Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 173
Filtrar
1.
PLoS One ; 15(4): e0231547, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32298328

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The Victorian legislation prohibits sex workers from working when they have visible anogenital herpes or warts. The aim of this study was to determine the proportion of asymptomatic female sex workers (FSW) diagnosed with anogenital herpes or warts by genital examination. METHODS: We analysed all computerised medical records of consultations with FSW at the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre (MSHC) in 2018. All asymptomatic sex workers were offered screening sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and a genital examination to identify visible anogenital herpes or warts at MSHC. FSW consultations were categorised into either 'asymptomatic' or 'symptomatic' based on the presence of symptoms reported by the FSW to the triage nurse. The proportion of asymptomatic FSW diagnosed with visible anogenital herpes or warts during a routine screening examination was calculated. RESULTS: In 2018, 4055 consultations were provided to 1979 FSW. 3406 of these consultations were asymptomatic and all were examined by an experienced clinician for signs of STIs. Of these 3406 asymptomatic consultations, seven FSW (0.21%, 95% CI: 0.08% to 0.42%) were diagnosed with visible anogenital herpes and/or warts following a genital examination. Four were diagnosed with warts (0.12%, 95% CI: 0.03% to 0.30%), two with herpes (0.06%, 95% CI: 0.01% to 0.21%) and one with both herpes and warts (0.03%, 95% CI: 0.001% to 0.16%). CONCLUSION: Based on these data, approximately 500 asymptomatic FSW would need to be examined to identify one case of anogenital herpes or warts. Genital examinations consume considerable clinical resources, increase the duration of consultations and provide essentially no significant benefit to the mandated testing for gonorrhoea, chlamydia, HIV and syphilis. Our clinic will use self-collected samples and no longer examine FSW who are asymptomatic.

2.
Sex Transm Infect ; 2020 Apr 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32341023

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To systematically review and appraise published data, to determine the prevalence of Mycoplasma genitalium (MG) in men who have sex with men (MSM) tested at each anatomical site, that is, at the urethra, rectum and/or pharynx. DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. DATA SOURCES: Ovid Medline, PubMed, Embase were searched for articles from 1st January 1981 (the year MG was first identified) to 1st June 2018. REVIEW METHODS: Studies were eligible for inclusion if they reported MG prevalence in MSM tested at the urethra, rectum and/or pharynx, in at least 50 MSM, using nucleic acid amplification testing. Data were extracted by anatomical site, symptom and HIV status. Summary estimates (95% CIs) were calculated using random-effects meta-analysis. Subgroup analyses were performed to assess heterogeneity between studies. RESULTS: Forty-six studies met inclusion criteria, with 34 reporting estimates of MG prevalence at the urethra (13 753 samples), 25 at the rectum (8629 samples) and 7 at the pharynx (1871 samples). MG prevalence was 5.0% (95% CI 3.5 to 6.8; I2=94.0) at the urethra; 6.2% (95% CI 4.6 to 8.1; I2=88.1) at the rectum and 1.0% (95% CI 0.0 to 5.1; I2=96.0) at the pharynx. The prevalence of MG was significantly higher at urethral and rectal sites in symptomatic versus asymptomatic MSM (7.1% vs 2.2%, p<0.001; and 16.1% vs 7.5%, p=0.039, respectively). MG prevalence at the urethra was significantly higher in HIV-positive compared with HIV-negative MSM (7.0% vs 3.4%, p=0.006). CONCLUSION: MG was common in MSM, particularly at urethral and rectal sites (5% to 6%). MG was more commonly detected in symptomatic men at both sites, and more common in HIV-positive men at the urethra. MG was uncommonly detected in the pharynx. Site-specific estimates are similar to those for chlamydia and will be helpful in informing testing practices in MSM. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42017058326.

3.
J Clin Microbiol ; 58(5)2020 Apr 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32132192

RESUMO

Screening for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae at the pharyngeal, urogenital, and anorectal sites is recommended for men who have sex with men (MSM). Combining the three individual-site samples into a single pooled sample could result in significant cost savings, provided there is no significant sensitivity reduction. The aim of this study was to examine the sensitivity of pooled samples for detecting chlamydia and gonorrhea in asymptomatic MSM using a nucleic acid amplification test. Asymptomatic MSM who tested positive for chlamydia or gonorrhoea were invited to participate. Paired samples were obtained from participants prior to administration of treatment. To form the pooled sample, the anorectal swab was agitated in the urine specimen transport tube and then discarded. The pharyngeal swab and 2 ml of urine sample were then added to the tube. The difference in sensitivity between testing of pooled samples and individual-site testing was calculated against an expanded gold standard, where an individual is considered positive if either pooled-sample or individual-site testing returns a positive result. All samples were tested using the Aptima Combo 2 assay. A total of 162 MSM were enrolled in the study. Sensitivities of pooled-sample testing were 86% (94/109; 95% confidence interval [CI], 79 to 92%]) for chlamydia and 91% (73/80; 95% CI, 83 to 96%) for gonorrhea. The sensitivity reduction was significant for chlamydia (P = 0.02) but not for gonorrhea (P = 0.34). Pooling caused 22 infections (15 chlamydia and 7 gonorrhoea) to be missed, and the majority were single-site infections (19/22). Pooling urogenital and extragenital samples from asymptomatic MSM reduced the sensitivity of detection by approximately 10% for chlamydia but not for gonorrhea.

4.
Sex Transm Infect ; 2020 Mar 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32169881

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Outbreaks of hepatitis A are being reported more commonly among men who have sex with men (MSM) globally. Australia has also reported a sharp increase in the number of cases of hepatitis A in 2017. This study aimed to determine the level of immunity to hepatitis A among MSM attending a large urban sexual health clinic in Victoria in the lead up to recent outbreak. METHODS: This was a retrospective audit of serological testing data from first-time MSM attendees at Melbourne Sexual Health Centre (MSHC) in Australia from 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2018. We determined the proportion of MSM who were tested and who had serological detection of hepatitis A IgG, stratified by age and calendar year. We used univariable and multivariable logistic regression to investigate factors associated with testing for and detection of hepatitis A IgG. RESULTS: There were 16 609 first-time MSM attendees at MSHC over the 7-year period, of which 9718 (59%, 95% CI 58% to 60%) were tested for hepatitis A IgG. There was a 2% annual increase in the proportion of men tested (from 60% in 2012 to 69% in 2018; OR=1.02, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.03, p=0.025). Men born outside of Australia/New Zealand, and younger men <30 years had higher odds of being tested. Of those tested, 44% (n=4304, 95% CI 43% to 45%) had hepatitis A IgG detected at their first visit, with no change over time (OR=1.01, 95% CI 0.99 to 1.03, p=0.210). Detection of hepatitis A IgG was associated with being aged 30 years or older (adjusted OR=2.06, 95% CI 1.89 to 2.24, p<0.001) or being born overseas versus Australia/New Zealand (AOR=1.21, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.31, p<0.001). CONCLUSION: Hepatitis A immunity among MSM remains below the estimated 70% required to prevent outbreaks. Measures including increased testing and higher vaccination coverage are needed to prevent outbreaks and to limit the number of cases and deaths.

5.
J Infect Dis ; 221(6): 1017-1024, 2020 Mar 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32031634

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The basis of fluoroquinolone treatment failure for Mycoplasma genitalium is poorly understood. METHODS: To identify mutations associated with failure we sequenced key regions of the M. genitalium parC and gyrA genes for patients undergoing sequential therapy with doxycycline-moxifloxacin (201 patients, including 21 with failure) or doxycycline-sitafloxacin (126 patients, including 13 with failure). RESULTS: The parC G248T/S83I mutation was more common among patients with failed sequential doxycycline-moxifloxacin (present in 76.2% of failures vs 7.8% cures, P < .001) or doxycycline-sitafloxacin (50% vs 16.8%, respectively; P = .01) treatment. Doxycycline-sitafloxacin was more efficacious than doxycycline-moxifloxacin against infections carrying the parC mutation conferring S83I amino acid change. Treatment was more likely to fail in these infections if they had a concurrent gyrA mutation (M95I or D99N) (P = .07 for doxycycline-moxifloxacin group and P = .009 for doxycycline-sitafloxacin group), suggesting an additive effect. CONCLUSIONS: This study indicates that parC G248T/S83I mutations contribute to failure of moxifloxacin and sitafloxacin, and the findings will inform the development of quinolone resistance assays needed to ensure optimal selection of antimicrobials for M. genitalium.

7.
J Med Microbiol ; 69(2): 244-248, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31958047

RESUMO

Introduction. Mycoplasma genitalium is a sexually transmitted organism with high levels of resistance to the recommended first-line therapy, azithromycin. The ResistancePlus MG test concurrently detects M. genitalium, and the presence of macrolide-resistance mutations (MRM). European, UK and Australian guidelines recommend a diagnostic test that reports MRM to optimize treatment through resistance-guided therapy. Hence, for samples collected for use on other platforms, reflex testing using the ResistancePlus MG test would be beneficial.Aim. To validate the ResistancePlus MG assay using samples collected in Aptima buffer for testing on the Hologic Panther.Methodology. Positive (n=99) and negative (n=229) clinical samples collected in Aptima buffer were extracted on the MagNA Pure 96 (Roche Diagnostics), and tested with the ResistancePlus MG test on the LightCycler 480 II (Roche Diagnostics). Results were compared to matched samples collected using standard sample collection (urine or swab resuspended in PBS), with positive percent agreement (PPA), negative percent agreement (NPA) and Cohen's Kappa statistic.Results. The ResistancePlus MG test had high performance with a 200 µl input volume (PPA/NPA for M. genitalium detection, 92.9 % [95 % confidence interval (CI): 85.5-96.9]/100 % [95 % CI: 97.9-100], MRM detection, 96.9 % [95 % CI: 88.2-99.5]/85.7 % [95 % CI: 66.4-95.3]) and for 1 ml input volume (PPA/NPA for M. genitalium detection, 95.9%/96.6%, MRM detection, 98.4%/90.3%). Samples remained positive after storage at room temperature beyond the manufacturer-recommended storage of <60 days (mean storage time for 1 ml extraction: 129 days).Conclusion. Samples collected using Aptima collection kits are suitable for reflex testing using the ResistancePlus MG test, allowing detection of macrolide resistance.


Assuntos
Antibacterianos/farmacologia , Testes Diagnósticos de Rotina/métodos , Farmacorresistência Bacteriana , Infecções por Mycoplasma/microbiologia , Mycoplasma genitalium/efeitos dos fármacos , Mycoplasma genitalium/isolamento & purificação , Austrália , Testes Diagnósticos de Rotina/instrumentação , Humanos , Macrolídeos/farmacologia , Infecções por Mycoplasma/diagnóstico , Mycoplasma genitalium/genética , Kit de Reagentes para Diagnóstico , Manejo de Espécimes
8.
Sex Transm Infect ; 2020 Jan 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31919276

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: In 2017, there was an outbreak of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) serogroup C among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Victoria, Australia. A government-funded free meningococcal (MenACWY) vaccination programme targeting all MSM living in Victoria was launched between December 2017 and December 2018. The aim of this study was to examine the vaccine uptake among MSM attending a sexual health clinic in Melbourne. METHODS: This was a retrospective clinical audit of MSM attending the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre (MSHC) during the vaccination programme. We calculated the proportion of MSM who received the meningococcal vaccine on their first visit and at any time during the programme. We performed univariable and multivariable logistic regression to identify the factors associated with the vaccine uptake on the first visit. RESULTS: Of the 10 370 MSM who attended MSHC, 55.5% received the vaccine on their first visit and 67.4% at any time during the programme. MSM had higher odds of receiving the vaccine on the first visit if they were aged 16-25 years (adjusted OR (aOR) 1.21; 95% CI 1.08 to 1.35) or 26-35 years (aOR 1.17; 95% CI 1.07 to 1.29) in comparison with MSM older than 35 years; were HIV-negative and not on pre-exposure prophylaxis (aOR 1.80; 95% CI 1.56 to 2.09); had more than four male partners in the last 12 months (aOR 1.16; 95% CI 1.06 to 1.27); had male partners only (aOR 2.24; 95% CI 1.96 to 2.55); or were born overseas (aOR 1.11; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.21). CONCLUSIONS: Two-thirds of the MSM attending a sexual health clinic received at least one dose of meningococcal vaccine. The vaccination programme coincided temporally with a dramatic reduction in the incidence of IMD. Vaccination should be further promoted among MSM and men who have sex with both men and women.

9.
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr ; 83(2): 99-102, 2020 Feb 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31929399

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Sexual mixing between HIV-positive, HIV-negative, and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) users among men who have sex with men (MSM) is an important determinant of the incidence of infection. There have been very limited studies examining the patterns of sexual mixing in relation to HIV status and PrEP use in the era of PrEP. SETTING: Melbourne Sexual Health Centre (MSHC), Australia. METHODS: We included all MSM partnerships attending MSHC on the same day between 2011 and 2018. A chi-square trend test was used to examine the changes in the annual proportion of partnerships by HIV serostatus in 2011-2018 and by PrEP use in 2016-2018. RESULTS: Of the 1765 MSM partnerships who attended MSHC between 2011 and 2018, 1.3% of the partnerships were concordant HIV-positive, 91.0% were concordant HIV-negative, and 7.6% were HIV-discordant. The proportion of HIV-discordant partnerships increased from 0% in 2011 to 12.5% in 2018 (ptrend < 0.001). In 2016-2018, only a small proportion (1.2%) of concordant HIV-negative partnerships involved both men taking PrEP, whereas 6.0% involved at least one man taking PrEP. Overall, 79.1% of concordant HIV-negative partnerships were not protected against HIV (ie, neither man taking PrEP), and this proportion declined significantly from 84.3% in 2016 to 74.0% in 2018 (ptrend = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The pattern of sexual mixing by HIV status and PrEP use among MSM partnerships has changed over time. PrEP use in both men within MSM partnerships is not common. About 79% of concordant HIV-negative partnerships were not protected against HIV as neither man taking PrEP.

10.
Sex Health ; 17(1): 53-60, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31928612

RESUMO

Background Sexually transmissible infections (STIs) are rising among female sex workers (FSW) in Australia. The rise might be explained by changes in sexual practices; however, there is limited behavioural data available. This study aimed to explore the current sexual practices among FSW in Melbourne. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted among FSW at Melbourne Sexual Health Centre between September 2017 and March 2018. Participants were asked about current sexual practices with male clients in an average working week. The frequency and proportion of each sexual practice was calculated. RESULTS: There were 180 questionnaires included in the analysis. The median age of the FSW was 28 years (interquartile range [IQR]: 25-34). Most FSW (80.6%) worked in brothels. In an average working week, FSW had a median of 10 (IQR: 7-20) male clients. The most common sexual practices included: vaginal sex (98.3%), fellatio (97.2%), cunnilingus (92.2%) and tongue-kissing (83.7%). FSW had a median number of 10 (IQR: 6-18) vaginal, 10 (IQR: 5-18) fellatio, 7 (IQR: 2-10) cunnilingus and 6 (IQR: 2-10) tongue-kissing clients. Consistent condom use with all clients was highest for vaginal sex (97.1%), followed by anal sex (92.3%), then fellatio (78.9%). Only 3.1% used dental dams consistently for cunnilingus. CONCLUSION: Consistent condom use with all clients was high among FSWs, especially for vaginal and anal sex. However, one-fifth of FSW had condomless fellatio during an average working week. Tongue-kissing was more common than previously published. Peer-led sexual health education on safe sex practice for FSW is of high importance.

11.
Sex Transm Infect ; 96(2): 110-114, 2020 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31346067

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: In 2017, an outbreak of hepatitis A among gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (MSM) was reported in Victoria, Australia. In 2018, the Victorian government implemented a free hepatitis A vaccination programme targeting all Victorian MSM. This study aimed to determine hepatitis A vaccine uptake among MSM in a sexual health clinic in Melbourne. METHODS: All MSM attending the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre (MSHC) in 2018 were included. Chart review was performed to determine the proportion of men vaccinated for at least one dose of hepatitis A and to examine why men did not receive the vaccine. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to examine the factors associated with vaccine uptake. Vaccine uptake was defined as receipt of at least one dose of hepatitis A vaccine. RESULTS: Of the 9582 MSM who attended MSHC in 2018, 61.3% (95% CI 60.3% to 62.2%) self-reported already being immune to hepatitis A. Of the 3713 remaining eligible men, 62.7% (95% CI 61.1% to 64.2%) received at least one dose of the hepatitis A vaccine on the day of attendance. Compared with MSM not living with HIV and not taking pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), MSM taking PrEP (adjusted OR 1.28; 95% CI 1.01 to 1.62) were more likely to receive the vaccine. 1386 men (37.3%) did not receive the vaccine and 55.4% were not offered the vaccine by their treating clinician. 300 men (21.6%) were identified as non-immune after serological testing but did not return for vaccination. By the end of 2018, 85.5% of MSHC attendees (8196/9582) were immune to hepatitis A. CONCLUSION: The critical vaccination threshold for hepatitis A has been estimated at >70%. Continuation of the targeted hepatitis A vaccination programme will improve immunity among the MSM population to prevent ongoing transmission and the likelihood of future outbreaks.

12.
J Infect Dis ; 221(3): 454-463, 2020 Jan 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31544206

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Gardnerella vaginalis is detected in women with and without bacterial vaginosis (BV). Identification of 4 G. vaginalis clades raised the possibility that pathogenic and commensal clades exist. We investigated the association of behavioral practices and Nugent Score with G. vaginalis clade distribution in women who have sex with women (WSW). METHODS: Longitudinal self-collected vaginal specimens were analyzed using established G. vaginalis species-specific and clade-typing polymerase chain reaction assays. Logistic regression assessed factors associated with detection of G. vaginalis clades, and multinomial regression assessed factors associated with number of clades. RESULTS: Clades 1, 2, and 3 and multiclade communities (<2 clades) were associated with Nugent-BV. Clade 1 (odds ratio [OR], 3.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.65-6.84) and multiclade communities (relative risk ratio [RRR], 9.51; 95% CI, 4.36-20.73) were also associated with Lactobacillus-deficient vaginal microbiota. Clade 4 was neither associated with Nugent-BV nor Lactobacillus-deficient microbiota (OR, 1.49; 95% CI, 0.67-3.33). Specific clades were associated with differing behavioral practices. Clade 1 was associated with increasing number of recent sexual partners and smoking, whereas clade 2 was associated with penile-vaginal sex and sharing of sex toys with female partners. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that G. vaginalis clades have varying levels of pathogenicity in WSW, with acquisition occurring through sexual activity. These findings suggest that partner treatment may be an appropriate strategy to improve BV cure.

13.
Sci Rep ; 9(1): 19749, 2019 Dec 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31874964

RESUMO

Women-who-have-sex-with-women (WSW) are at increased risk of bacterial vaginosis (BV). We investigated the impact of practices and past BV on the vaginal microbiota within a two-year longitudinal cohort of Australian WSW. Self-collected vaginal swabs were used to characterise the vaginal microbiota using 16S-rRNA gene sequencing. Hierarchical clustering defined community state types (CSTs). Bacterial diversity was calculated using the Shannon diversity index and instability of the vaginal microbiota was assessed by change of CST and Bray-Curtis dissimilarity. Sex with a new partner increased the bacterial diversity (adjusted-coefficient = 0.41, 95%CI: 0.21,0.60, p < 0.001) and instability of the vaginal microbiota, in terms of both change of CST (adjusted-odds-ratio = 2.65, 95%CI: 1.34,5.22, p = 0.005) and increased Bray-Curtis dissimilarity (adjusted-coefficient = 0.21, 95%CI: 0.11,0.31, p < 0.001). Women reporting sex with a new partner were more likely than women reporting no new partner to have a vaginal microbiota characterised by Gardnerella vaginalis (adjusted-relative-risk-ratio[aRRR] = 3.45, 95%CI: 1.42,8.41, p = 0.006) or anaerobic BV-associated bacteria (aRRR = 3.62, 95%CI: 1.43,9.14, p = 0.007) relative to a Lactobacillus crispatus dominated microbiota. Sex with a new partner altered the vaginal microbiota of WSW by increasing the diversity and abundance of BV-associated bacteria. These findings highlight the influence of practices on the development of a non-optimal vaginal microbiota and provide microbiological support for the sexual exchange of bacteria between women.

14.
Euro Surveill ; 24(44)2019 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31690365

RESUMO

BackgroundInternational travel is considered a risk factor for acquiring Chlamydia trachomatis; however, there are little empirical data to support this.AimTo examine the prevalence and risk factors for Chlamydia trachomatis infections among heterosexual international travellers (n = 28,786) attending the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre (MSHC), Australia, compared to Australian residents (n = 20,614).MethodsWe conducted a repeated cross-sectional study and analysed sexual behaviours and chlamydia positivity among heterosexual males and females aged ≤ 30 attending MSHC for the first time between January 2007 and February 2017. 'Travellers' were defined as individuals born outside of Australia who had resided in the country < 2 years. Associations between patient characteristics and chlamydia positivity were examined.ResultsChlamydia positivity was higher among travellers (11.2%) compared with Australian residents (8.5%; p < 0.001). Male travellers had higher chlamydia positivity (12.1%) than Australian males (9.3%; p < 0.001), as did female travellers (10.4%) compared with Australian females (7.7%; p < 0.001). Travellers had a higher mean number of sexual partners than Australian residents among males (5.7 vs 4.7; p < 0.001) and females (3.6 vs 3.2; p < 0.001). Travellers from the United Kingdom, Europe, Ireland and New Zealand accounted for 29.6%, 21%, 8.5% and 5.8% of C. trachomatis infections, respectively. Chlamydia in males and females was associated with younger age (≤ 25), inconsistent condom use, a higher number of sexual partners (≥ 4 partners) and being a traveller (p < 0.001).ConclusionsWe found that international travel is an independent risk factor for chlamydia among young heterosexual travellers in Australia, who should therefore be a target group for chlamydia prevention.

15.
J Clin Microbiol ; 58(1)2019 Dec 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31694973

RESUMO

The aim of this study was to determine whether Chlamydia trachomatis could be detected in saliva and if infection is specific to an anatomical site in the oropharynx. Men who have sex with men (MSM) who were diagnosed with oropharyngeal chlamydia at the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre in 2017-2018 were invited to participate upon returning for treatment. Swabs at the tonsillar fossae and posterior oropharynx and a saliva sample were collected. Throat samples were tested for C. trachomatis by the Aptima Combo 2 assay. The bacterial loads of C. trachomatis in all samples were assessed by quantitative PCR (qPCR) detecting the ompA gene. We calculated the positivity and bacterial load of C. trachomatis for all samples. Forty-two MSM were included. The median age was 28 years (interquartile range [IQR], 24 to 33 years). Thirty-two participants (76.2%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 60.5% to 87.9%) had C. trachomatis detected by qPCR at both the tonsillar fossae and the posterior oropharynx, followed by 9.5% (n = 4; 95% CI, 2.7% to 22.6%) positive at the posterior oropharynx only and 4.8% (n = 2; 95% CI, 0.58% to 16.2%) positive at the tonsillar fossae only. Twenty-nine MSM had C. trachomatis detected in saliva (69.0%; 95% CI, 52.9% to 82.3%). The median C. trachomatis load in saliva was 446 copies/ml (IQR, 204 to 1,390 copies/ml), that in the tonsillar fossae was 893 copies/swab (IQR, 390 to 13,224 copies/ml), and that in the posterior oropharynx was 1,204 copies/swab (IQR, 330 to 16,211). There was no significant difference in C. trachomatis load between the tonsillar fossae and the posterior oropharynx (P = 0.119). Among MSM with oropharyngeal chlamydia, nearly three-quarters had chlamydia DNA detected in saliva, although the viability and implications for transmission are unknown.

16.
Clin Infect Dis ; 2019 Oct 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31629365

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Macrolide-resistance in Mycoplasma genitalium (MG) exceeds 50% in many regions and quinolone-resistance is increasing. We recently reported that resistance-guided therapy (RGT) using doxycycline followed by sitafloxacin or 2.5g-azithromycin cured 92% and 95% of macrolide-resistant and macrolide-susceptible infections, respectively. We now present the data on RGT using doxycycline-moxifloxacin, the regimen recommended in international guidelines, and extend the data on the efficacy of doxyxycline-2.5g azithromycin and subsequent de novo macrolide-resistance. METHODS: Patients attending Melbourne Sexual Health Centre between 2017-2018 with STI-related syndromes were treated with doxycycline for 7 days and recalled if positive for MG. Macrolide-susceptible cases then received 2.5g azithromycin (1g, then 500mg daily for 3 days) and resistant cases received moxifloxacin (400 mg daily, 7 days). Test of cure (TOC) was recommended 14-28 days post-completion of antimicrobials. Adherence and adverse effects were recorded. RESULTS: A total of 383 patients (81 females/106 heterosexual males/196 men-who-have-sex-with-men) were included. Microbial cure following doxycycline-azithromycin was 95.4% (95% CI 89.7-98.0) and doxycycline-moxifloxacin was 92.0%(88.1-94.6). De novo macrolide-resistance was detected in 4.6% of cases. Combining doxycycline-azithromycin data with our prior RGT study (n=186) yielded a pooled cure of 95.7% (91.6-97.8). ParC mutations implicated in moxifloxacin failure were present in 15-22% of macrolide-resistant cases at baseline. CONCLUSION: These findings support the inclusion of moxifloxacin in resistance-guided strategies and extend the evidence for use of 2.5g azithromycin, and presumptive use of doxycycline. These data provide an evidence-base for current UK, Australian and European guidelines for the treatment of MG, an STI which is increasingly challenging to cure.

17.
Sex Transm Dis ; 46(11): 743-747, 2019 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31517767

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: There have been very limited studies of oropharyngeal gonorrhea in heterosexuals. Routine screening of oropharyngeal gonorrhea is not recommended in heterosexual contacts of gonorrhea. This study aimed to examine oropharyngeal gonorrhea positivity among heterosexuals reporting contact with a partner with gonorrhea. METHODS: At the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre (MSHC), all heterosexual individuals reporting contact with sexual partners with gonorrhea are tested for genital gonorrhea. In May 2017, MSHC also included screening for oropharyngeal gonorrhea in heterosexual contacts of gonorrhea. All contacts of gonorrhea among women and heterosexual men between May 2017 and November 2018 were reviewed. Site-specific gonorrhea positivity was also calculated. RESULTS: One hundred ninety-one gonorrhea contacts (102 heterosexual men and 89 women) were reviewed. The median age was 28 (interquartile range, 24-33) years. The gonorrhea positivity in males was significantly higher at the oropharynx compared with urethra (18%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 11% to 26% vs 2%; 95% CI, 0% to 7%; P < 0.001); and higher at the oropharynx compared with cervicovaginal site in women (46%; 95% CI, 35% to 57% vs 36%; 95% CI, 26% to 47%; P = 0.056). Of the 100 men who did not have genital gonorrhea, 17 (18%; 95% CI, 10% to 26%) tested positive at the oropharynx. Of the 55 women who did not have genital gonorrhea, 21 (24%; 95% CI, 15% to 34%) tested positive at the oropharynx. Infection at both the oropharynx and genital sites was not associated with sex worker status in women. Overall, 89% and 40% of gonorrhea in heterosexual men and women were only in the oropharynx, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Oropharyngeal gonorrhea testing among heterosexual contacts of gonorrhea may be indicated given a substantial proportion of gonorrhea contacts are only infected at this site.

18.
Vaccine ; 37(43): 6271-6275, 2019 Oct 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31521414

RESUMO

The Victorian Government introduced a time-limited quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination catch-up program targeting gay and bisexual men who have sex with men (MSM) aged up to 26 years in 2017. As of 2017, men aged ≥20 years were not eligible for the school-based HPV vaccination program. This study examined the prevalence of anal HPV among 496 MSM aged 20-26 years before they received the first dose of the HPV vaccine at the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre, Australia. More than half (56.5%) had any high-risk HPV genotypes detected in the anus. Almost half (43.1%) had at least one quadrivalent HPV vaccine-preventable genotype (6, 11, 16 or 18) and one-fifth (21.0%) had HPV 16 detected in the anus. These findings suggest that a targeted catch-up HPV vaccination program for MSM is still beneficial to protect against high-risk HPV genotypes associated with anal cancer, as well as low-risk HPV genotypes.

19.
Vaccine ; 37(46): 6907-6914, 2019 Oct 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31562001

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Australia introduced a school-based human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination program for females aged 12-13 years in 2007, with a three-year catch-up to age 26; and for boys aged 12-13 from 2013, with a two-year catch-up to age 15. This study aimed to compare the prevalence of penile HPV between teenage heterosexual males in cohorts eligible or non-eligible for the school-based male vaccination program. METHODS: Between 2014 and 2017, sexually active heterosexual males aged 17-19 were recruited from sexual health centres and community sources across Australia. Males provided a self-collected penile swab for 37 HPV genotypes using Roche Linear Array and completed a questionnaire. We calculated adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR) of HPV between males in two periods: 2014-2015 (preceding implementation of school-based male vaccination) and 2016-2017 (eligible for school-based male vaccination). Self-reported vaccine doses were confirmed with doses reported to the National HPV Vaccination Program Register. RESULTS: Overall, 152 males were recruited in 2014-2015 and 146 in 2016-2017. Numbers of female sex partners and condom use did not differ between the two periods. The prevalence of quadrivalent vaccine-preventable [4vHPV] genotypes (6/11/16/18) was low in both periods (2.6% [2014-15] versus 0.7% [2016-17]; p = 0.371; aPR 0.28 [95% CI: 0.03-2.62]). Compared with men in 2014-2015, men in 2016-2017 had a lower prevalence of any of the 37 HPV genotypes tested (21.7% versus 11.6%; aPR 0.62 [95% CI: 0.36-1.07]) and any of the 13 high-risk genotypes tested (15.8% versus 7.5%; aPR 0.59 [95% CI: 0.30-1.19]). Prevalence of low-risk HPV genotypes did not differ between the two periods. Of the males recruited in 2016-2017, 55% had received ≥1 vaccine dose. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of 4vHPV genotypes among teenage heterosexual males in both cohorts was low, presumably due to herd protection from the female-only vaccination program. Further studies are required to determine the impact of universal HPV vaccination on HPV prevalence in males.

20.
Clin Infect Dis ; 2019 Aug 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31420649

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Syphilis control among MSM would be improved if we could increase the proportion of cases who present for treatment at the primary stage rather than at a later stage, as this would reduce the duration of infectivity. We hypothesised that men who have sex with men (MSM) who practised receptive anal intercourse were more likely to present with secondary syphilis, compared to MSM who did not practise receptive anal intercourse. METHODS: In this retrospective analysis of MSM diagnosed with primary or secondary syphilis at Melbourne Sexual Health Centre between 2008 and 2017, we analysed associations between the stage of syphilis (primary vs secondary) and behavioural data collected by computer-assisted self-interview (CASI). RESULTS: 559 MSM were diagnosed with primary (n=338) or secondary (n=221) syphilis. 134 (24%) men reported not practising receptive anal sex. In multivariate logistic regression, MSM were more likely to present with secondary rather than primary syphilis if they reported practising receptive anal intercourse (adjusted odds ratio 3.90, p<0.001) after adjusting for age, HIV status, and condom use. MSM with primary syphilis who did not practise receptive anal intercourse almost always (92%) had their primary syphilis lesion on their penis. CONCLUSIONS: The finding that MSM who practised receptive anal intercourse more commonly presented with secondary syphilis, and hence in whom the primary stage had gone undetected, implies that anorectal syphilis chancres are less noticeable than penile chancres. These men may need additional strategies to improve early detection of anorectal chancres, to reduce their duration of infectivity and hence reduce onward transmission.

SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA