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1.
J Bodyw Mov Ther ; 27: 717-722, 2021 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34391312

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Being the second highest musculoskeletal problem irrespective of age, gender and occupation, the etiology of neck pain is predominantly mechanical in nature. This can lead to dysfunction with time and recurrence. Altered joint position sense (JPS) from soft tissues can alter the cervical biomechanics by compromising the cephalo spatial orientation, which depends on the visual, vestibular and proprioceptive cues. This study was done to observe the additive effect of "Brahma mudra" (BM) a yogic tool on non-specific mechanical neck pain and its clinical implication on pain, proprioception and functional abilities. METHODS: It was a quasi-experimental pre -post study design involving 30 individuals from a software firm between the age group of 18-45 years. The conventional treatment group received standard physiotherapy regime and in the BM group BM was incorporated in addition to standard physiotherapy regime. Independent sample student t-test/Mann Whitney test were used to compare continuous variables between two groups. Paired sample test/Wilcoxon signed rank test were used for within groups. RESULTS: There was a significant reduction in pain, improved functional abilities and proprioception in BM group when compared to conventional treatment group with 0.01 level of statistical significance. CONCLUSION: It may be concluded that practice of BM had an added effect to conventional standard physiotherapy regime in reduction of pain, improvement of proprioception and functional abilities among individuals with chronic non-specific mechanical neck pain.


Assuntos
Dor Crônica , Cervicalgia , Adolescente , Adulto , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pescoço , Cervicalgia/terapia , Modalidades de Fisioterapia , Propriocepção , Adulto Jovem
2.
Int J Yoga ; 12(2): 96-102, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31143016

RESUMO

Context: Recent studies provide ample evidence of the benefits of yoga in various chronic disorders. Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by chronic hyperglycemia and Sandler coined the term "Diabetic Lung" for the abnormal pulmonary function detected in diabetic patients due underlying pulmonary dysfunction. Yoga therapy may help in achieving better pulmonary function along with enhanced glycaemic control and overall health benefits. Aim: To study the effect of adjuvant yoga therapy in diabetic lung through spirometry. Settings and Design: Randomized control trial was made as interdisciplinary collaborative work between departments of Yoga Therapy, Pulmonary Medicine and Endocrinology, of MGMC & RI, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth Puducherry. Materials and Methods: 72 patients of diabetic lung as confirmed by spirometry (<70% of expected) were randomized into control group (n=36) who received only standard medical treatment and yoga group (n=36) who received yoga training thrice weekly for 4 months along with standard medical management. Yoga therapy protocol included yogic counseling, preparatory practices, Asanas or static postures, Pranayama or breathing techniques and relaxation techniques. Hathenas of the Gitananda Yoga tradition were the main practices used. Spirometry was done at the end of the study period. Data was analyzed by Student's paired and unpaired 't' test as it passed normality. Results: There was a statistically significant (P < 0.05) reduction in weight, and BMI along with a significant (P < 0.01) improvement in pulmonary function (FEV1, FVC) in yoga group as compared to control group where parameters worsened over study period. Conclusion: It is concluded from the present RCT that yoga has a definite role as an adjuvant therapy as it enhances standard medical care and hence is even more significant in routine clinical management of diabetes, improving physical condition and pulmonary function.

3.
Int J Yoga ; 12(2): 120-123, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31143019

RESUMO

Introduction: A multitude of modalities are available for the treatment of chronic rhinosinusitis, however, each has its side effects and compliance issues. Bhramari pranayama, which is a breathing exercise in the practice of yoga, offers an inexpensive and free from side effect modality in this regard. Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Bhramari pranayama in relieving the symptoms of chronic sinusitis. Methodology: A total of 60 patients with chronic sinusitis were randomly divided into two groups, one received conventional treatment of chronic sinusitis and the other group was in addition taught to practice yogic breathing exercise Bhramari pranayama. The patients were advised to practice this breathing exercise twice a day and were followed up at 1, 4, and 12 weeks using the Sino-Nasal Outcome Test (SNOT-22 score). Results: The mean SNOT-22 score in the group following the Bhramari pranayama breathing exercise using the ANOVA test improved from 39.13 ± 9.10 to 24.79 ± 8.31 (P = 0.0002), this improvement was seen by the end of 4 weeks itself and continued until the 12th week of assessment. Conclusion: Integrating regular practice of Bhramari pranayama along with the conventional management of chronic rhinosinusitis is more effective than conventional management alone.

4.
Indian J Psychiatry ; 61(6): 592-597, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31896865

RESUMO

Background: Depression causes significant burden both to the individual and to society, and its treatment by antidepressants has various disadvantages. There is preliminary evidence that adds on yoga therapy improves depression by impacting the neurotransmitters involved in the regulation of mood, motivation, and pleasure. Our study aimed to find the effect of adjunctive yoga therapy on outcome of depression and comorbid anxiety. Materials and Methods: A randomized controlled study involving patients with major depressive disorder (n = 80) were allocated to two groups, one received standard therapy (antidepressants and counseling) and the other received adjunct yoga therapy along with standard therapy. Ratings of depression and anxiety were done using Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale at baseline, 10th and 30th day. Clinical Global Impression (CGI) Scale was applied at baseline and 30th day to view the severity of illness and clinical improvement. Results: By the 30th day, individuals in the yoga group had significantly lower scores of depression, anxiety, and CGI scores, in comparison to the control group. The individuals in the yoga group had a significant fall in depression scores and significant clinical improvement, compared to the control group, from baseline to 30th day and 10th to 30th day. In addition, the individuals in the yoga group had a significant fall in anxiety scores from baseline to 10th day. Conclusion: Anxiety starts to improve with short-term yoga sessions, while long-term yoga therapy is likely to be beneficial in the treatment of depression.

5.
Int J Yoga ; 10(1): 24-28, 2017.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28149064

RESUMO

AIM AND OBJECTIVES: This study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of yoga on the mental health status of elderly women inmates residing in a hospice in Puducherry. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty elderly women were randomly divided into yoga and wait-listed control group. A yoga therapy program of 60 min was given twice a week for 12 weeks. This protocol was specially designed for senior citizens, keeping in mind their health status and physical limitations that included simple warm-up and breath-body movement coordination practices (jathis and kriyas), static stretching postures (asanas), breathing techniques (pranayamas), and relaxation. Hamilton anxiety scale for measuring anxiety, Hamilton rating scale for depression, and Rosenberg self-esteem scale to measure self-esteem were administered to both groups before and after the 12-week study period. Data were assessed for normality, and appropriate parametric and nonparametric statistical methods were applied for intra- and inter-group comparisons. RESULTS: Overall, intra- and inter-group comparison of prepost data showed statistically significant (P < 0.001) differences for all three parameters. There was an overall improvement in the scores indicating decreased levels of depression and anxiety coupled with an increase in the level of self-esteem after the yoga therapy program. DISCUSSION: The influence of yoga in the reduction of depression and anxiety scores and improvement in self-esteem scores in elderly women subjects is evident from this study. As reported in earlier studies, this may be attributed to changes in central neurotransmitters such as gamma-aminobutyric-acid coupled with increased parasympathetic tone and decreased sympatho-adrenal activity. CONCLUSION: It is recommended that yoga should be a part of health-care facilities for elderly as it can enhance the quality of life by improving their overall mental health status. It could provide a healthy and positive alternative from depressing negative thoughts, and give them a sense of purpose and hope.

6.
J Clin Diagn Res ; 10(3): CC04-6, 2016 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27134863

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia (RSA) is the differential change of Heart Rate (HR) in response to inspiration and expiration. This is a noninvasive sensitive index of parasympathetic cardiac control. AIM: To evaluate changes in RSA by utilizing a simple and cost-effective analysis of electrocardiographic (ECG) tracings obtained during performance of four pranayama techniques. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty two trained volunteers performed the following pranayamas with different ratios for inspiration and expiration: sukha (1:1), traditional (1:2), pranava (1:3) and savitri (2:1:2:1) and ECG was recorded while performing the techniques with rest period of 5 minutes in-between. HR was calculated and maximum HR during inspiration (Imax), minimum HR during expiration (Emin), differences between Imax and Emin (Δ), percentage differences between I(max) and Emin (Δ%) and expiration: inspiration ratio (E:I) calculated by respective formulae. Statistical analysis was carried out using repeated measures of ANOVA with Tukey-Kramer multiple comparisons test. RESULTS: There were significant differences between groups in all five aspects namely: p= 0.0093 for mean Imax, p = 0.0009 for mean Emin, and p < 0.0001 for Δ HR (I-E), Δ% HR (I-E) and E:I ratio. Pranava pranayama produced the greatest changes in all five comparisons. CONCLUSION: We suggest that further short and long term studies be undertaken with pranava pranayama in patients to further qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate inherent mechanisms of this simple technique. Addition of these cost-effective techniques to the medical armory will help patients of rhythm disorders and other cardiovascular conditions.

7.
J Intercult Ethnopharmacol ; 5(2): 168-73, 2016.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27104038

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Yoga has become popular worldwide with increasing research done on its therapeutic potential. However, it remains to be determined whether such findings actually percolate down into teaching and practice of Yoga teachers/therapists. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The aim of this survey was to document awareness of Yoga research findings in the Yoga community and find out how these were utilized. It was undertaken with a select group of 34 international Yoga teachers and therapists utilizing email and social media between August and December 2015. Majority of responders had well-established reputation in Yoga and were from diverse lineages with 30 of them having more than 5 years of experience in the field. A set of eight questions were sent to them related to essentiality of Yoga research, how they updated themselves on research findings and whether such studies influenced their teaching and practice. Responses were compiled and appropriate statistics determined for quantitative aspects while feedback, comments and suggestions were noted in detail. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: About 89% agreed that it was essential to be up-to-date on Yoga research but only 70% updated themselves regularly with average papers read fully per year being <10. Most accessed information through general news reports, emails from contacts, and articles on internet sites whereas only 7% were through PubMed. About 60% felt these studies helped them in general teaching whereas 20% said that such studies had not really influenced it in any way. CONCLUSION: This survey provides a basic picture of a general lack of awareness of Yoga research amongst practicing Yoga teachers and therapists. Though a majority agree research is important, few seriously update themselves on this through scientific channels. With regard to future studies, most wanted "proof" that could be used to convince potential clients and felt that more qualitative methods should be applied.

8.
J Intercult Ethnopharmacol ; 4(2): 134-7, 2015.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26401400

RESUMO

AIM AND OBJECTIVE: This pilot study was carried out to determine cardiovascular effects of a single session of an integrated "silver yoga" program in senior citizens of Serene Pelican Township, Pondicherry. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) measurements were recorded in 124 senior citizens (75 female, 49 male) with mean age of 67.19 ± 10.61 year who attended an integrated "Silver Yoga" program at Centre for Yoga Therapy, Education and Research from August to October 2014. Participants practiced the protocol that was specially designed for senior citizens, keeping in mind their health status and physical limitations. This included simple warm-ups (jathis), breath body movement coordination practices (kriyas), static stretching postures (asanas), breathing techniques (pranayamas), relaxation and simple chanting. Non-invasive BP apparatus was used to record the HR, systolic (SP) and diastolic pressure (DP) before and after the 60 min sessions. Pulse pressure (PP), mean pressure (MP), rate-pressure product (RPP) and double product (DoP) indices were derived from the recorded parameters. Student's paired t-test was used to compare data that passed normality testing by Kolmogorov-Smirnov Test and Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test for those that did not. P < 0.05 were accepted as indicating significant differences for pre-post comparisons. RESULTS: All parameters witnessed a reduction following the single session. This was statistically more significant (P < 0. 0001) in HR, RPP and DoP while it was also significant (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05) in SP and PP, respectively. The decrease in MP just missed significance (P = 0.054) while it was not significant in DP. CONCLUSION: There is a healthy reduction in HR, BP and derived cardiovascular indices following a single yoga session in geriatric subjects. These changes may be attributed to enhanced harmony of cardiac autonomic function as a result of coordinated breath-body work and mind-body relaxation due to an integrated "Silver Yoga" program.

9.
Int J Yoga ; 7(2): 89-95, 2014 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25035617

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: This study planned to compare immediate cardiovascular effects of different yoga asanas in healthy young volunteers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Heart rate (HR), systolic pressure (SP), and diastolic pressure (DP), blood pressure (BP), were recorded using the non invasive blood pressure (NIBP) apparatus in 22 healthy young subjects, before and after the performance of Dhanurasana (DA), Vakrasana (VA) (both sides), Janusirasasana (JSA) (both sides), Matsyasana and Shavasana for 30 s. HR and BP were further recorded during supine recovery at 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 min. A repeated measure of ANOVA was used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: There were significant changes in HR and BP both immediately after the Asanas as well as during the recovery period. Overall comparisons of ∆% changes immediately after the performance of the Asanas revealed significant differences with regard to HR that increased significantly after DA. In the recovery phase, there were significant intergroup differences from 2 min onward in both SP and DP. The decrease of SP after VA (right side) (VA-R) was significantly greater than Shavasana (4(th), 6(th), and 8(th) min) and JSA (left side) (JSA-L) at 6(th) and 8(th) min. DP decreased significantly after performing JSA-L compared to VA-R at the 6(th) and 8(th) min. DISCUSSION: The cardiovascular changes immediately after the Asanas and during the recovery phase reveal inherent differences between the selected postures. The rise of HR in DA may be attributed to increased sympathetic response due to the relative difficulty of the posture as well as abdominal compression occurring in it. The effect of supine relaxation is more pronounced after the performance of the Asanas as compared to mere relaxation in Shavasana. This may be attributed to a normalization and resultant homeostatic effect occurring due to a greater, healthier de-activation of the autonomic nervous system occurring towing to the presence of prior activation. There were also subtle differences between the right sided and left sided performance of VA and JSA that may be occurring due to the different internal structures being either compressed or relaxed on either side. CONCLUSION: Our study provides initial evidence of differential cardiovascular effects of Asanas and subtle differences between right and left sided performance. Further, cardiovascular recovery is greater after the performance of the Asanas as compared to shavasan; thus, implying a better response when effort precedes relaxation.

10.
J Clin Diagn Res ; 8(5): BC01-3, 2014 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24995168

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Pranayama has been assigned very important role in yogic system of exercises and is said to be much more important than yogasanas for keeping sound health. Also different pranayamas produce divergent physiological effects. AIM: To study the effect of 12 weeks training of slow and fast pranayama on handgrip strength and endurance in young, healthy volunteers of JIPMER population. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: Present study was conducted in the Department of Physiology, JIPMER in 2011-12 (1.06.11 to 1.04.12). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Total of 91 volunteer subjects were randomised into slow pranayama (SPG) (n=29), fast pranayama (FPG) (n=32) and control groups (CG) (n=30). Supervised pranayama training (SPG - Nadisodhana, Pranav pranayama and Savitri pranayama; FPG - Kapalabhati, Bhastrika and Kukkuriya pranayama) was given for 30 minutes thrice a week for 12 weeks to both slow and fast pranayama groups by certified yoga trainer. Hand grip strength (HGS) and endurance (HGE) parameters were recorded using handgrip dynamometer (Rolex, India) at baseline and after 12 weeks of pranayama training. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED: Longitudinal changes in each group were compared by using Student's paired t-test. Delta changes in each group were analysed by ANOVA with Tukey post-hoc analysis. RESULTS: In SPG significant improvement occurred only in HGE parameter from 83.95±45.06 to 101.62±53.87 (seconds) (p<0.001) whereas in FPG, significant improvement was observed in HGS from 33.31±9.83 to 37.9±9.41 (Kilograms) (p=0.01) as well as in HGE from 92.78±41.37 to 116.56±58.54 (seconds) (p=0.004). Using Students unpaired t-test difference between the groups in HGS is found to be 1.17±5.485 in SPG and in FPG is 4.59±7.26 (p=0.39); HGE difference in SPG is 1.77±21.17 and in FPG is 2.38±43.27 (p>0.05). CONCLUSION: Pranayama training decreases sympathetic activity, resulting in mental relaxation and decreased autonomic arousal thereby, decreasing force fluctuations during isometric contraction. This is reflected as improvement in HGS and HGE.

11.
Int J Yoga ; 6(2): 96-103, 2013 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23930027

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Though neurological benefits of yoga training have been reported, lacunae still exists in understanding neurophysiological effects of such training. Hence, the present study was conducted to find the effect of yogasanas and pranayams on neurological and neuromuscular functions in healthy human volunteers and also determined differential effects of training in asan, pranayama and their combination. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighty male trainees from Pondicherry Police Training School were randomly divided into asan, pranayama, and asan-pranayama groups who received a training of 4 days a week for 6 months and a control group. Electroencephalogram (EEG), nerve conduction (NC), electromyogram (EMG), visual evoked potentials (VEP), and auditory reaction time (ART) were recorded before and after the study period. NC, EMG, and VEP data were obtained from 28 subjects; EEG data from 48 subjects; and RT from 67 subjects. Intergroup differences were assessed by AVOVA/Kruskal-Wallis and intragroup differences by Student's t-test. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Police trainees showed beneficial effects of yoga training, although they were undergoing intensive police training and the yoga training was relatively less intense. Alpha, theta, and total power of EEG increased as a result of asan training. A shortening of visual reaction time and a decrease in red-green discriminatory reaction time signifies an improved and faster processing of visual input. They also showed a decrease in resting EMG voltage, signifying better muscular relaxation following pranayama training. Beta, theta and total power of EEG increased. ART and red-green discriminatory reaction times decreased in the trainees, signifying a more alert state as well as improved central neural processing. A combination of asan and pranayama training for 6 months produced an improvement in motor and sensory nerve conduction. Total power of EEG, alpha and theta power as well as delta % increased, while reaction time decreased signifying an alert and yet relaxed state of the neuromuscular system. SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION: The present study has shown that 6 months training in asan, pranayama as well as their combination is effective in improving physiological functions of police trainees. They showed beneficial effects of yoga training, although they were undergoing intensive police training and the yoga training was relatively less intense. Hence, we recommend that yoga training be introduced in police training curricula.

12.
Indian J Physiol Pharmacol ; 57(2): 199-204, 2013.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24617172

RESUMO

Suryanamaskar (SN), a yogic technique is composed of dynamic muscular movements synchronised with deep rhythmic breathing. As it may have influence on CNS, this study planned to investigate immediate effects of SN on reaction time (RT) and heart rate (HR). 21 female volunteers attending yoga classes were recruited for study group and 19 female volunteers not participating in yoga were recruited as external-controls. HR, auditory reaction time (ART) and visual reaction time (VRT) were recorded before and after three rounds of SN in study group as well as 5 minutes of quiet sitting in both groups. Performance of SN produced immediate decrease in both VRT and ART (P < 0.001). This was significant when compared to self-control period (P < 0.001) and compared to external-control group, it decreased significantly in ART (p = 0.02). This was pronounced when delta% was compared between groups (P < 0.001). HR increased significantly following SN compared with both self-control (p = 0.025) and external-control group (p = 0.032). Faster reactivity may be due to intermediate level of arousal by conscious synchronisation of dynamic movements with breathing. Rise in HR is attributed to sympathetic arousal and muscular exertion. We suggest that SN may be used as an effective training means to improve neuro-muscular abilities.


Assuntos
Frequência Cardíaca , Tempo de Reação , Ioga , Estimulação Acústica , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Estimulação Luminosa
13.
14.
Int J Yoga ; 5(2): 108-11, 2012 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22869993

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Recent studies have reported differential physiological and psychological effects produced by exclusive right and left nostril breathing and clinical research is required to prove immediate and sustained efficacy of these techniques in various psychosomatic conditions such as hypertension (HT). The present study was designed to determine immediate effects of 27 rounds of exclusive left nostril breathing, a yogic pranayama technique known as chandra nadi pranayama (CNP) on cardiovascular parameters in patients of essential HT. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty two patients of essential HT under regular standard medical management were individually taught to perform CNP by a qualified yoga instructor with a regularity of 6 breaths/min throughout a performance of 27 rounds of CNP. Pre and post intervention heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) measurements were recorded using non-invasive semi-automatic BP monitor and Students t test for paired data used to determine significant differences. RESULTS: Twenty seven rounds of CNP produced an immediate decrease in all the measured cardiovascular parameters with the decrease in HR, systolic pressure (SP), pulse pressure, rate-pressure product and double product being statistically significant. Further, gender-based sub-analysis of our data revealed that our male participants evidenced significant reductions in HR and SP with an insignificant decrease in diastolic pressure, while in female participants only HR decreased significantly with an insignificant decrease in SP. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: It is concluded that CNP is effective in reducing HR and SP in hypertensive patients on regular standard medical management. To the best of our knowledge, there are no previously published reports on immediate effects of left UFNB in patients of HT and ours is the first to report on this beneficial clinical effect. This may be due to a normalization of autonomic cardiovascular rhythms with increased vagal modulation and/or decreased sympathetic activity along with improvement in baroreflex sensitivity. Further studies are required to enable a deeper understanding of the mechanisms involved as well as determine how long such a BP lowering effect persists. We recommend that this simple and cost effective technique be added to the regular management protocol of HT and utilized when immediate reduction of BP is required in day-to-day as well as clinical situations.

15.
Int J Yoga ; 5(2): 157-8, 2012 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22870003
16.
Int J Yoga ; 5(1): 10-5, 2012 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22346060

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Yogic practices may aid in the prevention and management of diabetes mellitus (DM) and reduce cardiovascular complications in the population. The present study has been undertaken to evaluate the effect of yoga therapy on reaction time, biochemical parameters and wellness score of peri and post-menopausal diabetic patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 15 peri and post-menopausal patients receiving standard medical treatment for type 2 DM were recruited and reaction time and biochemical investigations were done before and after a comprehensive yoga therapy program comprising of three times a week sessions for six weeks. A post-intervention, retrospective wellness questionnaire compiled by ACYTER was used to evaluate the comparative feelings of the patients after the therapy program. RESULTS: Yoga training reduced auditory reaction time (ART) from right as well as left hand, the decrease being statistically significant (P<0.05) for ART from the right hand. There was a significant (P<0.01) decrease in fasting and postprandial blood glucose levels as well as low density lipoprotein. The decrease in total cholesterol, triglycerides, and very low density lipoprotein and increase in high density lipoprotein was also statistically significant (P<0.05). All the lipid ratios showed desirable improvement with a decrease (P<0.01) of TC/HDL and LDL/HDL ratios and increase (P<0.05) in the HDL/LDL ratio. DISCUSSION OR CONCLUSION: Shortening of RT implies an improvement in the information processing and reflexes and is the first such report in diabetic patients. This has clinical significance and is worth further exploration with wider, well controlled, randomized studies in the diabetic population. Changes in blood glucose levels may be due to improved insulin sensitivity, decline in insulin resistance and increased sensitivity of the pancreatic b cells to glucose signals. Yoga improved the 'heart friendly' status of lipid profile in our subjects and as our participants were peri and post-menopausal, the decrease in cardiovascular risk profile is of greater significance. A comprehensive yoga therapy program has the potential to enhance the beneficial effects of standard medical management of diabetes mellitus and can be used as an effective complementary or integrative therapy program.

17.
Indian J Physiol Pharmacol ; 56(2): 174-80, 2012.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23387247

RESUMO

Mentally challenged individuals are known to have slower speed of reaction. As a previous study has shown immediate improvement in reaction time (RT) following mukha bhastrika, a bellows type of pranayama, we planned to study the effect of this pranayama in mentally challenged adolescents. 34 mentally challenged adolescents (15.1 +/- 0.806 y) studying in a school for Special Needs were recruited as they have been receiving yoga training once a week for more than 3 years. Exclusion criteria were inability to either perform mukha bhastrika or to understand procedure for testing RT. Visual (VRT) and auditory reaction time (ART) was measured using RT apparatus before and after nine rounds of mukha bhastrika and a control period of ten minutes of normal activities to rule out any test-retest practice effect. Analysis of non-intervention period values showed that the reliability in terms of reproducibility of the observation for both VRT (r = 0.87) and ART (r = 0.95) was excellent. Mukha bhastrika produced an immediate and significant decrease in both VRT and ART. There was a statistically significant decrease in VRT (P < 0.0001) from 296.15ms +/- 13.49 to 263.59ms +/- 12.53 and ART (P < 0.0001) from 247.88 ms +/- 14.33 to 217.35 ms +/- 11.36 following mukha bhastrika. Decrease in RT signifies improved central neuronal processing ability. This may be due to greater arousal and faster rate of information processing, improved concentration and/or ability to ignore or inhibit extraneous stimuli. Mukha bhastrika may be altering afferent inputs from abdominal and thoracic regions, in turn modulating activity at ascending reticular activating system and thalamo-cortical levels. It is suggested that yogic breathing techniques like mukha bhastrika be used as an effective means of improving neuromuscular abilities in special children.


Assuntos
Deficiência Intelectual/fisiopatologia , Tempo de Reação , Ioga , Adolescente , Feminino , Humanos , Inteligência , Masculino
18.
Indian J Physiol Pharmacol ; 56(3): 273-8, 2012.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23734443

RESUMO

Slow, deep, pranayama-based breathing training has been shown to be effective in reducing blood pressure (BP). The present study was undertaken to determine immediate effects of performing pranava pranayama on cardiovascular parameters in hypertensive patients. 29 hypertensive patients who were on medical treatment and also attending yoga sessions were recruited for the present study. Supine heart rate (HR) and BP were recorded before and after performance of pranava pranayama for five minutes. Post intervention statistical analysis revealed a significant (P < 0.05) reduction in systolic pressure (SP) and a more significant (P < 0.01) reduction in HR, pulse pressure and double product (Do P). The reduction in rate-pressure product (RPP) was highly significant (P < 0.001). Pranava pranayama is effective in reducing HR and SP in hypertensive patients within five minutes of the practice. This may be due to a normalization of autonomic cardiovascular rhythms as a result of increased vagal modulation and/or decreased sympathetic activity and improved baroreflex sensitivity along with an augmentation of endogenous nitric oxide production. Our findings have potential therapeutic applications in day-to-day as well as clinical situations where blood pressure needs to be brought down at the earliest. The significant fall in RPP and Do P signifies a reduction in oxygen consumption and work done by the heart. It is concluded that pranava pranayama, a simple and cost effective technique can be used in the management of hypertensive patients in addition to the regular medical management. Further studies are required to enable a deeper understanding of the mechanisms involved and its usefulness in the long- term management of hypertension.


Assuntos
Sistema Cardiovascular/fisiopatologia , Hipertensão/psicologia , Hipertensão/terapia , Ioga/psicologia , Sistema Nervoso Autônomo/fisiopatologia , Barorreflexo/fisiologia , Pressão Sanguínea/fisiologia , Feminino , Frequência Cardíaca/fisiologia , Humanos , Hipertensão/fisiopatologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Óxido Nítrico/metabolismo , Consumo de Oxigênio/fisiologia , Respiração
19.
Int J Yoga ; 4(2): 71-6, 2011 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22022125

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Numerous scientific studies have reported beneficial physiological changes after short- and long-term yoga training. Suryanamaskar (SN) is an integral part of modern yoga training and may be performed either in a slow or rapid manner. As there are few studies on SN, we conducted this study to determine the differential effect of 6 months training in the fast and slow versions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 42 school children in the age group of 12-16 years were randomly divided into two groups of 21 each. Group I and Group II received 6 months training in performance of slow suryanamaskar (SSN) and fast suryanamaskar (FSN), respectively. RESULTS: Training in SSN produced a significant decrease in diastolic pressure. In contrast, training in FSN produced a significant increase in systolic pressure. Although there was a highly significant increase in isometric hand grip (IHG) strength and hand grip endurance (HGE) in both the groups, the increase in HGE in FSN group was significantly more than in SSN group. Pulmonary function tests showed improvements in both the groups though intergroup comparison showed no significance difference. Maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP) and maximum expiratory pressure increased significantly in both the groups with increase of MIP in FSN group being more significant than in SSN. CONCLUSION: The present study reports that SN has positive physiological benefits as evidenced by improvement of pulmonary function, respiratory pressures, hand grip strength and endurance, and resting cardiovascular parameters. It also demonstrates the differences between SN training when performed in a slow and fast manner, concluding that the effects of FSN are similar to physical aerobic exercises, whereas the effects of SSN are similar to those of yoga training.

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