. Also early phase trials involving additional agents that target the IL-6 receptor or IL-6 were evaluated. Safety concerns, including haematological, hepatic and metabolic issues as well as infections, are addressed likewise. CONCLUSIONS: The consensus statement identifies points to consider when using TCZ, regarding indications, contraindications, screening, dose, comedication, response evaluation and safety. The document is aimed at supporting clinicians and informing patients, administrators and payers on opportunities and limitations of IL-6 pathway inhibition.


Assuntos
Anticorpos Monoclonais Humanizados/administração & dosagem , Artrite Reumatoide/tratamento farmacológico , Inflamação/tratamento farmacológico , Interleucina-6/antagonistas & inibidores , Receptores de Interleucina-6/antagonistas & inibidores , Anticorpos Monoclonais Humanizados/efeitos adversos , Antirreumáticos/administração & dosagem , Antirreumáticos/efeitos adversos , Artrite Reumatoide/imunologia , Monitoramento de Medicamentos/métodos , Humanos , Inflamação/imunologia
17.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 70(6): 909-20, 2011 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-21378402

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Since initial approval for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), rituximab has been evaluated in clinical trials involving various populations with RA. Information has also been gathered from registries. This report therefore updates the 2007 consensus document on the use of rituximab in the treatment of RA. METHODS: Preparation of this new document involved many international experts experienced in the treatment of RA. Following a meeting to agree upon the core agenda, a systematic literature review was undertaken to identify all relevant data. Data were then interrogated by a drafting committee, with subsequent review and discussion by a wider expert committee leading to the formulation of an updated consensus statement. These committees also included patients with RA. RESULTS: The new statement covers wide-ranging issues including the use of rituximab in earlier RA and impact on structural progression, and aspects particularly pertinent to rituximab such as co-medication, optimal dosage regimens, repeat treatment cycles and how to manage non-response. Biological therapy following rituximab usage is also addressed, and safety concerns including appropriate screening for hepatitis, immunoglobulin levels and infection risk. This consensus statement will support clinicians and inform patients when using B-cell depletion in the management of RA, providing up-to-date information and highlighting areas for further research. CONCLUSION: New therapeutic strategies and treatment options for RA, a chronic destructive and disabling disease, have expanded over recent years. These have been summarised in general strategic suggestions and specific management recommendations, emphasising the importance of expedient disease-modifying antirheumatic drug implementation and tight disease control. This consensus statement is in line with these fundamental principles of management.


Assuntos
Anticorpos Monoclonais Murinos/uso terapêutico , Antirreumáticos/uso terapêutico , Artrite Reumatoide/tratamento farmacológico , Anticorpos Monoclonais Murinos/efeitos adversos , Antirreumáticos/efeitos adversos , Esquema de Medicação , Quimioterapia Combinada , Medicina Baseada em Evidências/métodos , Glucocorticoides/uso terapêutico , Humanos , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Rituximab , Resultado do Tratamento
18.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 69(6): 955-63, 2010 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-20448289

RESUMO

Self-management interventions are patient-centred and designed to foster active participation of patients in order to promote well-being and to manage symptoms. Over the past two decades, the role of self-management in chronic diseases has gained momentum. Self-management programmes are now acknowledged as a key element of quality care. New modes of delivery allow greater access to information and are tailored to address patient needs. This systematic review presents data from clinical studies of self-management over the past decade, summarises the evidence for programme effectiveness, and suggests future research directions.


Assuntos
Doenças Reumáticas/terapia , Autocuidado/métodos , Artrite Reumatoide/terapia , Fibromialgia/terapia , Humanos , Osteoartrite/terapia , Participação do Paciente , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Projetos de Pesquisa , Autocuidado/tendências , Resultado do Tratamento
19.
J Rheumatol Suppl ; 67: 36-7, 2003 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-12926651

RESUMO

The Bone and Joint Decade provides the opportunity for arthritis to be put firmly on political agendas worldwide. Greater political priority is crucial for everybody with arthritis, no matter where they live. People are "patients" for part of their lives, and people all the time, bringing to attention the need to address issues such as social exclusion, access to services, and negative attitudes and practices in society. The term "disability" is not synonymous with "inability," and should be embraced by people with arthritis. As a concept the term can be empowering to individuals, bonding those who face similar problems, including social exclusion and discrimination. When it is stripped of negative connotations, disability can also offer a positive identity. In the UK, the Disability Discrimination Act 1995 was the product of 25 years of campaigning by people who strongly believed that such discrimination should be illegal. The Act is not perfect and important parts have still to be implemented, but it exists as a resource for people with arthritis who may face discrimination. Only a minority of nations have disability discrimination legislation. Law alone will not end discrimination. If people with arthritis do not identify with being disabled then many people who meet the legal definition will continue to face unnecessary discrimination daily. A moral responsibility exists to help make the term one that attracts rather than deters those whom we seek to represent.


Assuntos
Artrite/psicologia , Artrite/reabilitação , Avaliação da Deficiência , Pessoas com Deficiência/educação , Pessoas com Deficiência/psicologia , Defesa do Paciente , Direitos Civis/legislação & jurisprudência , Pessoas com Deficiência/legislação & jurisprudência , Saúde Global , Humanos , Defesa do Paciente/normas , Defesa do Paciente/tendências , Preconceito , Apoio Social , Reino Unido
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