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1.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis ; 14(8): e0008497, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32845886

RESUMO

Current recommendations for the elimination of canine-mediated human rabies focus on mass dog vaccination as the most feasible and cost-effective strategy. However, attempts to control rabies are often combined with canine surgical sterilisation programmes. The added value of sterilisation is widely debated. A systematic review was undertaken to compare the outcomes and impact of vaccination and sterilisation programmes with vaccination only programmes. A systematic search of three electronic databases (CAB Abstracts, Medline and Global Health) and grey literature was performed. From 8696 abstracts found, 5554 unique studies were identified, and 16 studies met the inclusion criteria. Eight described vaccination only programmes and eight described vaccination and sterilisation programmes. Indicators of impact measured were dog bites and/or doses of post-exposure prophylaxis administered; numbers of dog and/or human rabies cases; dog population demographic changes; changes in health and welfare of dogs, and indicators related to human behaviour change. The studies were contextually very diverse, programmes being implemented were complex, and there was variation in measurement and reporting of key indicators. Therefore, it was difficult to compare the two types of intervention, and impossible to make an evaluation of the role of sterilisation, using this evidence. Given the large number of vaccination and sterilisation programmes conducted globally, the lack of studies available for review highlights a gap in data collection or reporting, essential for impact assessment. There are several knowledge gaps concerning the impact of the sterilisation component alone, as well as subsequent effects on rabies transmission and control. Prospective studies comparing the outcomes and impact of the two interventions would be required in order to establish any additional contribution of sterilisation, as well as the underlying mechanisms driving any changes. In the absence of such evidence, the priority for rabies control objectives should be implementation of mass vaccination, as currently recommended by the World Health Organisation.


Assuntos
Doenças do Cão/prevenção & controle , Raiva/veterinária , Esterilização Reprodutiva/veterinária , Animais , Cães , Humanos , Raiva/prevenção & controle , Vacinas Antirrábicas/administração & dosagem , Zoonoses
2.
Prev Vet Med ; 167: 61-67, 2019 Jun 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31027723

RESUMO

Electronic patient records from practice management software systems have been used extensively in medicine for the investigation of clinical problems leading to the creation of decision support frameworks. To date, technologies that have been utilised for this purpose such as text mining and content analysis have not been employed significantly in veterinary medicine. The aim of this research was to pilot the use of content analysis and text-mining software for the synthesis and analysis of information extracted from veterinary electronic patient records. The purpose of the work was to be able to validate this approach for future employment across a number of practices for the purposes of practice based research. The approach utilised content analysis (Prosuite) and text mining (WordStat) software to aggregate the extracted text. Text mining tools such as Keyword in Context (KWIC) and Keyword Retrieval (KR) were employed to identify specific occurrences of data across the records. Two different datasets were interrogated, a bespoke test dataset that had been set up specifically for the purpose of the research, and a functioning veterinary clinic dataset that had been extracted from one veterinary practice. Across both datasets, the KWIC analysis was found to have a high level of accuracy with the search resulting in a sensitivity of between 85.3-100%, a specificity of between 99.1-99.7%, a positive predictive value between 93.5-95.8% and a negative predictive value between 97.7-100%. The KR search, based on machine learning, was utilised for the clinic-based dataset and was found to perform slightly better than the KWIC analysis. This study is the first to demonstrate the application of content analysis and text mining software for validation purposes across a number of different datasets for the purpose of search and recall of specific information across electronic patient records. This has not been demonstrated previously for small animal veterinary epidemiological research for the purposes of large scale analysis for practice-based research. Extension of this work to investigate more complex diseases across larger populations is required to fully explore the use of this approach in veterinary practice.


Assuntos
Mineração de Dados , Registros Eletrônicos de Saúde , Administração da Prática da Medicina Veterinária , Software , Animais , Humanos , Projetos Piloto , Reino Unido
3.
Vet Sci ; 5(4)2018 Sep 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30274233

RESUMO

Clinical audit is a quality improvement tool used to assess and improve the clinical services provided to patients. This is the first study to investigate the extent to which clinical audit is understood and utilised in farm animal veterinary practice. A cross-sectional study to collect experiences and attitudes of farm animal veterinary surgeons in the UK towards clinical audit was conducted using an online nationwide survey. The survey revealed that whilst just under three-quarters (n = 237/325; 73%) of responding veterinary surgeons had heard of clinical audit, nearly 50% (n = 148/301) had never been involved in a clinical audit of any species. The participants' knowledge of what a clinical audit was varied substantially, with many respondents reporting not receiving training on clinical audit at the undergraduate or postgraduate level. Respondents that had participated in a clinical audit suggested that protected time away from clinical work was required for the process to be completed successfully. This novel study suggests that clinical audit is undertaken to some extent in farm animal practice and that practitioner perception is that it can bring benefits, but was felt that more resources and support were needed for it to be implemented successfully on a wider scale.

4.
Vet Sci ; 5(3)2018 Aug 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30142957

RESUMO

Prolapsed nictitans gland (PNG) is an important ocular condition of dogs. Various surgical interventions have been described, but effective technique is currently considered to be a matter of personal clinician preference. The aim of this rapid review was to evaluate existing peer-reviewed evidence of effectiveness for surgical techniques and their subsequent effects on quantitative and clinical lacrimal outcomes for PNG. We performed a structured bibliographic search of CAB Abstracts, PubMed, and Medline using terms relevant to dogs, nictitans gland, and surgery on 13 September 2017. Included studies were assessed for study design, reporting characteristics, surgical techniques, and surgical and lacrimal outcomes. Fifteen of three hundred fifteen identified studies were eligible for inclusion. Seven different replacement techniques were identified, along with gland excision. All studies were observational or descriptive, with the exception of a single crossover trial. Outcomes reporting was heterogeneous and provided limited detail on lacrimal outcomes or on breed propensity for recurrence. Insufficient data precluded comparison of techniques for either surgical failure rates or lacrimal outcomes, although proportional meta-analysis yielded an overall failure rate of 3% (95% CI 1⁻7%) for the Morgan's pocket procedure. Improved reporting of veterinary surgical studies will improve evidence appraisal and synthesis, as well as reduce potential sources of bias.

5.
Vet Sci ; 5(2)2018 Jun 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29865183

RESUMO

Treatment variation in medicine may be driven by evidence gaps, clinician factors, and patient preferences. Although well-documented in human medicine, variation in clinical management is relatively unexplored in veterinary practice. Clinical vignette questionnaires were administered to a cross section of general practitioners (GPs) and veterinarians with postgraduate training in ophthalmology (PGs) to survey recommended management of canine prolapsed nictitans gland ("cherry eye", PNG) and feline herpesvirus (FHV-1) keratitis. The majority of veterinarians (96.2%) suggested surgical replacement of cherry eye, with a pocketing technique being the most frequently nominated procedure. GPs were more likely to suggest gland excision in the event of surgical failure, while PGs more frequently nominated techniques incorporating a periosteal anchor for salvage repair. Most respondents managed FHV-1 keratitis with topical antibiotics (76.4%), with a minority suggesting topical antivirals (32.2%). GPs favoured topical acyclovir whilst PGs more frequently recommended topical trifluorothymidine. A significantly larger proportion of PGs nominated systemic famciclovir and lysine supplement for FHV-1 keratitis. This survey revealed moderate treatment variation for these conditions, both between and within practitioner groups. Additional research is needed to assess the reasons for this variation, particularly for conditions in which high quality evidence is scant.

6.
Prev Vet Med ; 154: 95-101, 2018 Jun 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29685450

RESUMO

Routine use of preventative medicines is advocated as part of responsible dog and cat ownership. However, it has been suggested that the number of owners in the United Kingdom (UK) using preventative medicines to protect their pets is in decline. The aim of this novel study was to use a qualitative methodology to explore the attitudes of pet owners and veterinary surgeons in the UK to using preventative medicine products in dogs and cats. Preventative medicine was defined as "a drug or any other preparation used to prevent disease, illness or injury." Semi-structured interviews were conducted by telephone with owners and veterinary surgeons who had recently participated in a preventative healthcare consultation. Thematic analysis of transcribed recordings of these interviews identified four themes. This paper reports the theme related to motivators and barriers to using preventative medicines. Owners' understanding varied widely about the importance of preventative medicines for pets, as did their confidence in the safety of prescription products. A good relationship with their veterinary surgeon or practice, seeing adverts on the television about specific diseases, advice from a breeder and having personally seen infected animals appeared to be motivators for owners to use preventative medicines. Concern about adverse events and uncertainty about the necessity of using preventative medicines were barriers. Owners who trusted their veterinary surgeons to advise them on preventative medicine products described little use of alternative information sources when making preventative medicine choices. However, owners who preferred to do their own research described reading online opinions, particular in relation to the safety of preventative medicines, which they found confusing. In contrast, veterinary surgeons described broad confidence in the safety and efficacy of prescription preventative medicines and described protection of pet health as a strong motivator for their use. Several expressed some concern about being seen to "sell" products, which may present a barrier to their advocacy. Veterinary surgeons were unsure about owners' level of understanding of the necessity of preventative medicines, particularly in relation to vaccinations, and few recalled instigating conversations with owners about product safety. Owner uncertainties about preventative medicine products may not be adequately addressed in the consulting room. This first qualitative study to investigate dog and cat preventative medicines suggests strategies are needed to increase discussion between pet owners and veterinary surgeons in the UK about the necessity, safety, efficacy and cost of preventative medicines.


Assuntos
Propriedade , Medicina Preventiva/métodos , Vacinação/veterinária , Médicos Veterinários , Animais , Atitude , Doenças do Gato/prevenção & controle , Gatos , Doenças do Cão/prevenção & controle , Cães , Promoção da Saúde , Motivação , Reino Unido , Vacinação/psicologia , Médicos Veterinários/psicologia
7.
Prev Vet Med ; 150: 60-69, 2018 Feb 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29406085

RESUMO

The use of corpus linguistic techniques and other related mathematical analyses have rarely, if ever, been applied to qualitative data collected from the veterinary field. The aim of this study was to explore the use of a combination of corpus linguistic analyses and mathematical methods to investigate a free-text questionnaire dataset collected from 3796 UK veterinarians on evidence-based veterinary medicine, specifically, attitudes towards practice-based research (PBR) and improving the veterinary knowledge base. The corpus methods of key word, concordance and collocate analyses were used to identify patterns of meanings within the free text responses. Key words were determined by comparing the questionnaire data with a wordlist from the British National Corpus (representing general English text) using cross-tabs and log-likelihood comparisons to identify words that occur significantly more frequently in the questionnaire data. Concordance and collocation analyses were used to account for the contextual patterns in which such key words occurred, involving qualitative analysis and Mutual Information Analysis (MI3). Additionally, a mathematical topic modelling approach was used as a comparative analysis; words within the free text responses were grouped into topics based on their weight or importance within each response to find starting points for analysis of textual patterns. Results generated from using both qualitative and quantitative techniques identified that the perceived advantages of taking part in PBR centred on the themes of improving knowledge of both individuals and of the veterinary profession as a whole (illustrated by patterns around the words learning, improving, contributing). Time constraints (lack of time, time issues, time commitments) were the main concern of respondents in relation to taking part in PBR. Opinions of what vets could do to improve the veterinary knowledge base focussed on the collecting and sharing of information (record, report), particularly recording and discussing clinical cases (interesting cases), and undertaking relevant continuing professional development activities. The approach employed here demonstrated how corpus linguistics and mathematical methods can help to both identify and contextualise relevant linguistic patterns in the questionnaire responses. The results of the study inform those seeking to coordinate PBR initiatives about the motivators of veterinarians to participate in such initiatives and what concerns need to be addressed. The approach used in this study demonstrates a novel way of analysing textual data in veterinary research.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Medicina Baseada em Evidências/métodos , Médicos Veterinários/psicologia , Medicina Veterinária/métodos , Medicina Baseada em Evidências/instrumentação , Bases de Conhecimento , Linguística , Modelos Teóricos , Inquéritos e Questionários , Reino Unido , Medicina Veterinária/instrumentação
8.
Vet Sci ; 5(1)2018 Feb 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29419766

RESUMO

Canine and feline preventative healthcare consultations can be more complex than other consultation types, but they are typically not allocated additional time in the United Kingdom (UK). Impacts of the perceived length of UK preventative healthcare consultations have not previously been described. The aim of this novel study was to provide the first qualitative description of owner and veterinary surgeon reflections on time during preventative healthcare consultations. Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with 14 veterinary surgeons and 15 owners about all aspects of canine and feline preventative healthcare consultations. These qualitative data were thematically analysed, and four key themes identified. This paper describes the theme relating to time and consultation length. Patient, owner, veterinary surgeon and practice variables were recalled to impact the actual, versus allocated, length of a preventative healthcare consultation. Preventative healthcare consultations involving young, old and multi-morbid animals and new veterinary surgeon-owner partnerships appear particularly susceptible to time pressures. Owners and veterinary surgeons recalled rushing and minimizing discussions to keep consultations within their allocated time. The impact of the pace, content and duration of a preventative healthcare consultation may be influential factors in consultation satisfaction. These interviews provide an important insight into the complex nature of preventative healthcare consultations and the behaviour of participants under different perceived time pressures. These data may be of interest and relevance to all stakeholders in dog and cat preventative healthcare.

9.
Ecohealth ; 15(1): 209-227, 2018 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29330676

RESUMO

Having gained momentum in the last decade, the One Health initiative promotes a holistic approach to address complex global health issues. Before recommending its adoption to stakeholders, however, it is paramount to first compile quantitative evidence of the benefit of such an approach. The aim of this scoping review was to identify and summarize primary research that describes monetary and non-monetary outcomes following adoption of a One Health approach. An extensive literature search yielded a total of 42,167 references, of which 85 were included in the final analysis. The top two biotic health issues addressed in these studies were rabies and malaria; the top abiotic health issue was air pollution. Most studies described collaborations between human and animal (n = 42), or human and environmental disciplines (n = 41); commonly reported interventions included vector control and animal vaccination. Monetary outcomes were commonly expressed as cost-benefit or cost-utility ratios; non-monetary outcomes were described using disease frequency or disease burden measurements. The majority of the studies reported positive or partially positive outcomes. This paper illustrates the variety of health challenges that can be addressed using a One Health approach, and provides tangible quantitative measures that can be used to evaluate future implementations of the One Health approach.


Assuntos
Saúde Ambiental/organização & administração , Saúde Única , Pesquisa/organização & administração , Saúde Ambiental/economia , Saúde Ambiental/normas , Prática Clínica Baseada em Evidências , Relações Interprofissionais , Pesquisa/normas
10.
Vet Sci ; 5(1)2018 Jan 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29346332

RESUMO

Dog and cat vaccination consultations are a common part of small animal practice in the United Kingdom. Few data are available describing what happens during those consultations or what participants think about their content. The aim of this novel study was to investigate the attitudes of dog and cat owners and veterinary surgeons towards the content of small animal vaccination consultations. Telephone interviews with veterinary surgeons and pet owners captured rich qualitative data. Thematic analysis was performed to identify key themes. This study reports the theme describing attitudes towards the content of the consultation. Diverse preferences exist for what should be prioritised during vaccination consultations, and mismatched expectations may lead to negative experiences. Vaccination consultations for puppies and kittens were described to have a relatively standardised structure with an educational and preventative healthcare focus. In contrast, adult pet vaccination consultations were described to focus on current physical health problems with only limited discussion of preventative healthcare topics. This first qualitative exploration of UK vaccination consultation expectations suggests that the content and consistency of adult pet vaccination consultations may not meet the needs or expectations of all participants. Redefining preventative healthcare to include all preventable conditions may benefit owners, pets and veterinary surgeons, and may help to provide a clearer structure for adult pet vaccination consultations. This study represents a significant advance our understanding of this consultation type.

11.
Vet Rec ; 182(1): 21, 2018 01 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29275324

RESUMO

There is little peer-reviewed research assessing therapeutic effectiveness in canine eye disease. Current treatments used in first opinion and ophthalmology referral practices are also somewhat poorly documented. The aim of this study was to investigate the current management of canine keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS) and acute primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG) by veterinary surgeons. Questionnaires using clinical vignettes were administered to a cross section of general practitioners ('GPs') and veterinarians engaged in or training for postgraduate ophthalmology practice ('PGs'). Similar treatment recommendations for KCS (topical cyclosporine, lubricant, antibiotic) were given by both groups of veterinarians with the single exception of increased topical antibiotic use by GPs. Treatment of acute glaucoma diverged between groups: PGs were much more likely to recommend topical prostaglandin analogues and a wider array of both topical and systemic treatments were recommended by both groups. Systemic ocular hypotensive agents were suggested infrequently. Our results suggest that treatments may vary substantially in ocular conditions, particularly in conditions for which neither guidelines nor high-quality evidence exists. This study highlights the need for novel strategies to address evidence gaps in veterinary medicine, as well as for better evaluation and dissemination of current treatment experience.


Assuntos
Doenças do Cão/terapia , Glaucoma/veterinária , Ceratoconjuntivite Seca/veterinária , Prática Profissional , Médicos Veterinários/estatística & dados numéricos , Doença Aguda , Adulto , Animais , Cães , Medicina Baseada em Evidências , Feminino , Glaucoma/terapia , Humanos , Ceratoconjuntivite Seca/terapia , Masculino , Oftalmologia/educação , Inquéritos e Questionários , Reino Unido
12.
Vet Sci ; 4(4)2017 Nov 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29165371

RESUMO

Rabbits and guinea pigs are increasingly popular pets in the UK, yet little is known about their common ailments, or how these relate to what appears in the published literature. The aim of this study was to characterise the common conditions of rabbits and guinea pigs, and to compare these with the topics found in the published literature. Information about the common conditions seen in rabbits and guinea pigs in clinical practice was obtained from a survey of UK veterinarians. The common conditions seen were compared with results from a structured literature search. Conditions relating to the dental (29.9%), and skin (37.6%) body systems were commonly nominated by veterinarians for rabbits and guinea pigs, respectively. A total of 655 rabbit and 1086 guinea pig citations were examined and there appeared to be a mismatch between the conditions nominated in the veterinary questionnaire, and those found in the literature. This is the first time that the published literature has been compared to the nominated caseload of veterinarians in practice, and there is concern that the literature about rabbits and guinea pigs may not be representative of, or relevant to the caseload seen in clinical practice. This is of importance for clinicians being able to apply an objective, evidence-based approach. The publishing of clinically-relevant, research-based evidence should be prioritised.

13.
Vet Sci ; 4(1)2017 Mar 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29056674

RESUMO

Evidence-based veterinary medicine (EVM) is an evolving discipline in veterinary medicine so it is important to periodically "benchmark" opinion about EVM across the profession. An international survey to assess veterinarians' awareness of EVM was conducted. Veterinarians were surveyed via an online questionnaire (all countries) or a postal questionnaire (UK only). Participants were asked whether they had heard of EVM, where they had first heard the term, and their preferences of method for receiving continuing professional development (CPD). There were 6310 respondents, of which 4579 (72.5%) worked in the UK and 5384 (85.3%) were clinicians. Veterinarians that had heard of EVM (n = 5420, 85.9%) were most likely to be clinicians (OR = 4.00; 95% CI: 3.37, 4.75), respondents working in the UK (OR = 1.32; CI: 1.13, 1.54), or respondents with a postgraduate degree or qualification (OR = 1.77; CI: 1.51, 2.08). The most common sources from which respondents had heard of EVM were at vet school or university (n = 1207, 29.8%), via literature (peer-reviewed papers or other publications) (n = 1074, 26.5%), and via CPD courses (n = 564, 13.9%). Most respondents were interested in finding out more about EVM (n = 4256 of 6173, 69%). The preferred methods of CPD were day or evening seminars (n = 2992 of 6017, 49.7%), conferences (n = 1409, 23.4%), and online courses (n = 524, 8.7%), although the order of preference differed slightly between groups. There appears to be substantial awareness of EVM amongst veterinarians internationally. However, it appears that further training in EVM would be welcomed. Preferences on how CPD in general is received differs between groups, so this should be borne in mind by training providers when formulating a strategy for the dissemination of EVM training across the global profession.

14.
J Zoo Wildl Med ; 48(2): 277-286, 2017 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28749273

RESUMO

An understanding of the main causes of mortality among captive gorillas is imperative to promoting their optimal care, health, and welfare. A retrospective observational review of mortality among the European zoo-housed western lowland gorilla ( Gorilla gorilla gorilla) population from 2004 to 2014 was carried out. This is the first published study of mortality in this population. Relevant postmortem data were requested from each collection reporting a death during the study period. Age at death enabled grouping into discrete age categories. Deaths were classified according to cause. The main causes of death overall and for each age category and sex were identified. In total, 151 gorillas from 50 European collections died during the study period. Postmortem data were available for 119 (79%) of the deaths, of which 102 (86%) were classified by cause. Diseases of the digestive system were responsible for most (23%) deaths overall. Also of significance (each accounting for 15% overall mortality) were deaths due to external causes (especially trauma) among young gorillas and cardiovascular disease among adult and aged animals. Being a male gorilla was associated with an 8.77- and 5.40-fold increase in risk of death due to cardiovascular and respiratory disease, respectively. Death due to external causes was 4.45 times more likely among females than males. There was no statistically significant difference in life expectancy between male and female gorillas. The authors conclude that further work is needed to understand risk factors involved in the main causes of death and suggest a need for standardization with regard the approach to postmortem examination and data collection, sample collection, and storage across European zoos.


Assuntos
Animais de Zoológico , Gorilla gorilla , Mortalidade/tendências , Aborto Animal , Envelhecimento , Animais , Causas de Morte , Europa (Continente) , Feminino , Masculino , Gravidez , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores Sexuais , Natimorto
15.
Prev Vet Med ; 148: 121-126, 2017 Dec 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28233582

RESUMO

The use of electronic patient records (EPRs) in veterinary research is becoming more common place. To date no-one has investigated how accurately and completely they represent the clinical interactions that happen between veterinary professionals, and their clients and patients. The aim of this study was to compare data extracted from consultations within EPRs with data gathered by direct observation of the same consultation. A secondary aim was to establish the inter-rater reliability of two researchers who examined the data extracted from the EPRs. A convenience sample of 36 small animal consultations undertaken by 2 veterinary surgeons (83% by one veterinary surgeon) at a mixed veterinary practice in the United Kingdom was studied. All 36 consultations were observed by a single researcher using a standardised data collection tool. The information recorded in the EPRs was extracted from the Practice Management Software (PMS) systems using a validated XML schema. The XML extracted data was then converted into the same format as the observed data by two independent researchers who examined the extracted information and recorded their findings using the same tool as for the observation. The issues discussed and any action taken relating to those problems recorded in the observed and extracted datasets were then compared. In addition the inter-rater reliability of the two researchers who examined the extracted data was assessed. Only 64.4% of the observed problems discussed during the consultations were recorded in the EPR. The type of problem, who raised the problem and at what point in the consultation the problem was raised significantly affected whether the problem was recorded or not in the EPR. Only 58.3% of observed actions taken during the consultations were recorded in the EPR and the type of action significantly affected whether it would be recorded or not. There was moderate agreement between the two researchers who examined the extracted data. This is the first study that examines how much of the activity that occurs in small animal consultations is recorded in the EPR. Understanding the completeness, reliability and validity of EPRs is vital if they are to continue to be used for clinical research and the results to direct clinical care.


Assuntos
Coleta de Dados/métodos , Registros Eletrônicos de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Variações Dependentes do Observador , Medicina Veterinária/instrumentação , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Reino Unido
16.
BMJ Open ; 6(12): e011458, 2016 12 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27932337

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to develop a critical appraisal (CA) tool that addressed study design and reporting quality as well as the risk of bias in cross-sectional studies (CSSs). In addition, the aim was to produce a help document to guide the non-expert user through the tool. DESIGN: An initial scoping review of the published literature and key epidemiological texts was undertaken prior to the formation of a Delphi panel to establish key components for a CA tool for CSSs. A consensus of 80% was required from the Delphi panel for any component to be included in the final tool. RESULTS: An initial list of 39 components was identified through examination of existing resources. An international Delphi panel of 18 medical and veterinary experts was established. After 3 rounds of the Delphi process, the Appraisal tool for Cross-Sectional Studies (AXIS tool) was developed by consensus and consisted of 20 components. A detailed explanatory document was also developed with the tool, giving expanded explanation of each question and providing simple interpretations and examples of the epidemiological concepts being examined in each question to aid non-expert users. CONCLUSIONS: CA of the literature is a vital step in evidence synthesis and therefore evidence-based decision-making in a number of different disciplines. The AXIS tool is therefore unique and was developed in a way that it can be used across disciplines to aid the inclusion of CSSs in systematic reviews, guidelines and clinical decision-making.


Assuntos
Estudos Transversais/normas , Medicina Baseada em Evidências/métodos , Projetos de Pesquisa/normas , Viés , Tomada de Decisão Clínica , Consenso , Técnica Delfos , Humanos
17.
BMC Vet Res ; 12(1): 239, 2016 Oct 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27765037

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Data extracted from electronic patient records (EPRs) within practice management software systems are increasingly used in veterinary research. The use of real patient data gives the potential to generate research that can readily be applied to clinical practice. The use of veterinary EPRs for research in the United Kingdom is hindered by the number of different Practice Management System (PMS) providers used by practices, as obtaining and combining data from different systems electronically can be problematic. The use of extensible mark up language (XML) to extract clinical data for research would potentially resolve the compatibility issues between systems. The aim of this study was to establish and validate a method for the extraction of small animal patient records from a veterinary PMS that could potentially be used across multiple systems. An XML schema was designed to extract clinical information from EPRs. The schema was tested and validated in a test system, and was then tested in a real small animal practice where data was extracted for 16 weeks. A 10 % sample of the extracted records was then compared to paper copies provided by the practice. RESULTS: All 21 fields encoded by the XML schema, from all of the records in the test system, were extracted with 100 % accuracy. Over the 18 week data collection period 4946 records, from 1279 patients, were extracted from the small animal practice. The 10 % printed records checked and compared with the XML extracted records demonstrated all required data was present. No unrequired, sensitive information e.g. costs or services/products or personal client information was extracted. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first time a method for data extraction from EPRs in veterinary practice using an XML schema has been reported in the United Kingdom. This is an efficient and accurate way of extracting data which could be applied to all PMSs nationally and internationally.


Assuntos
Registros Eletrônicos de Saúde , Administração da Prática da Medicina Veterinária/normas , Software , Medicina Veterinária/métodos , Animais , Reino Unido , Medicina Veterinária/normas
18.
Animals (Basel) ; 6(10)2016 10 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27727168

RESUMO

Disease prevention and control practices are frequently highlighted as important to ensure the health and welfare of farmed animals, although little is known as to why not many practices are carried out. The aim of this study was to identify the motivators and barriers of dairy cattle farmers towards the use of biosecurity measures on dairy farms using a health psychology approach. Twenty-five farmers on 24 farms in Great Britain (GB) were interviewed using the Theory of Planned Behaviour framework. Results indicated that farmers perceived they had the ability to control what happened on their farms in terms of preventing and controlling disease, and described benefits from being proactive and vigilant. However, barriers were cited in relation to testing inaccuracies, effectiveness and time-efficiency of practices, and disease transmission route (e.g., airborne transmission). Farmers reported they were positively influenced by veterinarians and negatively influenced by the government (Department for Environment Food & Rural Affairs (DEFRA)) and the general public. Decisions to implement practices were influenced by the perceived severity of the disease in question, if disease was diagnosed on the farm already, or was occurring on other farms. Farmers described undertaking a form of personal risk assessment when deciding if practices were worth doing, which did not always involve building in disease specific factors or opinions from veterinarians or other advisors. These results indicate that further guidance about the intricacies of control and prevention principles in relation to specific animal diseases may be required, with an obvious role for veterinarians. There appears to be an opportunity for farm advisors and herd health professionals to further understand farmer beliefs behind certain attitudes and target communication and advice accordingly to further enhance dairy cattle health and welfare.

19.
PLoS One ; 11(7): e0159732, 2016.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27458724

RESUMO

Veterinarians are encouraged to use evidence to inform their practice, but it is unknown what resources (e.g. journals, electronic sources) are accessed by them globally. Understanding the key places veterinarians seek information can inform where new clinically relevant evidence should most effectively be placed. An international survey was conducted to gain understanding of how veterinary information is accessed by veterinarians worldwide. There were 2137 useable responses to the questionnaire from veterinarians in 78 countries. The majority of respondents (n = 1835/2137, 85.9%) undertook clinical work and worked in a high income country (n = 1576/1762, 89.4%). Respondents heard about the survey via national veterinary organisations or regulatory bodies (31.5%), online veterinary forums and websites (22.7%), regional, discipline-based or international veterinary organisations (22.7%) or by direct invitation from the researchers or via friends, colleagues or social media (7.6%). Clinicians and non-clinicians reportedly used journals most commonly (65.8%, n = 1207/1835; 75.6%, n = 216/286) followed by electronic resources (58.7%, n = 1077/1835; 55.9%, n = 160/286), respectively. Respondents listed a total of 518 journals and 567 electronic sources that they read. Differences in veterinarian preference for resources in developed, and developing countries, were found. The nominated journals most read were the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association (12.7% of nominations) for clinicians and the Veterinary Record (5.7%) for non-clinicians. The most accessed electronic resource reported was the Veterinary Information Network (25.6%) for clinicians and PubMed (7.4%) for non-clinicians. In conclusion, a wide array of journals and electronic resources appear to be accessed by veterinarians worldwide. Veterinary organisations appear to play an important role in global communication and outreach to veterinarians and consideration should be given to how these channels could be best utilised for effective dissemination of key research findings.


Assuntos
Medicina Baseada em Evidências/métodos , Publicações Periódicas como Assunto , Medicina Veterinária/métodos , Mineração de Dados/métodos , Medicina Baseada em Evidências/normas , Internet , Médicos Veterinários/estatística & dados numéricos , Medicina Veterinária/normas
20.
Parasit Vectors ; 8: 500, 2015 Oct 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26427625

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: There is a need for an integrated genotyping approach for C. parvum; no sufficiently discriminatory scheme to date has been fully validated or widely adopted by veterinary or public health researchers. Multilocus fragment typing (MLFT) can provide good differentiation and is relatively quick and cheap to perform. A MLFT tool was assessed in terms of its typeability, specificity, precision (repeatability and reproducibility), accuracy and ability to genotypically discriminate bovine-derived Cryptosporidium parvum. METHODS: With the aim of working towards a consensus, six markers were selected for inclusion based on their successful application in previous studies: MM5, MM18, MM19, TP14, MS1 and MS9. Alleles were assigned according to the fragment sizes of repeat regions amplified, as determined by capillary electrophoresis. In addition, a region of the GP60 gene was amplified and sequenced to determine gp60 subtype and this was added to the allelic profiles of the 6 markers to determine the multilocus genotype (MLG). The MLFT tool was applied to 140 C. parvum samples collected in two cross-sectional studies of UK calves, conducted in Cheshire in 2004 (principally dairy animals) and Aberdeenshire/Caithness in 2011 (beef animals). RESULTS: Typeability was 84 %. The primers did not amplify tested non-parvum species frequently detected in cattle. In terms of repeatability, within- and between-run fragment sizes showed little variability. Between laboratories, fragment sizes differed but allele calling was reproducible. The MLFT had good discriminatory ability (Simpson's Index of Diversity, SID, was 0.92), compared to gp60 sequencing alone (SID 0.44). Some markers were more informative than others, with MS1 and MS9 proving monoallelic in tested samples. CONCLUSIONS: Further inter-laboratory trials are now warranted with the inclusion of human-derived C. parvum samples, allowing progress towards an integrated, standardised typing scheme to enable source attribution and to determine the role of livestock in future outbreaks of human C. parvum.


Assuntos
Doenças dos Bovinos/parasitologia , Criptosporidiose/parasitologia , Cryptosporidium parvum/genética , Genótipo , Tipagem de Sequências Multilocus/métodos , Animais , Bovinos , Criptosporidiose/diagnóstico , Criptosporidiose/epidemiologia , Fezes , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Reino Unido/epidemiologia
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