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1.
Heart Lung Circ ; 28 Suppl 3: S129, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31470979

RESUMO

This article has been retracted: please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal (https://www.elsevier.com/about/our-business/policies/article-withdrawal). This article has been retracted at the request of the Authors. This abstract has been published due to a miscommunication in the ANZSCTS ASM conference supplement. It needs to be retracted as we the authors wish to submit a full length paper with updated material.

2.
JACC Clin Electrophysiol ; 5(8): 944-954, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31439296

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to evaluate incidence, clinical significance, and predictors of early ventricular arrhythmias (VAs) in left ventricular assist device (LVAD) recipients. BACKGROUND: LVAD implantation is increasingly used in patients with end-stage heart failure. Early VAs may occur during the 30-day post-operative period, but many questions remain unanswered regarding their incidence and clinical impact. METHODS: This observational study was conducted in 19 centers between 2006 and 2016. Early VAs were defined as sustained ventricular tachycardia and/or ventricular fibrillation occurring <30 days post-LVAD implantation and requiring appropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy, external electrical shock, or medical therapy. RESULTS: A total of 652 patients (median age: 59.8 years; left ventricular ejection fraction: 20.7 ± 7.4%; HeartMate 2: 72.8%; HeartWare: 19.5%; Jarvik 2000: 7.7%) were included in the analysis. Early VAs occurred in 162 patients (24.8%), most frequently during the first week after LVAD implantation. Multivariable analysis identified history of VAs prior to LVAD and any combined surgery with LVAD as 2 predictors of early VAs. The occurrence of early VAs with electrical storm was the strongest predictor of 30-day post-operative mortality, associated with a 7-fold increase of 30-day mortality. However, in patients discharged alive from hospital, occurrence of early VAs did not influence long-term survival. CONCLUSIONS: Early VAs are common after LVAD implantation and increase 30-day post-operative mortality, without affecting long-term survival. Further studies will be needed to analyze whether pre- or pre-operative ablation of VAs may improve post-operative outcomes. (Determination of Risk Factors of Ventricular Arrhythmias After Implantation of Continuous Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device With Continuous Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device [ASSIST-ICD]; NCT02873169).

3.
Heart Rhythm ; 2019 Jun 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31255846

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Ventricular arrhythmias (VAs) can occur after continuous flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation as a single arrhythmic event or as electrical storm (ES) with multiple repetitive VA episodes. OBJECTIVE: We aimed at analyzing the incidence, predictors, and clinical impact of ES in LVAD recipients. METHODS: Patients analyzed were those included in the multicenter ASSIST-ICD observational study. ES was consensually defined as occurrence of ≥3 separate episodes of sustained VAs within a 24-hour interval. RESULTS: Of 652 patients with an LVAD, 61 (9.4%) presented ES during a median follow-up period of 9.1 (interquartile range [IQR] 2.5-22.1) months. The first ES occurred after 17 (IQR 4.0-56.2) days post LVAD implantation, most of them during the first month after the device implantation (62.9%). The incidence then tended to decrease during the initial years of follow-up and increased again after the third year post LVAD implantation. History of VAs before LVAD implantation and heart failure duration > 84 months were independent predictors of ES. The occurrence of ES was associated with an increased early mortality since 20 patients (32.8%) died within the first 2 weeks of ES. Twenty-two patients (36.1%) presented at least 1 recurrence of ES, occurring 43.0 (IQR 8.0-69.0) days after the initial ES. Patients experiencing ES had a significantly lower 1-year survival rate than did those free from ES (log-rank, P = .039). CONCLUSION: There is a significant incidence of ES in patients with an LVAD. The short-term mortality after ES is high, and one-third of patients will die within 15 days. Whether radiofrequency ablation of arrhythmias improves outcomes would require further studies.

4.
JACC Clin Electrophysiol ; 4(9): 1166-1175, 2018 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30236390

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to evaluate the incidence, clinical impact, and predictors of late ventricular arrhythmias (VAs) in left ventricular assist device (LVAD) recipients aiming to clarify implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) indications. BACKGROUND: The arrhythmic risk and need for ICD in patients implanted with an LVAD are not very well known. METHODS: This observational study was conducted in 19 centers between 2006 and 2016. Late VAs were defined as sustained ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation occurring >30 days post-LVAD implantation, without acute reversible cause and requiring appropriate ICD therapy, external electrical shock, or medical therapy. RESULTS: Among 659 LVAD recipients, 494 (median 58.9 years of age; mean left ventricular ejection fraction 20.7 ± 7.4%; 73.1% HeartMate II, 18.6% HeartWare, 8.3% Jarvik 2000) were discharged alive from hospital and included in the final analysis. Late VAs occurred in 133 (26.9%) patients. Multivariable analysis identified 6 independent predictors of late VAs: VAs before LVAD implantation, atrial fibrillation before LVAD implantation, idiopathic etiology of the cardiomyopathy, heart failure duration >12 months, early VAs (<30 days post-LVAD), and no angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors during follow-up. The "VT-LVAD score" was created, identifying 4 risk groups: low (score 0 to 1), intermediate (score 2 to 4), high (score 5 to 6), and very high (score 7 to 10). The rates of VAs at 1 year were 0.0%, 8.0%, 31.0% and 55.0%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Late VAs are common after LVAD implantation. The VT-LVAD score may help to identify patients at risk of late VAs and guide ICD indications in previously nonimplanted patients. (Determination of Risk Factors of Ventricular Arrhythmias [VAs] after implantation of continuous flow left ventricular assist device with continuous flow left ventricular assist device [CF-LVAD] [ASSIST-ICD]; NCT02873169).

5.
Stem Cells Transl Med ; 7(10): 705-708, 2018 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30211981

RESUMO

We report the case of a patient who had undergone injections of myoblasts in an infarct area 16 years before being referred for heart transplantation. The pathological examination of the explanted heart found persisting myotubes embedded in fibrosis. This finding supports the ability of myoblasts to survive in harsh environments, which can make them appealing candidates for transplantation in diseases requiring supply of new myogenic cells. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2018;7:705-708.

6.
Arch Cardiovasc Dis ; 2018 Aug 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30078651

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The frequency, characteristics and outcomes of primary prevention implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) recipients who eventually undergo heart transplantation (HT) during follow-up have not been well described. AIMS: In a cohort of patients with heart failure implanted with an ICD for primary prevention of sudden cardiac death, to identify those at high risk of subsequent HT and evaluate ICD usefulness. METHODS: Between 2002 and 2012, 5539 patients received a primary prevention ICD across 12 centers, and were enrolled in the DAI-PP programme, including 5427 with full HT information available. RESULTS: During a median follow-up of 1024 days (interquartile range 484-1702 days), 176 (3.2%) patients underwent HT. Median duration between ICD implantation and HT was 484 days (IQR 169-1117 days). Among those aged≤65 years (theoretical age limit for HT registration in France), the overall incidence per 1000 person-years was 18.03 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 15.32-20.74). Left ventricular ejection fraction<25% (hazard ratio [HR]: 3.43, 95% CI: 2.34-5.04; P<0.0001), younger age (HR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.93-0.96; P<0.0001), New York Heart Association (NYHA) class III-IV (HR: 2.67, 95% CI: 1.79-4.00; P<0.0001) and no cardiac resynchronization therapy (HR: 2.09, 95% CI: 1.39-3.14; P=0.0004) were independently associated with HT. Patients with these three characteristics (excluding age) had a 1-year HT rate of 15.2%. Incidence of appropriate ICD therapies was 92.7 per 1000 person-years for patients who underwent HT versus 76.1 for those who did not (P=0.64). CONCLUSIONS: The overall incidence of HT in this primary prevention population was relatively high, especially among young patients with a very low ejection fraction, an advanced NYHA class and were unsuitable for cardiac resynchronization therapy (up to 15% annually). Patients awaiting HT experienced a significant rate of appropriate ICD therapies, reinforcing the importance of specific cardiac rhythm management in these patients.

7.
Circulation ; 135(10): 917-935, 2017 Mar 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28148598

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) contributes to heart allograft loss. However, an important knowledge gap remains in terms of the pathophysiology of AMR and how detection of immune activity, injury degree, and stage could be improved by intragraft gene expression profiling. METHODS: We prospectively monitored 617 heart transplant recipients referred from 4 French transplant centers (January 1, 2006-January 1, 2011) for AMR. We compared patients with AMR (n=55) with a matched control group of 55 patients without AMR. We characterized all patients using histopathology (ISHLT [International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation] 2013 grades), immunostaining, and circulating anti-HLA donor-specific antibodies at the time of biopsy, together with systematic gene expression assessments of the allograft tissue, using microarrays. Effector cells were evaluated with in vitro human cell cultures. We studied a validation cohort of 98 heart recipients transplanted in Edmonton, AB, Canada, including 27 cases of AMR and 71 controls. RESULTS: A total of 240 heart transplant endomyocardial biopsies were assessed. AMR showed a distinct pattern of injury characterized by endothelial activation with microcirculatory inflammation by monocytes/macrophages and natural killer (NK) cells. We also observed selective changes in endothelial/angiogenesis and NK cell transcripts, including CD16A signaling and interferon-γ-inducible genes. The AMR-selective gene sets accurately discriminated patients with AMR from those without and included NK transcripts (area under the curve=0.87), endothelial activation transcripts (area under the curve=0.80), macrophage transcripts (area under the curve=0.86), and interferon-γ transcripts (area under the curve=0.84; P<0.0001 for all comparisons). These 4 gene sets showed increased expression with increasing pathological AMR (pAMR) International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation grade (P<0.001) and association with donor-specific antibody levels. The unsupervised principal components analysis demonstrated a high proportion of molecularly inactive pAMR1(I+), and there was significant molecular overlap between pAMR1(H+) and full-blown pAMR2/3 cases. Endothelial activation transcripts, interferon-γ, and NK transcripts showed association with chronic allograft vasculopathy. The molecular architecture and selective AMR transcripts, together with gene set discrimination capacity for AMR identified in the discovery set, were reproduced in the validation cohort. CONCLUSIONS: Tissue-based measurements of specific pathogenesis-based transcripts reflecting NK burden, endothelial activation, macrophage burden, and interferon-γ effects accurately classify AMR and correlate with degree of injury and disease activity. This study illustrates the clinical potential of a tissue-based analysis of gene transcripts to refine diagnosis of heart transplant rejection.


Assuntos
Anticorpos/imunologia , Perfilação da Expressão Gênica , Rejeição de Enxerto/diagnóstico , Antígenos HLA/imunologia , Adulto , Anticorpos/sangue , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Feminino , Rejeição de Enxerto/metabolismo , Rejeição de Enxerto/patologia , Transplante de Coração , Humanos , Interferon gama/genética , Interferon gama/metabolismo , Células Matadoras Naturais/citologia , Células Matadoras Naturais/imunologia , Células Matadoras Naturais/metabolismo , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Miocárdio/metabolismo , Miocárdio/patologia , Análise de Sequência com Séries de Oligonucleotídeos , Estudos Prospectivos , Receptores de IgG/genética , Receptores de IgG/metabolismo , Transplante Homólogo
8.
Resuscitation ; 108: 68-74, 2016 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27670358

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The benefits of available automatic external defibrillators (AEDs) for out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) are well known, but strategies for their deployment outdoors remain somewhat arbitrary. Our study sought to assess different strategies for AED deployment. METHODS: All OHCAs in Paris between 2000 and 2010 were prospectively recorded and geocoded. A guidelines-based strategy of placing an AED in locations where more than one OHCA had occurred within the past five years was compared to two novel strategies: a grid-based strategy with a regular distance between AEDs and a landmark-based strategy. The expected number of AEDs necessary and their median (IQR) distance to the nearest OHCA were assessed for each strategy. RESULTS: Of 4176 OHCAs, 1372 (33%) occurred in public settings. The first strategy would result in the placement of 170 AEDs, with a distance to OHCA of 416 (180-614) m and a continuous increase in the number of AEDS. In the second strategy, the number of AEDs and their distance to the closest OHCA would change with the grid size, with a number of AEDs between 200 and 400 seeming optimal. In the third strategy, median distances between OHCAs and AEDs would be 324m if placed at post offices (n=195), 239 at subway stations (n=302), 137 at bike-sharing stations (n=957), and 142 at pharmacies (n=1466). CONCLUSION: This study presents an original evidence-based approach to strategies of AED deployment to optimize their number and location. This rational approach can estimate the optimal number of AEDs for any city.


Assuntos
Reanimação Cardiopulmonar , Desfibriladores/provisão & distribução , Cardioversão Elétrica/estatística & dados numéricos , Idoso , Serviços Médicos de Emergência , Medicina de Emergência Baseada em Evidências , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Modelos de Interação Espacial , Parada Cardíaca Extra-Hospitalar/terapia , Paris , Estudos Prospectivos
9.
Am J Cardiol ; 118(8): 1225-1232, 2016 Oct 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27561197

RESUMO

We aimed to assess if the outcome of primary prevention implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) without cardiac resynchronization therapy is dependent on New York Heart Association (NYHA) class. Among the participants of Défibrillateur Automatique Implantable-Prévention Primaire (DAI-PP; NCT01992458) multicenter cohort study, 155 patients in NYHA class I, 504 in NYHA class II, and 188 in NYHA class III had a QRS width <120 ms and were implanted with an ICD without cardiac resynchronization therapy and, thus, were eligible for the purpose of this analysis. Total and specific mortalities and the incidence of appropriate therapies were assessed for every NYHA. During 2,606 patient-years (3.1 ± 2.1 years), 104 (12.3%) subjects died and 188 (22.2%) experienced appropriate therapies. After adjustment, overall mortality increased with NYHA class (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.11 to 2.41, p = 0.014), driven by an increase in cardiovascular death. Conversely, incidence of appropriate ICD intervention was comparable among the 3 NYHA groups (NYHA class I 7.43, NYHA class II 7.91, and NYHA class III 12.10 per 100 patient-years; HR 1.19, 95% CI 0.89 to 1.59, p = 0.231). Incidence of ICD-unresponsive sudden death was very low and also comparable (NYHA class I 0.22, NYHA class II 0.36, and NYHA class III 0.83 per 100 patient-years (HR 6.34, 95% CI 0.32 to 124.49, p = 0.224). No significant differences were observed in the other specific modes of death. In conclusion, although patients in NYHA class III have higher overall mortality, they experience a comparable incidence of appropriate ICD therapies. The low incidence of ICD-unresponsive sudden death in all assessed NYHA classes also supports the efficacy of ICDs, irrespective of NYHA class.


Assuntos
Morte Súbita Cardíaca/prevenção & controle , Desfibriladores Implantáveis , Insuficiência Cardíaca/terapia , Prevenção Primária , Idoso , Causas de Morte , Estudos de Coortes , Morte Súbita Cardíaca/etiologia , Feminino , Insuficiência Cardíaca/complicações , Insuficiência Cardíaca/mortalidade , Insuficiência Cardíaca/fisiopatologia , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Mortalidade , Análise Multivariada , Modelos de Riscos Proporcionais , Índice de Gravidade de Doença
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