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1.
Foot Ankle Spec ; : 1938640020908428, 2020 Mar 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32114794

RESUMO

Introduction: There is increasing interest in the early identification and treatment of adverse medical events following orthopaedic procedures. The purpose of this study is to characterize the timing of 8 early adverse events following open reduction and internal fixation of closed fractures of the ankle. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program. A total of 17 318 patients undergoing open reduction and internal fixation of closed ankle fractures were identified. 48.4% of patients were discharged on the day of surgery. For each of 8 different early adverse events, the median postoperative day of diagnosis, interquartile range for day of diagnosis, and middle 80% for day of diagnosis were determined. Timing was compared between unimalleolar and bi-/trimalleolar fractures and between inpatient and outpatient procedures. Results: The median day of diagnosis (and interquartile range; middle 80%) for myocardial infarction was 2 (1-5; 0-17), pneumonia 3 (2-7; 1-19), acute kidney injury 6.5 (2-18; 2-20), urinary tract infection 7 (2-14; 0-24), pulmonary embolism 10 (3-21; 0-27), sepsis 15 (4-22; 1-28), deep vein thrombosis 17 (10-22; 3-27), and surgical site infection 19 (14-25; 8-28). Patients with bi-/trimalleolar fractures had earlier occurrence of myocardial infarction (day 2 vs 10), urinary tract infection (day 6.5 vs 9.5), and sepsis (day 10 vs 20.5). Inpatients had later occurrence of acute kidney injury (day 7 vs 3), but earlier occurrence of urinary tract infection (day 6 vs 15). Conclusions: These precisely described time periods for occurrence of specific adverse events enable heightened awareness among orthopaedic surgeons during the first month following open reduction and internal fixation of the ankle. Orthopaedic surgeons should have the lowest threshold for testing for each adverse event during the time period of greatest risk. Levels of Evidence: Therapeutic, Level III: Retrospective cohort study.

2.
Foot Ankle Int ; : 1071100720910422, 2020 Mar 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32141327

RESUMO

Nuclear medicine has been widely applied as a diagnostic tool for orthopedic foot and ankle pathology. Although its indications have diminished with improvements in and the availability of magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear medicine still has a significant and valuable role. The present article offers a comprehensive and current review of the most common nuclear imaging modalities for the orthopedic foot and ankle surgeon. Methods discussed include bone scintigraphy, gallium citrate scintigraphy, labeled-leukocyte scintigraphy, and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). We review the indications and utility of these techniques as they pertain to specific foot and ankle conditions, including osteomyelitis, stress fractures, talar osteochondral lesions, complex regional pain syndrome, oncology, plantar fasciitis, and the painful total ankle arthroplasty. We conclude with a discussion of our approach to nuclear medicine with illustrative cases. Level of Evidence: Level V, expert opinion.

3.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32109920

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Total hip and knee arthroplasty (THA and TKA) are performed more commonly than total ankle arthroplasty (TAA), so patients and the orthopaedic community are more familiar with the likelihood of complications after THA and TKA than after TAA. The present study places early complication rates after TAA in the context of those after THA and TKA. METHODS: Patients who underwent TAA, THA, or TKA during 2006 to 2016 as part of the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program were identified. Multivariate regression was used to compare procedures with adjustment for baseline and anesthesia characteristics. RESULTS: One hundred thirty-eight thousand three hundred twenty-five patients underwent THA, 223,587 TKA, and 839 TAA. The total complication rate was lower for TAA (2.98%) compared with THA (4.92%, P = 0.011) and TKA (4.56%, P = 0.049). Similarly, the rate of blood transfusion was lower for TAA (0.48%) compared with THA (9.66%) and TKA (6.44%, P < 0.001 for each). The rate of additional surgery was lower for TAA compared with THA (0.48% versus 1.79%, P = 0.007). Finally, the rate of readmission was lower for TAA (1.45%) compared with THA (3.66%, P = 0.002) and TKA (3.40%, P = 0.005). DISCUSSION: Patients can be counseled that relative to THA and TKA, TAA is safer in the perioperative period, with lower rates of adverse events, blood transfusion, additional surgery, and hospital readmission.

4.
Foot Ankle Int ; : 1071100719892962, 2019 Dec 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31833393

RESUMO

Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) is frequently utilized to manage complex wounds, however its mechanisms of healing remain poorly understood. Changes in growth factor expression, micro- and macro-deformation, blood flow, exudate removal, and bacterial concentration within the wound bed are thought to play a role. NPWT is gaining widespread usage in foot and ankle surgery, including the management of traumatic wounds; diabetic and neuropathic ulcers; wounds left open after debridement for infection or dehiscence; high-risk, closed incisions; tissue grafts and free flaps. This article reviews the rationale for NPWT, its proposed mechanisms of action, and the evidence regarding its clinical applications within the field of foot and ankle surgery. Level of Evidence: Level V, expert opinion.

5.
Clin Spine Surg ; 32(9): 403-408, 2019 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31567533

RESUMO

STUDY DESIGN: Prospective. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate improvements in grip and pinch strength in patients with or without myelopathy and determine patient factors that are predictive of continued postoperative grip strength weakness. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: The degree to which cervical myelopathy can diminish upper extremity muscle strength has not been objectively characterized. Few studies have investigated the association between the expected improvements in patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and strength in grip and pinch after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). METHODS: Patients were asked to perform grip and pinch strength tests both preoperatively and at 6-month follow-up. Patients were also administered PRO surveys, which included Neck Disability Index, Short-Form-12 physical composite score and mental composite score, and Visual Analog Scale neck and arm pain scores. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to determine optimum cutoff values of preoperative patient factors to predict postoperative dominant handgrip weakness after ACDF. RESULTS: Patients with radiculopathy demonstrated a significantly greater improvement in Visual Analog Scale arm pain compared with patients with myelopathy. The ROC curve analysis determined the optimum cutoff for preoperative dominant handgrip strength to be 22 kgf. This value demonstrated a sensitivity of 0.89 and a specificity of 0.62. The area under the ROC curve value was 0.71 (95% confidence interval, 0.55-0.88), indicating fair prognostic accuracy of the cutoff for postoperative dominant handgrip weakness. CONCLUSIONS: In this prospective, observational study, postoperative increase in grip and pinch strength demonstrated an association with improvement of pain and disability of the neck and overall quality of health regardless of the presence of cervical myelopathy. Preoperative grip strength weakness was found to be predictive of postoperative grip strength deficiency after ACDF. Our investigation suggests the recovery of hand function may be correlated with improvement of PROs after ACDF.

6.
J Bone Joint Surg Am ; 101(19): 1768-1774, 2019 Oct 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31577682

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: As orthopaedic surgery moves toward bundled payments, there is growing interest in identifying patients at high risk of early postoperative adverse events. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a risk-stratification system for the occurrence of early adverse events among patients treated with open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) for a closed fracture of the ankle. METHODS: Patients undergoing ORIF for a closed ankle fracture during the period of 2006 to 2017, as documented by the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program, were identified. For the 60% of patients randomly selected as the development cohort, multivariate Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to identify factors that were independently associated with the occurrence of adverse events (including events such as reoperation, surgical site infection, and pulmonary embolism). On the basis of these results, a nomogram analysis was used to generate a point-based risk-stratification system. To evaluate the validity of the point-based system, the system was applied to the remaining 40% of patients constituting the validation cohort and tested for its ability to predict adverse events. RESULTS: Of the 7,582 patients in the development cohort, 455 developed an adverse event (estimated adverse event risk of 6%). On the basis of Cox proportional-hazards regression, patients were assigned points for each of the following significant risk factors: +1 point for age of 40 to 59 years, +3 points for age of 60 to 79 years, +5 points for age of ≥80 years, +1 point for female sex, +2 points for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), +2 points for insulin-dependent diabetes, +3 points for anemia, and +4 points for end-stage renal disease. The validation cohort included 5,263 patients. Among this second cohort, the risk-stratification system predicted the risk of early adverse events (p < 0.001; Harrell C = 0.697). CONCLUSIONS: The occurrence of early adverse events following ORIF for closed ankle fractures was associated with greater age, female sex, COPD, insulin-dependent diabetes, anemia, and end-stage renal disease. We present and validate a simple point-based risk-stratification system to predict the risk of early adverse events. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.


Assuntos
Fraturas do Tornozelo/terapia , Fixação Interna de Fraturas/métodos , Redução Aberta/métodos , Adulto , Distribuição por Idade , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Ambulatórios/estatística & dados numéricos , Anemia/complicações , Fraturas do Tornozelo/complicações , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 1/complicações , Feminino , Humanos , Falência Renal Crônica/complicações , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/etiologia , Estudos Prospectivos , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/complicações , Estudos Retrospectivos , Medição de Risco , Fatores de Risco , Fatores Sexuais
7.
Orthop J Sports Med ; 7(7): 2325967119860752, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31392239

RESUMO

Background: Operative time is a risk factor for short-term complications after orthopaedic procedures; however, it has yet to be investigated as an independent risk factor for postoperative complications after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Purpose: To determine whether operative time is an independent risk factor for complications, readmissions, and extended hospital stays within 30 days after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program was queried for all hospital-based inpatient and outpatient arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs (Current Procedural Terminology code 29827) from 2005 to 2016. Concomitant procedures such as subacromial decompression, biceps tenodesis, superior labrum anterior and posterior (SLAP) repair, labral repair, and distal clavicle excision were also included, whereas patients undergoing arthroplasty were excluded from the study. Operative time was correlated with patient demographics, comorbidities, and concomitant procedures. All adverse events were correlated with operative time, while controlling for the above preoperative variables, using multivariate Poisson regression with a robust error variance. Results: A total of 27,524 procedures met inclusion and exclusion criteria. The mean age of patients was 58.4 ± 10.9 years, the mean operative time was 86.9 ± 37.4 minutes, and the mean body mass index was 30.4 ± 7.0 kg/m2. Concomitant biceps tenodesis, glenohumeral debridement, SLAP repair, labral repair, and distal clavicle excision significantly increased operative time (P < .001) but not the risk of adverse events (P > .05). The overall rate of adverse events was 0.88%. After adjusting for demographic and procedural characteristics, a 15-minute increase in operative duration was associated with an increased risk of anemia requiring transfusion (relative risk [RR], 1.27 [95% CI, 1.14-1.42]; P < .001), venous thromboembolism (RR, 1.17 [95% CI, 1.02-1.35]; P = .029), surgical site infection (RR, 1.13 [95% CI, 1.03-1.24]; P = .011), and extended length of hospital stay (RR, 1.07 [95% CI, 1.00-1.14]; P = .036). Conclusion: Although the rate of short-term complications after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is low, incremental increases in operative time are associated with an increased risk of adverse events such as surgical site infection, pulmonary embolism, transfusion, and extended length of hospital stay. Efforts should be made to maximize surgical efficiency in the operating room through optimal coordination of the staff or increased preoperative planning.

8.
Iowa Orthop J ; 39(1): 211-216, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31413696

RESUMO

Background: Midlevel providers (i.e. physician assistants [PAs] and nurse practitioners [NPs]) are being integrated into systems of care due to the exponentially increasing demand for orthopaedic care. There is a lack of studies which investigate orthopaedic patients' perspectives regarding midlevel providers. Methods: An anonymous questionnaire was administered to 538 first-time patients of four orthopaedic surgeons before their new patient visit. Content included patient perspectives regarding: optimal scope of practice, midlevel provider importance in physician selection, and reimbursement equity with physicians. Results: Of 538 consecutive patients, 415 (77%) responded. 57% were female with an average age of 63.9 ± 11.4 years. Most patients (68%) considered the training background of the surgeon's midlevel provider when initially choosing an orthopaedic surgeon. 34% of all patients perceived PAs to be more highly trained than NPs while 17% perceived the opposite. Patients had specific preferences regarding which services should be surgeon-provided: follow-up for abnormal tests (82%), initial postoperative appointment (81%), new patient visits (81%), and determining the need for advanced diagnostic studies (e.g. MRI) (76%). Patients had specific preferences regarding which services could be midlevel-provided: preoperative teaching (73%), minor in-office procedures (65%), long term postoperative appointments (61%), and prescriptions (61%). Patients lacked a consensus on reimbursement equity for midlevel providers and orthopaedic surgeons, despite most patients (78%) reporting the surgeon provides a higher-quality consultation. Conclusions: As health care becomes increasingly consumer-centric and value-driven, a databased utilization of midlevel staff will allow orthopaedic physicians to optimize efficiency and patient satisfaction. Surgeons may consider our results in division of clinical duties among midlevel staff since patients had specific preferences regarding which services should be physician-provided or midlevel-provided. Orthopaedic surgeons may also consider including the midlevel provider in marketing efforts, as most patients considered the midlevel provider's training background when initially choosing a surgeon and perceived PAs to be more highly trained than NPs. Patients lacked a consensus towards reimbursement equity for orthopaedic surgeons and midlevels, despite reporting that the surgeon provides a higher quality consultation. These findings are important as the midlevel workforce grows in response to the rising demand for orthopaedic care.Level of Evidence: IV.


Assuntos
Competência Clínica , Profissionais de Enfermagem/estatística & dados numéricos , Cirurgiões Ortopédicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Satisfação do Paciente/estatística & dados numéricos , Assistentes Médicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Procedimentos Ortopédicos/métodos , Preferência do Paciente , Inquéritos e Questionários , Estados Unidos
9.
Foot Ankle Int ; 40(11): 1282-1287, 2019 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31319712

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The functional capacity evaluation (FCE) is used to determine physical ability after treatment of a workplace-related injury. This evaluation is a determinant in the administration of benefits and the decision to return to work (RTW). The purpose of this study was to characterize FCE results and ability to RTW after treatment for workplace-related orthopedic injuries to the foot or ankle. METHODS: A retrospective medical record review from the practices of 4 orthopedic foot and ankle surgeons was conducted. Inclusion criteria were a workplace-related injury to the foot or ankle, at least 2 years of follow-up, and an associated FCE. The FCE report and clinic notes were used to determine the patient's preinjury job requirement, postinjury FCE-determined ability, specific FCE- or physician-imposed work restrictions, and clearance to RTW. A total of 188 patients met inclusion criteria. RESULTS: In total, 74.4% of patients had FCE-determined work abilities at or above their preinjury job requirements, and 63.3% of patients were cleared to RTW. The mean time from injury to FCE was 1.9 ± 1.5 years, and the mean time to clearance for RTW was 2.0 ± 1.3 years. A less strenuous preinjury job requirement was positively associated with both the FCE-determined ability meeting the preinjury job requirement (P < .001) and clearance to RTW (P = .034). CONCLUSION: Two in 3 patients were cleared to RTW following workplace-related injuries to the foot or ankle culminating in an FCE. However, it took a mean of 2 years to achieve this clearance. Patients with more strenuous jobs were less likely to be able to RTW after injury. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level III, retrospective comparative study.


Assuntos
Traumatismos do Tornozelo/fisiopatologia , Traumatismos do Pé/fisiopatologia , Ferimentos e Lesões/fisiopatologia , Avaliação da Deficiência , Humanos , Médicos , Estudos Retrospectivos , Avaliação da Capacidade de Trabalho , Ferimentos e Lesões/prevenção & controle
10.
Int J Spine Surg ; 13(3): 262-269, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31328090

RESUMO

Background: The minimum clinically importance difference (MCID) represents a threshold for improvements in patient-reported outcomes (PROs) that patients deem important. No previous study has comprehensively examined risk factors for failure to achieve MCID after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) procedures for radiculopathic symptomatology. The purpose of this study is to determine risk factors for failure to reach MCID for Neck Disability Index (NDI), Visual Analog Scale (VAS) neck pain, and VAS arm pain in patients undergoing 1- or 2-level ACDF procedures. Methods: A surgical registry of patients who underwent primary, 1- or 2-level ACDF from 2014 to 2016 was reviewed. Rates of MCID achievement for NDI, VAS neck pain, and VAS arm pain at final follow-up were calculated based on published MCID values. Patients were then categorized into demographic and procedural categories. Bivariate regression was used to test for association of demographic and procedural characteristics with failure to reach MCID for each PRO. The final multivariate model including all demographic and procedural categories as controls was created using backward stepwise regression. Results: Eighty-three, 84, and 77 patients were included in the analysis for VAS neck, VAS arm, and NDI, respectively. Rates of MCID achievement for VAS neck, VAS arm, and NDI were 55.4%, 36.9%, and 76.6%, respectively. On bivariate analysis, patients with Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) ≥ 2 were less likely to achieve MCID for NDI than patients with CCI < 2 (P = .025). On multivariate analysis, CCI ≥ 2 (P = .025) was further associated with failure to reach MCID for NDI. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that the majority of patients do not reach MCID for arm pain. Additionally, higher comorbidity burden as evidenced by higher CCI scores is a negative predictive factor for the achievement of MCID in neck disability following ACDF. Level of Evidence: 3.

11.
Foot Ankle Spec ; : 1938640019865364, 2019 Jul 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31347397

RESUMO

Foot and ankle surgeons routinely prescribe diagnostic imaging that exposes patients to potentially harmful ionizing radiation. It is unclear how well patients understand the radiation to which they are exposed. In this study, 946 consecutive new patients were surveyed regarding medical imaging and radiation exposure prior to their first appointment. Respondents compared the amount of radiation associated with chest X-rays (CXRs) with various types of foot and ankle imaging. Results were compared with actual values of radiation exposure from the published literature. Of 946 patients surveyed, 841 (88.9%) participated. Most had private insurance (82.8%) and a bachelor's degree or higher (60.6%). Most believed that foot X-ray, ankle X-ray, "low dose" foot and ankle computed tomography (CT) scan (alluding to cone-beam CT), and traditional foot and ankle CT scan contain similar amounts of ionizing radiation to CXR. This contradicts the published literature that suggests that the actual exposure to patients is 0.006, 0.006, 0.127, and 0.833 CXR equivalents of radiation, respectively. Of patients who had undergone an X-ray, 55.9% thought about the issue of radiation prior to the study, whereas 46.1% of those undergoing a CT scan considered radiation prior to the exam. Similarly, 35.2% and 27.6% reported their doctor having discussed radiation with them prior to obtaining an X-ray and CT scan, respectively. Patients greatly overestimate the radiation exposure associated with plain film X-rays and cone-beam CT scans of the foot and ankle, and may benefit from increased counseling regarding the relatively low radiation exposure associated with these imaging modalities. Level of Evidence: Level III: Prospective questionnaire.

12.
Arthroscopy ; 35(7): 2089-2098, 2019 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31227396

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To determine whether operative time is an independent risk factor for 30-day complications after arthroscopic surgical procedures on the knee. METHODS: The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was queried between 2005 and 2016 for all arthroscopic knee procedures including lateral release, loose body removal, synovectomy, chondroplasty, microfracture, and meniscectomy. Cases with concomitant procedures were excluded. Correlations between operative time and adverse events were controlled for variables such as age, sex, body mass index, patient comorbidities, and procedure using a multivariate Poisson regression with robust error variance. RESULTS: A total of 78,864 procedures met our inclusion and exclusion criteria. The mean age of patients was 51.0 ± 14.3 years; mean operative time, 31.2 ± 18.1 minutes; and mean body mass index, 31.0 ± 7.8. Arthroscopic lateral release (coefficient, 5.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.8-6.8; P < .001), removal of loose bodies (coefficient, 4.2; 95% CI, 3.2-5.3; P < .001), synovectomy (coefficient, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.2-2.3; P < .001), and microfracture (coefficient, 6.5; 95% CI, 5.8-7.2; P < .001) had significantly greater durations of surgery in comparison with meniscectomy. The overall rate of adverse events was 1.24%. After we adjusted for demographic characteristics and the procedure, a 15-minute increase in operative duration was associated with an increased risk of transfusion (relative risk [RR], 1.5; 95% CI, 1.3-1.8; P < .001), death (RR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.2-2.1; P = .005), dehiscence (RR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.2-2.2; P = .002), surgical-site infection (RR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.2-1.3; P = .001), sepsis (RR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.2-1.4; P < .001), readmission (RR, 1.1; 95% CI, 1.1-1.2; P < .001), and extended length of stay (RR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.3-1.4; P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: Marginal increases in operative time are associated with an increased risk of adverse events such as surgical-site infection, sepsis, extended length of stay, and readmission. Efforts should be made to maximize surgical efficiency. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level IV, retrospective database study.

13.
J Wrist Surg ; 8(3): 221-225, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31192044

RESUMO

Background Open injuries communicating with the wrist joint are essential to detect to facilitate timely, appropriate treatment. While the saline load test to detect traumatic arthrotomy has been well studied in the knee and ankle, it has not been studied in the wrist, and therefore the appropriate volume of saline infusion to detect traumatic arthrotomy is not known. Purpose The purpose of this study was to utilize wrist arthroscopy to determine the saline infusion volume necessary to achieve 99% sensitivity in detecting traumatic arthrotomy. Methods Twenty consecutive patients undergoing elective wrist arthroscopy were prospectively enrolled. A 5-mm arthrotomy was established between the third and fourth dorsal extensor compartments. An 18-gauge needle was inserted into the 6R portal on the radial side of the extensor carpi ulnaris. Sterile normal saline was injected into the wrist joint through the needle at a rate of 0.1 mL per second until extravasation from the 3-4 portal was visualized. Saline volumes required for extravasation were analyzed. Results The mean saline volume required for extravasation was 0.8 mL. The volume of saline needed to achieve sensitivities of 50, 90, 95, and 99% were 0.4, 2.2, 2.3, and 2.5 mL respectively. Conclusions The saline infusion volume required to detect a dorsal radiocarpal arthrotomy with 99% sensitivity was 2.5 mL. We recommend using at least 2.5 mL when performing the saline load test to rule out a potential arthrotomy to the wrist in the traumatic setting. Level of Evidence: This is a Level II, diagnostic study.

14.
Arthroscopy ; 35(7): 1984-1991, 2019 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31196694

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To compare the efficacy, as measured through the rate of reoperation, and rates of other 30-day perioperative complications between arthrotomy and arthroscopy for the treatment of septic native shoulders in a national patient population. METHODS: Patients who were diagnosed with septic arthritis in a native shoulder and underwent irrigation and debridement through arthrotomy or arthroscopy were identified in the 2005-2016 National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. Patient preoperative characteristics were characterized. Rate of reoperation, a proxy used to measure treatment efficacy, and other perioperative complications were compared between the 2 procedures. RESULTS: In total, 100 patients undergoing shoulder arthrotomy and 155 patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy for septic shoulder were identified. On univariate analysis, there were no statistically significant differences in patient preoperative characteristics, operative time (60 vs. 48 minutes, P = .290), length of stay (7.5 vs. 6.6 days, P = .267), or time to reoperation (8.9 vs. 7.2 days, P = .594) between the 2 surgical groups. On multivariate analysis controlling for patient characteristics, there were no statistically significant differences in risk of reoperation (relative risk [RR] = 1.914, 99% confidence interval [CI] = 0.730-5.016, P = .083), any adverse events (RR = 1.254, 99% CI = 0.860-1.831, P = .122), minor adverse events (RR = 1.304, 99% CI = 0.558-3.047, P = .421), serious adverse events (RR = 1.306, 99% CI = 0.842-2.025, P = .118), or readmission (RR = 0.999, 99% CI = 0.441-2.261, P = .998) comparing arthrotomy with arthroscopy. CONCLUSIONS: By demonstrating similar rates of reoperation, other postoperative complications, and 30-day readmissions, the current study suggests that arthrotomy and arthroscopic surgery have similar efficacy in treating septic shoulders. However, owing to the small sample size, there is still the possibility of a type II error. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level III, therapeutic retrospective comparative study.

15.
Orthop J Sports Med ; 7(2): 2325967118825453, 2019 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31001565

RESUMO

Background: A longer operative time has been previously recognized as a risk factor for short-term complications after various orthopaedic procedures; however, it has yet to be investigated as an independent risk factor for postoperative complications after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Purpose: To identify whether a longer operative time in ACL reconstruction is an independent risk factor for the development of postoperative complications, hospital readmissions, or an extended length of stay within 30 days of the index procedure. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: Patients undergoing ACL reconstruction between 2005 and 2016 were identified using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database. Cases with concomitant procedures were excluded from the analysis. We evaluated the association between operative time and preoperative variables such as patient age, sex, body mass index, comorbidities, and procedure. Correlations between adverse events and operative time, while controlling for the above preoperative variables, were calculated using multivariate Poisson regression with robust error variance. Results: A total of 14,159 procedures were included in this investigation. The mean patient age was 32.6 ± 10.8 years, the mean body mass index was 27.7 ± 6.5 kg/m2, and the mean operative time was 89.7 ± 28.6 minutes. Patients who were between the ages of 18 and 30 years (mean operative time, 95.1 ± 27.8 minutes; relative risk [RR], 17.7; P < .001), male (mean operative time, 91.9 ± 28.3 minutes; RR, 4.7; P < .001), and nondiabetic (mean operative time, 89.8 ± 28.6 minutes; RR, 7.1; P = .011) were associated with a longer operative duration. The overall complication rate was 1.1%. After adjusting for demographic characteristics and procedures, 15-minute incremental increases in operative duration were associated with an increased risk of deep vein thrombosis (RR, 1.12; P = .042), surgical site infections (RR, 1.21; P = .001), and sepsis (RR, 1.66; P < .001) as well as increased readmission rates (RR, 1.23; P = .001) and an extended length of stay (RR, 1.18; P = .008). Conclusion: While the overall adverse risk rate after ACL reconstruction remains low, marginal increases in operative time are associated with an increased risk of adverse events such as deep vein thrombosis, surgical site infections, sepsis, an extended length of stay, and readmissions. Thus, the operating physician and surgical staff should make all efforts to coordinate and prepare for each case to maximize surgical efficiency.

16.
J Hand Surg Am ; 44(8): 703.e1-703.e8, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30928022

RESUMO

Four-corner arthrodesis is commonly performed for symptomatic scapholunate advanced collapse and scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse. Potential complications associated with current techniques include nonunion, hardware issues, and dorsal impingement. A method for achieving 4-corner arthrodesis with strong internal fixation and effective compression while avoiding dorsal and cartilage-bearing surfaces can maximize the benefits of the fusion while minimizing the aforementioned complications. We present a cerclage fusion technique for achieving 4-corner arthrodesis. Proposed benefits of this technique include ease of fixation placement in the coronal plane, inclusion of a large surface area for compression, avoidance of dorsal and cartilage-bearing surfaces, and the ability to adjust sagittal alignment in the midcarpal joint.

17.
J Orthop ; 16(5): 359-362, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31011248

RESUMO

Background: Radiographically measured subcutaneous peri-incisional tissue depth has been correlated with post-operative surgical site infection after cardiac, cervical spine, and total knee surgery. Its impact following primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) has not been studied. We compare the interobserver reliability of measuring peritrochanteric fat thickness on pre-operative radiographs and hypothesize that these measurements are a reproducible way to predict acute post-operative wound complications and infection in patients undergoing THA. Methods: A retrospective case-control analysis was performed at a single institution. Patients taken to the operating room within 90 days of their primary THA for a wound complication or deep infection between 2008 and 2016 were identified. Patients <18 years old, those with history of open surgery on the affected hip, or with inadequate radiographs were excluded. Patients were matched 1:1 for gender, age, BMI, and ASA score to THA patients without early wound complications. Results: All radiographic measurements performed were found to have excellent inter-rater reliabilities (range 0.96-0.98). There was no difference in peritrochanteric fat thickness measurements between the two groups including the sourcil to skin surface (89.5 mm vs. 91.9 mm, p = 0.5), tip of greater trochanter to skin surface (52.9 mm vs. 53.7 mm, p = 0.8), and lateral greater trochanter to skin surface (36.0 mm vs. 37.8 mm, p = 0.6) measurements. Conclusion: Contrary to other previously reported surgical procedures, radiographic measurement of subcutaneous depth is not a valid tool for predicting a return to the OR for wound complications in the early post-operative period following primary total hip arthroplasty.

19.
J Arthroplasty ; 34(7S): S173-S177.e1, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30827716

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Surgeons have increasingly emphasized early mobilization as a way to facilitate discharge following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of this study was to determine whether starting formal physical therapy (PT) the afternoon of postoperative day (POD) 0, instead of starting PT the morning of POD 1, could shorten hospital length of stay (LOS). METHODS: Patients undergoing elective TKA with a planned minimum 1-night hospital stay were randomized to start formal PT the afternoon following surgery or the morning of POD 1. LOS in hours was the primary outcome. An a priori sample size calculation suggested that 394 patients were required to show a 4-hour difference between groups. RESULTS: Out of 394 patients enrolled and randomized, 378 (95.9%) completed the study. The observed difference in hospital LOS was not large enough to be of clinical significance (intention-to-treat analysis: median of 32.0 hours for POD 0 PT vs 31.0 hours for POD 1 PT, P = .65; as-treated analysis: median of 31.0 hours for POD 0 PT vs 32.0 hours for POD 1 PT, P = .12). Similarly, the observed differences in satisfaction with inpatient PT (10.0 vs 10.0, P = .77), patient-reported readiness for discharge at time of discharge (10.0 vs 10.0, P = .97), and POD 0 pain (3.3 vs 4.0, P = .79) were not large enough to be of clinical significance. CONCLUSION: While PT on the day of surgery has been suggested as one method to facilitate discharge following TKA, this randomized trial did not demonstrate clinically meaningful differences in hospital LOS or patient satisfaction when PT is initiated on the day of surgery vs on the morning after surgery.

20.
Foot Ankle Spec ; : 1938640019835299, 2019 Mar 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30913923

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Little is known regarding the association of operative time with adverse events following foot and ankle surgery. This study tests whether greater operative time is associated with the occurrence of adverse events following open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) of the ankle. METHODS: The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was queried for cases of ankle ORIF (primary CPT codes 27766, 27769, 27792, 27814, 27822, 27823) performed during 2005-2016. Operative time was tested for association with the occurrence of adverse events with controls for baseline characteristics and primary CPT code. RESULTS: A total of 20 591 procedures met inclusion/exclusion criteria. The average (±SD) operative time was 75.7 (±37.3) minutes and varied by baseline characteristics and primary CPT code. After controlling for these factors, a 15-minute increase in operative time was associated with an 11% increase in risk for developing surgical site infection (SSI; relative risk [RR]: 1.11; 95% CI: 1.06-1.16), 20% for wound dehiscence (RR: 1.20; 95% CI: 1.11-1.29), 10% for anemia requiring transfusion (RR: 1.10; 95% CI: 1.04-1.17), 60% for cerebrovascular accident (RR: 1.60; 95% CI: 1.17-2.18), 14% for unplanned intubation (RR: 1.14; 95% CI: 1.03-1.26), and 7% for extended length of hospital admission (RR: 1.07; 95% CI: 1.05-1.09). CONCLUSION: Operative time is linearly and independently associated with the risks for SSI, wound dehiscence, and other adverse events following ORIF of the ankle. Efforts should be implemented to safely minimize operative duration without compromising the technical components of the procedure. LEVELS OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic, Level IV.

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